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Sample records for 5prime trna halves

  1. The heteromeric Nanoarchaeum equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves noncanonical bulge–helix–bulge motifs of joined tRNA halves

    PubMed Central

    Randau, Lennart; Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle; Yuan, Jing; Podar, Mircea; Li, Hong; Söll, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Among the tRNA population of the archaeal parasite Nanoarchaeum equitans are five species assembled from separate 5′ and 3′ tRNA halves and four species derived from tRNA precursors containing introns. In both groups an intervening sequence element must be removed during tRNA maturation. A bulge–helix–bulge (BHB) motif is the hallmark structure required by the archaeal splicing endonuclease for recognition and excision of all introns. BHB motifs are recognizable at the joining sites of all five noncontinuous tRNA species, although deviations from the canonical BHB motif are clearly present in at least two of them. Here, we show that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease cleaves tRNA precursors containing normal introns, as well as all five noncontinuous precursor tRNAs, at the predicted splice sites, indicating the enzyme's dual role in the removal of tRNA introns and processing of tRNA halves to be joined in trans. The cleavage activity on a set of synthetic canonical and noncanonical BHB constructs showed that the N. equitans splicing endonuclease accepts a broader range of substrates than the homodimeric Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme. In contrast to the A. fulgidus endonuclease, the N. equitans splicing enzyme possesses two different subunits. This heteromeric endonuclease type, found in N. equitans, in all Crenarchaeota, and in Methanopyrus kandleri, is able to act on the noncanonical tRNA introns present only in these organisms, which suggests coevolution of enzyme and substrate. PMID:16330750

  2. Sex hormone-dependent tRNA halves enhance cell proliferation in breast and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shozo; Loher, Phillipe; Shigematsu, Megumi; Palazzo, Juan P; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Imoto, Issei; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kirino, Yohei

    2015-07-21

    Sex hormones and their receptors play critical roles in the development and progression of the breast and prostate cancers. Here we report that a novel type of transfer RNA (tRNA)-derived small RNA, termed Sex HOrmone-dependent TRNA-derived RNAs (SHOT-RNAs), are specifically and abundantly expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines. SHOT-RNAs are not abundantly present in ER(-) breast cancer, AR(-) prostate cancer, or other examined cancer cell lines from other tissues. ER-dependent accumulation of SHOT-RNAs is not limited to a cell culture system, but it also occurs in luminal-type breast cancer patient tissues. SHOT-RNAs are produced from aminoacylated mature tRNAs by angiogenin-mediated anticodon cleavage, which is promoted by sex hormones and their receptors. Resultant 5'- and 3'-SHOT-RNAs, corresponding to 5'- and 3'-tRNA halves, bear a cyclic phosphate (cP) and an amino acid at the 3'-end, respectively. By devising a "cP-RNA-seq" method that is able to exclusively amplify and sequence cP-containing RNAs, we identified the complete repertoire of 5'-SHOT-RNAs. Furthermore, 5'-SHOT-RNA, but not 3'-SHOT-RNA, has significant functional involvement in cell proliferation. These results have unveiled a novel tRNA-engaged pathway in tumorigenesis of hormone-dependent cancers and implicate SHOT-RNAs as potential candidates for biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  3. Sex hormone-dependent tRNA halves enhance cell proliferation in breast and prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Shozo; Loher, Phillipe; Shigematsu, Megumi; Palazzo, Juan P.; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Imoto, Issei; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kirino, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones and their receptors play critical roles in the development and progression of the breast and prostate cancers. Here we report that a novel type of transfer RNA (tRNA)-derived small RNA, termed Sex HOrmone-dependent TRNA-derived RNAs (SHOT-RNAs), are specifically and abundantly expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines. SHOT-RNAs are not abundantly present in ER− breast cancer, AR− prostate cancer, or other examined cancer cell lines from other tissues. ER-dependent accumulation of SHOT-RNAs is not limited to a cell culture system, but it also occurs in luminal-type breast cancer patient tissues. SHOT-RNAs are produced from aminoacylated mature tRNAs by angiogenin-mediated anticodon cleavage, which is promoted by sex hormones and their receptors. Resultant 5′- and 3′-SHOT-RNAs, corresponding to 5′- and 3′-tRNA halves, bear a cyclic phosphate (cP) and an amino acid at the 3′-end, respectively. By devising a “cP-RNA-seq” method that is able to exclusively amplify and sequence cP-containing RNAs, we identified the complete repertoire of 5′-SHOT-RNAs. Furthermore, 5′-SHOT-RNA, but not 3′-SHOT-RNA, has significant functional involvement in cell proliferation. These results have unveiled a novel tRNA-engaged pathway in tumorigenesis of hormone-dependent cancers and implicate SHOT-RNAs as potential candidates for biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26124144

  4. The cyclization of arabinosyladenine-5-prime-phosphorimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1991-01-01

    When arabinosyladenine-5-prime-phosphorimidazolide is allowed to decompose in aqueous solution at room temperature and pH 7.2, depending on the buffer, 5-24 percent is converted to the 2-prime,5-prime-cyclic phosphate (V). Although the extent of cyclization is much greater than for adenosine-5-prime-phosphorimidazolide, cyclization is less efficient than hydrolysis and so would not substantially decrease the efficiency of condensation reactions in aqueous solution. The significance of this result for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  5. 5'-Terminal nucleotide variations in human cytoplasmic tRNAHisGUG and its 5'-halves.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Megumi; Kirino, Yohei

    2017-02-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are fundamental adapter components of translational machinery. tRNAs can further serve as a source of tRNA-derived noncoding RNAs that play important roles in various biological processes beyond translation. Among all species of tRNAs, tRNA(HisGUG) has been known to uniquely contain an additional guanosine residue at the -1 position (G-1) of its 5'-end. To analyze this -1 nucleotide in detail, we developed a TaqMan qRT-PCR method that can distinctively quantify human mature cytoplasmic tRNA(HisGUG) containing G-1, U-1, A-1, or C-1 or lacking the -1 nucleotide (starting from G1). Application of this method to the mature tRNA fraction of BT-474 breast cancer cells revealed the presence of tRNA(HisGUG) containing U-1 as well as the one containing G-1 Moreover, tRNA lacking the -1 nucleotide was also detected, thus indicating the heterogeneous expression of 5'-tRNA(HisGUG) variants. A sequence library of sex hormone-induced 5'-tRNA halves (5'-SHOT-RNAs), identified via cP-RNA-seq of a BT-474 small RNA fraction, also demonstrated the expression of 5'-tRNA(HisGUG) halves containing G-1, U-1, or G1 as 5'-terminal nucleotides. Although the detected 5'-nucleotide species were identical, the relative abundances differed widely between mature tRNA and 5'-half from the same BT-474 cells. The majority of mature tRNAs contained the -1 nucleotide, whereas the majority of 5'-halves lacked this nucleotide, which was biochemically confirmed using a primer extension assay. These results reveal the novel identities of tRNA(HisGUG) molecules and provide insights into tRNA(HisGUG) maturation and the regulation of tRNA half production.

  6. Identification of aberrant tRNA-halves expression patterns in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nientiedt, Malin; Deng, Mario; Schmidt, Doris; Perner, Sven; Müller, Stefan C.; Ellinger, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA; <200 nt) regulate various cellular processes and modify gene expression. Under nutritional, biological or physiochemical stress some mature sncRNAs (e.g. tRNAs) are cleaved into halves (30–50 nt) and smaller fragments (18–22 nt); the significance and functional role of these tRNA fragments is unknown, but their existence has been linked to carcinogenesis. We used small RNA sequencing to determine the expression of sncRNAs. Subsequently the findings were validated for miR-122-5p, miR-142-3p and 5'tRNA4-Val-AAC using qPCR. We identified differential expression of 132 miRNAs (upregulated: 61, downregulated: 71) and 32 tRNAs (upregulated: 13, downregulated: 19). Read length analysis showed that miRNAs mapped in the 20–24 nt fraction, whereas tRNA reads mapped in the 30–36 nt fraction instead the expected size of 73–95 nt thereby indicating cleavage of tRNAs. Overexpression of miR-122-5p and miR-142-3p as well as downregulation of 5'tRNA4-Val-AAC was validated in an independent cohort of 118 ccRCC and 74 normal renal tissues. Furthermore, staging and grading was inversely correlated with the 5'tRNA4-Val-AAC expression. Serum levels of miR-122-5p, miR-142-3p and 5'tRNA4-Val-AAC did not differ in ccRCC and control subjects. In conclusion, 5′ cleavage of tRNAs occurs in ccRCC, but the exact functional implication of tRNA-halve deregulation remains to be clarified. PMID:27883021

  7. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kasper L; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. We constructed strains lacking individual or combinations of these RNT2 genes that were viable but had distinct cellular and molecular phenotypes. In strains lacking only one Rnt2 protein or lacking a subfamily of three catalytically inactive Rnt2 proteins, starvation-induced tRNA fragments continued to accumulate, with only a minor change in fragment profile in one strain. We therefore generated strains lacking pairwise combinations of the top three candidates for Rnt2 tRNases. Each of these strains showed a distinct starvation-specific profile of tRNA and rRNA fragment accumulation. These results, the delineation of a broadened range of conditions that induce the accumulation of tRNA halves, and the demonstration of a predominantly ribonucleoprotein-free state of tRNA halves in cell extract suggest that ciliate tRNA halves are degradation intermediates in an autophagy pathway induced by growth arrest that functions to recycle idle protein synthesis machinery.

  8. 7 CFR 51.1437 - Size classifications for halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Size Classifications § 51.1437 Size classifications for halves. The size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in... Table I, the size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in terms of the number of halves or a...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1437 - Size classifications for halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Size Classifications § 51.1437 Size classifications for halves. The size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in... Table I, the size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in terms of the number of halves or a...

  10. Oligomerizations of deoxyadenosine bis-phosphates and of their 3-prime-5-prime, 3-prime-3-prime, and 5-prime-5-prime dimers - Effects of a pyrophosphate-linked, poly(T) analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, J.; Bakker, C. G.; Schwartz, Alan W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a 3-prime-5-prime pyrophosphate-linked oligomer of pTp on oligomerizations of pdAp and of its 3-prime-5-prime, 3-prime-3-prime, and 5-prime-5-prime dimers was investigated, using HPLC to separate the reaction mixtures; peak detection was by absorbance monitoring at 254 nm. It was expected that the dimers would form stable complexes with the template, with the degree of stability depending upon the internal linkage of each dimer. It was found that, although the isomers differ substantially in their oligomerization behavior in the absence of template, the analog-template catalyzes the oligomerization to about the same extent in all three cases.

  11. 7 CFR 51.1437 - Size classifications for halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Size Classifications § 51.1437 Size classifications for halves. The size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in accordance with one of the size... have been removed. (b) In lieu of the size classifications in Table I, the size of pecan halves in...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1437 - Size classifications for halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Size Classifications § 51.1437 Size classifications for halves. The size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in accordance with one of the size... have been removed. (b) In lieu of the size classifications in Table I, the size of pecan halves in...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1437 - Size classifications for halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Size Classifications § 51.1437 Size classifications for halves. The size of pecan halves in a lot may be specified in accordance with one of the size... have been removed. (b) In lieu of the size classifications in Table I, the size of pecan halves in...

  14. Depletion of tRNA-halves enables effective small RNA sequencing of low-input murine serum samples

    PubMed Central

    Van Goethem, Alan; Yigit, Nurten; Everaert, Celine; Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Mus, Liselot M.; Barbieri, Eveline; Speleman, Frank; Mestdagh, Pieter; Shohet, Jason; Van Maerken, Tom; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing ascent of sequencing technologies has enabled researchers to gain unprecedented insights into the RNA content of biological samples. MiRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in regulating gene expression. The discovery that miRNAs are stably present in circulation has spiked interest in their potential use as minimally-invasive biomarkers. However, sequencing of blood-derived samples (serum, plasma) is challenging due to the often low RNA concentration, poor RNA quality and the presence of highly abundant RNAs that dominate sequencing libraries. In murine serum for example, the high abundance of tRNA-derived small RNAs called 5′ tRNA halves hampers the detection of other small RNAs, like miRNAs. We therefore evaluated two complementary approaches for targeted depletion of 5′ tRNA halves in murine serum samples. Using a protocol based on biotinylated DNA probes and streptavidin coated magnetic beads we were able to selectively deplete 95% of the targeted 5′ tRNA half molecules. This allowed an unbiased enrichment of the miRNA fraction resulting in a 6-fold increase of mapped miRNA reads and 60% more unique miRNAs detected. Moreover, when comparing miRNA levels in tumor-carrying versus tumor-free mice, we observed a three-fold increase in differentially expressed miRNAs. PMID:27901112

  15. Shaping tRNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  16. 7 CFR 51.1433 - U.S. Commercial Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Commercial Halves. 51.1433 Section 51.1433 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1433 U.S. Commercial Halves....

  17. 7 CFR 51.1433 - U.S. Commercial Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Commercial Halves. 51.1433 Section 51.1433 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1433 U.S. Commercial Halves....

  18. 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis using 3[prime]-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, M.C.; Shuey, S.W.; Bradley, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5[prime] end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  19. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each 1... nearly equal as possible) halves. For example, divide the area into top and bottom halves or left and right halves. Choose the top/bottom or left/right division that produces halves having as close to...

  20. Effect of cold exposure on thyroxine 5 prime -deiodinase activity in iron-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, D.E.; Beard, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    When exposed to cold, severely anemic iron-deficient (ID) rats become hypothermic, fail to adequately increase metabolic rate, and have lower interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) thyroxine 5{prime}-deiodinase (5{prime}-DI) activity compared to control (CN) rats. Less severely anemic rats and CN rats were exposed to 4C for 6h. Rectal temperatures were measured hourly, and VO{sub 2} was measured both prior to and throughout the cold exposure period. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity was measured in cold-exposed ID and CN rats and compared to ID and CN rats that were not cold exposed. During cold exposure, both ID and CN rats increased metabolic rate similarly. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity also increased similarly in both groups after cold exposure. These results show that moderately anemic DI rats acutely increase metabolic rate and IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity in the cold. This suggests brown fat production of thyroid hormone is not limiting thermoregulatory performance.

  1. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A MOLD SURROUNDING A MATCHPLATE PATTERN, DENNIS GRAY OPERATOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  2. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Baocheng; Xiong, Yong; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2010-11-22

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3{prime} end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5{prime}-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5{prime}-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3{prime} hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  3. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G.; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M.

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  4. Genomic organization and 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequence of the murine stomatin gene (Epb72)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Turetsky, T.; Mentzer, W.C. |

    1996-06-15

    Stomatin is a poorly understood integral membrane protein that is absent from the erythrocyte membranes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis. This report describes the cloning of the murine stomatin chromosomal gene, determination of its genomic structure, and characterization of the 5{prime}-flanking genomic DNA sequences. The stomatin gene is encoded by seven exons spread over {approximately}25 kb of genomic DNA. There is no concordance between the exon structure of the stomatin gene and the locations of three domains predicted on the basis of protein structure. Inspection of the 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequences reveals features of a TATA-less housekeeping gene promoter and consensus sequences for a number of potential DNA-binding proteins. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. How to halve ploidy: lessons from budding yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Gary William; Sarkar, Sourav; Arumugam, Prakash

    2012-09-01

    Maintenance of ploidy in sexually reproducing organisms requires a specialized form of cell division called meiosis that generates genetically diverse haploid gametes from diploid germ cells. Meiotic cells halve their ploidy by undergoing two rounds of nuclear division (meiosis I and II) after a single round of DNA replication. Research in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) has shown that four major deviations from the mitotic cell cycle during meiosis are essential for halving ploidy. The deviations are (1) formation of a link between homologous chromosomes by crossover, (2) monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores during meiosis I, (3) protection of centromeric cohesion during meiosis I, and (4) suppression of DNA replication following exit from meiosis I. In this review we present the current understanding of the above four processes in budding yeast and examine the possible conservation of molecular mechanisms from yeast to humans.

  6. Jobs, Skills and Incomes in Ghana: How Was Poverty Halved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nsowah-Nuamah, Nicholas; Teal, Francis; Awoonor-Williams, Moses

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of official statistics, poverty has halved in Ghana over the period from 1991 to 2005. Our objective in this paper is to assess how far this fall was linked to the creation of better paying jobs and the increase in education. We find that earnings rose rapidly in the period from 1998 to 2005, by 64% for men and by 55% for women. While…

  7. Non-symbolic halving in an Amazonian indigene group

    PubMed Central

    McCrink, Koleen; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pica, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Much research supports the existence of an Approximate Number System (ANS) that is recruited by infants, children, adults, and non-human animals to generate coarse, non-symbolic representations of number. This system supports simple arithmetic operations such as addition, subtraction, and ordering of amounts. The current study tests whether an intuition of a more complex calculation, division, exists in an indigene group in the Amazon, the Mundurucu, whose language includes no words for large numbers. Mundurucu children were presented with a video event depicting a division transformation of halving, in which pairs of objects turned into single objects, reducing the array's numerical magnitude. Then they were tested on their ability to calculate the outcome of this division transformation with other large-number arrays. The Mundurucu children effected this transformation even when non-numerical variables were controlled, performed above chance levels on the very first set of test trials, and exhibited performance similar to urban children who had access to precise number words and a surrounding symbolic culture. We conclude that a halving calculation is part of the suite of intuitive operations supported by the ANS. PMID:23587042

  8. Extreme point and halving edge search in abstract order types.

    PubMed

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Miltzow, Tillmann; Pilz, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Many properties of finite point sets only depend on the relative position of the points, e.g., on the order type of the set. However, many fundamental algorithms in computational geometry rely on coordinate representations. This includes the straightforward algorithms for finding a halving line for a given planar point set, as well as finding a point on the convex hull, both in linear time. In his monograph Axioms and Hulls, Knuth asks whether these problems can be solved in linear time in a more abstract setting, given only the orientation of each point triple, i.e., the set's chirotope, as a source of information. We answer this question in the affirmative. More precisely, we can find a halving line through any given point, as well as the vertices of the convex hull edges that are intersected by the supporting line of any two given points of the set in linear time. We first give a proof for sets realizable in the Euclidean plane and then extend the result to non-realizable abstract order types.

  9. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon-anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed. PMID:24904644

  10. Achieving the goal of halving global hunger by 2015.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prakash

    2006-02-01

    The FAO World Food Summit (WFS) in 1996 set the goal of halving the numbers of the global population suffering hunger by the year 2015, which was later incorporated into the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDG) that commit the international community to an expanded vision of development, and one that vigorously promotes human development as the key to sustaining social and economic progress in all countries. The two targets under the first MDG goal to eradicate poverty and hunger call for halving the proportion of individuals who suffer from poverty and from hunger by 2015. This commitment is another instance of the international community through the UN system yet again renewing its efforts and setting a target and a time frame to deal with the global problem of hunger, poverty and malnutrition. To date, the efforts to reduce global hunger in the developing world have fallen far short of the pace required to meet these targets. There has no doubt been some progress and several countries in the developing world have proved that success is possible. The economic and societal costs to developing countries of not taking decisive action, and thus failing to achieve a reduction in hunger and undernutrition, including micronutrient malnutrition costs, are that every year five million children lose their lives, 220 million disability-adjusted life years are lost as a result of childhood and maternal undernutrition and billions of dollars are lost in productivity and incomes in these countries. Alongside this perennial problem in developing societies are emerging new epidemics of diet-related diseases resulting from the profound demographic changes, urbanization and the economic transition that is transforming and globalizing the food systems in these countries. Thus, many developing countries are facing new and additional challenges of co-existing hunger alongside the emergence of other forms of malnutrition. Meeting the WFS and MDG targets of achieving the goal of

  11. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  12. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossard, L.; Philibert, A.; Bertrand, M.; Colnenne-David, C.; Debaeke, P.; Munier-Jolain, N.; Jeuffroy, M. H.; Richard, G.; Makowski, D.

    2014-03-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export.

  13. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production.

    PubMed

    Hossard, L; Philibert, A; Bertrand, M; Colnenne-David, C; Debaeke, P; Munier-Jolain, N; Jeuffroy, M H; Richard, G; Makowski, D

    2014-03-20

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export.

  14. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production

    PubMed Central

    Hossard, L.; Philibert, A.; Bertrand, M.; Colnenne-David, C.; Debaeke, P.; Munier-Jolain, N.; Jeuffroy, M. H.; Richard, G.; Makowski, D.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export. PMID:24651597

  15. Why New Zealand must rapidly halve its greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Scott; Woodward, Alistair; Macmillan, Alexandra; Baker, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Lindsay, Graeme; Hales, Simon; Sinclair, David; Jaine, Richard; Springford, Liz; Holmes, Andrew; Laking, George; Jones, Rhys; Carr, Harriette; Edwards, Richard; Shaw, Caroline; Wells, Susan; Hosking, Jamie; Forde, Andrea; Bismark, Marie; Palmer, Stephen; Keating, Gay; Simpson, Jenny; Highton, Rachel; Dhar, Divya; Kane, Penny

    2009-10-09

    New Zealand must commit to substantial decreases in its greenhouse gas emissions, to avoid the worst impacts of climate change on human health, both here and internationally. We have the fourth highest per capita greenhouse gas emissions in the developed world. Based on the need to limit warming to 2 degrees C by 2100, our cumulative emissions, and our capability to mitigate, New Zealand should at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 (i.e. a target of at least 40% less than 1990 levels). This target has a strong scientific basis, and if anything may be too lenient; reducing the risk of catastrophic climate change may require deeper cuts. Short-term economic costs of mitigation have been widely overstated in public debate. They must also be balanced by the far greater costs caused by inertia and the substantial health and social benefits that can be achieved by a low emissions society. Large emissions reductions are achievable if we mobilise New Zealand society and let technology follow the signal of a responsible target.

  16. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  17. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... square shape the top/bottom halves have the same shape as the left/right halves when compared to a circle... compared to a circle (both are rectangles having the same dimensions). Therefore, choose either left/right... compared to a circle (both are rectangles having the same dimensions). Therefore, choose either...

  18. Comparison of the halving of tablets prepared with eccentric and rotary tablet presses.

    PubMed

    Sovány, T; Kása, P; Pintye-Hódi, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the densification of powder mixtures on eccentric and rotary tablet presses and to establish relationships with the halving properties of the resulting scored tablets. This is an important problem because the recent guidelines of EU require verification of the equal masses of tablet halves. The models of Walker, Heckel, and Kawakita were used to describe the powder densification on the two machines. The calculated parameters revealed that the shorter compression cycle of rotary machines results in poorer densification and lower tablet hardness at a given compression force. This is manifested in poorer halving properties, which are influenced mainly by the hardness. Better densification improves the halving even at lower tablet hardness. This demonstrates that these parameters can be good predictors of tablet halving properties.

  19. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  20. Soluble minerals in chemical evolution. I - Adsorption of 5-prime-AMP on CaSO4 - A model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Chan, S.; Calderon, J.; Lahav, N.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-prime-AMP onto solid CaSO4-2H2O was studied in a saturated suspension as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration. The adsorption is pH-dependent and is directly correlated with the charge on the 5-prime-AMP molecule which is determined by the state of protonation of the N-1 nitrogen of the purine ring and the phosphate oxygens. It is proposed that the binding that occurs between the nucleotide and the salt is electrostatic in nature. The adsorption decreases with increasing ionic strength of the solution which means that in a fluctuating environment of wetting and drying cycles, a biomolecule similar to 5-prime-AMP could be expected to desorb during the drying phase. The results indicate that CaSO4-2H2O can serve as a concentrating surface for biomolecules. The significance of this is discussed with regard to the possible role of soluble minerals and their surfaces in a geochemical model consistent with the evolution of the earth and the origin of life.

  1. Speeding Up Sigmatropic Shifts-To Halve or to Hold.

    PubMed

    Tantillo, Dean J

    2016-04-19

    Catalysis is common. Rational catalyst design, however, is at the frontier of chemical science. Although the histories of physical organic and synthetic organic chemistry boast key chapters involving [3s,3s] sigmatropic shifts, catalysis of these reactions is much less common than catalysis of ostensibly more complex processes. The comparative dearth of catalysts for sigmatropic shifts is perhaps a result of the perception that transition state structures for these reactions, like their reactants, are nonpolar and therefore not amenable to selective stabilization and its associated barrier lowering. However, as demonstrated in this Account, transition state structures for [3s,3s] sigmatropic shifts can in fact have charge distributions that differ significantly from those of reactants, even for hydrocarbon substrates, allowing for barriers to be decreased and rates increased. In some cases, differences in charge distribution result from the inclusion of heteroatoms at specific positions in reactants, but in other cases differences are actually induced by catalysts. Perhaps surprisingly, strategies for complexation of transition state structures that remain nonpolar are also possible. In general, the strategies for catalysis employed can be characterized as involving either mechanistic intervention, where a catalyst induces a change from the concerted mechanism expected for a [3s,3s] sigmatropic shift to a multistep process (cutting the transformation into halves or smaller pieces) whose overall barrier is decreased relative to the concerted process, or transition state complexation, where a catalyst simply binds (holds) more tightly to the transition state structure for a [3s,3s] sigmatropic shift than to the reactant, leading to a lower barrier in the presence of the catalyst. Both of these strategies can be considered to be biomimetic in that enzymes frequently induce multistep processes and utilize selective transition state stabilization for the steps involved

  2. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  3. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  4. Analysis of the 5{prime} junctions of R2 insertions with the 28S gene: Implications for non-LTR retrotransposition

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.A.; Burke, W.D.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1996-03-01

    R2 elements are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposable elements that insert into 28S rRNA genes of most insect species. The single open reading frame of R2 encodes a protein with both endonuclease activity, which cleaves the target site, and reverse transcriptase activity, which uses this cleavage to prime reverse transcription. This target-primed reverse transcription mechanism is also used by group II introns. Little is known of the mechanism by which the 5{prime} end of R2 is integrated after reverse transcription. We have determined the 5{prime} junction sequence of 94 R2 elements from 14 different species of Drosophila. Only 37% of the full-length elements contained precise 5{prime} junctions; the remainder contained deletions of the 28S gene and/or insertions of additional sequences. Because the 5{prime} junctions of truncated copies were similar to full-length elements, no sequences at the 5{prime} end of R2 appear to be required for element integration. A model in which the R2 reverse transcriptase is capable of switching templates from the R2 RNA transcript to the upstream 28S gene can best explain the observed 5{prime} junction sequences. This template jumping is analogous to the template switching of retroviral reverse transcriptases during formation of the double-stranded integration products. 44 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Genome recoding by tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Tuorto, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    RNA modifications are emerging as an additional regulatory layer on top of the primary RNA sequence. These modifications are particularly enriched in tRNAs where they can regulate not only global protein translation, but also protein translation at the codon level. Modifications located in or in the vicinity of tRNA anticodons are highly conserved in eukaryotes and have been identified as potential regulators of mRNA decoding. Recent studies have provided novel insights into how these modifications orchestrate the speed and fidelity of translation to ensure proper protein homeostasis. This review highlights the prominent modifications in the tRNA anticodon loop: queuosine, inosine, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine, wybutosine, threonyl–carbamoyl–adenosine and 5-methylcytosine. We discuss the functional relevance of these modifications in protein translation and their emerging role in eukaryotic genome recoding during cellular adaptation and disease. PMID:27974624

  6. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  7. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of Neurospora crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, A M; Hecker, L I; Silberklang, M; Schwartzbach, S D; RajBhandary, U L; Barnett, W E

    1977-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the cytoplasm of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. The sequence is: pAGCUGCAUm1GGCGCAGCGGAAGCGCM22GCY*GGGCUCAUt6AACCCGGAGm7GU (or D) - CACUCGAUCGm1AAACGAG*UUGCAGCUACCAOH. Similar to initiator tRNAs from the cytoplasm of other eukaryotes, this tRNA also contains the sequence -AUCG- instead of the usual -TphiCG (or A)- found in loop IV of other tRNAs. The sequence of the N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA is quite different from that of the corresponding mitochondrial initiator tRNA. Comparison of the sequence of N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA to those of yeast, wheat germ and vertebrate cytoplasmic initiator tRNA indicates that the sequences of the two fungal tRNAs are no more similar to each other than they are to those of other initiator tRNAs. Images PMID:146192

  9. Stochastic context-free grammars for tRNA modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Y; Brown, M; Hughey, R; Mian, I S; Sjölander, K; Underwood, R C; Haussler, D

    1994-01-01

    Stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) are applied to the problems of folding, aligning and modeling families of tRNA sequences. SCFGs capture the sequences' common primary and secondary structure and generalize the hidden Markov models (HMMs) used in related work on protein and DNA. Results show that after having been trained on as few as 20 tRNA sequences from only two tRNA subfamilies (mitochondrial and cytoplasmic), the model can discern general tRNA from similar-length RNA sequences of other kinds, can find secondary structure of new tRNA sequences, and can produce multiple alignments of large sets of tRNA sequences. Our results suggest potential improvements in the alignments of the D- and T-domains in some mitochondrial tRNAs that cannot be fit into the canonical secondary structure. PMID:7800507

  10. Distribution of a length polymorphism 5{prime} to exon 1 of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Low, P.S.; Liu, Y.; Saha, N.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of the ATIII gene has been described as having been detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a frequency of 0.75 for the short allele (S) in the Caucasian population. This length polymorphism of the ATIII gene has been studied in 251 Chinese healthy subjects. Genomic DNA was amplified by PCR with primers of published sequences. Fragments of the amplified DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed on a UV transilluminator. The frequency of the short allele (S) was found to be significantly lower (0.37) than that in the Caucasians (0.75). The distribution of genotypes of this polymorphism of the ATIII gene was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The large difference of allelic frequencies in the Mongoloid and Caucasian populations makes it a useful marker for population studies.

  11. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite. II - Adsorption and desorption of 5-prime-AMP in iron-calcium montmorillonite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Lawless, J. G.; Mazzurco, J.; Church, F. M.; Margulies, L.; Orenberg, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of 5-prime-AMP with montmorillonite saturated with various ratios of two metals found ubiquitously on the surface of earth, that is, iron and calcium, is investigated. Adsorption and desorption of the nucleotide were studied in the pH range of 2-12 at three levels of addition: 0.080, 0.268 and 0.803 mmole 5-prime-AMP per gram of clay. Two desorption stages were employed - H2O wash and NaOH extraction (pH = 12.0). 5-prime-AMP was preferentially adsorbed on the Fe-containing clays relative to the Ca clay. The nucleotide was fully recovered by the two desorption stages, mostly by the NaOH extraction. The evidence at hand indicates that 5-prime-AMP reaction with clay is affected by electrostatic interactions involving both attraction and repulsion forces. Some specific adsorption, possibly the result of covalent bonding and complex formation with the adsorbed ion, cannot be ruled out for iron but does not appear to operate for calcium. Changes in pH cause varying degrees of attaction and repulsion of 5-prime-AMP and may have been operating on the primitive earth, leading to sequences of adsorption and release of this biomolecule.

  12. CCA addition to tRNA: implications for tRNA quality control.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2010-04-01

    The CCA sequence is conserved at the 3' end of all mature tRNA molecules to function as the site of amino acid attachment. This sequence is acquired and maintained by stepwise nucleotide addition by the ubiquitous CCA enzyme, which is an unusual RNA polymerase that does not use a nucleic acid template for nucleotide addition. Crystal structural work has divided CCA enzymes into two structurally distinct classes, which differ in the mechanism of template-independent nucleotide selection. Recent kinetic work of the class II E. coli CCA enzyme has demonstrated a rapid and uniform rate constant for the chemistry of nucleotide addition at each step of CCA synthesis, although the enzyme uses different determinants to control the rate of each step. Importantly, the kinetic work reveals that, at each step of CCA synthesis, E. coli CCA enzyme has an innate ability to discriminate against tRNA backbone damage. This discrimination suggests the possibility of a previously unrecognized quality control mechanism that would prevent damaged tRNA from CCA maturation and from entering the ribosome machinery of protein synthesis. This quality control is relevant to cellular stress conditions that damage tRNA backbone and predicts a role of CCA addition in stress response.

  13. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each 1 meter square portion where it is necessary to collect a surface wipe test sample into two equal (or...

  14. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each 1 meter square portion where it is necessary to collect a surface wipe test sample into two equal (or...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1430 - U.S. No. 1 Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1430 U.S. No. 1 Halves. “U.S. No. 1 Halves” consists of pecan half-kernels which meet the following requirements: (a)...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1430 - U.S. No. 1 Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1430 U.S. No. 1 Halves. “U.S. No. 1 Halves” consists of pecan half-kernels which meet the following requirements: (a)...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1430 - U.S. No. 1 Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1430 U.S. No. 1 Halves. “U.S. No. 1 Halves” consists of pecan half-kernels which meet the following requirements: (a) For quality: (1) Well dried; (2)...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1430 - U.S. No. 1 Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1430 U.S. No. 1 Halves. “U.S. No. 1 Halves” consists of pecan half-kernels which meet the following requirements: (a) For quality: (1) Well dried; (2)...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1430 - U.S. No. 1 Halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Grades § 51.1430 U.S. No. 1 Halves. “U.S. No. 1 Halves” consists of pecan half-kernels which meet the following requirements: (a) For quality: (1) Well dried; (2)...

  20. Using Both Halves of the Brain to Teach the Whole Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossett, Becky

    1983-01-01

    All instruction, including social studies, should be concerned with developing both halves of the brain rather than continuing to place emphasis only on those functions which reside in the left cerebral hemisphere. When presented with a social studies problem, students can view it in two ways--logically and intuitively. (RM)

  1. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS Sampling Non-Porous Surfaces for Measurement-Based... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each...

  2. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both (3'-/sup 32/P)-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these ..gamma..-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues.

  3. Gene rearrangements and evolution of tRNA pseudogenes in the mitochondrial genome of the parrotfish (Teleostei: Perciformes: Scaridae).

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Kohji; Miya, Masaki; Satoh, Takashi P; Westneat, Mark W; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2004-09-01

    "top half (TpsiC and acceptor arms). Considering their potential secondary structures (holding "top halves" of the clover-leaf structures), locations within mitogenomes (flanking the 5' ends of the ND2 genes) and stabilities over time (survived at least 14 Myr), it is likely that the tRNA pseudogenes retain function as punctuation marks for mitochondrial ND2 mRNA processing.

  4. APF pitch-halving for 22nm logic cells using gridded design rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Bencher, Christopher; Chen, Hao D.; Dai, Huixiong; Duane, Michael P.

    2008-03-01

    The 22nm logic technology node with dimensions of ~32nm will be the first node to require some form of pitch-halving. A unique combination of a Producer APF (R)-based process sequence and GDR-based design style permits implementation of random logic functions with regular layout patterns. The APF (Advanced Patterning Film) pitch-halving approach is a classic Self-Aligned Double Patterning scheme (SADP) [1,2,3,4] which involves the creation of CVD dielectric spacers on an APF sacrificial template and using the spacers as a hardmask for line frequency doubling. The Tela Canva TM implements Gridded Design Rules (GDR) using straight lines placed on a regular grid. Logic functions can be implemented using lines on a half-pitch with gaps at selected locations.

  5. Handling tRNA introns, archaeal way and eukaryotic way

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihisa, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Introns are found in various tRNA genes in all the three kingdoms of life. Especially, archaeal and eukaryotic genomes are good sources of tRNA introns that are removed by proteinaceous splicing machinery. Most intron-containing tRNA genes both in archaea and eukaryotes possess an intron at a so-called canonical position, one nucleotide 3′ to their anticodon, while recent bioinformatics have revealed unusual types of tRNA introns and their derivatives especially in archaeal genomes. Gain and loss of tRNA introns during various stages of evolution are obvious both in archaea and eukaryotes from analyses of comparative genomics. The splicing of tRNA molecules has been studied extensively from biochemical and cell biological points of view, and such analyses of eukaryotic systems provided interesting findings in the past years. Here, I summarize recent progresses in the analyses of tRNA introns and the splicing process, and try to clarify new and old questions to be solved in the next stages. PMID:25071838

  6. tRNA fragments in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul; Ivanov, Pavel

    2014-11-28

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is traditionally considered to be an adaptor molecule that helps ribosomes to decode messenger RNA (mRNA) and synthesize protein. Recent studies have demonstrated that tRNAs also serve as a major source of small non-coding RNAs that possess distinct and varied functions. These tRNA fragments are heterogeneous in size, nucleotide composition, biogenesis and function. Here we describe multiple roles that tRNA fragments play in cell physiology and discuss their relevance to human health and disease.

  7. tRNA nucleotide 47: an evolutionary enigma.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; McClain, W H; Cedergren, R

    1998-08-01

    A previous analysis of tRNA sequences suggested a correlation between the absence of a nucleotide at position 47 (nt 47) in the extra loop and the presence of a U13:G22 base pair in the D-stem. We have evaluated the significance of this correlation by determining the in vivo activity of tRNAs containing either a C13:G22 or a U13:G22 pair in tRNA molecules with or without nt 47. Although this correlation might reflect some malfunction of tRNAs lacking nt 47, but containing the C13:G22, assays of the in vivo suppressor activity showed that this tRNA is actually more active than the tRNA with the features found in the database, i.e., a U13:G22 base pair and no nt 47. Moreover, analogous constructs with a GGC anticodon permitted the growth of an Escherichia coli strain deleted for tRNA(Ala)GGC genes equally well. On the other hand, long-term growth experiments with competing E. coli strains harboring the tRNA lacking nt 47, either with the C13:G22 or the U13:G22 base pair demonstrated that the U13:G22 tRNA overtook the C13:G22 strain even when the starting proportion of strains favored the C13:G22 strain. Thus, the preference for the U13:G22 tRNA lacking nt 47 in the sequence database is most likely due to factors that come into play during extended growth or latency rather than to the ability of the tRNA to engage in protein synthesis.

  8. GA Enhanced a-Amylase Synthesis in Halved Grains of Barley (Hordeum vulgare): A Simple Laboratory Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory demonstration is suggested for the formation of a-amylase enzyme in halved grains of barley. Data presented in the article provide some information of the pattern of a- and b-amylase activity during germination. (PS)

  9. Drying kinetics of apricot halves in a microwave-hot air hybrid oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horuz, Erhan; Bozkurt, Hüseyin; Karataş, Haluk; Maskan, Medeni

    2017-01-01

    Drying behavior and kinetics of apricot halves were investigated in a microwave-hot air domestic hybrid oven at 120, 150 and 180 W microwave power and 50, 60 and 70 °C air temperature. Drying operation was finished when the moisture content reached to 25% (wet basis) from 77% (w.b). Increase in microwave power and air temperature increased drying rates and reduced drying time. Only falling rate period was observed in drying of apricot halves in hybrid oven. Eleven mathematical models were used for describing the drying kinetics of apricots. Modified logistic model gave the best fitting to the experimental data. The model has never been used to explain drying behavior of any kind of food materials up to now. Fick's second law was used for determination of both effective moisture diffusivity and thermal diffusivity values. Activation energy values of dried apricots were calculated from Arrhenius equation. Those that obtained from effective moisture diffusivity, thermal diffusivity and drying rate constant values ranged from 31.10 to 39.4 kJ/mol, 29.56 to 35.19 kJ/mol, and 26.02 to 32.36 kJ/mol, respectively.

  10. tRNA genes and the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Foltan, Jaromir S

    2008-08-07

    The genetic code describes translational assignments between codons and amino acids. tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are those molecules by means of which these assignments are established. Any aaRS recognizes its tRNAs according to some of their nucleotides called identity elements (IEs). Let a 1Mut-similarity Sim (1Mut) be the average similarity between such tRNA genes whose codons differ by one point mutation. We showed that: (1) a global maximum of Sim (1Mut) is reached at the standard genetic code 27 times for 4 sets of IEs of tRNA genes of eukaryotic species, while it is so only 5 times for similarities Sim (C&R) between all tRNA genes whose codons lie in the same column or row of the code. Therefore, point mutations of anticodons were tested by nature to recruit tRNAs from one isoaccepting group to another, (2) because plain similarities Sim (all) between tRNA genes of species within any of the three domains of life are higher than between tRNA genes of species belonging to different domains, tRNA genes retained information about early evolution of cells, (3) we searched the order of tRNAs in which they were most probably assigned to their codons and amino acids. The beginning Ala, (Val), Pro, Ile, Lys, Arg, Trp, Met, Asp, Cys, (Ser) of our resulting chronology lies under a plateau on a graph of Sim (1Mut,IE)(univ.ancestors) plotted over this chronology for a set S(IE) of all IEs of tRNA genes, whose universal ancestors were separately computed for each codon. This plateau has remained preserved along the whole line of evolution of the code and is consistent with observations of Ribas de Pouplana and Schimmel [2001. Aminoacy1-tRNA synthetases: potential markers of genetic code development. Trends Biochem. Sci. 26, 591-598] that specific pairs of aaRSs-one from each of their two classes-can be docked simultaneously onto the acceptor stem of tRNA and hence an interaction existed between their ancestors using a reduced code, (4) sharpness of a

  11. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations and disease.

    PubMed

    Yarham, John W; Elson, Joanna L; Blakely, Emma L; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA (MTT) gene mutations are an important cause of human morbidity and are associated with a wide range of pathology, from isolated organ-specific diseases such as myopathy or hearing loss, through to multisystem disorders with encephalopathy, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy. Our understanding of how MTT mutations cause disease remains poor and progress has been hampered by the complex interaction of genotype with phenotype that can result in patients who harbor the same mutation exhibiting starkly contrasting phenotypes, whereas other (genetically heterogeneous) patients manifest clinically identical syndromes. A further complexity is the highly polymorphic nature of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which must temper any reflex assumptions of pathogenicity for novel MTT substitutions. Nevertheless significant progress is being made and we shall review the methods employed to identify and characterize MTT mutations as pathogenic. Also important is our understanding of the molecular processes involved and we shall discuss the data available on two of the most studied MTT mutations (m.8344A > G and m.3243A > G) as well as other potential pathogenic mechanisms. Knowledge of factors influencing the inheritance of MTT mutations, and therefore the likelihood of disease transmission, is of particular importance to female patients. At present, the factors determining transmission remain elusive, but we shall examine several possible mechanisms and discuss the evidence for each. Finally, a number of different yeast and mouse models are currently used to investigate mitochondrial disease and we will assess the importance of and difficulties associated with each model as well as the future of possible therapies for patients with mitochondrial disease.

  12. Modelling of vitamin A binding to tRNA.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2014-10-01

    The binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with tRNA are located in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modelling were used to determine retinoid binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of retinol and retinoic acid complexation on tRNA conformation and aggregation. Structural analysis showed that retinol and retinoic acid bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs with overall binding constants of Kret-tRNA=2.0 (±0.40)×10(4)M(-1) and Kretac-tRNA=6.0 (±1)×10(4)M(-1). The number of binding sites occupied by retinoids on tRNA were 1.4 for retinol-tRNA and 1.7 for retinoic acid-tRNA complexes. Hydrophobic interactions were also observed at high retinol and retinoic acid contents. Molecular modelling showed the participation of several nucleobases in retinoid-tRNA complexation with free binding energy of -4.36 for retinol-tRNA and -4.53kcal/mol for retinoic acid-tRNA adducts.

  13. Semisynthetic tRNA complement mediates in vitro protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenling; Stein, Viktor; Tnimov, Zakir; Mureev, Sergey; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-04-08

    Genetic code expansion is a key objective of synthetic biology and protein engineering. Most efforts in this direction are focused on reassigning termination or decoding quadruplet codons. While the redundancy of genetic code provides a large number of potentially reassignable codons, their utility is diminished by the inevitable interaction with cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. To address this problem, we sought to establish an in vitro protein synthesis system with a simplified synthetic tRNA complement, thereby orthogonalizing some of the sense codons. This quantitative in vitro peptide synthesis assay allowed us to analyze the ability of synthetic tRNAs to decode all of 61 sense codons. We observed that, with the exception of isoacceptors for Asn, Glu, and Ile, the majority of 48 synthetic Escherichia coli tRNAs could support protein translation in the cell-free system. We purified to homogeneity functional Asn, Glu, and Ile tRNAs from the native E. coli tRNA mixture, and by combining them with synthetic tRNAs, we formulated a semisynthetic tRNA complement for all 20 amino acids. We further demonstrated that this tRNA complement could restore the protein translation activity of tRNA-depleted E. coli lysate to a level comparable to that of total native tRNA. To confirm that the developed system could efficiently synthesize long polypeptides, we expressed three different sequences coding for superfolder GFP. This novel semisynthetic translation system is a powerful tool for tRNA engineering and potentially enables the reassignment of at least 9 sense codons coding for Ser, Arg, Leu, Pro, Thr, and Gly.

  14. Stability of Dihydroartemisinin–Piperaquine Tablet Halves During Prolonged Storage Under Tropical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Kaur, Harparkash; Terlouw, Dianne J.

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine (DP) is recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, used in efforts to contain artemisinin resistance, and increasingly considered for mass drug administration. Because of the narrow therapeutic dose range and available tablet strengths, the manufacturers and World Health Organization recommended regimens involve breaking tablets into halves to accurately dose children according to body weight. Use of tablet fractions in programmatic settings under tropical conditions requires a highly stable product; however, the stability of DP tablet fractions is unknown. We aged full and half DP (Eurartesim®) tablets in a stability chamber at 30°C and 70% humidity level. The active pharmaceutical ingredients dihydroartemisinin and piperaquine remained at ≥ 95% over the 3 months' period of ageing in light and darkness. These findings are reassuring for DP, but highlight the need to assess drug stability under real-life settings during the drug development process, particularly for key drugs of global disease control programs. PMID:27895269

  15. Early molecular response in chronic myeloid leukemia and halving time: Latest evidences.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Massaro, Fulvio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-09-01

    Achieving a BCR-ABL/ABL ratio <10% at 3 months has become an important goal of treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Several evidences showed that this early molecular response (EMR) is associated with positive long-term outcome in terms of overall survival and progression-free survival, but a consensus has not been reached when this goal is not achieved. European LeukemiaNet recommendations defined patients as treatment failure only after the 6- month time point. Not all patients that lack EMR have similar outcome and it became important to identify patients before this time point of 3 months. Several groups introduced the concept of "halving time" or "velocity of ratio reduction" that could anticipate the possibility to recognize patients deserving a switch to another treatment. Aim of this review is to summarize all evidences reported on the significance of EMR and how this evaluation changed our perspectives and modified our therapeutic strategies.

  16. Tissue-specific methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in the 5{prime} upstream region of the mouse catalase gene (Cas-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, I.L.; Singh, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The intracellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase, is encoded by a gene whose level of expression in different organisms, including humans, varies with tissue-type. The {open_quotes}TATA-less{close_quotes} 5{prime} upstream region of the catalase gene, in mice and humans, contains a CpG island. Such CG-rich regions are target sites for cytosine methylation and have been implicated in tissue-specific gene expression. However, the methylation status of individual CpG dinucleotides and their significance in gene expression has not been established. A 275 bp fragment within the 5{prime} region of Cas-1 was evaluated for CpG methylation. HpaII digestion of genomic DNA, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (HpaII-PCR), suggests that at least one of three CCGG is not methylated in nine different somatic tissues that express this enzyme at various levels. In contrast, all three CCGG sites are methylated in DNA from sperm and spleen. Further examination of the methylation specificity of individual CCGG sites was conducted using sodium bisulfite modification of genomic DNA followed by HPaII-PCR. Sodium bisulfite modifies non-methylated cytosines to uracils, changing a CG to a TG dinucleotide. This nucleotide substitution eliminates HpaII sites and allows the methylation status of each of the CCGG sites to be assessed. The ability to discern the number and combination of methylated sites within the 5{prime} region of a gene permits the determination of a possible correlation between differential methylation patterns and temporal/spatial gene regulation. Analysis of differential methylation, using the mouse catalase gene as a model, provides further insight into CpG methylation as one mechanism of mammalian gene regulation.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of ( sup 3 H)-5 prime azido-N-1-naphthylphthlamic acid, a photolabile N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid analog

    SciTech Connect

    Voet, J.G.; Dodge, B.; Harris, K.; Jacobs, M.; Larkin, L.; Bader, S.; Schnitzler, G.; Sutherland, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The NPA (N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid) receptor is an important protein involved in the regulation of transport of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In our attempt to isolate and characterize this protein we have previously synthesized and characterized a photolabile analog of NPA, 5{prime}-azido-NPA (Az-NPA) and shown it to be a competitor of NPA for binding sites on the NPA receptor as well as an inhibitor of auxin transport. We have now synthesized and characterized ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA. The precursor, 2,3,4,5-Br-5{prime}-amino-NPA was dehydrohalogenated with tritium gas by Research Products International. The amino group was converted to an azido group and the product purified by HPLC. ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA was found to be photolabile and to co-chromatograph with our synthetic unlabeled Az-NPA. Furthermore, the tritiated material was found to bind to zucchini hypocotyl cell membranes in a manner competitive with NPA as well as unlabeled Az-NPA. Photolysis of zucchini phase-partitioned plasma membranes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA resulted in covalent association of tritium with the membranes. Much of this covalent association could be prevented by prior treatment of the membranes with excess NPA.

  18. Biological effects of exogenous adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate on cultured mammalian cells: Evidence for a receptor mechanism and its regulation by desensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    Exogenous adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) mobilized intracellular calcium in human carcinoma A43l cells and in Swiss 3T3 and 3T6 mouse fibroblasts by increasing inositol trisphosphate similar to well down growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), bradykinin (BK), serum). Calcium mobilization was examined by video imaging of fura-2 fluorescence is single cells, following the radioactive isotope {sup 45}Ca, and monitoring the decrease in fluorescence of cells loaded with chlortetracycline. Uridine 5{prime}-triphosphate, but not other nucleotides, mimicked ATP. Single-cell analysis revealed synchronous responses in 10 sec to ATP, BK or serum, while PDGF (3T3) and EGF (A431) produced slower signals with significant cell-to-cell variation. PDGF desensitized 3T3 cells to ATP and BK added 100 sec later but ATP or BK did not desensitized to PDGF. Homologous desensitization was seen with all agonists. Heterologous desensitization was also observed in A431 cells where ATP desensitized to serum, but serum did not to ATP. ATP-stimulated calcium entry was detected after 10 sec in A431 cells, but not in Swiss 3T6 cells. Entry started before significant efflux had occurred and did not fit the capacitance model of Putney. A 2-3 hr ATP pretreatment produced a homologous desensitization state that required 20 hr to disappear, probably due to down-regulation of the putative ATP receptors.

  19. Fibrillin binds calcium and is coded by cDNAs that reveal a multidomain structure and alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end

    SciTech Connect

    Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C.; Charbonneau, N.L.; Sakai, L.Y. ); Dietz, H.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Fibrillin is an important structural protein of the extracellular matrix. It is a large cysteine-rich glycoprotein with extensive intrachain disulfide bonds, likely contributed by multiple EGF-like repeats. The authors have previously published 6.9 kb of FBN1 cDNA sequence. FBN1 cDNA clones that extend the sequence 3089 bp in the 5[prime] direction are described in this report. The deduced primary structure suggests that fibrillin in composed of multiple domains. The most predominant features the presence of 43 calcium binding EGF-like repeats. They demonstrate here that fibrillin molecules bind calcium. In addition, three alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end are described. Analysis of 5.8 kb of surrounding genomic sequence revealed a 1.8-kb CpG island spanning the alternatively spliced exons and the next downstream exon. Since FBN1 is the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, the information presented here will be useful in identifying new mutations and in understanding the function of fibrillin in the pathogenesis of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their connections to disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Gyu; Schimmel, Paul; Kim, Sunghoon

    2008-08-12

    Aminoacylation of transfer RNAs establishes the rules of the genetic code. The reactions are catalyzed by an ancient group of 20 enzymes (one for each amino acid) known as aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (AARSs). Surprisingly, the etiology of specific diseases-including cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions-is connected to specific aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. These connections include heritable mutations in the genes for tRNA synthetases that are causally linked to disease, with both dominant and recessive disease-causing mutations being annotated. Because some disease-causing mutations do not affect aminoacylation activity or apparent enzyme stability, the mutations are believed to affect functions that are distinct from aminoacylation. Examples include enzymes that are secreted as procytokines that, after activation, operate in pathways connected to the immune system or angiogenesis. In addition, within cells, synthetases form multiprotein complexes with each other or with other regulatory factors and in that way control diverse signaling pathways. Although much has been uncovered in recent years, many novel functions, disease connections, and interpathway connections of tRNA synthetases have yet to be worked out.

  1. Lysine tRNA and cell division: a G1 cell cycle mutant is temperature sensitive for the modification of tRNA5Lys to tRNA4Lys.

    PubMed Central

    Ortwerth, B J; Lin, V K; Lewis, J; Wang, R J

    1984-01-01

    Ts-694 is a temperature sensitive mutant of hamster cells which is blocked in the G1 phase of the cell cycle at the restrictive temperature of 39 degrees. A comparison of the Lys-tRNA isoacceptors by RPC-5 chromatography showed a decrease in tRNA5Lys and an increase in tRNA4Lys at 39 degrees. This was identical to the changes seen in confluent cultures at the permissive temperature of 33 degrees. These Lys-tRNA changes were not seen in ts-694 cells blocked in G1 by isoleucine deficiency, nor in two other G1 ts mutants at the restrictive temperature. Cells trapped in S phase by a thymidine block also contained decreased levels of tRNA4Lys when raised to 39 degrees. Both tRNA4Lys levels and cell division increased when the cells were returned to the permissive temperature. An in vitro assay was established for the modification of tRNA5Lys to tRNA4Lys with tRNA6Lys and tRNA2Lys as intermediates. The first reaction is the synthesis of tRNA6Lys which involves the introduction of a modified uridine at the third position of the anticodon. Extracts of 694 cells grown at 33 degrees were able to modify rat liver [3H] tRNA5Lys to tRNA6Lys and tRNA4Lys in vitro when assayed at 25 degrees but not at 39 degrees. Extracts of Balb/c 3T3 cells, however, were more active at 39 degrees than at 25 degrees showing that the normal enzyme is not temperature sensitive. Ts-694 cell tRNA, isolated from cells grown at 33 degrees was aminoacylated at both 25 degrees and 39 degrees with rat liver synthetases. tRNA4Lys was present at both temperatures indicating that ts-694 cells do not contain a temperature sensitive tRNA4Lys. Images PMID:6569451

  2. Probing tRNA interaction with biogenic polyamines.

    PubMed

    Ouameur, Amin Ahmed; Bourassa, Philippe; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2010-10-01

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.

  3. Rational design of an orthogonal tryptophanyl nonsense suppressor tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Randall A.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    While a number of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS):tRNA pairs have been engineered to alter or expand the genetic code, only the Methanococcus jannaschii tyrosyl tRNA synthetase and tRNA have been used extensively in bacteria, limiting the types and numbers of unnatural amino acids that can be utilized at any one time to expand the genetic code. In order to expand the number and type of aaRS/tRNA pairs available for engineering bacterial genetic codes, we have developed an orthogonal tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase and tRNA pair, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the process of developing an amber suppressor tRNA, we discovered that the Escherichia coli lysyl tRNA synthetase was responsible for misacylating the initial amber suppressor version of the yeast tryptophanyl tRNA. It was discovered that modification of the G:C content of the anticodon stem and therefore reducing the structural flexibility of this stem eliminated misacylation by the E. coli lysyl tRNA synthetase, and led to the development of a functional, orthogonal suppressor pair that should prove useful for the incorporation of bulky, unnatural amino acids into the genetic code. Our results provide insight into the role of tRNA flexibility in molecular recognition and the engineering and evolution of tRNA specificity. PMID:20571084

  4. Linkage disequilibrium between polymorphisms at the 5{prime} untranslated region and intron 5 (Dde I) of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.S.H.; Liu, Y.; Low, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of exon 1 and an RFLP (Dde I) in intron 5 (nt 160) of the ATIII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with primers of published sequences. DNA fragments were size-fractionated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed over a UV transilluminator. A strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between these two polymorphisms of the ATIII gene in the Chinese ({chi}{sup 2} = 63.7; {triangle} 0.42, P < 0.001). The estimated frequencies of the three haplotypes were found to be 0.37 for SD+, 0.40 for LD+ and 0.23 for LD-.

  5. The Selenocysteine tRNA STAF-Binding Region is Essential for Adequate Selenocysteine tRNA Status, Selenoprotein Expression and Early Age Survival of Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STAF is a transcription activating factor for a number of RNA Pol III-and RNA Pol II-dependent genes including the selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA gene. Here, the role of STAF in regulating expression of Sec tRNA and selenoproteins was examined in an invivo model. Heterozygous inactivation of the Staf gen...

  6. Diversity of human tRNA genes from the 1000-genomes project.

    PubMed

    Parisien, Marc; Wang, Xiaoyun; Pan, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The sequence diversity of individual human genomes has been extensively analyzed for variations and phenotypic implications for mRNA, miRNA, and long non-coding RNA genes. TRNA (tRNA) also exhibits large sequence diversity in the human genome, but tRNA gene sequence variation and potential functional implications in individual human genomes have not been investigated. Here we capitalize on the sequencing data from the 1000-genomes project to examine the diversity of tRNA genes in the human population. Previous analysis of the reference human genome indicated an unexpected large number of diverse tRNA genes beyond the necessity of translation, suggesting that some tRNA transcripts may perform non-canonical functions. We found 24 new tRNA sequences in>1% and 76 new tRNA sequences in>0.2% of all individuals, indicating that tRNA genes are also subject to evolutionary changes in the human population. Unexpectedly, two abundant new tRNA genes contain base-pair mismatches in the anticodon stem. We experimentally determined that these two new tRNAs have altered structures in vitro; however, one new tRNA is not aminoacylated but extremely stable in HeLa cells, suggesting that this new tRNA can be used for non-canonical function. Our results show that at the scale of human population, tRNA genes are more diverse than conventionally understood, and some new tRNAs may perform non-canonical, extra-translational functions that may be linked to human health and disease.

  7. Interaction of tRNA with antitumor polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Ahmed Ouameur, A; Thomas, T; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2009-08-01

    We studied the interaction between tRNA and three polyamine analogues (1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane.4HCl (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333)) using FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed that polyamine analogues bound tRNA via guanine N7, adenine, uracil O2, and the backbone phosphate (PO2-) groups, while the most reactive sites for biogenic polyamines were guanine N7/O6, adenine N7, uracil O2, and sugar 2'-OH groups as well as the backbone phosphate group. The binding constants of polyamine analogue-tRNA recognition were lower than those of the biogenic polyamine-tRNA complexes, with K333 = 2.8 (+/-0.5) x 10(4), K(BE-333) = 3.7 (+/-0.7) x 10(4), K(BE-3333) = 4.0 (+/-0.9) x 10(4), K(spm) = 8.7 (+/-0.9) x 10(5), K(spd) = 6.1 (+/-0.7) x 10(5), and K(put) = 1.0 (+/-0.3) x 10(5) mol/L. tRNA remained in the A-family conformation; however, it aggregated at high polyamine analogue concentrations.

  8. tRNA hopping: enhancement by an expanded anticodon.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1989-01-01

    At a low level wild-type tRNA(1Val) inserts a single amino acid (valine) for the five nucleotide sequence GUGUA which has overlapping valine codons. Mutants of tRNA(1Val) with an insertion of A or U between positions 34 and 35 of their anticodons have enhanced reading of the quintuplet sequences. We propose that this decoding occurs by a hopping mechanism rather than by quintuplet pairing. Such hopping involves disengagement of the paired codon and anticodon with the mRNA slipping two (or more) bases along the ribosomal--peptidyl tRNA complex and subsequently re-pairing at a second codon--the landing site. The mutant with the anticodon sequence 3'CAAU5' 'hops' over the stop codon in the mRNA sequence GUG UAA GUU with the insertion of a single amino acid (valine). In contrast, in reading the same sequence, the mutant with the anticodon 3'CAUU5' hops onto the stop with the insertion of two valine residues. It is likely that in some instances of hopping alternate anticodon bases are used for the initial pairing and at the landing site. PMID:2686986

  9. The chicken FMR1 gene is highly conserved with a CCT 5{prime} - untranslated repeat and encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.K.; Zhang, F.; Ashley, C.T. Jr.; Warren, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The transcriptional silencing of the human gene, fragile X metal retardation 1 (FMR1), is due to abnormal methylation in response to an expanded 5{prime}-untranslated CGG trinucleotide repeat and accounts for most cases of fragile X syndrome, a frequent inherited form of metal retardation. Although the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is known to have properties of a RNA-binding protein, the precise function of FMRP remains to be elucidated. We report the cloning of the chicken homolog of FMR1 and show strong evolutionary conservation, with nucleotide and amino acid identities of 85 and 92%, respectively, between chicken and human. In place of the mammalian CGG trinucleotide repeat, a 99-nt tripartite repetitive element containing a CCT trinucleotide repeat flanked on both sides by dinucleotide repeats was identified. Blocks of highly conserved 3{prime}-untranslated sequence were also found. Within the coding region, two copies each of the highly conserved K homology motif and the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) box motif, both ribonucleotide particle family domains implicated in RNA binding, were identified. Chicken FMRP was found to bind RNA in vitro, and this activity correlated with the presence of the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein that includes the RGG motifs. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  10. tRNA concentration fine tunes protein solubility.

    PubMed

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Lehnhardt, Lothar; Böhmer, Nadine; Kaufmann, Paul; Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2012-09-21

    Clusters of codons pairing to low-abundance tRNAs synchronize the translation with co-translational folding of single domains in multidomain proteins. Although proven with some examples, the impact of the ribosomal speed on the folding and solubility on a global, cell-wide level remains elusive. Here we show that upregulation of three low-abundance tRNAs in Escherichia coli increased the aggregation propensity of several cellular proteins as a result of an accelerated elongation rate. Intriguingly, alterations in the concentration of the natural tRNA pool compromised the solubility of various chaperones consequently rendering the solubility of some chaperone-dependent proteins.

  11. An alanine tRNA gene cluster from Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Luciano, E; Candelas, G C

    1996-06-01

    We report the sequence of a 2.3-kb genomic DNA fragment from the orb-web spider, Nephila clavipes (Nc). The fragment contains four regions of high homology to tRNA(Ala). The members of this irregularly spaced cluster of genes are oriented in the same direction and have the same anticodon (GCA), but their sequence differs at several positions. Initiation and termination signals, as well as consensus intragenic promoter sequences characteristic of tRNA genes, have been identified in all genes. tRNA(Ala) are involved in the regulation of the fibroin synthesis in the large ampullate Nc glands.

  12. Towards a comprehensive picture of alloacceptor tRNA remolding in metazoan mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, Abdullah H.; Hölzer, Martin; Jühling, Frank; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Al-Arab, Marwa; Tout, Kifah; Marz, Manja; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F.; Bernt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Remolding of tRNAs is a well-documented process in mitochondrial genomes that changes the identity of a tRNA. It involves a duplication of a tRNA gene, a mutation that changes the anticodon and the loss of the ancestral tRNA gene. The net effect is a functional tRNA that is more closely related to tRNAs of a different alloacceptor family than to tRNAs with the same anticodon in related species. Beyond being of interest for understanding mitochondrial tRNA function and evolution, tRNA remolding events can lead to artifacts in the annotation of mitogenomes and thus in studies of mitogenomic evolution. Therefore, it is important to identify and catalog these events. Here we describe novel methods to detect tRNA remolding in large-scale data sets and apply them to survey tRNA remolding throughout animal evolution. We identify several novel remolding events in addition to the ones previously mentioned in the literature. A detailed analysis of these remoldings showed that many of them are derived from ancestral events. PMID:26227972

  13. Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA on Nanodiamond Surface Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet; Mochalin, Vadym N.; O'Neill, Hugh; Gogotsi, Yury; Chu, Xiang Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Diamond is an outstanding material in many aspects, and nanodiamond (ND) inherits most of the superior properties of bulk diamond and delivers them at the nanoscale. ND has excellent properties that can be applied in biomedical field such as a good platform for drug delivery. In this study, we show that hydrated tRNA can be adsorbed on the surfaces of nanodiamonds and further demonstrate specific properties in its dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of the system by Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. The dynamics of hydrated tRNA on ND surfaces exhibits a logarithmic-like decay within the time range of 10 ps to 1 ns, which has also been observed in the freestanding proteins and other biopolymers. We further compare the dynamics of tRNA hydrated with D2O on ND surface with that of freestanding hydrated tRNA molecules. Our results show that the relaxational dynamics of tRNA on ND surface is much faster than that of the freestanding tRNA molecules. This gives the hint that the folded states of tRNA is modified by ND surfaces to engage faster dynamics. The difference in the dynamics of the hydration water modified by ND is another possible reason which causes the faster dynamics in tRNA on ND surface.

  14. Evolutionary constraints on the plastid tRNA set decoding methionine and isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Alkatib, Sibah; Fleischmann, Tobias T.; Scharff, Lars B.; Bock, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The plastid (chloroplast) genomes of seed plants typically encode 30 tRNAs. Employing wobble and superwobble mechanisms, most codon boxes are read by only one or two tRNA species. The reduced set of plastid tRNAs follows the evolutionary trend of organellar genomes to shrink in size and coding capacity. A notable exception is the AUN codon box specifying methionine and isoleucine, which is decoded by four tRNA species in nearly all seed plants. However, three of these four tRNA genes were lost from the genomes of some parasitic plastid-containing lineages, possibly suggesting that less than four tRNA species could be sufficient to decode the triplets in the AUN box. To test this hypothesis, we have performed knockout experiments for the four AUN-decoding tRNAs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. We find that all four tRNA genes are essential under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, possibly suggesting tRNA import into plastids of parasitic plastid-bearing species. Phylogenetic analysis of the four plastid tRNA genes reveals striking conservation of all those bacterial features that are involved in discrimination between the different tRNA species containing CAU anticodons. PMID:22553362

  15. Expanding tRNA recognition of a tRNA synthetase by a single amino acid change

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Tumbula-Hansen, Debra; Toogood, Helen; Söll, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) occurs in two types: the discriminating enzyme (D-AspRS) forms only Asp-tRNAAsp, whereas the nondiscriminating enzyme (ND-AspRS) also synthesizes Asp-tRNAAsn, which is a required intermediate for protein synthesis in many organisms. We attempted to expand the tRNA recognition of the discriminating Thermococcus kodakaraensis AspRS to that of a ND-AspRS by in vitro mutagenesis. An alignment of 26 archaeal AspRS proteins revealed two positions (26 and 85 in the T. kodakaraensis sequence) whose amino acid identity changes according to the enzymes' tRNA specificity. In their anticodon-binding domain, D-AspRS proteins contain W26 (or Q26) and K85, compared with H26 and P85 in the ND-AspRSs. T. kodakaraensis AspRS gained the ability to form Asp-tRNAAsn in vitro when the W26H or K85P changes were introduced independently or in combination. In the aminoacylation of tRNAAsn or tRNAAsp transcripts, the mutant enzymes displayed at least a 100- to 500-fold change in tRNA specificity, as judged by the ratio of the kcat/Km values of Asp-tRNAAsp vs. Asp-tRNAAsn formation. That T. kodakaraensis mutant AspRSs mischarge tRNAAsn was also manifested in the higher level (1.7%) of aspartylation of unfractionated Pyrococcus tRNA compared with that achieved by the wild-type enzyme (0.9%). Northern blot analysis of the Asp-tRNA separated by acid/urea gel electrophoresis confirmed the in vitro synthesis of Asp-tRNAAsn. A structure-based model points to a direct interaction of K85 in T. kodakaraensis AspRS with the anticodon nucleotide C36 of tRNAAsp. Thus, a switch between D-AspRS and ND-AspRS enzymes could have evolved with only limited amino acid changes. PMID:12730374

  16. Quality Control Pathways for Nucleus-Encoded Eukaryotic tRNA Biosynthesis and Subcellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    tRNAs perform an essential role in translating the genetic code. They are long-lived RNAs that are generated via numerous posttranscriptional steps. Eukaryotic cells have evolved numerous layers of quality control mechanisms to ensure that the tRNAs are appropriately structured, processed, and modified. We describe the known tRNA quality control processes that check tRNAs and correct or destroy aberrant tRNAs. These mechanisms employ two types of exonucleases, CCA end addition, tRNA nuclear aminoacylation, and tRNA subcellular traffic. We arrange these processes in order of the steps that occur from generation of precursor tRNAs by RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription to end maturation and modification in the nucleus to splicing and additional modifications in the cytoplasm. Finally, we discuss the tRNA retrograde pathway, which allows tRNA reimport into the nucleus for degradation or repair. PMID:25848089

  17. Genome-wide screen uncovers novel pathways for tRNA processing and nuclear–cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingyan; Bao, Alicia; Chatterjee, Kunal; Wan, Yao; Hopper, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are essential for protein synthesis. However, key gene products involved in tRNA biogenesis and subcellular movement remain to be discovered. We conducted the first comprehensive unbiased analysis of the role of nearly an entire proteome in tRNA biology and describe 162 novel and 12 previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene products that function in tRNA processing, turnover, and subcellular movement. tRNA nuclear export is of particular interest because it is essential, but the known tRNA exporters (Los1 [exportin-t] and Msn5 [exportin-5]) are unessential. We report that mutations of CRM1 (Exportin-1), MEX67/MTR2 (TAP/p15), and five nucleoporins cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, a hallmark of defective tRNA nuclear export. CRM1 mutation genetically interacts with los1Δ and causes altered tRNA nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution. The data implicate roles for the protein and mRNA nuclear export machineries in tRNA nuclear export. Mutations of genes encoding actin cytoskeleton components and mitochondrial outer membrane proteins also cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, likely due to defective splicing on mitochondria. Additional gene products, such as chromatin modification enzymes, have unanticipated effects on pre-tRNA end processing. Thus, this genome-wide screen uncovered putative novel pathways for tRNA nuclear export and extensive links between tRNA biology and other aspects of cell physiology. PMID:26680305

  18. Mechanism of 3'-Matured tRNA Discrimination from 3'-Immature tRNA by Class-II CCA-Adding Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2016-06-07

    CCA-adding enzyme adds the 3'-CCA of tRNA, using CTP and ATP as substrates, and terminates RNA synthesis after completion of CCA addition, without using a nucleic acid template. The complex structure of class-II Thermotoga maritima CCA-adding enzyme and mature tRNA with 3'-CCA revealed the mechanisms by which the enzyme terminates RNA synthesis after completion of 3'-CCA addition, and discriminates 3'-mature tRNA from 3'-immature tRNA. After completion of 3'-CCA addition at the catalytic site, the 3'-CCA refolds and relocates to the release site, which is discrete from the catalytic site. The 3'-CCA forms a continuously stacked, stable conformation together with the enzyme. Consequently, the 3'-mature tRNA rotates relative to the surface of the enzyme, and only the 3'-mature tRNA is ready for release. The 3'-regions of immature tRNAs cannot form the stable stacking conformation in the release site; thus, the 3' end is relocated in the catalytic site, and the 3'-CCA is reconstructed.

  19. tRNA evolution from the proto-tRNA minihelix world

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Kim, Yunsoo; Sanjay, Adithya; Burton, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple models have been advanced for the evolution of cloverleaf tRNA. Here, the conserved archaeal tRNA core (75-nt) is posited to have evolved from ligation of three proto-tRNA minihelices (31-nt) and two-symmetrical 9-nt deletions within joined acceptor stems (93 – 18 = 75-nt). The primary evidence for this conclusion is that the 5-nt stem 7-nt anticodon loop and the 5-nt stem 7-nt T loop are structurally homologous and related by coding sequence. We posit that the D loop was generated from a third minihelix (31-nt) in which the stem and loop became rearranged after 9-nt acceptor stem deletions and cloverleaf folding. The most 3´-5-nt segment of the D loop and the 5-nt V loop are apparent remnants of the joined acceptor stems (14 – 9 = 5-nt). Before refolding in the tRNA cloverleaf, we posit that the 3′-5-nt segment of the D loop and the 5-nt V loop were paired, and, in the tRNA cloverleaf, frequent pairing of positions 29 (D loop) and 47 (V loop) remains (numbered on a 75-nt tRNA cloverleaf core). Amazingly, after >3.5 billion years of evolutionary pressure on the tRNA cloverleaf structure, a model can be constructed that convincingly describes the genesis of 75/75-nt conserved archaeal tRNA core positions. Judging from the tRNA structure, cloverleaf tRNA appears to represent at least a second-generation scheme (and possibly a third-generation scheme) that replaced a robust 31-nt minihelix protein-coding system, evidence for which is preserved in the cloverleaf structure. Understanding tRNA evolution provides insights into ribosome and rRNA evolution. PMID:27636862

  20. Stereochemical control over Mn(II)-Thio versus Mn(II)-Oxy coordination in adenosine 5 prime -O-(1-thiodiphosphate) complexes at the active site of creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Sammons, R.D.; Goodhart, P.J.; LoBrutto, R.; Reed, G.H. )

    1989-02-21

    The stereochemical configurations of the Mn(II) complexes with the resolved epimers of adenosine 5{prime}-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (ADP{alpha}S), bound at the active site of creatine kinase, have been determined in order to assess the relative strengths of enzymic stereoselectivity versus Lewis acid/base preferences in metal-ligand binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data have been obtained for Mn(II) in anion-stabilized, dead-end (transition-state analogue) complexes, in ternary enzyme-Mn{sup II}ADP{alpha}S complexes, and in the central complexes of the equilibrium mixture. The modes of coordination of Mn(II) at P{sub alpha} in the nitrate-stabilized, dead-end complexes with each epimer of ADP{alpha}S were ascertained by EPR measurements with (R{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S and (S{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S. A reduction in the magnitude of the {sup 55}Mn hyperfine coupling constant in the spectrum for the complex containing (S{sub p})-ADP{alpha}S is indicative of Mn(II)-thio coordination at P{sub alpha}. The results indicate that a strict discrimination for a unique configuration of the metal-nucleotide substrate is expressed upon binding of all of the substrates to form the active complex (or an analogue thereof). This enzymic stereoselectivity provides sufficient binding energy to overcome an intrinsic preference for the hard Lewis acid Mn(II) to coordinate to the hard Lewis base oxygen.

  1. In vivo and in vitro dermal penetration of 2,4,5,2 prime ,4 prime , 5 prime -hexachlorobiphenyl in young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.V.; Sumler, M.R. ); Fisher, H.L.; Hall, L.L. )

    1989-10-01

    Penetration of 2,4,5,2{prime},4{prime},5{prime}-({sup 14}C)hexachlorobiphenyl (HCB) through skin of young (33 days) and adult (82 days) female Fischer 344 rats was determined in vivo and by two in vitro methods. In vivo dermal penetration at 120 hr was 45% in young and 43% in adults. At 72 hr in vivo dermal penetration was 35% in young and 26% in adults compared to 1.5% for young and 1.0% for adult as measured with a continuous flow in vitro system and 2.9% for young and 1.9% for adults as measured with a static in vitro system. Most of the dermally absorbed HCB remained in the body as only 4.9 and 2.6% of that absorbed was excreted by young and adult rats, respectively, at the end of 120 hr. Significant differences in dermal penetration and kinetics of HCB between young and adult female rats were observed. The elimination of ECB-derived material was approximately six times higher in feces than in urine. A physiological pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the organ and tissue radioactivity distribution data. Parameters in the model determined from dermal dosing of female Fischer 344 rats were in reasonable agreement with those reported in the literature for adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (iv dose). The rate constant for dermal penetration was 0.83 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} min{sup {minus}1} for adults and 0.96 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} min{sup {minus}1} for young. The delay or lag time parameter for dermal penetration was 4.4 hr in adults and 1.1 hr in young.

  2. Epistatic selection of a sequence 5{prime} of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis may account for the high frequency of this disease in the Caucasian population

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Jr. |; Nash, E.; Cutting, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive disorders in Caucasian populations. Numerous hypotheses including genetic drift, founder effect, sex ratio, segregation distortions and various forms of heterozygote advantage have been proposed to explain the relatively high frequency of CF alleles. The observation of high linkage disequilibrium between markers at the 5{prime} end of CFTR and mutations that cause CF raised the possibility of epistatic selection. CF-linked marker allele frequencies were determined in 417 elderly individuals from a stable Czech population that survived high levels of infant and childhood mortality in the pre-antibiotic era. These data were compared with allele frequencies of 646 contemporary newborns and 345 young adults drawn from the same population who had significantly lower mortality rates in the antibiotic era. Allele frequencies of markers CS7/Hhal and KM19/Pstl from the D7S23 locus are significantly different (p<0.05) between elderly female and male subjects in this population. Furthermore, there is a significant difference in the allele frequencies of marker CS7/Hhal when newborn females and elderly women are compared (p<0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the allele status at the CS7 region influenced female survival in the period of high infant and childhood mortality in the pre-antibiotic era. Under this selective pressure, CFTR mutations that occurred on the {open_quotes}favorable{close_quotes} background would marginally increase in frequency in each successive generation and more ancient mutations residing on this background would become the most frequent in the general population.

  3. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  4. Bioaccumulation of dietary 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl and induction of hepatic arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, E.G. da; Curtis, L.R.

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed either 5 or 20 {micro}g, 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl (245-HxCB)/g diet (wet wt.) for 4,8, or 12 weeks. Hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities and dietary 245-HxCB accumulation in liver, muscle, and remaining carcass were determined. Liver-to-body weight ratios were not altered by either of the two 245-HxCB concentrations. Relative growth rate increased with time but was not altered by 245-HxCB concentration. Bioaccumulation of 245-HxCB was dose and time dependent in all tissues without reaching apparent stayed state. Hepatic arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activities increased with 245-HxCB dose and with time. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activities also increased in fish fed 20 {micro}g 245-HxCB/g diet. No 245-HxCB-induced changes in uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UDP-DT) or NADPH-dytochrome-c reductase (NCCR) activities were determined. High-resolution GC-MS analysis of the 245-HxCB standard revealed trace (0.4--0.5%) contamination by two mono-ortho pentachlorobiphenyls (PnCBs): 2,3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-PnCB and 2,3,4,4{prime},5-PnCB. Total liver accumulation of these contaminants was inversely related with corresponding EROD and AHH activities and estimated to contribute minimally to their induction. Results from this study suggested that long-term dietary 245-HxCB exposure induced cytochrome P4501A activities in rainbow trout liver.

  5. Autonomous and in trans functions for the two halves of Srv2/CAP in promoting actin turnover.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Jansen, Silvia; Little, Kristin; Suarez, Cristian; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Blanchoin, Laurent; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-06-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that Srv2/CAP (cyclase-associated protein) has two distinct functional roles in regulating actin turnover, with its N-terminus enhancing cofilin-mediated severing of actin filaments and its C-terminus catalyzing actin monomer recycling. However, it has remained unclear to what degree these two activities are coordinated by being linked in one molecule, or whether they can function autonomously. To address this, we physically divided the protein into two separate halves, N-Srv2 and C-Srv2, and asked whether they are able to function in trans both in living cells and in reconstituted assays for F-actin turnover and actin-based motility. Remarkably, in F-actin turnover assays the stimulatory effects of N-Srv2 and C-Srv2 functioning in trans were quantitatively similar to those of intact full-length Srv2. Further, in bead motility assays and in vivo, the fragments again functioned in trans, although not with the full effectiveness of intact Srv2. From these data, we conclude that the functions of the two halves of Srv2/CAP are largely autonomous, although their linkage improves coordination of the two functions in specific settings, possibly explaining why the linkage is conserved across distant plant, animal, and fungal species.

  6. Mapping the tRNA binding site on the surface of human DNMT2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Helm, Mark; Jeltsch, Albert

    2012-06-05

    The DNMT2 enzyme methylates tRNA-Asp at position C38. Because there is no tRNA-Dnmt2 cocrystal structure available, we have mapped the tRNA binding site of DNMT2 by systematically mutating surface-exposed lysine and arginine residues to alanine and studying the tRNA methylation activity and binding of the corresponding variants. After mutating 20 lysine and arginine residues, we identified eight of them that caused large (>4-fold) decreases in catalytic activity. These residues cluster within and next to a surface cleft in the protein, which is large enough to accommodate the tRNA anticodon loop and stem. This cleft is located next to the binding pocket for the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and the catalytic residues of DNMT2 are positioned at its walls or bottom. Many of the variants with strongly reduced catalytic activity showed only a weak loss of tRNA binding or even bound better to tRNA than wild-type DNMT2, which suggests that the enzyme induces some conformational changes in the tRNA in the transition state of the methyl group transfer reaction. Manual placement of tRNA into the structure suggests that DNMT2 mainly interacts with the anticodon stem and loop.

  7. tRNA conjugation with chitosan nanoparticles: An AFM imaging study.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-04-01

    The conjugation of tRNA with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes 15,100 and 200 kDa was investigated in aqueous solution using multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Structural analysis showed that chitosan binds tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs as well as backbone PO2 group, through electrostatic, hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of KCh-15-tRNA=4.1 (±0.60)×10(3)M(-1), KCh-100-tRNA=5.7 (±0.8)×10(3)M(-1) and KCh-200-tRNA=1.2 (±0.3)×10(4)M(-1). As chitosan size increases more stable polymer-tRNA conjugate is formed. AFM images showed major tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred as chitosan concentration increased. Even though chitosan induced major biopolymer structural changes, tRNA remains in A-family structure.

  8. Export and transport of tRNA are coupled to a multi-protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Willkomm, D K; Grünweller, A; Vollbrandt, T; Sommer, S; Busch, S; Pfeiffer, T; Brinkmann, J; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    2000-01-01

    Vigilin is a ubiquitous multi heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K homologous (KH)-domain protein. Here we demonstrate that purified recombinant human vigilin binds tRNA molecules with high affinity, although with limited specificity. Nuclear microinjection experiments revealed for the first time that the immuno-affinity-purified nuclear vigilin core complex (VCC(N)) as well as recombinant vigilin accelerate tRNA export from the nucleus in human cells. The nuclear tRNA receptor exportin-t is part of the VCC(N). Elongation factor (EF)-1alpha is enriched in VCC(N) and its cytoplasmic counterpart VCC(C), whereas EF-1beta, EF-1gamma and EF-1delta are basically confined to the VCC(C). Our results suggest further that vigilin and exportin-t might interact during tRNA export, provide evidence that the channeled tRNA cycle is already initiated in the nucleus, and illustrate that intracellular tRNA trafficking is associated with discrete changes in the composition of cellular cytoplasmic multi-protein complexes containing tRNA. PMID:10657246

  9. In vivo single-RNA tracking shows that most tRNA diffuses freely in live bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plochowietz, Anne; Farrell, Ian; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2017-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) links messenger RNA nucleotide sequence with amino acid sequence during protein synthesis. Despite the importance of tRNA for translation, its subcellular distribution and diffusion properties in live cells are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first direct report on tRNA diffusion localization in live bacteria. We internalized tRNA labeled with organic fluorophores into live bacteria, applied single-molecule fluorescence imaging with single-particle tracking and localized and tracked single tRNA molecules over seconds. We observed two diffusive species: fast (with a diffusion coefficient of ∼8 μm2/s, consistent with free tRNA) and slow (consistent with tRNA bound to larger complexes). Our data indicate that a large fraction of internalized fluorescent tRNA (>70%) appears to diffuse freely in the bacterial cell. We also obtained the subcellular distribution of fast and slow diffusing tRNA molecules in multiple cells by normalizing for cell morphology. While fast diffusing tRNA is not excluded from the bacterial nucleoid, slow diffusing tRNA is localized to the cell periphery (showing a 30% enrichment versus a uniform distribution), similar to non-uniform localizations previously observed for mRNA and ribosomes. PMID:27625389

  10. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  11. The effect of earth's atmosphere on contrast reduction for a nonuniform surface albedo and 'two-halves' field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a model for contrast reduction by atmospheric haze developed for the 'two-halves' field of the earth's surface and other geometries of the earth's surface albedo. The model is based on a simplified solution of the equation of radiative transfer in two dimensions, resulting in a method for calculation of the upward zenith intensity in the atmosphere as a function of the distance from the border between the two half planes, for an unabsorbing atmosphere. The adjacency effect between two infinitesimal areas of different albedos is calculated; the resultant simplified solution is used to develop expressions for the line-spread function of the atmosphere and the modulation transfer function. The line-spread function is used to calculate the point spread function, which can be used to compute the intensity above any surface with given spatial dependence of the reflectivity.

  12. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi )

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The T box mechanism: tRNA as a regulatory molecule

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicholas J.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2009-01-01

    The T box mechanism is widely used in Gram-positive bacteria to regulate expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes and genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and uptake. Binding of a specific uncharged tRNA to a riboswitch element in the nascent transcript causes a structural change in the transcript that promotes expression of the downstream coding sequence. In most cases, this occurs by stabilization of an antiterminator element that competes with formation of a terminator helix. Specific tRNA recognition by the nascent transcript results in increased expression of genes important for tRNA aminoacylation in response to decreased pools of charged tRNA. PMID:19932103

  14. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  15. Extensive and evolutionarily persistent mitochondrial tRNA editing in Velvet Worms (phylum Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Pett, Walker; Trewick, Steve; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of onychophorans (velvet worms) present an interesting problem: Some previous studies reported them lacking several transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, whereas others found that all their tRNA genes were present but severely reduced. To resolve this discrepancy, we determined complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the onychophorans Oroperipatus sp. and Peripatoides sympatrica as well as cDNA sequences from 14 and 10 of their tRNAs, respectively. We show that tRNA genes in these genomes are indeed highly reduced and encode truncated molecules, which are restored to more conventional structures by extensive tRNA editing. During this editing process, up to 34 nucleotides are added to the tRNA sequences encoded in Oroperipatus sp. mtDNA, rebuilding the aminoacyl acceptor stem, the TΨC arm, and in some extreme cases, the variable arm and even a part of the anticodon stem. The editing is less extreme in P. sympatrica in which at least a part of the TΨC arm is always encoded in mtDNA. When the entire TΨC arm is added de novo in Oroperipatus sp., the sequence of this arm is either identical or similar among different tRNA species, yet the sequences show substantial variation for each tRNA. These observations suggest that the arm is rebuilt, at least in part, by a template-independent mechanism and argue against the alternative possibility that tRNA genes or their parts are imported from the nucleus. By contrast, the 3' end of the aminoacyl acceptor stem is likely restored by a template-dependent mechanism. The extreme tRNA editing reported here has been preserved for >140 My as it was found in both extant families of onychophorans. Furthermore, a similar type of tRNA editing may be present in several other groups of arthropods, which show a high degree of tRNA gene reduction in their mtDNA.

  16. Mitochondrial tRNA sequences as unusual replication origins: pathogenic implications for Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé; Krishnan, Neeraja M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2006-12-07

    The heavy strand of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes accumulates deaminations proportionally to the time it spends single-stranded during replication. A previous study showed that the strength of genome-wide deamination gradients originating from tRNA gene's locations increases with their capacities to form secondary structures resembling mitochondrial origins of light strand replication (OL), suggesting an alternative function for tRNA sequences. We hypothesize that this function is frequently pathogenic for those tRNA genes that normally do not form OL-like structures, because this could cause excess mutations in genome regions unadapted to tolerate them. In human mitochondrial genomes, pathogenic tRNA variants usually form less OL-like structures than non-pathogenic ones in cases where the normal non-pathogenic tRNA variant can function as OL, as evolutionary analyses reveal. For tRNAs lacking the putative OL-like functioning capacity, pathogenic variants form more OL-like secondary structures, particularly structures that might invoke bi-directional replication (true for 14 among 21 tRNA species, p<0.05, sign test; significantly at p<0.05 (1 tailed test) for 7 tRNA species), but not more unidirectional replication invoking structures. Accounting for the functional cloverleaf-like structure-forming capacities of tRNAs yields similar results. Rare, non-pathogenic tRNA mutants tend to form more OL-like structures than the common, non-pathogenic ones, suggesting weak directional selection also among non-pathogenic variants. The duration spent single stranded by a region of the heavy strand (D(ssH)) during replication, estimated by integrating over all regions that can function as OL in Homo sapiens mitochondrial genomes, increases with distance of that region from the Dloop. This suggests convergence of single-strandedness during replication and transcription, and explains conserved locations of tRNA species in mitochondrial genomes and bacterial operons. These

  17. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  18. Flipping of the ribosomal A-site adenines provides a basis for tRNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chugh, Jeetender; Casiano-Negroni, Anette; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes control the missense error rate of ~10−4 during translation though quantitative contributions of individual mechanistic steps of the conformational changes yet to be fully determined. Biochemical and biophysical studies led to a qualitative tRNA selection model in which ribosomal A-site residues A1492 and A1493 (A1492/3) flip out in response to cognate tRNA binding, promoting the subsequent reactions, but not in the case of near cognate or non-cognate tRNA. However, this model was recently questioned by X-ray structures revealing conformations of extrahelical A1492/3 and domain closure of the decoding center in both cognate and near-cognate tRNA bound ribosome complexes, suggesting that the non-specific flipping of A1492/3 has no active role in tRNA selection. We explore this question by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, aided with fluorescence and NMR experiments, to probe the free energy cost of extrahelical flipping of 1492/3 and the strain energy associated with domain conformational change. Our rigorous calculations demonstrate that the A1492/3 flipping is indeed a specific response to the binding of cognate tRNA, contributing 3 kcal/mol to the specificity of tRNA selection. Furthermore, the different A-minor interactions in cognate and near-cognate complexes propagate into the conformational strain and contribute another 4 kcal/mol in domain closure. The recent structure of ribosome with features of extrahelical A1492/3 and closed domain in near-cognate complex is reconciled by possible tautomerization of the wobble base pair in mRNA-tRNA. These results quantitatively rationalize other independent experimental observations and explain the ribosomal discrimination mechanism of selecting cognate versus near-cognate tRNA. PMID:24813122

  19. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-30

    8b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If oppl l/.et - Air Force Ofc. of Scientific Res. f/ I Be. ADDRESS...phenotype. Recent studies have also led to the identification of an enzyme which incorporates hypoxanthine into mature tRNA macromolecules. The...observation consistent with our original hypothesis. Investigations into tRNA modifications within the anticodon region have led to the identification of an

  20. P-body components, Dhh1 and Pat1, are involved in tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hurto, Rebecca L.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of tRNA depends on the balance between tRNA nuclear export/re-export and retrograde tRNA nuclear import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of tRNA is sensitive to nutrient availability as cells deprived of various nutrients exhibit tRNA nuclear accumulation. Starvation induces numerous events that result in translational repression and P-body formation. This study investigated the possible coordination of these responses with tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution. Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote translation repression and P-body formation in response to starvation. Loss of both, Dhh1 and Pat1, results in a failure to repress translation and to induce P-body formation in response to glucose starvation. This study reports that nutrient deprived dhh1 pat1 cells also fail to accumulate tRNA within nuclei. Conversely, inhibition of translation initiation and induction of P-body formation by overproduction of Dhh1 or Pat1 cause tRNA nuclear accumulation in nutrient-replete conditions. Also, loss of the mRNA decapping activator, Lsm1, causes tRNA nuclear accumulation. However, the coordination between P-body formation, translation repression, and tRNA distribution is limited to the early part of the P-body formation/translation repression pathway as loss of mRNA decapping or 5′ to 3′ degradation does not influence tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The data provide the first link between P-body formation/translation initiation and tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The current model is that Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote starvation-induced tRNA nuclear accumulation. PMID:21398402

  1. Cleavage of tRNA within the mature tRNA sequence by the catalytic RNA of RNase P: implication for the formation of the primer tRNA fragment for reverse transcription in copia retrovirus-like particles.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Sasaki, N; Ando-Yamagami, Y

    1990-01-01

    The retrovirus-like particles of Drosophila are intermediates of retrotransposition of the transposable element copia. In these particles, a 39-nucleotide-long fragment from the 5' region of Drosophila initiator methionine tRNA (tRNA(iMet) is used as the primer for copia minus-strand reverse transcription. To function as primer for this reverse transcription, the Drosophila tRNA(iMet) must be cleaved in vivo at the site between nucleotides 39 and 40. When a synthetic Drosophila tRNA(iMet) precursor was incubated with M1RNA, the catalytic RNA of Escherichia coli RNase P, other cleavages within the mature tRNA sequence were detected in addition to the efficient removal of the 5' leader sequence of this tRNA precursor. One of these cleavage sites is between nucleotides 39 and 40 of Drosophila tRNA(iMet). Based on this result, we propose a model for formation of the primer tRNA fragment for reverse transcription in copia retrovirus-like particles. Images PMID:1700426

  2. Peculiarities of interaction of porphyrins with tRNA at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Dalyan, Y; Vardanyan, I; Chavushyan, A; Balayan, G

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of meso-tetra-(4N-oxyethylpyridyl)porphyrin (TOEPyP4) and its Zn(II)-, Cu(II)-, Mn(III)-derivatives with tRNA from E.Coli at low ionic strength (micro=0.02M) was studied using UV/Vis spectrophotometry and Circular Dichroism (CD) methods. An unusual Induced Circular Dichroism (ICD) spectra profile of the ZnTOEPyP4-tRNA complex is found. It is demonstrated that ZnTOEPyP4 is ordered in a stack, not only on helical sites, but also on loops of a hairpin form of tRNA. TOEPyP4 and CuTOEPyP4 are able to intercalate in the helical sites of this form of tRNA. MnTOEPyP4 interacts with tRNA via external non-ordered mechanism. It is established that all porphyrins are bound with tRNA more strongly than with DNA.

  3. tRNA fluorescent labeling at 3' end inducing an aminoacyl-tRNA-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Quagliuolo, L; Iorio, E L; Giovane, A

    1993-04-01

    A fluorescent tRNA derivative labeled at 3'-O position of the ultimate adenosine residue by reaction, under mild conditions, of tRNA with isatoic anhydride [3,1-benzoxazine-2,4(1H)-dione] was obtained. The labeling selectivity was determined by several criteria: digestion with RNase, followed by HPLC of the digest, produces only one labeled nucleoside, identified as 3'-O-anthraniloyladenosine; the ratio of the absorbance at 260 nm to 332 nm also suggests a 1:1 molar ratio between the nucleic acid and the fluorophore; finally, the incapacity of the labeled tRNA to be charged by the specific aminoacyltransferase further demonstrates the engagement of the 3'-O position. Although the 3'-O-anthraniloyl-labeled tRNA does not seem to be functionally active, as far as the aminoacyl charging activity is concerned, surprisingly we found that it is able to form the ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP with an affinity consistently higher than uncharged tRNA. From fluorescence anisotropy measurements the ternary complex dissociation constant was estimated as 73 nM for Escherichia coli and 140 nM for yeast anthraniloyl-tRNA(Phe). These results may be interpreted in terms of the particular structure of the anthraniloyl group that makes the labeled tRNA similar to an aminoacyl-tRNA.

  4. tRNA thiolation links translation to stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Damon, Jadyn R; Pincus, David; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-01-15

    Although tRNA modifications have been well catalogued, the precise functions of many modifications and their roles in mediating gene expression are still being elucidated. Whereas tRNA modifications were long assumed to be constitutive, it is now apparent that the modification status of tRNAs changes in response to different environmental conditions. The URM1 pathway is required for thiolation of the cytoplasmic tRNAs tGlu(UUC), tGln(UUG), and tLys(UUU) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that URM1 pathway mutants have impaired translation, which results in increased basal activation of the Hsf1-mediated heat shock response; we also find that tRNA thiolation levels in wild-type cells decrease when cells are grown at elevated temperature. We show that defects in tRNA thiolation can be conditionally advantageous, conferring resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress. URM1 pathway proteins are unstable and hence are more sensitive to changes in the translational capacity of cells, which is decreased in cells experiencing stresses. We propose a model in which a stress-induced decrease in translation results in decreased levels of URM1 pathway components, which results in decreased tRNA thiolation levels, which further serves to decrease translation. This mechanism ensures that tRNA thiolation and translation are tightly coupled and coregulated according to need.

  5. Nuclear pore proteins are involved in the biogenesis of functional tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Simos, G; Tekotte, H; Grosjean, H; Segref, A; Sharma, K; Tollervey, D; Hurt, E C

    1996-01-01

    Los1p and Pus1p, which are involved in tRNA biogenesis, were found in a genetic screen for components interacting with the nuclear pore protein Nsp1p. LOS1, PUS1 and NSP1 interact functionally, since the combination of mutations in the three genes causes synthetic lethality. Pus1p is an intranuclear protein which exhibits a nucleotide-specific and intron-dependent tRNA pseudouridine synthase activity. Los1p was shown previously to be required for efficient pre-tRNA splicing; we report here that Los1p localizes to the nuclear pores and is linked functionally to several components of the tRNA biogenesis machinery including Pus1p and Tfc4p. When the formation of functional tRNA was analyzed by an in vivo assay, the los1(-) pus1(-) double mutant, as well as several thermosensitive nucleoporin mutants including nsp1, nup116, nup133 and nup85, exhibited loss of suppressor tRNA activity even at permissive temperatures. These data suggest that nuclear pore proteins are required for the biogenesis of functional tRNA. Images PMID:8641292

  6. Exportin-5-mediated nuclear export of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A and tRNA.

    PubMed

    Calado, Angelo; Treichel, Nathalie; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kutay, Ulrike

    2002-11-15

    Transport of proteins and RNA into and out of the cell nucleus is mediated largely by a family of RanGTP-binding transport receptors. Export receptors (exportins) need to bind RanGTP for efficient loading of their export cargo. We have identified eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and tRNA as RanGTP-dependent binding partners of exportin-5 (Exp5). Exp5 stimulates nuclear export of eEF1A when microinjected into the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Surprisingly, the interaction between eEF1A and Exp5 is dependent on tRNA that can interact directly with Exp5 and, if aminoacylated, recruits eEF1A into the export complex. These data suggested to us that Exp5 might support tRNA export. Indeed, not only the canonical tRNA export receptor, exportin-t, but also Exp5 can drive nuclear export of tRNA. Taken together, we show that there exists an alternative tRNA export pathway which can be exploited to keep eEF1A out of the cell nucleus.

  7. A newly discovered tRNA(1Asp) gene (aspV) of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T; Nagasawa, T; Takano, K; Sekiguchi, M

    1987-02-01

    We report a new tRNA(1Asp) gene near the dnaQ gene, which is located at 5 min on the Escherichia coli linkage map. We named it aspV. The sequence corresponding to the mature tRNA is identical with that of the two previously identified tRNA(1Asp) genes (aspT and aspU), but there is no homology in the sequences of their 3'- and 5'-flanking regions.

  8. Mode of action of RNase BN/RNase Z on tRNA precursors: RNase BN does not remove the CCA sequence from tRNA.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Tanmay; Deutscher, Murray P

    2010-07-23

    RNase BN, the Escherichia coli homolog of RNase Z, was previously shown to act as both a distributive exoribonuclease and an endoribonuclease on model RNA substrates and to be inhibited by the presence of a 3'-terminal CCA sequence. Here, we examined the mode of action of RNase BN on bacteriophage and bacterial tRNA precursors, particularly in light of a recent report suggesting that RNase BN removes CCA sequences (Takaku, H., and Nashimoto, M. (2008) Genes Cells 13, 1087-1097). We show that purified RNase BN can process both CCA-less and CCA-containing tRNA precursors. On CCA-less precursors, RNase BN cleaved endonucleolytically after the discriminator nucleotide to allow subsequent CCA addition. On CCA-containing precursors, RNase BN acted as either an exoribonuclease or endoribonuclease depending on the nature of the added divalent cation. Addition of Co(2+) resulted in higher activity and predominantly exoribonucleolytic activity, whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), RNase BN was primarily an endoribonuclease. In no case was any evidence obtained for removal of the CCA sequence. Certain tRNA precursors were extremely poor substrates under any conditions tested. These findings provide important information on the ability of RNase BN to process tRNA precursors and help explain the known physiological properties of this enzyme. In addition, they call into question the removal of CCA sequences by RNase BN.

  9. [Small-angle x-ray and sedimentation studies on alpha-haemocyanin H. pomatia (halve molecules) in glycerol and sucrose solutions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Pilz, I; Witters, R; Lontie, R

    1976-01-01

    The alpha-haemocyanin molecules of Helix pomatia were decomposed into halves and studied in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. The following parameters of the molecule could be obtained: radius of gyration, volume, molecular weight, overall shape and dimensions of the molecule. With small-angle X-ray scattering fluctuations of the electron density within the protein cause parasitic scattering at larger angles. According to Stuhrmann and Kirste it is possible to eliminate it mathematically by varying the electron density of the buffer. For this purpose different quantities of glycerol respectively saccharose were added to the solvent to study the scattering of alpha-haemocyanin halves in solvents of varied electron density. The change of the isopotential specific volume of haemocyanin and the strong increase of the statistical errors of its scattering by decreasing of the excess scattering of solution over solvent per unit volume did not allow an application of the method of Stuhrmann and Kirste. The data obtained for alpha-haemocanin halves in different solvents are given. Besides also the sedimentation of the alpha-haemocyanin halves were studied in solutions containing varied amounts of glycerol and saccharose. An attempt was made to calculate the change of the partial specific volume of haemocyanin by adding glycerol or saccharose.

  10. A glycolytic enzyme, enolase, is recruited as a cofactor of tRNA targeting toward mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Entelis, Nina; Brandina, Irina; Kamenski, Piotr; Krasheninnikov, Igor A.; Martin, Robert P.; Tarassov, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    In many organisms, mitochondria import nuclear DNA-encoded small RNAs. In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one out of two cytoplasmic isoacceptor tRNAsLys is partially addressed into the organelle. Mitochondrial targeting of this tRNA was shown to depend on interaction with the precursor of mitochondrial lysyl–tRNA synthetase, preMsk1p. However, preMsk1p alone was unable to direct tRNA targeting, suggesting the existence of additional protein factor(s). Here, we identify the glycolytic enzyme, enolase, as such a factor. We demonstrate that recombinant enolase and preMSK1p are sufficient to direct tRNA import in vitro and that depletion of enolase inhibits tRNA import in vivo. Enzymatic and tRNA targeting functions of enolase appear to be independent. Three newly characterized properties of the enolase can be related to its novel function: (1) specific affinity to the imported tRNA, (2) the ability to facilitate formation of the complex between preMsk1p and the imported tRNA, and (3) partial targeting toward the mitochondrial outer membrane. We propose a model suggesting that the cell exploits mitochondrial targeting of the enolase in order to address the tRNA toward peri-mitochondrially synthesized preMsk1p. Our results indicate an alternative molecular chaperone function of glycolytic enzyme enolase in tRNA mitochondrial targeting. PMID:16738406

  11. Synthesis and crystal structure of a layered silicate HUS-1 with a halved sodalite-cage topology.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takuji; Oumi, Yasunori; Honda, Koutaro; Sano, Tsuneji; Momma, Koichi; Izumi, Fujio

    2011-03-21

    A new layered silicate, HUS-1, was synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis using decomposed FAU- and *BEA-type zeolites as nanosized silica parts. Structural analyses by X-ray powder diffractometry and solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy revealed that HUS-1 has a layered structure containing a silicate layer per unit cell along a stacking direction. Its framework topology is similar to that of SOD-type zeolites and consists of a halved sodalite cage, which includes four- and six-membered Si rings. Structure refinement by the Rietveld method showed that tetramethylammonium (TMA) ions used as a structure-directing agent (SDA) were incorporated into the interlayer. The four methyl groups of the TMA molecule were located orderly in a hemispherical cage in the silicate layer, which suggests restraint of molecular motion. The interlayer distance is estimated at about 0.15 nm, which is unusually short in comparison with that in other layered silicates (e.g., β-HLS or RUB-15) with similar framework topologies. The presence of hydrogen bonding between adjacent terminal O atoms was clearly revealed by the (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy and by electron-density distribution obtained by the maximum entropy method.

  12. A problem halved? *

    PubMed Central

    Carne, Stuart

    1982-01-01

    In this paper I shall trace the history of the development of the referral system in Great Britain and comment on the role of the second opinion as it affects the three parties concerned: the patient, the specialist and the general practitioner. Imagesp10-a

  13. Piecemeal Buildup of the Genetic Code, Ribosomes, and Genomes from Primordial tRNA Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Derek; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The origin of biomolecular machinery likely centered around an ancient and central molecule capable of interacting with emergent macromolecular complexity. tRNA is the oldest and most central nucleic acid molecule of the cell. Its co-evolutionary interactions with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase protein enzymes define the specificities of the genetic code and those with the ribosome their accurate biosynthetic interpretation. Phylogenetic approaches that focus on molecular structure allow reconstruction of evolutionary timelines that describe the history of RNA and protein structural domains. Here we review phylogenomic analyses that reconstruct the early history of the synthetase enzymes and the ribosome, their interactions with RNA, and the inception of amino acid charging and codon specificities in tRNA that are responsible for the genetic code. We also trace the age of domains and tRNA onto ancient tRNA homologies that were recently identified in rRNA. Our findings reveal a timeline of recruitment of tRNA building blocks for the formation of a functional ribosome, which holds both the biocatalytic functions of protein biosynthesis and the ability to store genetic memory in primordial RNA genomic templates. PMID:27918435

  14. Elongator function in tRNA wobble uridine modification is conserved between yeast and plants

    PubMed Central

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Jablonowski, Daniel; Wrackmeyer, Uta; Tschitschmann, Susan; Sondermann, David; Jäger, Gunilla; Gong, Zhizhong; Byström, Anders S; Schaffrath, Raffael; Breunig, Karin D

    2010-01-01

    Based on studies in yeast and mammalian cells the Elongator complex has been implicated in functions as diverse as histone acetylation, polarized protein trafficking and tRNA modification. Here we show that Arabidopsis mutants lacking the Elongator subunit AtELP3/ELO3 have a defect in tRNA wobble uridine modification. Moreover, we demonstrate that yeast elp3 and elp1 mutants expressing the respective Arabidopsis Elongator homologues AtELP3/ELO3 and AtELP1/ELO2 assemble integer Elongator complexes indicating a high degree of structural conservation. Surprisingly, in vivo complementation studies based on Elongator-dependent tRNA nonsense suppression and zymocin tRNase toxin assays indicated that while AtELP1 rescued defects of a yeast elp1 mutant, the most conserved Elongator gene AtELP3, failed to complement an elp3 mutant. This lack of complementation is due to incompatibility with yeast ELP1 as coexpression of both plant genes in an elp1 elp3 yeast mutant restored Elongator's tRNA modification function in vivo. Similarly, AtELP1, not ScELP1 also supported partial complementation by yeast–plant Elp3 hybrids suggesting that AtElp1 has less stringent sequence requirements for Elp3 than ScElp1. We conclude that yeast and plant Elongator share tRNA modification roles and propose that this function might be conserved in Elongator from all eukaryotic kingdoms of life. PMID:20398216

  15. Monitoring mis-acylated tRNA suppression efficiency in mammalian cells via EGFP fluorescence recovery.

    PubMed

    Ilegems, Erwin; Pick, Horst M; Vogel, Horst

    2002-12-01

    A reporter assay was developed to detect and quantify nonsense codon suppression by chemically aminoacylated tRNAs in mammalian cells. It is based on the cellular expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter for the site-specific amino acid incorporation in its sequence using an orthogonal suppressor tRNA derived from Escherichia coli. Suppression of an engineered amber codon at position 64 in the EGFP run-off transcript could be achieved by the incorporation of a leucine via an in vitro aminoacylated suppressor tRNA. Microinjection of defined amounts of mutagenized EGFP mRNA and suppressor tRNA into individual cells allowed us to accurately determine suppression efficiencies by measuring the EGFP fluorescence intensity in individual cells using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Control experiments showed the absence of natural suppression or aminoacylation of the synthetic tRNA by endogenous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. This reporter assay opens the way for the optimization of essential experimental parameters for expanding the scope of the suppressor tRNA technology to different cell types.

  16. Determinants of tRNA Recognition by the Radical SAM Enzyme RlmN

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Christina M.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    RlmN, a bacterial radical SAM methylating enzyme, has the unusual ability to modify two distinct types of RNA: 23S rRNA and tRNA. In rRNA, RlmN installs a methyl group at the C2 position of A2503 of 23S rRNA, while in tRNA the modification occurs at nucleotide A37, immediately adjacent to the anticodon triplet. Intriguingly, only a subset of tRNAs that contain an adenosine at position 37 are substrates for RlmN, suggesting that the enzyme carefully probes the highly conserved tRNA fold and sequence features to identify its targets. Over the past several years, multiple studies have addressed rRNA modification by RlmN, while relatively few investigations have focused on the ability of this enzyme to modify tRNAs. In this study, we utilized in vitro transcribed tRNAs as model substrates to interrogate RNA recognition by RlmN. Using chimeras and point mutations, we probed how the structure and sequence of RNA influences methylation, identifying position 38 of tRNAs as a critical determinant of substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that, analogous to previous mechanistic studies with fragments of 23S rRNA, tRNA methylation requirements are consistent with radical SAM reactivity. Together, our findings provide detailed insight into tRNA recognition by a radical SAM methylating enzyme. PMID:27902775

  17. Methylation of tRNA by normal mouse liver and Erhlich ascites cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Sitz, T.O.

    1986-05-01

    When Erhlich ascites tumor and normal mouse liver extracts were incubated with (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)-S-adenosylmethionine and E. coli tRNA, the tumor extracts had a ten-fold higher methyltransferase activity than mouse liver extracts. However, only a two-fold higher methyltransferase activity was observed when methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA was used as a substrate. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of alkaline hydrolysates of methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA (tRNA isolated from mice treated with ethionine) showed 70% of the /sup 3/H-methyl groups in the mononucleotide peak and 30% in alkaline stable di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks demonstrating methylation of both the base and ribose moieties. Perchloric acid digest of material isolated from the di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks confirm that the /sup 3/H-methyl groups are on the ribose moieties. In hydrolysates of E. coli tRNA /sup 3/H-methyl groups appeared in only the mononucleotide peak, i.e. only base methylation. These data, from Erhlich ascites cells, suggest that ribose methyltransferases may have greater RNA substrate specificity than the base methyltransferases and may act processively to produce alkaline stable oligonucleotides.

  18. Locating the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin with tRNA.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Bekale, L; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-09-01

    We located the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin on tRNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various polyphenol contents. FTIR, UV-visible, CD spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine polyphenol binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of polyphenol complexation on tRNA conformation and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that polyphenols bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs through hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of K(res-tRNA)=8.95(±0.80)×10(3) M(-1), K(gen-tRNA)=3.07(±0.5)×10(3) M(-1) and K(cur-tRNA)=1.55(±0.3)×10(4) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in polyphenol-tRNA adduct formation with free binding energy of -4.43 for resveratrol, -4.26 kcal/mol for genistein and -4.84 kcal/mol for curcumin, indicating that the interaction process is spontaneous at room temperature. While tRNA remains in A-family structure, major biopolymer aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polyphenol contents.

  19. tRNA integrity is a prerequisite for rapid CCA addition: implication for quality control.

    PubMed

    Dupasquier, Marcel; Kim, Sangbumn; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2008-06-06

    CCA addition to the 3' end is an essential step in tRNA maturation. High-resolution crystal structures of the CCA enzymes reveal primary enzyme contact with the tRNA minihelix domain, consisting of the acceptor stem and T stem-loop. RNA and DNA minihelices are efficient substrates for CCA addition in steady-state kinetics. However, in contrast to structural models and steady-state experiments, we show here by single-turnover kinetics that minihelices are insufficient substrates for the Escherichia coli CCA enzyme and that only the full-length tRNA is kinetically competent. Even a nick in the full-length tRNA backbone in the T loop, or as far away from the minihelix domain as in the anticodon loop, prevents efficient CCA addition. These results suggest a kinetic quality control provided by the CCA enzyme to inspect the integrity of the tRNA molecule and to discriminate against nicked or damaged species from further maturation.

  20. The CCA-adding enzyme: A central scrutinizer in tRNA quality control.

    PubMed

    Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2015-09-01

    tRNA nucleotidyltransferase adds the invariant CCA-terminus to the tRNA 3'-end, a central step in tRNA maturation. This CCA-adding enzyme is a specialized RNA polymerase that synthesizes the CCA sequence at high fidelity in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an additional function of this enzyme was identified, where it generates a specific degradation tag on structurally unstable tRNAs. This tag consists of an additional repeat of the CCA triplet, leading to a 3'-terminal CCACCA sequence. In order to explain how the enzyme catalyzes this extended polymerization reaction, Kuhn et al. solved a series of co-crystal structures of the CCA-adding enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus in complex with different tRNA substrates. They show that the enzyme forces a bound unstable tRNA to refold the acceptor stem for a second round of CCA-addition, while stable transcripts are robust enough to resist this isomerization. In this review, we discuss how the CCA-adding enzyme uses a simple yet very elegant way to scrutinize its substrates for sufficient structural stability and, consequently, functionality.

  1. The tRNA recognition mechanism of the minimalist SPOUT methyltransferase, TrmL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Zhou, Mi; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other transfer RNAs (tRNA)-modifying enzymes from the SPOUT methyltransferase superfamily, the tRNA (Um34/Cm34) methyltransferase TrmL lacks the usual extension domain for tRNA binding and consists only of a SPOUT domain. Both the catalytic and tRNA recognition mechanisms of this enzyme remain elusive. By using tRNAs purified from an Escherichia coli strain with the TrmL gene deleted, we found that TrmL can independently catalyze the methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to and isoacceptors without the involvement of other tRNA-binding proteins. We have solved the crystal structures of TrmL in apo form and in complex with S-adenosyl-homocysteine and identified the cofactor binding site and a possible active site. Methyltransferase activity and tRNA-binding affinity of TrmL mutants were measured to identify residues important for tRNA binding of TrmL. Our results suggest that TrmL functions as a homodimer by using the conserved C-terminal half of the SPOUT domain for catalysis, whereas residues from the less-conserved N-terminal half of the other subunit participate in tRNA recognition. PMID:23804755

  2. T box RNA decodes both the information content and geometry of tRNA to affect gene expression.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jason C; Chen, Yujie; Grundy, Frank J; Henkin, Tina M; Pollack, Lois; Ke, Ailong

    2013-04-30

    The T box leader sequence is an RNA element that controls gene expression by binding directly to a specific tRNA and sensing its aminoacylation state. This interaction controls expression of amino acid-related genes in a negative feedback loop. The T box RNA structure is highly conserved, but its tRNA binding mechanism is only partially understood. Known sequence elements are the specifier sequence, which recognizes the tRNA anticodon, and the antiterminator bulge, which base pairs with the tRNA acceptor end. Here, we reveal the crucial function of the highly conserved stem I distal region in tRNA recognition and report its 2.65-Å crystal structure. The apex of this region contains an intricately woven loop-loop interaction between two conserved motifs, the Adenine-guanine (AG) bulge and the distal loop. This loop-loop structure presents a base triple on its surface that is optimally positioned for base-stacking interactions. Mutagenesis, cross-linking, and small-angle X-ray scattering data demonstrate that the apical base triple serves as a binding platform to dock the tRNA D- and T-loops. Strikingly, the binding platform strongly resembles the D- and T-loop binding elements from RNase P and the ribosome exit site, suggesting that this loop-loop structure may represent a widespread tRNA recognition platform. We propose a two-checkpoint molecular ruler model for tRNA decoding in which the information content of tRNA is first examined through specifier sequence-anticodon interaction, and the length of the tRNA anticodon arm is then measured by the distal loop-loop platform. When both conditions are met, tRNA is secured, and its aminoacylation state is sensed.

  3. Structural analysis of the 5 prime flanking region of the. beta. -globin gene in African sickle cell anemia patients: Further evidence for three origins of the sickle cell mutation in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Chebloune, Y.; Pagnier, J.; Trabuchet, G.; Faure, C.; Verdier, G.; Labie, D.; Nigon, V. )

    1988-06-01

    Haplotype analysis of the {beta}-globin gene cluster shows two regions of DNA characterized by nonrandom association of restriction site polymorphisms. These regions are separated by a variable segment containing the repeated sequences (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y}, which might be involved in recombinational events. Studies of haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in Africa provide strong argument for three origins of the mutation: Benin, Senegal, and the Central African Republic. The structure of the variable segment in the three African populations was studied by S1 nuclease mapping of genomic DNA, which allows a comparison of several samples. A 1080-base-pair DNA segment was sequenced for one sample from each population. S1 nuclease mapping confirmed the homogeneity of each population with regard to both (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y} repeats. The authors found three additional structures for (AT){sub x}T{sub y} correlating with the geographic origin of the patients. Ten other nucleotide positions, 5{prime} and 3{prime} to the (AT){sub x}T{sub y} copies, were found to be variable when compared to homologous sequences from human and monkey DNAs. These results allow us to propose an evolutionary scheme for the polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-globin gene. The results strongly support the hypothesis of three origins for the sickle mutation in Africa.

  4. Systematic screening for mutations in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the human dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Stoeber, G.

    1996-07-26

    A possible dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. In the present study we systematically searched for the presence of mutations in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene. This region has previously been shown to contain a functional promoter. We investigated 119 unrelated individuals (including 36 schizophrenic patients, 38 bipolar affective patients, and 45 healthy controls) using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA). Eleven overlapping PCR fragments covered 2,189 bp of DNA sequence. We identified six single base substitutions: -2218T/C, -2102C/A, -2030T/C, -1992G/A, -1251G/C, and -800T/C. None of the mutations was found to be located in regions which have important influence on the level of transcriptional activity. Allele frequencies were similar in patients and controls, indicating that genetic variation in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the DRD1 gene is unlikely to play a frequent, major role in the genetic predisposition to either schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Saturation of recognition elements blocks evolution of new tRNA identities.

    PubMed

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Bello, Carla; Dans, Pablo D; Torres, Adrian Gabriel; Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Orozco, Modesto; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the principles that led to the current complexity of the genetic code is a central question in evolution. Expansion of the genetic code required the selection of new transfer RNAs (tRNAs) with specific recognition signals that allowed them to be matured, modified, aminoacylated, and processed by the ribosome without compromising the fidelity or efficiency of protein synthesis. We show that saturation of recognition signals blocks the emergence of new tRNA identities and that the rate of nucleotide substitutions in tRNAs is higher in species with fewer tRNA genes. We propose that the growth of the genetic code stalled because a limit was reached in the number of identity elements that can be effectively used in the tRNA structure.

  6. A mitochondrial tRNA aspartate mutation causing isolated mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Goemans, Nathalie; Van Coster, Rudy; Givron, Patrice; Reybrouck, Tony; Sciot, Raf; Meulemans, Ann; Smet, Joel; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2005-08-30

    Several mutations in mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) genes can cause mitochondrial myopathy. We describe a young girl who presented with pronounced exercise intolerance. The anaerobic threshold and the maximal oxygen consumption were decreased. She had decreased complex I and IV enzyme activity and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. An A to G transition at nucleotide position 7526 in tRNA Aspartate (tRNA(Asp)) gene was heteroplasmic in several of the patient's tissues. We were unable to detect the mutation in muscle tissue from the patient's mother. This case adds a new genetic etiology for mitochondrial myopathy. It also illustrates for patients with combined deficiency of the complex I and IV enzyme activity the value of sequencing in the affected tissue muscle, and not only in blood, all mitochondrial tRNA genes including those not commonly affected, such as in this case mt tRNA(Asp).

  7. E. coli initiator tRNA analogs with different nucleotides in the discriminator base position.

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, H; Imai, M; Ohtsuka, E; Ikehara, M; Söll, D

    1982-01-01

    The effect of base changes at the fourth position from the 3'-terminus of Escherichia coli initiator tRNAMet has been studied to test the 'discriminator hypothesis' which proposed that the nucleotide in this position might have a role in the specificity of the aminoacylation reaction. E. coli initiator tRNA lacking the 3'-terminal tetranucleotide was prepared by partial digestion with S1 nuclease. To construct tRNA analogs with different bases in the fourth position this truncated tRNA was joined by RNA ligase to each of four chemically synthesized 2',3'-ethoxy-methylidene tetranucleotides pACCA(em), pCCCA(em), pGCCA(em), and pUCCA(em). In vitro aminoacylation studies showed that all four molecules accepted methionine, albeit with different Vmax values. Images PMID:6294608

  8. Emerging roles of tRNA in adaptive translation, signalling dynamics and disease.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Sebastian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-02-01

    tRNAs, nexus molecules between mRNAs and proteins, have a central role in translation. Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity of tRNA biosynthesis, modification patterns, regulation and function. In this Review, we present emerging concepts regarding how tRNA abundance is dynamically regulated and how tRNAs (and their nucleolytic fragments) are centrally involved in stress signalling and adaptive translation, operating across a wide range of timescales. Mutations in tRNAs or in genes affecting tRNA biogenesis are also linked to complex human diseases with surprising heterogeneity in tissue vulnerability, and we highlight cell-specific aspects that modulate the disease penetrance of tRNA-based pathologies.

  9. Saturation of recognition elements blocks evolution of new tRNA identities

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Bello, Carla; Dans, Pablo D.; Torres, Adrian Gabriel; Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Orozco, Modesto; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the principles that led to the current complexity of the genetic code is a central question in evolution. Expansion of the genetic code required the selection of new transfer RNAs (tRNAs) with specific recognition signals that allowed them to be matured, modified, aminoacylated, and processed by the ribosome without compromising the fidelity or efficiency of protein synthesis. We show that saturation of recognition signals blocks the emergence of new tRNA identities and that the rate of nucleotide substitutions in tRNAs is higher in species with fewer tRNA genes. We propose that the growth of the genetic code stalled because a limit was reached in the number of identity elements that can be effectively used in the tRNA structure. PMID:27386510

  10. From Prebiotics to Probiotics: The Evolution and Functions of tRNA Modifications

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Katherine M.; Alfonzo, Juan D.

    2016-01-01

    All nucleic acids in cells are subject to post-transcriptional chemical modifications. These are catalyzed by a myriad of enzymes with exquisite specificity and that utilize an often-exotic array of chemical substrates. In no molecule are modifications more prevalent than in transfer RNAs. In the present document, we will attempt to take a chemical rollercoaster ride from prebiotic times to the present, with nucleoside modifications as key players and tRNA as the centerpiece that drove the evolution of biological systems to where we are today. These ideas will be put forth while touching on several examples of tRNA modification enzymes and their modus operandi in cells. In passing, we submit that the choice of tRNA is not a whimsical one but rather highlights its critical function as an essential invention for the evolution of protein enzymes. PMID:26985907

  11. Metazoan tRNA introns generate stable circular RNAs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhipeng; Filonov, Grigory S.; Noto, John J.; Schmidt, Casey A.; Hatkevich, Talia L.; Wen, Ying; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a class of abundant circular noncoding RNAs that are produced during metazoan tRNA splicing. These transcripts, termed tRNA intronic circular (tric)RNAs, are conserved features of animal transcriptomes. Biogenesis of tricRNAs requires anciently conserved tRNA sequence motifs and processing enzymes, and their expression is regulated in an age-dependent and tissue-specific manner. Furthermore, we exploited this biogenesis pathway to develop an in vivo expression system for generating “designer” circular RNAs in human cells. Reporter constructs expressing RNA aptamers such as Spinach and Broccoli can be used to follow the transcription and subcellular localization of tricRNAs in living cells. Owing to the superior stability of circular vs. linear RNA isoforms, this expression system has a wide range of potential applications, from basic research to pharmaceutical science. PMID:26194134

  12. In vivo regeneration of rat sciatic nerve in a double-halved stitch-less guide: a pilot-study.

    PubMed

    Merolli, A; Rocchi, L; Catalano, F; Planell, J; Engel, E; Martinez, E; Sbernardori, M C; Marceddu, S; Leali, P Tranquilli

    2009-01-01

    It is about 20 years that tubular nerve guides have been introduced into clinical practice as a reliable alternative to autograft, in gaps not-longer-than 20 mm, bringing the advantage of avoiding donor site sacrifice and morbidity. There are limitations in the application of tubular guides. First, tubular structure in itself makes surgical implantation difficult; second, stitch sutures required to secure the guide may represent a site of unfavorable fibroblastic reaction; third, maximum length and diameter of the guide correlate with the occurrence of a poorer central vascularization of regenerated nerve. We report on the in vivo testing of a new concept of nerve-guide (named NeuroBox) which is double-halved, not-degradable, rigid, and does not require any stitch to be held in place, employing acrylate glue instead. Five male Wistar rats had the new guide implanted in a 4-mm sciatic nerve defect; two guides incorporated a surface constituted of microtrenches aligned longitudinally. Further five rats had the 4-mm gap left without repair. Contralateral intact nerves were used as controls. After 2 months, nerve regeneration occurred in all animals treated by the NeuroBox; fine blood vessels were well represented. There was no regeneration in the un-treated animals. Even if the limited number of animals does not allow to draw definitive conclusions, some result can be highlighted: an easy surgical technique was associated with the box-shaped guide and acrylate glue was easily applied; an adequate intraneural vascularization was found concurrently with the regeneration of the nerve and no adverse fibroblastic proliferation was present.

  13. Rp-phosphorothioate modifications in RNase P RNA that interfere with tRNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, W D; Warnecke, J M; Erdmann, V A; Hartmann, R K

    1995-01-01

    We have used Rp-phosphorothioate modifications and a binding interference assay to analyse the role of phosphate oxygens in tRNA recognition by Escherichia coli ribonuclease P (RNase P) RNA. Total (100%) Rp-phosphorothioate modification at A, C or G positions of RNase P RNA strongly impaired tRNA binding and pre-tRNA processing, while effects were less pronounced at U positions. Partially modified E. coli RNase P RNAs were separated into tRNA binding and non-binding fractions by gel retardation. Rp-phosphorothioate modifications that interfered with tRNA binding were found 5' of nucleotides A67, G68, U69, C70, C71, G72, A130, A132, A248, A249, G300, A317, A330, A352, C353 and C354. Manganese rescue at positions U69, C70, A130 and A132 identified, for the first time, sites of direct metal ion coordination in RNase P RNA. Most sites of interference are at strongly conserved nucleotides and nine reside within a long-range base-pairing interaction present in all known RNase P RNAs. In contrast to RNase P RNA, 100% Rp-phosphorothioate substitutions in tRNA showed only moderate effects on binding to RNase P RNAs from E. coli, Bacillus subtilis and Chromatium vinosum, suggesting that pro-Rp phosphate oxygens of mature tRNA contribute relatively little to the formation of the tRNA-RNase P RNA complex. Images PMID:7540978

  14. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  15. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-03-12

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located.

  16. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located. Images PMID:6200830

  17. Mutation and Selection on the Wobble Nucleotide in tRNA Anticodons in Marine Bivalve Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Li, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Background Animal mitochondrial genomes typically encode one tRNA for each synonymous codon family, so that each tRNA anticodon essentially has to wobble to recognize two or four synonymous codons. Several factors have been hypothesized to determine the nucleotide at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon in mitochondrial genomes, such as the codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis, the wobble versatility hypothesis, the translation initiation and elongation conflict hypothesis, and the wobble cost hypothesis. Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed codon usage and tRNA anticodon wobble sites of 29 marine bivalve mitochondrial genomes to evaluate features of the wobble nucleotides in tRNA anticodons. The strand-specific mutation bias favors G and T on the H strand in all the 29 marine bivalve mitochondrial genomes. A bias favoring G and T is also visible in the third codon positions of protein-coding genes and the wobble sites of anticodons, rejecting that codon usage bias drives the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons or tRNA anticodon bias drives the evolution of codon usage. Almost all codon families (98.9%) from marine bivalve mitogenomes support the wobble versatility hypothesis. There are a few interesting exceptions involving tRNATrp with an anticodon CCA fixed in Pectinoida species, tRNASer with a GCU anticodon fixed in Mytiloida mitogenomes, and the uniform anticodon CAU of tRNAMet translating the AUR codon family. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that most of the nucleotides at the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in marine bivalve mitogenomes are determined by wobble versatility. Other factors such as the translation initiation and elongation conflict, and the cost of wobble translation may contribute to the determination of the wobble nucleotide in tRNA anticodons. The finding presented here provides valuable insights into the previous hypotheses of the wobble nucleotide in tRNA anticodons by adding some new evidence. PMID:21267462

  18. tRNA regulation of gene expression: Interactions of an mRNA 5′-UTR with a regulatory tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Audrey R.; Henkin, Tina M.; Agris, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    Many genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and other amino acid–related products in Gram-positive bacteria, including important pathogens, are regulated through interaction of unacylated tRNA with the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the mRNA. Each gene regulated by this mechanism responds specifically to the cognate tRNA, and specificity is determined by pairing of the anticodon of the tRNA with a codon sequence in the “Specifier Loop” of the 5′-UTR. For the 5′-UTR to function in gene regulation, the mRNA folding interactions must be sufficiently stable to present the codon sequence for productive binding to the anticodon of the matching tRNA. A model bimolecular system was developed in which the interaction between two half molecules (“Common” and “Specifier”) would reconstitute the Specifier Loop region of the 5′-UTR of the Bacillus subtilis glyQS gene, encoding GlyRS mRNA. Gel mobility shift analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy yielded experimental K ds of 27.6 ± 1.0 μM and 10.5 ± 0.7 μM, respectively, for complex formation between Common and Specifier half molecules. The reconstituted 5′-UTR of the glyQS mRNA bound the anticodon stem and loop of tRNAGly (ASLGlyGCC) specifically and with a significant affinity (K d = 20.2 ± 1.4 μM). Thus, the bimolecular 5′-UTR and ASLGlyGCC models mimic the RNA–RNA interaction required for T box gene regulation in vivo. PMID:16741230

  19. The Methyl Group of the N6-Methyl-N6-Threonylcarbamoyladenosine in tRNA of Escherichia coli Modestly Improves the Efficiency of the tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Qiang; Curran, James F.; Björk, Glenn R.

    1998-01-01

    tRNA species that read codons starting with adenosine (A) contain N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) derivatives adjacent to and 3′ of the anticodons from all organisms. In Escherichia coli there are 12 such tRNA species of which two (tRNAGGUThr1 and tRNAGGUThr3) have the t6A derivative N6-methyl-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (m6t6A37). We have isolated a mutant of E. coli that lacks the m6t6A37 in these two tRNAGGUThr species. These tRNA species in the mutant are likely to have t6A37 instead of m6t6A37. We show that the methyl group of m6t6A37 originates from S-adenosyl-l-methionine and that the gene (tsaA) which most likely encodes tRNA(m6t6A37)methyltransferase is located at min 4.6 on the E. coli chromosomal map. The growth rate of the cell, the polypeptide chain elongation rate, and the selection of Thr-tRNAGGUThr to the ribosomal A site programmed with either of the cognate codons ACC and ACU were the same for the tsaA1 mutant as for the congenic wild-type strain. The expression of the threonine operon is regulated by an attenuator which contains in its leader mRNA seven ACC codons that are read by these two m6t6A37-containing tRNAGGUThr species. We show that the tsaA1 mutation resulted in a twofold derepression of this operon, suggesting that the lack of the methyl group of m6t6A37 in tRNAGGUThr slightly reduces the efficiency of this tRNA to read cognate codon ACC. PMID:9537379

  20. Mutational Analysis of Mitochondrial tRNA Genes in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, ZF; Zheng, LC; Xie, DY; Yu, SS; Zhao, J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes have been found to be associated with various diseases including lung cancer. To understand the possible relationship between mtRNA mutations and lung cancer, we sequenced the 22 mt-tRNA genes from 200 lung cancer blood samples, as well as 100 healthy subjects. As a result, five mutations were identified including the tRNAAla T5655C, tRNAArg T10454C, tRNALeu(CUN) A12330G, tRNASer(UCN) T7505C and tRNAThr G15927A. These mutations were absent in the healthy subjects. These mutations and polymorphisms were localized at the highly conserved nucleotides of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs, which are critical for the tRNA steady state level and may result in failure in the tRNA metabolism. Moreover, through the application of the pathogenicity scoring system, we found that only the T10454C mutation should be classified as a “neutral polymorphism,” while the other mutations were regarded as “definitely pathogenic.” Taken together, our data indicate that tRNA genes are the hot-spots for pathogenic mutations associated with lung cancer. Our findings may provide valuable information for pathophysiology, management and genetic counseling of lung cancer. PMID:28289588

  1. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promotes cancer cell proliferation by augmenting tRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Ekta; Kumar, Pavanish; Liu, Chia Yi; Akıncılar, Semih Can; Raju, Anandhkumar; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Qiang, Yu; Li, Shang; Tan, Ern Yu; Hui, Kam M.; Loh, Yuin Han

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) reconstitutes telomerase activity in the majority of human cancers. Here, we found that ectopic TERT expression increases cell proliferation, while acute reductions in TERT levels lead to a dramatic loss of proliferation without any change in telomere length, suggesting that the effects of TERT could be telomere independent. We observed that TERT determines the growth rate of cancer cells by directly regulating global protein synthesis independently of its catalytic activity. Genome-wide TERT binding across 5 cancer cell lines and 2 embryonic stem cell lines revealed that endogenous TERT, driven by mutant promoters or oncogenes, directly associates with the RNA polymerase III (pol III) subunit RPC32 and enhances its recruitment to chromatin, resulting in increased RNA pol III occupancy and tRNA expression in cancers. TERT-deficient mice displayed marked delays in polyomavirus middle T oncogene–induced (PyMT-induced) mammary tumorigenesis, increased survival, and reductions in tRNA levels. Ectopic expression of either RPC32 or TERT restored tRNA levels and proliferation defects in TERT-depleted cells. Finally, we determined that levels of TERT and tRNA correlated in breast and liver cancer samples. Together, these data suggest the existence of a unifying mechanism by which TERT enhances translation in cells to regulate cancer cell proliferation. PMID:27643433

  2. Evolution of a tRNA operon in gamma purple bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1989-01-01

    Genomic DNA from eubacteria belonging to the gamma-3 subdivision of purple bacteria, as classified by Woese (C.R. Woese, Microbiol. Rev. 51:221-271, 1987), were probed with the argT operon of Escherichia coli encoding 5'-tRNA(Arg)-tRNA(His)-tRNA(Leu)-tRNA(Pro)-3'. The homologous operon from Vibrio harveyi was isolated and sequenced. Comparison of the five available sequences of this tRNA cluster from members of the families Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae led to the conclusion that variations in different versions of this operon arose not only by point mutations but also by duplication and addition-deletion of entire tRNA genes. This data base permitted the formulation of a proposal dealing with the evolutionary history of this operon and suggested that DNA regions containing tRNA genes are active centers (hot spots) of recombination. Finally, since the operon from V. harveyi was not highly repetitive and did not contain tRNA pseudogenes, as in the Photobacterium phosphoreum operon, hybridization of genomic DNAs from different photobacterial strains with probes specific for the repeated pseudogene element was performed. We conclude that the phylogenetic distribution of the repetitive DNA is restricted to strains of P. phosphoreum. Images PMID:2687235

  3. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  4. A correlation between N2-dimethylguanosine presence and alternate tRNA conformers.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S; Cedergren, R

    1995-11-01

    Even though the evolutionary conservation of the cloverleaf model is strongly suggestive of powerful constraints on the secondary structure of functional tRNAs, some mitochondrial tRNAs cannot be folded into this form. From the optimal base pairing pattern of these recalcitrant tRNAs, structural correlations between the length of the anticodon stem and the lengths of connector regions between the two helical domains, formed by the coaxial stacking of the anticodon and D-stems and the acceptor and T-stems, have been derived and used to scan the tRNA and tRNA gene database. We show here that some cytosolic tRNA gene sequences that are compatible with the cloverleaf model can also be folded into patterns proposed for the unusual mitochondrial tRNAs. Furthermore, the ability to be folded into these atypical structures correlates in the mature RNA sequences with the presence of dimethylguanosine, whose role may be to prevent the unusual mitochondrial tRNA pattern folding.

  5. Biochemical and Structures Studies of tRNA Modificaton and Repair Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Chun

    2009-01-01

    RNA hypermodifications near the anticodon of tRNA are fundamental for the efficiency and fidelity of protein synthesis. Dimethylallyltransferase (DMATase) catalyzes transfer of a dimethylallyl moiety from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate to N6 of A37 in certain tRNAs. We first determined the crystal structures of "Pseudomonas aeruginosa" DMATase.…

  6. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  7. A yeast glutamine tRNA signals nitrogen status for regulation of dimorphic growth and sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L. E.; Rowley, N.; Dawes, I. W.; Johnston, G. C.; Singer, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Dimorphic growth of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen supply. On a preferred nitrogen source diploid cells grow as ellipsoidal cells by using a bipolar pattern of budding, whereas on a poor nitrogen source a unipolar pattern of budding is adopted, resulting in extended pseudohyphal chains of filamentous cells. Here we report that the quality of the nitrogen source is signaled by the glutamine tRNA isoform with a 5′-CUG anticodon (tRNACUG). Mutations that alter this tRNA impair assessment of the nitrogen supply without measurably affecting protein synthesis, so that mutant cells display pseudohyphal growth even on a preferred nitrogen source. The nitrogen status for other nitrogen-responsive processes such as catabolic gene expression and sporulation also is signaled by this tRNA: mutant cells inappropriately induce the nitrogen-repressed gene CAR1 and undergo precocious sporulation in nitrogen-rich media. Therefore, in addition to its role in mRNA translation, this tRNA also transduces nitrogen signals that regulate development. PMID:9671727

  8. Tissue- and Time-Specific Expression of Otherwise Identical tRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Adir, Idan; Dahan, Orna; Broday, Limor; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rechavi, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage bias affects protein translation because tRNAs that recognize synonymous codons differ in their abundance. Although the current dogma states that tRNA expression is exclusively regulated by intrinsic control elements (A- and B-box sequences), we revealed, using a reporter that monitors the levels of individual tRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, that eight tryptophan tRNA genes, 100% identical in sequence, are expressed in different tissues and change their expression dynamically. Furthermore, the expression levels of the sup-7 tRNA gene at day 6 were found to predict the animal’s lifespan. We discovered that the expression of tRNAs that reside within introns of protein-coding genes is affected by the host gene’s promoter. Pairing between specific Pol II genes and the tRNAs that are contained in their introns is most likely adaptive, since a genome-wide analysis revealed that the presence of specific intronic tRNAs within specific orthologous genes is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. PMID:27560950

  9. Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Deficiency Promotes Angiogenesis via the Unfolded Protein Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, Daniel; Davis, Andrew E.; Lo, Brigid D.; Miller, Mayumi F.; Paukstelis, Paul J.; Swift, Matthew R.; Pham, Van N.; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Bell, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna M.; Kamei, Makoto; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Understanding the mechanisms regulating normal and pathologic angiogenesis is of great scientific and clinical interest. In this report, we show that mutations in two different aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, threonyl tRNA synthetase (tarsy58) or isoleucyl tRNA synthetase (iarsy68), lead to similar increased branching angiogenesis in developing zebrafish. Approach and Results The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway is activated by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase deficiencies, and we show that UPR genes atf4, atf6, and xbp1, as well as the key pro-angiogenic ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (vegfaa), are all up-regulated in tarsy58 and iarsy68 mutants. Finally, we show that the PERK-ATF4 arm of the UPR pathway is necessary for both the elevated vegfaa levels and increased angiogenesis observed in tarsy58 mutants. Conclusions Our results suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress acts as a pro-angiogenic signal via UPR pathway-dependent up-regulation of vegfaa. PMID:26821951

  10. N6-methyladenosine in mRNA disrupts tRNA selection and translation elongation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Junhong; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Demirci, Hasan; Chen, Jin; Petrov, Alexey; Prabhakar, Arjun; O'Leary, Seán E.; Dominissini, Dan; Rechavi, Gideon; Soltis, S. Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-01-01

    N6-methylation of adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant post-transcriptional modification within the coding region of mRNA, but its role during translation remains unknown. Here, we used bulk kinetic and single-molecule methods to probe the effect of m6A in mRNA decoding. Although m6A base pairs with uridine during decoding as shown by x-ray crystallographic analyses of Thermus thermophilus ribosomal complexes, our measurements employing an Escherichia coli translation system revealed that m6A modification of mRNA can act as a barrier to tRNA accommodation and translation elongation. The interaction between an m6A-modified codon and cognate tRNA echoes the interaction between a near-cognate codon and tRNA, as delay in tRNA accommodation depends on the position and context of m6A within codons and on the accuracy level of translation. Overall, our results demonstrate that chemical modification of mRNA can change translational dynamics. PMID:26751643

  11. Site-selective hydrolysis of tRNA by lanthanide metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nobuhiro ); Takeda, Naoya; Yashiro, Morio; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Komiyama, Makoto ); Shiiba, Tetsuro )

    1993-12-22

    tRNA[sup Phe] is site-selectively hydrolyzed by lanthanide metal complexes (Ce(III), Eu(III), La(III)) of hexaimine macrocyclic ligands. The selectivities of the complexes are much higher than those of the metal ions and are strongly dependent on the ligand structure. The tertiary structure of tRNA is essential for the site-selective scission.

  12. Co-evolution of tRNA 3′ trailer sequences with 3′ processing enzymes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHONGWEI; GONG, XIN; JOSHI, VEDANG H.; LI, MUXIN

    2005-01-01

    Maturation of the tRNA 3′ terminus is a complicated process in bacteria. Usually, it is initiated by an endonucleolytic cleavage carried out by RNase E and Z in different bacteria. In Escherichia coli, RNase E cleaves AU-rich sequences downstream of tRNA, producing processing intermediates with a few extra residues at the 3′ end; these are then removed by exoribonuclease trimming to generate the mature 3′ end. Here we show that essentially all E. coli tRNA precursors contain a potential RNase E cleavage site, the AU-rich sequence element (AUE), in the 3′ trailer. This suggests that RNase E cleavage and exonucleolytic trimming is a general pathway for tRNA maturation in this organism. Remarkably, the AUE immediately downstream of each tRNA is selectively conserved in bacteria having RNase E and tRNA-specific exoribonucleases, suggesting that this pathway for tRNA processing is also commonly used in these bacteria. Two types of RNase E-like proteins are identified in actinobacteria and the α-subdivision of proteobacteria. The tRNA 3′ proximal AUE is conserved in bacteria with only one type of E-like protein. Selective conservation of the AUE is usually not observed in bacteria without RNase E. These results demonstrate a novel example of co-evolution of RNA sequences with processing activities. PMID:15811923

  13. Different sequence signatures in the upstream regions of plant and animal tRNA genes shape distinct modes of regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, the transcription of tRNA genes is initiated by the concerted action of transcription factors IIIC (TFIIIC) and IIIB (TFIIIB) which direct the recruitment of polymerase III. While TFIIIC recognizes highly conserved, intragenic promoter elements, TFIIIB binds to the non-coding 5'-upstream regions of the tRNA genes. Using a systematic bioinformatic analysis of 11 multicellular eukaryotic genomes we identified a highly conserved TATA motif followed by a CAA-motif in the tRNA upstream regions of all plant genomes. Strikingly, the 5'-flanking tRNA regions of the animal genomes are highly heterogeneous and lack a common conserved sequence signature. Interestingly, in the animal genomes the tRNA species that read the same codon share conserved motifs in their upstream regions. Deep-sequencing analysis of 16 human tissues revealed multiple splicing variants of two of the TFIIIB subunits, Bdp1 and Brf1, with tissue-specific expression patterns. These multiple forms most likely modulate the TFIIIB-DNA interactions and explain the lack of a uniform signature motif in the tRNA upstream regions of animal genomes. The anticodon-dependent 5'-flanking motifs provide a possible mechanism for independent regulation of the tRNA transcription in various human tissues.

  14. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  15. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  16. Structural rules and conformational compensations in the tRNA L-form.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S; Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1997-02-21

    The mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNA) of five distinct, secondary structure types have been identified in the tRNA sequence compilation, and the three-dimensional modeling for representative sequences of these types has been carried out using a new criterion for the lengths of the helical domains and connector regions in a full-sized tRNA conformation. This criterion has been derived from the analysis of the known structures of cytosolic tRNAs and states that in the tRNA structure nucleotide 59 of the T-loop should stack onto Domain 1. To ensure this, Domain 1 must have 12 layers of stacked nucleotides, and in the case of a deletion of a base-pair in the T-stem, an additional 13th layer is required. Although a number of mitochondrial tRNAs harbored deficiencies in this criterion and, therefore, could not be modeled directly, this disability could be corrected and modeling accomplished by invoking structural compensations derived from one of two unusual aspects of these tRNAs. One class of these tRNAs contained an unpaired nucleotide in their anticodon stem, and their three-dimensional structure was successfully modeled when the unpaired nucleotide was intercalated into the helical domain of the stem. The second class contained more than the required number of nucleotides connecting the tRNA helical domains; the conformational flexibility of these nucleotides allowed them to take the place of the absent layers. The conformational compensation that we report rationalizes disparate features of these tRNAs and suggests that the stacking of nucleotide 59 on Domain 1 is an essential feature of the three-dimensional L-form of tRNA.

  17. Spectrophotometric assays for monitoring tRNA aminoacylation and aminoacyl-tRNA hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A; Richardson, Charles J

    2017-01-15

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a central role in protein synthesis, catalyzing the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. Here, we describe a spectrophotometric assay for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in which the Tyr-tRNA product is cleaved, regenerating the tRNA substrate. As tRNA is the limiting substrate in the assay, recycling it substantially increases the sensitivity of the assay while simultaneously reducing its cost. The tRNA aminoacylation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by coupling the production of AMP to the conversion of NAD(+) to NADH. We have adapted the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay to monitor: (1) aminoacylation of tRNA by l- or d-tyrosine, (2) cyclodipeptide formation by cyclodipeptide synthases, (3) hydrolysis of d-aminoacyl-tRNAs by d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and (4) post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. All of these assays are continuous and homogenous, making them amenable for use in high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. In the case of the cyclodipeptide synthase, d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and post-transfer editing assays, the aminoacyl-tRNAs are generated in situ, avoiding the need to synthesize and purify aminoacyl-tRNA substrates prior to performing the assays. Lastly, we describe how the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay can be adapted to monitor the activity of other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and how the approach to regenerating the tRNA substrate can be used to increase the sensitivity and decrease the cost of commercially available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase assays.

  18. Evolution meets disease: penetrance and functional epistasis of mitochondrial tRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Ferrín, Gustavo; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Gallardo, M Esther; Viscomi, Carlo; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Zeviani, Massimo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2011-04-01

    About half of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations causing diseases in humans occur in tRNA genes. Particularly intriguing are those pathogenic tRNA mutations than can reach homoplasmy and yet show very different penetrance among patients. These mutations are scarce and, in addition to their obvious interest for understanding human pathology, they can be excellent experimental examples to model evolution and fixation of mitochondrial tRNA mutations. To date, the only source of this type of mutations is human patients. We report here the generation and characterization of the first mitochondrial tRNA pathological mutation in mouse cells, an m.3739G>A transition in the mitochondrial mt-Ti gene. This mutation recapitulates the molecular hallmarks of a disease-causing mutation described in humans, an m.4290T>C transition affecting also the human mt-Ti gene. We could determine that the pathogenic molecular mechanism, induced by both the mouse and the human mutations, is a high frequency of abnormal folding of the tRNA(Ile) that cannot be charged with isoleucine. We demonstrate that the cells harboring the mouse or human mutant tRNA have exacerbated mitochondrial biogenesis triggered by an increase in mitochondrial ROS production as a compensatory response. We propose that both the nature of the pathogenic mechanism combined with the existence of a compensatory mechanism can explain the penetrance pattern of this mutation. This particular behavior can allow a scenario for the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs in which the fixation of two alleles that are individually deleterious can proceed in two steps and not require the simultaneous mutation of both.

  19. Cocrystal structure of a T-box riboswitch Stem I domain in complex with its cognate tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, T-box riboswitches regulate expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and other proteins in response to fluctuating tRNA aminoacylation levels under various nutritional states1. T-boxes reside in the 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the mRNAs they regulate, and comprise two conserved domains. Stem I harbors the specifier trinucleotide that base-pairs with the anticodon of cognate tRNA. 3’ to Stem I is the antiterminator domain, which base-pairs with the tRNA acceptor end and evaluates its aminoacylation state2. Despite high phylogenetic conservation and widespread occurrence in pathogens, the structural basis of tRNA recognition3,4 by this riboswitch remains ill-defined. Here, we demonstrate that the ~100-nucleotide T-box Stem I is necessary and sufficient for specific, high-affinity (Kd ~150 nM) tRNA binding, and report its structure in complex with cognate tRNA at 3.2 Å resolution. Stem I recognizes the overall architecture of tRNA in addition to its anticodon, something accomplished by large ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) like the ribosome or proteins such as ARSs5, but unprecedented for a compact mRNA domain. The C-shaped Stem I cradles the L-shaped tRNA forming an extended (1604 Å2) intermolecular interface. In addition to the specifier-anticodon interaction, two interdigitated T-loops near the apex of Stem I stack on the tRNA elbow in a manner analogous to those of the J11/12-J12/11 motif6 of RNase P and the L1 stalk7 of the ribosomal E-site. Since these RNPs and T-boxes are unrelated, this strategy to recognize an universal tRNA feature likely evolved convergently. Mutually induced fit of Stem I and the tRNA exploiting the intrinsic flexibility of tRNA and its conserved post-transcriptional modifications results in high shape complementarity, which in addition to providing specificity and affinity, globally organizes the T-box to orchestrate tRNA-dependent transcription regulation. PMID:23892783

  20. Binding of tRNA nucleotidyltransferase to Affi-Gel Blue: rapid purification of the enzyme and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, M P; Masiakowski, P

    1978-06-01

    Rabbit liver tRNA nucleotidyldransferase bound to columns of Affi-Gel Blue and could be specifically eluted with tRNA. This observation led to development of a rapid purification procedure for the enzyme. The adsorbent was also used to assess interaction of tRNA nucleotidyltransferase with various polynucleotides and substrates. The enzyme could be efficiently desorbed from Affi-Gel Blue by low concentrations of tRNA-C-C, less well by tRNA-C-C-A, and not at all by poly(A), poly(C), ATP or CTP.

  1. The m1A(58) modification in eubacterial tRNA: An overview of tRNA recognition and mechanism of catalysis by TrmI.

    PubMed

    Dégut, Clément; Ponchon, Luc; Folly-Klan, Marcia; Barraud, Pierre; Tisné, Carine

    2016-03-01

    The enzymes of the TrmI family catalyze the formation of the m(1)A58 modification in tRNA. We previously solved the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus enzyme and conducted a biophysical study to characterize the interaction between TrmI and tRNA. TrmI enzymes are active as a tetramer and up to two tRNAs can bind to TrmI simultaneously. In this paper, we present the structures of two TrmI mutants (D170A and Y78A). These residues are conserved in the active site of TrmIs and their mutations result in a dramatic alteration of TrmI activity. Both structures of TrmI mutants revealed the flexibility of the N-terminal domain that is probably important to bind tRNA. The structure of TrmI Y78A catalytic domain is unmodified regarding the binding of the SAM co-factor and the conformation of residues potentially interacting with the substrate adenine. This structure reinforces the previously proposed role of Y78, i.e. stabilize the conformation of the A58 ribose needed to hold the adenosine in the active site. The structure of the D170A mutant shows a flexible active site with one loop occupying in part the place of the co-factor and the second loop moving at the entrance to the active site. This structure and recent data confirms the central role of D170 residue binding the amino moiety of SAM and the exocyclic amino group of adenine. Possible mechanisms for methyl transfer are then discussed.

  2. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    DOE PAGES

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; ...

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on NDmore » surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.« less

  3. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang -qiang

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on ND surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.

  4. Binding of DNA-binding alkaloids berberine and palmatine to tRNA and comparison to ethidium: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Pandya, Prateek; Chowdhury, Sebanti Roy; Kumar, Surat; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of two natural protoberberine plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine with tRNA phe was studied using various biophysical techniques and molecular modeling and the data were compared with the binding of the classical DNA intercalator, ethidium. Circular dichroic studies revealed that the tRNA conformation was moderately perturbed on binding of the alkaloids. The cooperative binding of both the alkaloids and ethidium to tRNA was revealed from absorbance and fluorescence studies. Fluorescence quenching studies advanced a conclusion that while berberine and palmatine are partially intercalated, ethidium is fully intercalated on the tRNA molecule. The binding of the alkaloids as well as ethidium stabilized the tRNA melting, and the binding constant evaluated from the averaged optical melting temperature data was in agreement with fluorescence spectral-binding data. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the tRNA melting showed three close transitions that were affected on binding of these small molecules. Molecular docking calculations performed showed the preferred regions of binding of these small molecules on the tRNA. Taken together, the results suggest that the binding of the alkaloids berberine and palmatine on the tRNA structure appears to be mostly by partial intercalation while ethidium intercalates fully on the tRNA. These results further advance our knowledge on the molecular aspects on the interaction of these alkaloids to tRNA.

  5. Protein Synthesis in E. coli: Dependence of Codon-Specific Elongation on tRNA Concentration and Codon Usage.

    PubMed

    Rudorf, Sophia; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a protein, a ribosome moves along a messenger RNA (mRNA), reads it codon by codon, and takes up the corresponding ternary complexes which consist of aminoacylated transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and GTP. During this process of translation elongation, the ribosome proceeds with a codon-specific rate. Here, we present a general theoretical framework to calculate codon-specific elongation rates and error frequencies based on tRNA concentrations and codon usages. Our theory takes three important aspects of in-vivo translation elongation into account. First, non-cognate, near-cognate and cognate ternary complexes compete for the binding sites on the ribosomes. Second, the corresponding binding rates are determined by the concentrations of free ternary complexes, which must be distinguished from the total tRNA concentrations as measured in vivo. Third, for each tRNA species, the difference between total tRNA and ternary complex concentration depends on the codon usages of the corresponding cognate and near-cognate codons. Furthermore, we apply our theory to two alternative pathways for tRNA release from the ribosomal E site and show how the mechanism of tRNA release influences the concentrations of free ternary complexes and thus the codon-specific elongation rates. Using a recently introduced method to determine kinetic rates of in-vivo translation from in-vitro data, we compute elongation rates for all codons in Escherichia coli. We show that for some tRNA species only a few tRNA molecules are part of ternary complexes and, thus, available for the translating ribosomes. In addition, we find that codon-specific elongation rates strongly depend on the overall codon usage in the cell, which could be altered experimentally by overexpression of individual genes.

  6. RNA fragments mimicking tRNA analogs interact with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Roza; Janicka, Magdalena; Jedrzejczyk, Dominika; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2016-04-01

    In times, when drug seeking assays focus on the natural molecular triggers and their analogs, a deeper insight into molecular mechanisms governing the initial step of intrinsic apoptosis (cytochrome c release) is essential to suppress the immortality of pathologically changed cells. In this study, we examined RNA molecules mimicking mitochondrial tRNAs interacting with cytochrome c and possibly affecting its cellular function. tRNA analogs were designed and synthesized prior to the conformational analysis and gel assays clearly stating the nucleic acid-protein complex formation. The circular dichroism spectroscopic (CD) and microscale thermophoresis examination revealed the structural and conformational differences between four tRNA analogs in their interactions with cytochrome c. Obtained CD spectra and gel studies resulted in the complex ratio estimation and conclusion that not only the complex formation may be preferential towards specific tRNAs present in the cell, but nucleobase modifications are not essential for such interaction.

  7. Biogenesis and function of tRNA fragments during sperm maturation and fertilization in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Jeremy M.; Boskovic, Ana; Derr, Alan G.; Bing, Xin Y.; Belleannee, Clemence; Kucukural, Alper; Serra, Ryan W.; Sun, Fengyun; Song, Lina; Carone, Benjamin R.; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Li, Xin Z.; Fauquier, Lucas; Moore, Melissa J.; Sullivan, Robert; Mello, Craig C.; Garber, Manuel; Rando, Oliver J.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies link parental environments to phenotypes in subsequent generations. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which paternal diet affects offspring metabolism. Protein restriction in mice affects small RNA levels in mature sperm, with decreased let-7 levels and increased levels of 5’ fragments of glycine tRNAs. tRNA fragments are scarce in testicular sperm, but are gained as sperm mature in the epididymis. Epididymosomes – vesicles that fuse with sperm during epididymal transit – carry RNA payloads matching those of mature sperm, and deliver RNAs to immature sperm in vitro. Functionally, tRNA-Gly-GCC fragments repress genes associated with the endogenous retroelement MERVL, both in ES cells and embryos. Our results shed light on small RNA biogenesis, and its dietary regulation, during post-testicular sperm maturation, and link tRNA fragments to regulation of endogenous retroelements active in the preimplantation embryo. PMID:26721685

  8. Dyskerin, tRNA genes, and condensin tether pericentric chromatin to the spindle axis in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Chloe E.; Stephens, Andrew D.; Kirkland, Jacob G.; Hamdani, Omar; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2014-01-01

    Condensin is enriched in the pericentromere of budding yeast chromosomes where it is constrained to the spindle axis in metaphase. Pericentric condensin contributes to chromatin compaction, resistance to microtubule-based spindle forces, and spindle length and variance regulation. Condensin is clustered along the spindle axis in a heterogeneous fashion. We demonstrate that pericentric enrichment of condensin is mediated by interactions with transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) genes and their regulatory factors. This recruitment is important for generating axial tension on the pericentromere and coordinating movement between pericentromeres from different chromosomes. The interaction between condensin and tRNA genes in the pericentromere reveals a feature of yeast centromeres that has profound implications for the function and evolution of mitotic segregation mechanisms. PMID:25332162

  9. let-65 is cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alriyami, Maha Z.; Jones, Martin R.; Johnsen, Robert C.; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Baillie, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is one of more than 20 cytoplasmic aminoacyl tRNA synthetase enzymes (ARS). This family of enzymes catalyzes a process fundamental for protein translation. Using a combination of genetic mapping, oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, and phenotypic correlation, we show that mutations in the essential gene, let-65, reside within the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of MetRS, which we have named mars-1. We demonstrate that the lethality associated with alleles of let-65 is fully rescued by a transgenic array that spans the mars-1 genomic region. Furthermore, sequence analysis reveals that six let-65 alleles lead to the alteration of highly conserved amino acids. PMID:25606464

  10. Discovery and characterization of a novel class of pyrazolopyrimidinedione tRNA synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Justin I; Smith, James F; Tomaras, Andrew P; Zaniewski, Richard; McPherson, Craig J; McAllister, Laura A; Hartman-Neumann, Sandra; Arcari, Joel T; Lescoe, Marykay; Gutierrez, Jemy; Yuan, Ying; Limberakis, Chris; Miller, Alita A

    2015-06-01

    A high-throughput phenotypic screen for novel antibacterial agents led to the discovery of a novel pyrazolopyrimidinedione, PPD-1, with preferential activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Resistance mapping revealed the likely target of inhibition to be lysyl tRNA synthetase (LysRS). Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to an analog, PPD-2, which gained Gram-negative antibacterial activity at the expense of MRSA activity and resistance to this compound mapped to prolyl tRNA synthetase (ProRS). These targets of inhibition were confirmed in vitro, with PPD-1 showing IC₅₀s of 21.7 and 35 μM in purified LysRS and ProRS enzyme assays, and PPD-2, 151 and 0.04 μM, respectively. The highly attractive chemical properties of these compounds combined with intriguing preliminary SAR suggest that further exploration of this compelling novel series is warranted.

  11. tRNADB-CE: tRNA gene database well-timed in the era of big sequence data.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Iwasaki, Yuki; Ikemura, Toshimichi

    2014-01-01

    The tRNA gene data base curated by experts "tRNADB-CE" (http://trna.ie.niigata-u.ac.jp) was constructed by analyzing 1,966 complete and 5,272 draft genomes of prokaryotes, 171 viruses', 121 chloroplasts', and 12 eukaryotes' genomes plus fragment sequences obtained by metagenome studies of environmental samples. 595,115 tRNA genes in total, and thus two times of genes compiled previously, have been registered, for which sequence, clover-leaf structure, and results of sequence-similarity and oligonucleotide-pattern searches can be browsed. To provide collective knowledge with help from experts in tRNA researches, we added a column for enregistering comments to each tRNA. By grouping bacterial tRNAs with an identical sequence, we have found high phylogenetic preservation of tRNA sequences, especially at the phylum level. Since many species-unknown tRNAs from metagenomic sequences have sequences identical to those found in species-known prokaryotes, the identical sequence group (ISG) can provide phylogenetic markers to investigate the microbial community in an environmental ecosystem. This strategy can be applied to a huge amount of short sequences obtained from next-generation sequencers, as showing that tRNADB-CE is a well-timed database in the era of big sequence data. It is also discussed that batch-learning self-organizing-map with oligonucleotide composition is useful for efficient knowledge discovery from big sequence data.

  12. Hydrophobic Properties of tRNA with Varied Conformations Evaluated by an Aqueous Two-Phase System

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Keishi; Tomita, Hibiki; Tanaka, Seishiro; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The surface properties of transfer RNA (tRNA) were analyzed using a poly(ethylene glycol)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), where the surface net hydrophobicity (HFS) and the local hydrophobicity (LH) were evaluated based on the partition coefficient of tRNA in the ATPS. According to the evaluated HFS values, the surface of the tRNA molecule was hydrophilic at 20° -40 °C, and it became hydrophobic at 50° -80 °C because of the exposure of the intrinsic nucleobases of tRNA. In contrast, the LH values were found to be maximal at 20° -40 °C. The conformation of tRNA was investigated by Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, corroborating the results with the calculated prediction of its secondary structure (Mfold). It was shown that 66% of A-form structure existed at room temperature; the base stacking (θ265) was gradually decreased, and the A-form structure (θ208) was denatured along with a sigmoid curve against the temperature increase; the denatured secondary structures were observed above 50° C by Mfold prediction. The HFS value of the DNA duplex was found to be hydrophilic, compared to that of the single-stranded DNA, indicating that the exposure of nucleobases is a key factor of the hydrophobic properties of nucleotides. We conclude that the hydrophobic property of the tRNA surface was directly affected by its conformational transition. PMID:23091416

  13. Mapping hidden potential identity elements by computing the average discriminating power of individual tRNA positions.

    PubMed

    Szenes, Aron; Pál, Gábor

    2012-06-01

    The recently published discrete mathematical method, extended consensus partition (ECP), identifies nucleotide types at each position that are strictly absent from a given sequence set, while occur in other sets. These are defined as discriminating elements (DEs). In this study using the ECP approach, we mapped potential hidden identity elements that discriminate the 20 different tRNA identities. We filtered the tDNA data set for the obligatory presence of well-established tRNA features, and then separately for each identity set, the presence of already experimentally identified strictly present identity elements. The analysis was performed on the three kingdoms of life. We determined the number of DE, e.g. the number of sets discriminated by the given position, for each tRNA position of each tRNA identity set. Then, from the positional DE numbers obtained from the 380 pairwise comparisons of the 20 identity sets, we calculated the average excluding value (AEV) for each tRNA position. The AEV provides a measure on the overall discriminating power of each position. Using a statistical analysis, we show that positional AEVs correlate with the number of already identified identity elements. Positions having high AEV but lacking published identity elements predict hitherto undiscovered tRNA identity elements.

  14. Plant-Specific Preprotein and Amino Acid Transporter Proteins Are Required for tRNA Import into Mitochondria1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Narsai, Reena; Ivanova, Aneta; Megel, Cyrille; Schock, Annette; Kraus, Sabrina; Glaser, Elzbieta; Philippar, Katrin; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Soll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A variety of eukaryotes, in particular plants, do not contain the required number of tRNAs to support the translation of mitochondria-encoded genes and thus need to import tRNAs from the cytosol. This study identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins, Tric1 and Tric2 (for tRNA import component), which on simultaneous inactivation by T-DNA insertion lines displayed a severely delayed and chlorotic growth phenotype and significantly reduced tRNA import capacity into isolated mitochondria. The predicted tRNA-binding domain of Tric1 and Tric2, a sterile-α-motif at the C-terminal end of the protein, was required to restore tRNA uptake ability in mitochondria of complemented plants. The purified predicted tRNA-binding domain binds the T-arm of the tRNA for alanine with conserved lysine residues required for binding. T-DNA inactivation of both Tric proteins further resulted in an increase in the in vitro rate of in organello protein synthesis, which was mediated by a reorganization of the nuclear transcriptome, in particular of genes encoding a variety of proteins required for mitochondrial gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The characterization of Tric1/2 provides mechanistic insight into the process of tRNA import into mitochondria and supports the theory that the tRNA import pathway resulted from the repurposing of a preexisting protein import apparatus. PMID:27789739

  15. In silico detection of tRNA sequence features characteristic to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase class membership

    PubMed Central

    Jakó, Éena; Ittzés, Péter; Szenes, Áron; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs; Pál, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are grouped into Class I and II based on primary and tertiary structure and enzyme properties suggesting two independent phylogenetic lineages. Analogously, tRNA molecules can also form two respective classes, based on the class membership of their corresponding aaRS. Although some aaRS–tRNA interactions are not extremely specific and require editing mechanisms to avoid misaminoacylation, most aaRS–tRNA interactions are rather stereospecific. Thus, class-specific aaRS features could be mirrored by class-specific tRNA features. However, previous investigations failed to detect conserved class-specific nucleotides. Here we introduce a discrete mathematical approach that evaluates not only class-specific ‘strictly present’, but also ‘strictly absent’ nucleotides. The disjoint subsets of these elements compose a unique partition, named extended consensus partition (ECP). By analyzing the ECP for both Class I and II tDNA sets from 50 (13 archaeal, 30 bacterial and 7 eukaryotic) species, we could demonstrate that class-specific tRNA sequence features do exist, although not in terms of strictly conserved nucleotides as it had previously been anticipated. This finding demonstrates that important information was hidden in tRNA sequences inaccessible for traditional statistical methods. The ECP analysis might contribute to the understanding of tRNA evolution and could enrich the sequence analysis tool repertoire. PMID:17704131

  16. Mapping Hidden Potential Identity Elements by Computing the Average Discriminating Power of Individual tRNA Positions

    PubMed Central

    Szenes, Áron; Pál, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    The recently published discrete mathematical method, extended consensus partition (ECP), identifies nucleotide types at each position that are strictly absent from a given sequence set, while occur in other sets. These are defined as discriminating elements (DEs). In this study using the ECP approach, we mapped potential hidden identity elements that discriminate the 20 different tRNA identities. We filtered the tDNA data set for the obligatory presence of well-established tRNA features, and then separately for each identity set, the presence of already experimentally identified strictly present identity elements. The analysis was performed on the three kingdoms of life. We determined the number of DE, e.g. the number of sets discriminated by the given position, for each tRNA position of each tRNA identity set. Then, from the positional DE numbers obtained from the 380 pairwise comparisons of the 20 identity sets, we calculated the average excluding value (AEV) for each tRNA position. The AEV provides a measure on the overall discriminating power of each position. Using a statistical analysis, we show that positional AEVs correlate with the number of already identified identity elements. Positions having high AEV but lacking published identity elements predict hitherto undiscovered tRNA identity elements. PMID:22378766

  17. ARAGORN, a program to detect tRNA genes and tmRNA genes in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Laslett, Dean; Canback, Bjorn

    2004-01-01

    A computer program, ARAGORN, identifies tRNA and tmRNA genes. The program employs heuristic algorithms to predict tRNA secondary structure, based on homology with recognized tRNA consensus sequences and ability to form a base-paired cloverleaf. tmRNA genes are identified using a modified version of the BRUCE program. ARAGORN achieves a detection sensitivity of 99% from a set of 1290 eubacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal tRNA genes and detects all complete tmRNA sequences in the tmRNA database, improving on the performance of the BRUCE program. Recently discovered tmRNA genes in the chloroplasts of two species from the ‘green’ algae lineage are detected. The output of the program reports the proposed tRNA secondary structure and, for tmRNA genes, the secondary structure of the tRNA domain, the tmRNA gene sequence, the tag peptide and a list of organisms with matching tmRNA peptide tags. PMID:14704338

  18. Solution behavior and complete sup 1 H and sup 13 C NMR assignments of the coenzyme B sub 12 derivative (5 prime -deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide using modern 2D NMR experiments, including 600-MHz sup 1 H NMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, T.G.; Yohannes, P.G.; Marzilli, L.G. ); Hay, B.P.; Scott, J.R.; Finke, R.G. )

    1989-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods have been used to assign completely the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the (5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide cation (AdoCbi{sup +}) in D{sub 2}O. Most of the {sup 1}H spectral assignments were made by using 2D homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy (HOHAHA), absorption-mode (phase sensitive) 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy, and spin-locked NOE spectroscopy (also called ROESY, for rotating-frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy). Most of the protonated carbon resonances were assigned by using {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy. The nonprotonated carbon resonances, as well as the remaining unassigned {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR signals, were assigned from long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C connectivities determined from {sup 1}H-detected multiple-bond heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence spectroscopy (HMBC). Comparison of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts and {sup 1}H NOEs of AdoCbi{sup +} with those of coenzyme B{sup 12} ((5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobalamin) and its benzimidazole-protonated, base-off form indicates that the electronic properties and structure of AdoCbi{sup +} are similar to that of coenzyme B{sup 12} in the protonated, base-off form. The {sup 13}C chemical shifts of most of the carbons of AdoCbi{sup +} do not vary significantly from those of base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sup 12}, indicating that the electronic environment of the corrin ring is also similar in both compounds. However, significant differences in the chemical shifts of some of the corresponding carbons of the b, d, e, and f corrin side chains in AdoCbi{sup +} and in base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sub 12} indicate that the positions of these side chains may be different in AdoCbi{sup +} compared to base-off coenzyme B{sup 12}.

  19. Purification, Structure and Properties of Escherichia coli tRNA Pseudouridine Synthase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    RD-8193 9" PURIFICATION STRUCTURE AMD PROPERTIES OF ESCNERICHIA 11 COLI TRt4A PSEUDOURIDINE SYNTHASE 1(U) CALIFORNIA UNY OAKLAND NAVAL BIOSCIENCES...Keywo rd S: tN Pseudou ridine Synthase 1, Escherichia Cal i, 03 Plasmid, 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...The RNA modification enzyme, tRNA pseudouridine synthase I (PSUI) has been isolated in 95% purity from an Escherichia coli strain harboring a

  20. Dynamics of RNA modification by a multi-site-specific tRNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hamdane, Djemel; Guelorget, Amandine; Guérineau, Vincent; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    In most organisms, the widely conserved 1-methyl-adenosine58 (m1A58) tRNA modification is catalyzed by an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent, site-specific enzyme TrmI. In archaea, TrmI also methylates the adjacent adenine 57, m1A57 being an obligatory intermediate of 1-methyl-inosine57 formation. To study this multi-site specificity, we used three oligoribonucleotide substrates of Pyrococcus abyssi TrmI (PabTrmI) containing a fluorescent 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at the two target positions and followed the RNA binding kinetics and methylation reactions by stopped-flow and mass spectrometry. PabTrmI did not modify 2-AP but methylated the adjacent target adenine. 2-AP seriously impaired the methylation of A57 but not A58, confirming that PabTrmI methylates efficiently the first adenine of the A57A58A59 sequence. PabTrmI binding provoked a rapid increase of fluorescence, attributed to base unstacking in the environment of 2-AP. Then, a slow decrease was observed only with 2-AP at position 57 and SAM, suggesting that m1A58 formation triggers RNA release. A model of the protein–tRNA complex shows both target adenines in proximity of SAM and emphasizes no major tRNA conformational change except base flipping during the reaction. The solvent accessibility of the SAM pocket is not affected by the tRNA, thereby enabling S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine to be replaced by SAM without prior release of monomethylated tRNA. PMID:25217588

  1. Nucleoside modifications in the regulation of gene expression: focus on tRNA.

    PubMed

    Duechler, Markus; Leszczyńska, Grażyna; Sochacka, Elzbieta; Nawrot, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Both, DNA and RNA nucleoside modifications contribute to the complex multi-level regulation of gene expression. Modified bases in tRNAs modulate protein translation rates in a highly dynamic manner. Synonymous codons, which differ by the third nucleoside in the triplet but code for the same amino acid, may be utilized at different rates according to codon-anticodon affinity. Nucleoside modifications in the tRNA anticodon loop can favor the interaction with selected codons by stabilizing specific base pairs. Similarly, weakening of base pairing can discriminate against binding to near-cognate codons. mRNAs enriched in favored codons are translated in higher rates constituting a fine-tuning mechanism for protein synthesis. This so-called codon bias establishes a basic protein level, but sometimes it is necessary to further adjust the production rate of a particular protein to actual requirements, brought by, e.g., stages in circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression or exposure to stress. Such an adjustment is realized by the dynamic change of tRNA modifications resulting in the preferential translation of mRNAs coding for example for stress proteins to facilitate cell survival. Furthermore, tRNAs contribute in an entirely different way to another, less specific stress response consisting in modification-dependent tRNA cleavage that contributes to the general down-regulation of protein synthesis. In this review, we summarize control functions of nucleoside modifications in gene regulation with a focus on recent findings on protein synthesis control by tRNA base modifications.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors with dual-tail moieties to match the hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the carbonic anhydrase active site.

    PubMed

    Tanpure, Rajendra P; Ren, Bin; Peat, Thomas S; Bornaghi, Laurent F; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2015-02-12

    We present a new approach to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) inhibitor design that enables close interrogation of the regions of the CA active site where there is the greatest variability in amino acid residues among the different CA isozymes. By appending dual tail groups onto the par excellence CA inhibitor acetazolamide, compounds that may interact with the distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the CA II active site were prepared. The dual-tail combinations selected included (i) two hydrophobic moieties, (ii) two hydrophilic moieties, and (iii) one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic moiety. The CA enzyme inhibition profile as well as the protein X-ray crystal structure of compound 3, comprising one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic tail moiety, in complex with CA II is described. This novel dual-tail approach has provided an enhanced opportunity to more fully exploit interactions with the CA active site by enabling these molecules to interact with the distinct halves of the active site. In addition to the dual-tail compounds, a corresponding set of single-tail derivatives was synthesized, enabling a comparative analysis of the single-tail versus dual-tail compound CA inhibition profile.

  3. MMB-GUI: a fast morphing method demonstrates a possible ribosomal tRNA translocation trajectory.

    PubMed

    Tek, Alex; Korostelev, Andrei A; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-08

    Easy-to-use macromolecular viewers, such as UCSF Chimera, are a standard tool in structural biology. They allow rendering and performing geometric operations on large complexes, such as viruses and ribosomes. Dynamical simulation codes enable modeling of conformational changes, but may require considerable time and many CPUs. There is an unmet demand from structural and molecular biologists for software in the middle ground, which would allow visualization combined with quick and interactive modeling of conformational changes, even of large complexes. This motivates MMB-GUI. MMB uses an internal-coordinate, multiscale approach, yielding as much as a 2000-fold speedup over conventional simulation methods. We use Chimera as an interactive graphical interface to control MMB. We show how this can be used for morphing of macromolecules that can be heterogeneous in biopolymer type, sequence, and chain count, accurately recapitulating structural intermediates. We use MMB-GUI to create a possible trajectory of EF-G mediated gate-passing translocation in the ribosome, with all-atom structures. This shows that the GUI makes modeling of large macromolecules accessible to a wide audience. The morph highlights similarities in tRNA conformational changes as tRNA translocates from A to P and from P to E sites and suggests that tRNA flexibility is critical for translocation completion.

  4. Polyadenylation helps regulate functional tRNA levels in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Bijoy K.; Maples, Valerie F.; Kushner, Sidney R.

    2012-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a new regulatory mechanism for tRNA processing in Escherichia coli whereby RNase T and RNase PH, the two primary 3′ → 5′ exonucleases involved in the final step of 3′-end maturation, compete with poly(A) polymerase I (PAP I) for tRNA precursors in wild-type cells. In the absence of both RNase T and RNase PH, there is a >30-fold increase of PAP I-dependent poly(A) tails that are ≤10 nt in length coupled with a 2.3- to 4.2-fold decrease in the level of aminoacylated tRNAs and a >2-fold decrease in growth rate. Only 7 out of 86 tRNAs are not regulated by this mechanism and are also not substrates for RNase T, RNase PH or PAP I. Surprisingly, neither PNPase nor RNase II has any effect on tRNA poly(A) tail length. Our data suggest that the polyadenylation of tRNAs by PAP I likely proceeds in a distributive fashion unlike what is observed with mRNAs. PMID:22287637

  5. Mitochondrial genomes of praying mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment of tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Lan, Xu-e; Zhu, Wen-bo; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) contain a conserved set of 37 genes for an extensive diversity of lineages. Previously reported dictyopteran mitogenomes share this conserved mitochondrial gene arrangement, although surprisingly little is known about the mitogenome of Mantodea. We sequenced eight mantodean mitogenomes including the first representatives of two families: Hymenopodidae and Liturgusidae. Only two of these genomes retain the typical insect gene arrangement. In three Liturgusidae species, the trnM genes have translocated. Four species of mantis (Creobroter gemmata, Mantis religiosa, Statilia sp., and Theopompa sp.-HN) have multiple identical tandem duplication of trnR, and Statilia sp. additionally includes five extra duplicate trnW. These extra trnR and trnW in Statilia sp. are erratically arranged and form another novel gene order. Interestingly, the extra trnW is converted from trnR by the process of point mutation at anticodon, which is the first case of tRNA reassignment for an insect. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed amongst mantodean mitogenomes with variable copies of tRNA according to comparative analysis of codon usage. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the characteristics of tRNA only possess limited phylogenetic information in this research. Nevertheless, these features of gene rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment provide valuable information toward understanding mitogenome evolution in insects. PMID:27157299

  6. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  7. TRNA mutations that affect decoding fidelity deregulate development and the proteostasis network in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Reverendo, Marisa; Soares, Ana R; Pereira, Patrícia M; Carreto, Laura; Ferreira, Violeta; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Moura, Gabriela R; Santos, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes that encode tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA syntheases, tRNA modifying enzymes and other tRNA interacting partners are associated with neuropathies, cancer, type-II diabetes and hearing loss, but how these mutations cause disease is unclear. We have hypothesized that levels of tRNA decoding error (mistranslation) that do not fully impair embryonic development can accelerate cell degeneration through proteome instability and saturation of the proteostasis network. To test this hypothesis we have induced mistranslation in zebrafish embryos using mutant tRNAs that misincorporate Serine (Ser) at various non-cognate codon sites. Embryo viability was affected and malformations were observed, but a significant proportion of embryos survived by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR), the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) and downregulating protein biosynthesis. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage and disruption of the mitochondrial network, were also observed, suggesting that mistranslation had a strong negative impact on protein synthesis rate, ER and mitochondrial homeostasis. We postulate that mistranslation promotes gradual cellular degeneration and disease through protein aggregation, mitochondrial dysfunction and genome instability.

  8. Unique pathway of expression of an opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.J.; De La Pena, P.; Tobian, J.A.; Zasloff, M.; Hatfield, D.

    1987-09-01

    An opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNA gene is present in single copy in the genomes of higher vertebrates. The authors have shown that the product of this gene functions as a suppressor in an in vitro assay, and they have proposed that it may donate a modified amino acid directly to protein in response to specific UGA codons. In this report, they show through in vitro and in vivo studies that the human and Xenopus opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNAs are synthesized by a pathway that is, to the best of our knowledge, unlike that of nay know eukaryotic tRNA. The primary transcript of this gene does not contain a 5'-leader sequence; and, therefore, transcription of this suppressor is initiated at the first nucleotide within the coding sequence. The 5'-terminal triphosphate, present on the primary transcript, remains intact through 3'-terminal maturation and through subsequent transport of the tRNA to the cytoplasm. The unique biosynthetic pathway of this opal suppressor may underlie its distinctive role in eukaryotic cells.

  9. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  10. Argonaute 2 Binds Directly to tRNA Genes and Promotes Gene Repression in cis

    PubMed Central

    Woolnough, Jessica L.; Atwood, Blake L.

    2015-01-01

    To further our understanding of the RNAi machinery within the human nucleus, we analyzed the chromatin and RNA binding of Argonaute 2 (AGO2) within human cancer cell lines. Our data indicated that AGO2 binds directly to nascent tRNA and 5S rRNA, and to the genomic loci from which these RNAs are transcribed, in a small RNA- and DICER-independent manner. AGO2 chromatin binding was not observed at non-TFIIIC-dependent RNA polymerase III (Pol III) genes or at extra-TFIIIC (ETC) sites, indicating that the interaction is specific for TFIIIC-dependent Pol III genes. A genome-wide analysis indicated that loss of AGO2 caused a global increase in mRNA expression level among genes that flank AGO2-bound tRNA genes. This effect was shown to be distinct from that of the disruption of DICER, DROSHA, or CTCF. We propose that AGO2 binding to tRNA genes has a novel and important regulatory role in human cells. PMID:25918241

  11. Structural basis for tRNA modification by Elp3 from Dehalococcoides mccartyi

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Sebastian; Onuma, Osita F.; Baudin, Florence; Graziadei, Andrea; Taverniti, Valerio; Lin, Ting-Yu; Baymann, Frauke; Seraphin, Bertrand; Breunig, Karin D.; Müller, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    During translation elongation decoding is based on the recognition of codons by corresponding tRNA anticodon triplets. Molecular mechanisms that regulate global protein synthesis via specific base modifications in tRNA anticodons have recently received increasing attention. The conserved eukaryotic Elongator complex specifically modifies uridines located in the wobble base position of tRNAs. Here, we present the crystal structure of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Elp3 (DmcElp3) at 2.15 Å resolution. Our results reveal the unexpected arrangement of Elp3 lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) and radical S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) domains that share a large interface to form a composite active site and tRNA binding pocket with an iron sulfur cluster located in the dimerization interface of two DmcElp3 molecules. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies of yeast Elp3 confirm the relevance of our findings for eukaryotic Elp3s and for understanding Elongator’s role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer in humans. PMID:27455459

  12. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  13. Snapshots of Dynamics in Synthesizing N6-Isopentenyladenosine at the tRNA Anticodon

    SciTech Connect

    Chimnaronk, R.; Forouhar, F; Sakai, J; Yao, M; Tron, C; Atta, M; Fontecave, M; Hunt, J; Tanaka, I

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial and eukaryotic tRNAs that decode codons starting with uridine have a hydrophobically hypermodified adenosine at position 37 (A37) adjacent to the 3?-end of the anticodon, which is essential for efficient and highly accurate protein translation by the ribosome. However, it remains unclear as to how the corresponding tRNAs are selected to be modified by alkylation at the correct position of the adenosine base. We have determined a series of crystal structures of bacterial tRNA isopentenyltransferase (MiaA) in apo- and tRNA-bound forms, which completely render snapshots of substrate selections during the modification of RNA. A compact evolutionary inserted domain (herein swinging domain) in MiaA that exhibits as a highly mobile entity moves around the catalytic domain as likely to reach and trap the tRNA substrate. Thereby, MiaA clamps the anticodon stem loop of the tRNA substrate between the catalytic and swinging domains, where the two conserved elongated residues from the swinging domain pinch the two flanking A36 and A38 together to squeeze out A37 into the reaction tunnel. The site-specific isopentenylation of RNA is thus ensured by a characteristic pinch-and-flip mechanism and by a reaction tunnel to confine the substrate selection. Furthermore, combining information from soaking experiments with structural comparisons, we propose a mechanism for the ordered substrate binding of MiaA.

  14. Structure of a bacterial ribonuclease P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Nicholas J; Osterman, Amy; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K; Pan, Tao; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-12-09

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is the universal ribozyme responsible for 5'-end tRNA processing. We report the crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima RNase P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA(Phe). The 154 kDa complex consists of a large catalytic RNA (P RNA), a small protein cofactor and a mature tRNA. The structure shows that RNA-RNA recognition occurs through shape complementarity, specific intermolecular contacts and base-pairing interactions. Soaks with a pre-tRNA 5' leader sequence with and without metal help to identify the 5' substrate path and potential catalytic metal ions. The protein binds on top of a universally conserved structural module in P RNA and interacts with the leader, but not with the mature tRNA. The active site is composed of phosphate backbone moieties, a universally conserved uridine nucleobase, and at least two catalytically important metal ions. The active site structure and conserved RNase P-tRNA contacts suggest a universal mechanism of catalysis by RNase P.

  15. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5′ peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential “housekeeping” roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3′-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3′-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5′-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  16. MMB-GUI: a fast morphing method demonstrates a possible ribosomal tRNA translocation trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Tek, Alex; Korostelev, Andrei A.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-01

    Easy-to-use macromolecular viewers, such as UCSF Chimera, are a standard tool in structural biology. They allow rendering and performing geometric operations on large complexes, such as viruses and ribosomes. Dynamical simulation codes enable modeling of conformational changes, but may require considerable time and many CPUs. There is an unmet demand from structural and molecular biologists for software in the middle ground, which would allow visualization combined with quick and interactive modeling of conformational changes, even of large complexes. This motivates MMB-GUI. MMB uses an internal-coordinate, multiscale approach, yielding as much as a 2000-fold speedup over conventional simulation methods. We use Chimera as an interactive graphical interface to control MMB. We show how this can be used for morphing of macromolecules that can be heterogeneous in biopolymer type, sequence, and chain count, accurately recapitulating structural intermediates. We use MMB-GUI to create a possible trajectory of EF-G mediated gate-passing translocation in the ribosome, with all-atom structures. This shows that the GUI makes modeling of large macromolecules accessible to a wide audience. The morph highlights similarities in tRNA conformational changes as tRNA translocates from A to P and from P to E sites and suggests that tRNA flexibility is critical for translocation completion. PMID:26673695

  17. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-05-16

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer of chlamydial-like tRNA genes into early vascular plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Knie, Nils; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of lycophytes are surprisingly diverse, including strikingly different transfer RNA (tRNA) gene complements: No mitochondrial tRNA genes are present in the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii, whereas 26 tRNAs are encoded in the chondrome of the clubmoss Huperzia squarrosa. Reinvestigating the latter we found that trnL(gag) and trnS(gga) had never before been identified in any other land plant mitochondrial DNA. Sensitive sequence comparisons showed these two tRNAs as well as trnN(guu) and trnS(gcu) to be very similar to their respective counterparts in chlamydial bacteria. We identified homologs of these chlamydial-type tRNAs also in other lycophyte, fern, and gymnosperm DNAs, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) into mitochondria in the early vascular plant stem lineages. These findings extend plant mitochondrial HGT to affect individual tRNA genes, to include bacterial donors, and suggest that Chlamydiae on top of their recently proposed key role in primary chloroplast establishment may also have participated in early tracheophyte genome evolution.

  19. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  20. Cleavage specificity of chloroplast and nuclear tRNA 3'-processing nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Oommen, A; Li, X Q; Gegenheimer, P

    1992-01-01

    tRNAs in eukaryotic nuclei and organelles are synthesized as precursors lacking the 3'-terminal CCA sequence and possessing 5' (leader) and 3' (trailer) extensions. Nucleolytic cleavage of the 3' trailer and addition of CCA are therefore required for formation of functional tRNA 3' termini. Many chloroplast tRNA genes encode a C at position 74 which is not removed during processing but which can be incorporated as the first base of the CCAOH terminus. Sequences downstream of nucleotide 74, however, are always removed. Synthetic yeast pre-tRNA(Phe) substrates containing the complete CCA74-76 sequence were processed with crude or partially purified chloroplast enzyme fractions. The 3'-extended substrates (tRNA-CCA-trailer) were cleaved exclusively between nucleotides 74 and 75 to give tRNA-COH, whereas a 3'-mature transcript (tRNA-CCAOH) was not cleaved at all. A 5'-, 3'-extended chloroplast tRNA-CAG-trailer was also processed entirely to tRNA-COH. Furthermore, a 5'-mature, 3'-extended yeast pre-tRNA(Phe) derivative, tRNA-ACA-trailer, in which C74 was replaced by A, was cleaved precisely after A74. In contrast, we found that a partially purified enzyme fraction (a nuclear/cytoplasmic activity) from wheat embryo cleaved the 3'-extended yeast tRNA(Phe) precursors between nucleotides 73 and 74 to give tRNA(OH). This specificity is consistent with that of all previously characterized nuclear enzyme preparations. We conclude that (i) chloroplast tRNA 3'-processing endonuclease cleaves after nucleotide 74 regardless of the nature of the surrounding sequences; (ii) this specificity differs from that of the plant nuclear/cytoplasmic processing nuclease, which cleaves after base 73; and (iii) since 3'-mature tRNA is not a substrate for either activity, these 3' nucleases must require substrates possessing a 3'-terminal extension that extends past nucleotide 76. This substrate specificity may prevent mature tRNA from counterproductive cleavage by the 3' processing system

  1. Protein kinase A is part of a mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the nuclear tRNA export receptors Los1p and Msn5p.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; van der Merwe, George; Mangroo, Dev

    2014-02-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors.

  2. Codon-reading specificity of an unmodified form of Escherichia coli tRNA1Ser in cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, K; Takaku, H; Yokoyama, S

    1996-01-01

    Unmodified tRNA molecules are useful for many purposes in cell-free protein biosynthesis, but there is little information about how the lack of tRNA post-transcriptional modifications affects the coding specificity for synonymous codons. In the present study, we prepared an unmodified form of Escherichia coli tRNA1Ser, which originally has the cmo5UGA anticodon (cmo5U = uridine 5-oxyacetic acid) and recognizes the UCU, UCA and UCG codons. The codon specificity of the unmodified tRNA was tested in a cell-free protein synthesis directed by designed mRNAs under competition conditions with the parent tRNA1Ser. It was found that the unmodified tRNA with the UGA anti-codon recognizes the UCA codon nearly as efficiently as the modified tRNA. The unmodified tRNA recognized the UCU codon with low, but detectable efficiency, whereas no recognition of the UCC and UCG codons was detected. Therefore, the absence of modifications makes this tRNA more specific to the UCA codon by remarkably reducing the efficiencies of wobble reading of other synonymous codons, without a significant decrease in the UCA reading efficiency. PMID:8760870

  3. Maf1-mediated regulation of yeast RNA polymerase III is correlated with CCA addition at the 3' end of tRNA precursors.

    PubMed

    Foretek, Dominika; Nuc, Przemysław; Żywicki, Marek; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Kudla, Grzegorz; Boguta, Magdalena

    2016-08-27

    In eukaryotic cells tRNA synthesis is negatively regulated by the protein Maf1, conserved from yeast to humans. Maf1 from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates repression of trna transcription when cells are transferred from medium with glucose to medium with glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source. The strain with deleted gene encoding Maf1 (maf1Δ) is viable but accumulates tRNA precursors. In this study tRNA precursors were analysed by RNA-Seq and Northern hybridization in wild type strain and maf1Δ mutant grown in glucose medium or upon shift to repressive conditions. A negative effect of maf1Δ mutant on the addition of the auxiliary CCA nucleotides to the 3' end of pre-tRNAs was observed in cells shifted to unfavourable growth conditions. This effect was reduced by overexpression of the yeast CCA1 gene encoding ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The CCA sequence at the 3' end is important for export of tRNA precursors from the nucleus and essential for tRNA charging with amino acids. Data presented here indicate that CCA-addition to intron-containing end-processed tRNA precursors is a limiting step in tRNA maturation when there is no Maf1 mediated RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repression. The correlation between CCA synthesis and Pol III regulation by Maf1 could be important in coordination of tRNA transcription, processing and regulation of translation.

  4. Overexpression of tnaC of Escherichia coli Inhibits Growth by Depleting tRNA2Pro Availability

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Gong, Feng; Yanofsky, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Transcription of the tryptophanase (tna) operon of Escherichia coli is regulated by catabolite repression and tryptophan-induced transcription antitermination. Induction results from ribosome stalling after translation of tnaC, the coding region for a 24-residue leader peptide. The last sense codon of tnaC, proline codon 24 (CCU), is translated by tRNA2Pro. We analyzed the consequences of overexpression of tnaC from a multicopy plasmid and observed that under inducing conditions more than 60% of the tRNA2Pro in the cell was sequestered in ribosomes as TnaC-tRNA2Pro. The half-life of this TnaC-tRNA2Pro was shown to be 10 to 15 min under these conditions. Plasmid-mediated overexpression of tnaC, under inducing conditions, reduced cell growth rate appreciably. Increasing the tRNA2Pro level relieved this growth inhibition, suggesting that depletion of this tRNA was primarily responsible for the growth rate reduction. Growth inhibition was not relieved by overexpression of tRNA1Pro, a tRNAPro that translates CCG, but not CCU. Replacing the Pro24CCU codon of tnaC by Pro24CCG, a Pro codon translated by tRNA1Pro, also led to growth rate reduction, and this reduction was relieved by overexpression of tRNA1Pro. These findings establish that the growth inhibition caused by tnaC overexpression during induction by tryptophan is primarily a consequence of tRNAPro depletion, resulting from TnaC-tRNAPro retention within stalled, translating ribosomes. PMID:16484200

  5. Under- and over-water halves of Gyrinidae beetle eyes harbor different corneal nanocoatings providing adaptation to the water and air environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatski, Artem; Kryuchkov, Michail; Sergeev, Anton; Klimov, Andrey A.; Shcherbakov, Maxim R.; Enin, Gennadiy A.; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2014-08-01

    Whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) inhabit water surfaces and possess unique eyes which are split into the overwater and underwater parts. In this study we analyze the micro- and nanostructure of the split eyes of two Gyrinidae beetles genera, Gyrinus and Orectochilus. We find that corneae of the overwater ommatidia are covered with maze-like nanostructures, while the corneal surface of the underwater eyes is smooth. We further show that the overwater nanostructures possess no anti-wetting, but the anti-reflective properties with the spectral preference in the range of 450-600 nm. These findings illustrate the adaptation of the corneal nanocoating of the two halves of an insect's eye to two different environments. The novel natural anti-reflective nanocoating we describe may find future technological applications.

  6. Under- and over-water halves of Gyrinidae beetle eyes harbor different corneal nanocoatings providing adaptation to the water and air environments.

    PubMed

    Blagodatski, Artem; Kryuchkov, Michail; Sergeev, Anton; Klimov, Andrey A; Shcherbakov, Maxim R; Enin, Gennadiy A; Katanaev, Vladimir L

    2014-08-08

    Whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) inhabit water surfaces and possess unique eyes which are split into the overwater and underwater parts. In this study we analyze the micro- and nanostructure of the split eyes of two Gyrinidae beetles genera, Gyrinus and Orectochilus. We find that corneae of the overwater ommatidia are covered with maze-like nanostructures, while the corneal surface of the underwater eyes is smooth. We further show that the overwater nanostructures possess no anti-wetting, but the anti-reflective properties with the spectral preference in the range of 450-600 nm. These findings illustrate the adaptation of the corneal nanocoating of the two halves of an insect's eye to two different environments. The novel natural anti-reflective nanocoating we describe may find future technological applications.

  7. Under- and over-water halves of Gyrinidae beetle eyes harbor different corneal nanocoatings providing adaptation to the water and air environments

    PubMed Central

    Blagodatski, Artem; Kryuchkov, Michail; Sergeev, Anton; Klimov, Andrey A.; Shcherbakov, Maxim R.; Enin, Gennadiy A.; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2014-01-01

    Whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) inhabit water surfaces and possess unique eyes which are split into the overwater and underwater parts. In this study we analyze the micro- and nanostructure of the split eyes of two Gyrinidae beetles genera, Gyrinus and Orectochilus. We find that corneae of the overwater ommatidia are covered with maze-like nanostructures, while the corneal surface of the underwater eyes is smooth. We further show that the overwater nanostructures possess no anti-wetting, but the anti-reflective properties with the spectral preference in the range of 450–600 nm. These findings illustrate the adaptation of the corneal nanocoating of the two halves of an insect's eye to two different environments. The novel natural anti-reflective nanocoating we describe may find future technological applications. PMID:25103074

  8. Intra-tRNA distance measurements for nucleocapsid proteindependent tRNA unwinding during priming of HIV reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Chan, B; Weidemaier, K; Yip, W T; Barbara, P F; Musier-Forsyth, K

    1999-01-19

    We report here the direct measurement of intra-tRNA distances during annealing of the tRNA primer to the HIV RNA genome. This key step in the initiation of retroviral reverse transcription involves hybridization of one strand of the acceptor arm of a specific lysine tRNA to the primer binding site on the RNA genome. Although the mechanism of tRNA unwinding and annealing is not known, previous studies have shown that HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) greatly accelerates primer/template binary complex formation in vitro. An open question is whether NC alone unwinds the primer or whether unwinding by NC requires the RNA genome. We monitored the annealing process in solution by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Distance measurements demonstrate unequivocally that the tRNA acceptor stem is not substantially unwound by NC in the absence of the RNA genome, that is, unwinding is not separable from hybridization. Moreover, FRET measurements show that both heat- and NC-mediated annealing result in an approximately 40-A increase in the separation of the two ends of the tRNA acceptor arm on binding to the template. This large increase in separation of the two ends suggests a complete displacement of the nonhybridized strand of the acceptor stem in the initiation complex.

  9. Large gene overlaps and tRNA processing in the compact mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Armadillidium vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Doublet, Vincent; Ubrig, Elodie; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Bouchon, Didier; Marcadé, Isabelle; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    A faithful expression of the mitochondrial DNA is crucial for cell survival. Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a highly compact gene organization. The typical 16.5 kbp animal mtDNA encodes 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. In the backyard pillbug Armadillidium vulgare, the rather small 13.9 kbp mtDNA encodes the same set of proteins and rRNAs as compared to animal kingdom mtDNA, but seems to harbor an incomplete set of tRNA genes. Here, we first confirm the expression of 13 tRNA genes in this mtDNA. Then we show the extensive repair of a truncated tRNA, the expression of tRNA involved in large gene overlaps and of tRNA genes partially or fully integrated within protein-coding genes in either direct or opposite orientation. Under selective pressure, overlaps between genes have been likely favored for strong genome size reduction. Our study underlines the existence of unknown biochemical mechanisms for the complete gene expression of A. vulgare mtDNA, and of co-evolutionary processes to keep overlapping genes functional in a compacted mitochondrial genome. PMID:26361137

  10. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α.

    PubMed

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement T Y; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours.

  11. Large gene overlaps and tRNA processing in the compact mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Doublet, Vincent; Ubrig, Elodie; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Bouchon, Didier; Marcadé, Isabelle; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    A faithful expression of the mitochondrial DNA is crucial for cell survival. Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a highly compact gene organization. The typical 16.5 kbp animal mtDNA encodes 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. In the backyard pillbug Armadillidium vulgare, the rather small 13.9 kbp mtDNA encodes the same set of proteins and rRNAs as compared to animal kingdom mtDNA, but seems to harbor an incomplete set of tRNA genes. Here, we first confirm the expression of 13 tRNA genes in this mtDNA. Then we show the extensive repair of a truncated tRNA, the expression of tRNA involved in large gene overlaps and of tRNA genes partially or fully integrated within protein-coding genes in either direct or opposite orientation. Under selective pressure, overlaps between genes have been likely favored for strong genome size reduction. Our study underlines the existence of unknown biochemical mechanisms for the complete gene expression of A. vulgare mtDNA, and of co-evolutionary processes to keep overlapping genes functional in a compacted mitochondrial genome.

  12. Synthetic RNA-cleaving molecules mimicking ribonuclease A active center. Design and cleavage of tRNA transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Podyminogin, M A; Vlassov, V V; Giegé, R

    1993-01-01

    RNA cleaving molecules were synthesized by conjugating imidazole residues imitating the essential imidazoles in the active center of pancreatic ribonuclease to an intercalating compound, derivative of phenazine capable of binding to the double stranded regions of polynucleotides. Action of the molecules on tRNA was investigated. It was found, that some of the compounds bearing two imidazole residues cleave tRNA under physiological conditions. The cleavage reaction shows a bell-shaped pH dependence with a maximum at pH 7.0 indicating participation of protonated and non-protonated imidazole residues in the process. Under the conditions stabilizing the tRNA structure, a tRNAAsp transcript was cleaved preferentially at the junctions of the stem and loop regions of the cloverleaf tRNA fold, at the five positions C56, C43, C20.1, U13, and U8, with a marked preference for C56. This cleavage pattern is consistent with a hydrolysis mechanism involving non-covalent binding of the compounds to the double-stranded regions of tRNA followed by an attack of the imidazole residues at the juxtaposed flexible single-stranded regions of the molecule. The compounds provide new probes for the investigation of RNA structure in solution and potential reactive groups for antisense oligonucleotide derivatives. Images PMID:7507235

  13. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  14. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. ); Boland, W. )

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  15. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-08

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  16. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  17. Genetics, Structure and Functional Features of the RNA Modification Enzyme, tRNA psi Synthase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    been sequenced. In collaboration with M. Winkler (Northwestern Univ.), it has been found that the hisT gene is part of an operon containing a second...Recently, the hisT operon has been inserted into a runaway replication plasmi, ,BEU50, which can overproduce the enzyme by another 3-5-fold. In this strain...in the hisT operon are tightly linked, their products appear to be function~llyindepBpdent. PSUILin modify all of the hisT isoacceptors of tRNA

  18. sigma, a repetitive element found adjacent to tRNA genes of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    del Rey, F J; Donahue, T F; Fink, G R

    1982-01-01

    sigma is a DNA element of about 340 base pairs (bp) that is repeated many times in the yeast genome. The element has 8-bp inverted repeats at its ends and is flanked by 5-bp direct repeats. The 5-bp repeats are different for each sigma and have no homology with the ends of the sigma sequence. sigma is located 16 or 18 bp from the 5' end of several tRNA genes. Southern analysis of different yeast strains shows that the pattern of hybridization is different even for closely related strains. Images PMID:6287468

  19. Was there a universal tRNA before specialized tRNAs came into existence?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, James C., Jr.; Staves, Mark P.

    1990-01-01

    It is generally true that evolving systems begin simply and become more complex in the evolutionary process. For those who try to understand the origin of a biochemical system, what is required is the development of an idea as to what simpler system preceded the present one. A hypothesis is presented that a universal tRNA molecule, capable of reading many codons, may have preceded the appearance of individual tRNAs. Evidence seems to suggest that this molecule may have been derived from a common ancestor of the contemporary 5S rRNAs and tRNAs.

  20. Optical Kerr effect of tRNA solution induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucia, Weronika E.; Sharma, Gargi; Joseph, Cecil S.; Sarbak, Szymon; Oliver, Cameron; Dobek, Andrzej; Giles, Robert H.

    2016-10-01

    The optical Kerr effect (OKE) in a transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) solution induced by femtosecond pulses of linearly polarized pump light (λi = 800 nm) and sounded by probe light (λp = 800 nm) was studied. The measurements were performed to find nonlinear optical parameters describing a single molecule (molecular Kerr constant K, mean nonlinear third order optical polarizability cpi) and to compare them with our previous OKE results obtained in ns and ps time range. The OKE experiment has proven to be an efficient method to obtain the nonlinear parameters of single molecules in solution, which reflects dynamic structure changes.

  1. A homozygous truncating mutation in PUS3 expands the role of tRNA modification in normal cognition

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Han, Lu; Faqeih, Eissa; Ewida, Nour; Alobeid, Eman; Phizicky, Eric M.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability is a common and highly heterogeneous disorder etiologically. In a multiplex consanguineous family, we applied autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing and identified a novel homozygous truncating mutation in PUS3 that fully segregates with the intellectual disability phenotype. Consistent with the known role of Pus3 in isomerizing uracil to pseudouridine at positions 38 and 39 in tRNA, we found a significant reduction in this post-transcriptional modification of tRNA in patient cells. Our finding adds to a growing list of intellectual disability disorders that are caused by perturbation of various tRNA modifications, which highlights the sensitivity of the brain to these highly conserved processes. PMID:27055666

  2. tRNA genes of Streptomyces lividans: new sequences and comparison of structure and organization with those of other bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sedlmeier, R; Werner, T; Kieser, H M; Hopwood, D A; Schmieger, H

    1994-01-01

    Three closely linked Streptomyces lividans tRNA genes encoding two tRNA(Lys)s and a tRNA(Gly) were cloned and sequences. The structure of tRNA(Gly) is unusual for eubacterial tRNAs. Including those in previous reports (R. Sedlmeier and H. Schmieger, Nucleic Acids Res. 18:4027, 1990, and R. Sedlmeier, G. Linti, K. Gregor, and H. Schmieger, Gene 132:125-130, 1993), 18 S. lividans tRNA genes were physically mapped on the chromosome of the closely related strain Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The structure and organization of tRNA genes of S. lividans and S. coelicolor are compared with those of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. PMID:8071238

  3. Phylogeny from function: evidence from the molecular fossil record that tRNA originated in replication, not translation.

    PubMed

    Maizels, N; Weiner, A M

    1994-07-19

    We propose a phylogeny for the evolution of tRNA that is based on the ubiquity and conservation of tRNA-like structures in the replication of contemporary genomes. This phylogeny is unique in suggesting that the function of tRNA in replication dates back to the very beginnings of life on earth, before the advent of templated protein synthesis. The origin we propose for tRNA has distinct implications for the order in which other components of the modern translational apparatus evolved. We further suggest that the "top half" of modern tRNA-a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T psi C arm--is the ancient structural and functional domain and that the "bottom half" of tRNA--a coaxial stack of the dihydrouracil arm on the anticodon arm--arose later to provide additional specificity.

  4. Phylogeny from function: evidence from the molecular fossil record that tRNA originated in replication, not translation.

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, N; Weiner, A M

    1994-01-01

    We propose a phylogeny for the evolution of tRNA that is based on the ubiquity and conservation of tRNA-like structures in the replication of contemporary genomes. This phylogeny is unique in suggesting that the function of tRNA in replication dates back to the very beginnings of life on earth, before the advent of templated protein synthesis. The origin we propose for tRNA has distinct implications for the order in which other components of the modern translational apparatus evolved. We further suggest that the "top half" of modern tRNA-a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T psi C arm--is the ancient structural and functional domain and that the "bottom half" of tRNA--a coaxial stack of the dihydrouracil arm on the anticodon arm--arose later to provide additional specificity. Images PMID:8041690

  5. tRNA Shifts the G-quadruplex-Hairpin Conformational Equilibrium in RNA towards the Hairpin Conformer.

    PubMed

    Rode, Ambadas B; Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-11-07

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in cellular homeostasis and are involved in many human diseases including cancer. Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are the basis for the diverse functions of many non-coding RNAs. Herein, we show how the presence of tRNA influences the equilibrium between hairpin and G-quadruplex conformations in the 5' untranslated regions of oncogenes and model sequences. Kinetic and equilibrium analyses of the hairpin to G-quadruplex conformational transition of purified RNA as well as during co-transcriptional folding indicate that tRNA significantly shifts the equilibrium toward the hairpin conformer. The enhancement of relative translation efficiency in a reporter gene assay is shown to be due to the tRNA-mediated shift in hairpin-G-quadruplex equilibrium of oncogenic mRNAs. Our findings suggest that tRNA is a possible therapeutic target in diseases in which RNA conformational equilibria is dysregulated.

  6. The ribosome triggers the stringent response by RelA via a highly distorted tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Fernández, Israel S; Kelley, Ann C; Cartón, David Gil; Ramakrishnan, Venki; Valle, Mikel

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response links nutrient starvation with the transcriptional control of genes. This process is initiated by the stringent factor RelA, which senses the presence of deacylated tRNA in the ribosome as a symptom of amino-acid starvation to synthesize the alarmone (p)ppGpp. Here we report a cryo-EM study of RelA bound to ribosomes bearing cognate, deacylated tRNA in the A-site. The data show that RelA on the ribosome stabilizes an unusual distorted form of the tRNA, with the acceptor arm making contact with RelA and far from its normal location in the peptidyl transferase centre. PMID:23877429

  7. Effect of intron mutations on processing and function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SUP53 tRNA in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, M C; Abelson, J

    1986-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae leucine-inserting amber suppressor tRNA gene SUP53 (a tRNALeu3 allele) was used to investigate the relationship between precursor tRNA structure and mature tRNA function. This gene encodes a pre-tRNA which contains a 32-base intron. The mature tRNASUP53 contains a 5-methylcytosine modification of the anticodon wobble base. Mutations were made in the SUP53 intron. These mutant genes were transcribed in an S. cerevisiae nuclear extract preparation. In this extract, primary tRNA gene transcripts are end-processed and base modified after addition of cofactors. The base modifications made in vitro were examined, and the mutant pre-tRNAs were analyzed for their ability to serve as substrates for partially purified S. cerevisiae tRNA endonuclease and ligase. Finally, the suppressor function of these mutant tRNA genes was assayed after their integration into the S. cerevisiae genome. Mutant analysis showed that the totally intact precursor tRNA, rather than any specific sequence or structure of the intron, was necessary for efficient nonsense suppression by tRNASUP53. Less efficient suppressor activity correlated with the absence of the 5-methylcytosine modification. Most of the intron-altered precursor tRNAs were successfully spliced in vitro, indicating that modifications are not critical for recognition by the tRNA endonuclease and ligase. Images PMID:3537724

  8. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  9. Protozoan ALKBH8 oxygenases display both DNA repair and tRNA modification activities.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn; Davydova, Erna; Puścian, Alicja; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Krokan, Hans E; Klungland, Arne; Tudek, Barbara; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø

    2014-01-01

    The ALKBH family of Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases comprises enzymes that display sequence homology to AlkB from E. coli, a DNA repair enzyme that uses an oxidative mechanism to dealkylate methyl and etheno adducts on the nucleobases. Humans have nine different ALKBH proteins, ALKBH1-8 and FTO. Mammalian and plant ALKBH8 are tRNA hydroxylases targeting 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-modified uridine (mcm5U) at the wobble position of tRNAGly(UCC). In contrast, the genomes of some bacteria encode a protein with strong sequence homology to ALKBH8, and robust DNA repair activity was previously demonstrated for one such protein. To further explore this apparent functional duality of the ALKBH8 proteins, we have here enzymatically characterized a panel of such proteins, originating from bacteria, protozoa and mimivirus. All the enzymes showed DNA repair activity in vitro, but, interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function different from that of their eukaryotic counterparts. The present study provides new insights on the function and evolution of the ALKBH8 family of proteins.

  10. AlkB homolog 3-mediated tRNA demethylation promotes protein synthesis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuko; Ooshio, Ikumi; Fusamae, Yasuyuki; Kitae, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Megumi; Jingushi, Kentaro; Hase, Hiroaki; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa; Tsujikawa, Kazutake

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian AlkB homolog (ALKBH) family of proteins possess a 2-oxoglutarate- and Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase domain. A similar domain in the Escherichia coli AlkB protein catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of 1-methyladenine (1-meA) and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC) in both DNA and RNA. AlkB homolog 3 (ALKBH3) was also shown to demethylate 1-meA and 3-meC (induced in single-stranded DNA and RNA by a methylating agent) to reverse the methylation damage and retain the integrity of the DNA/RNA. We previously reported the high expression of ALKBH3 in clinical tumor specimens and its involvement in tumor progression. In this study, we found that ALKBH3 effectively demethylated 1-meA and 3-meC within endogenously methylated RNA. Moreover, using highly purified recombinant ALKBH3, we identified N6-methyladenine (N6-meA) in mammalian transfer RNA (tRNA) as a novel ALKBH3 substrate. An in vitro translation assay showed that ALKBH3-demethylated tRNA significantly enhanced protein translation efficiency. In addition, ALKBH3 knockdown in human cancer cells impaired cellular proliferation and suppressed the nascent protein synthesis that is usually accompanied by accumulation of the methylated RNAs. Thus, our data highlight a novel role for ALKBH3 in tumor progression via RNA demethylation and subsequent protein synthesis promotion. PMID:28205560

  11. Unique domain appended to vertebrate tRNA synthetase is essential for vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Hui-Min; Swindell, Eric C.; Marshall, Alan G.; Guo, Min; Kishi, Shuji; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2012-01-01

    New domains were progressively added to cytoplasmic aminoacyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases during evolution. One example is the UNE-S domain, appended to seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) in species that developed closed circulatory systems. Here we show using solution and crystal structure analyses and in vitro and in vivo functional studies that UNE-S harbours a robust nuclear localization signal (NLS) directing SerRS to the nucleus where it attenuates vascular endothelial growth factor A expression. We also show that SerRS mutants previously linked to vasculature abnormalities either deleted the NLS or have the NLS sequestered in an alternative conformation. A structure-based second-site mutation, designed to release the sequestered NLS, restored normal vasculature. Thus, the essential function of SerRS in vascular development depends on UNE-S. These results are the first to show an essential role for a tRNA synthetase-associated appended domain at the organism level, and suggest that acquisition of UNE-S has a role in the establishment of the closed circulatory systems of vertebrates. PMID:22353712

  12. Structure of tRNA Dimethylallyltransferase: RNA Modification through a Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Zhou, Chun; Huang, Raven H.

    2008-09-04

    Dimethylallyltransferase (DMATase) transfers a five-carbon isoprenoid moiety from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) to the amino group of adenosine at position 37 of certain tRNAs. Reported here are the crystal structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DMATase alone and in complex with pyrophosphate at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme possesses a central channel spanning the entire width of the enzyme. Both the accepting substrate tRNA and the donating substrate DMAPP appear to enter the channel from opposite sides in an ordered sequence, with tRNA first and DMAPP second, and the RNA modification reaction occurs in the middle of the channel once the two substrates have met. The structure of DMATase is homologous to a class of small soluble kinases involved in biosynthesis of nucleotide precursors for nucleic acids, indicating its possibly evolutionary origin. Furthermore, specific recognition of the pyrophosphate by a conserved loop in DMATase, similar to the P-loop commonly seen in diverse nucleotide-binding proteins, demonstrates that DMATase is structurally and mechanistically distinct from farnesyltransferase, another family of prenyltransferases involved in protein modification.

  13. Cross-Talk between Dnmt2-Dependent tRNA Methylation and Queuosine Modification.

    PubMed

    Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2017-02-10

    Enzymes of the Dnmt2 family of methyltransferases have yielded a number of unexpected discoveries. The first surprise came more than ten years ago when it was realized that, rather than being DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 enzymes actually are transfer RNA (tRNA) methyltransferases for cytosine-5 methylation, foremost C38 (m5C38) of tRNAAsp. The second unanticipated finding was our recent discovery of a nutritional regulation of Dnmt2 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Significantly, the presence of the nucleotide queuosine in tRNAAsp strongly stimulates Dnmt2 activity both in vivo and in vitro in S. pombe. Queuine, the respective base, is a hypermodified guanine analog that is synthesized from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) by bacteria. Interestingly, most eukaryotes have queuosine in their tRNA. However, they cannot synthesize it themselves, but rather salvage it from food or from gut microbes. The queuine obtained from these sources comes from the breakdown of tRNAs, where the queuine ultimately was synthesized by bacteria. Queuine thus has been termed a micronutrient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of Dnmt2 methylation and queuosine modification with respect to translation as well as the organismal consequences of the absence of these modifications. Models for the functional cooperation between these modifications and its wider implications are discussed.

  14. Structural basis for tRNA modification by Elp3 from Dehalococcoides mccartyi.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Sebastian; Zabel, Rene; Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Onuma, Osita F; Baudin, Florence; Graziadei, Andrea; Taverniti, Valerio; Lin, Ting-Yu; Baymann, Frauke; Séraphin, Bertrand; Breunig, Karin D; Müller, Christoph W

    2016-09-01

    During translation elongation, decoding is based on the recognition of codons by corresponding tRNA anticodon triplets. Molecular mechanisms that regulate global protein synthesis via specific base modifications in tRNA anticodons are receiving increasing attention. The conserved eukaryotic Elongator complex specifically modifies uridines located in the wobble base position of tRNAs. Mutations in Elongator subunits are associated with certain neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Here we present the crystal structure of D. mccartyi Elp3 (DmcElp3) at 2.15-Å resolution. Our results reveal an unexpected arrangement of Elp3 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) and radical S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) domains, which share a large interface and form a composite active site and tRNA-binding pocket, with an iron-sulfur cluster located in the dimerization interface of two DmcElp3 molecules. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies of yeast Elp3 confirmed the relevance of our findings for eukaryotic Elp3s and should aid in understanding the cellular functions and pathophysiological roles of Elongator.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of a lysine tRNA from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Ishikura, H

    1977-01-01

    A lysine tRNA (tRNA1Lys) was purified from Bacillus subtilis W168 by a consecutive use of several column chromatographic systems. The nucleotide sequence was determined to be pG-A-G-C-C-A-U-U-A-G-C-U-C-A-G-U-D-G-G-D-A-G-A-G-C-A-U-C-U-G-A-C-U-U(U*)-U-U-K-A-psi-C-A-G-A-G-G-m7G(G)-U-C-G-A-A-G-G-T-psi-C-G-A-G-U-C-C-U-U-C-A-U-G-G-C-U-C-A-C-C-AOH, where K and U* are unidentified nucleosides. The nucleosides of U34 and m7G46 were partially substituted with U* and G, respectively. The binding ability of lysyl-tRNA1Lys to Escherichia coli ribosomes was stimulated with ApApA as well as ApApG. PMID:414208

  16. T box riboswitches in Actinobacteria: Translational regulation via novel tRNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Anna V.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    The T box riboswitch regulates many amino acid-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria. T box riboswitch-mediated gene regulation was shown previously to occur at the level of transcription attenuation via structural rearrangements in the 5′ untranslated (leader) region of the mRNA in response to binding of a specific uncharged tRNA. In this study, a novel group of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase gene (ileS) T box leader sequences found in organisms of the phylum Actinobacteria was investigated. The Stem I domains of these RNAs lack several highly conserved elements that are essential for interaction with the tRNA ligand in other T box RNAs. Many of these RNAs were predicted to regulate gene expression at the level of translation initiation through tRNA-dependent stabilization of a helix that sequesters a sequence complementary to the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence, thus freeing the SD sequence for ribosome binding and translation initiation. We demonstrated specific binding to the cognate tRNAIle and tRNAIle-dependent structural rearrangements consistent with regulation at the level of translation initiation, providing the first biochemical demonstration, to our knowledge, of translational regulation in a T box riboswitch. PMID:25583497

  17. Complete 5' and 3' end maturation of group II intron-containing tRNA precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Hess, W R

    2001-01-01

    Higher plant chloroplasts provide the only experimentally validated example of functional tRNA genes that are disrupted by group II introns. Here, precursor transcripts for tRNA(Gly)(UCC), tRNA(Val)(UAC), and tRNA(Ala)(UGC) were investigated for processing of 5' leader and 3' trailer sequences in vivo. Use of intron-specific primer pairs and inclusion of a barley chloroplast splicing mutant specifically allowed us to evaluate the potential effect of intervening sequences that disrupt tRNA secondary and tertiary structures. The data suggest that (1) neither integrity of the dihydrouridine nor the anticodon domain is required for the nucleotidyltransferase-mediated addition of 3'-terminal CCA; (2) interruption of these two structural elements by group II introns does not interfere with nucleotide-specific 5' maturation by RNase P; (3) processing intermediates of chloroplast tRNAs can be 3' polyadenylated; and (4) plastid DNA-encoded proteins are not required for 3' and 5' maturation of plastid tRNAs. PMID:11233985

  18. The Levels of a Universally Conserved tRNA Modification Regulate Cell Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Benitez, Diego; Thiaville, Patrick C.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Glavic, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    N6-Threonylcarbamoyl-adenosine (t6A) is a universal modification occurring at position 37 in nearly all tRNAs that decode A-starting codons, including the eukaryotic initiator tRNA (tRNAiMet). Yeast lacking central components of the t6A synthesis machinery, such as Tcs3p (Kae1p) or Tcs5p (Bud32p), show slow-growth phenotypes. In the present work, we show that loss of the Drosophila tcs3 homolog also leads to a severe reduction in size and demonstrate, for the first time in a non-microbe, that Tcs3 is required for t6A synthesis. In Drosophila and in mammals, tRNAiMet is a limiting factor for cell and animal growth. We report that the t6A-modified form of tRNAiMet is the actual limiting factor. We show that changing the proportion of t6A-modified tRNAiMet, by expression of an un-modifiable tRNAiMet or changing the levels of Tcs3, regulate target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase activity and influences cell and animal growth in vivo. These findings reveal an unprecedented relationship between the translation machinery and TOR, where translation efficiency, limited by the availability of t6A-modified tRNA, determines growth potential in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26063805

  19. A Divalent Metal Ion-Dependent N1-Methyl Transfer to G37-tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Reiko; Lahoud, Georges; Christian, Thomas; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the majority of S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyl transferases requires no divalent metal ions. Here we report that methyl transfer from AdoMet to N1 of G37-tRNA, catalyzed by the bacterial TrmD enzyme, is strongly dependent on divalent metal ions and that Mg2+ is the most physiologically relevant. Kinetic isotope analysis, metal rescue, and spectroscopic measurements indicate that Mg2+ is not involved in substrate binding, but in promoting methyl transfer. Based on the pH-activity profile indicating one proton transfer during the TrmD reaction, we propose a catalytic mechanism in which the role of Mg2+ is to help to increase the nucleophilicity of N1 of G37 and stabilize the negative developing charge on O6 during attack on the methyl sulfonium of AdoMet. This work demonstrates how Mg2+ contributes to the catalysis of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer in one of the most crucial post-transcriptional modifications to tRNA. PMID:25219964

  20. From End to End: tRNA Editing at 5'- and 3'-Terminal Positions

    PubMed Central

    Betat, Heike; Long, Yicheng; Jackman, Jane E.; Mörl, Mario

    2014-01-01

    During maturation, tRNA molecules undergo a series of individual processing steps, ranging from exo- and endonucleolytic trimming reactions at their 5'- and 3'-ends, specific base modifications and intron removal to the addition of the conserved 3'-terminal CCA sequence. Especially in mitochondria, this plethora of processing steps is completed by various editing events, where base identities at internal positions are changed and/or nucleotides at 5'- and 3'-ends are replaced or incorporated. In this review, we will focus predominantly on the latter reactions, where a growing number of cases indicate that these editing events represent a rather frequent and widespread phenomenon. While the mechanistic basis for 5'- and 3'-end editing differs dramatically, both reactions represent an absolute requirement for generating a functional tRNA. Current in vivo and in vitro model systems support a scenario in which these highly specific maturation reactions might have evolved out of ancient promiscuous RNA polymerization or quality control systems. PMID:25535083

  1. Distinct kinetic determinants for the stepwise CCA addition to tRNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangbumn; Liu, Cuiping; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard B; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2009-10-01

    The universally conserved CCA sequence is present at the 3' terminal 74-76 positions of all active tRNA molecules as a functional tag to participate in ribosome protein synthesis. The CCA enzyme catalyzes CCA synthesis in three sequential steps of nucleotide addition at rapid and identical rates. However, the kinetic determinant of each addition is unknown, thus limiting the insights into the kinetic basis of CCA addition. Using our recently developed single turnover kinetics of Escherichia coli CCA enzyme as a model, we show here that the identical rate of the stepwise CCA addition is determined by distinct kinetic parameters. Specifically, the kinetics of C74 and C75 addition is controlled by the chemistry of nucleotidyl transfer, whereas the kinetics of A76 addition is controlled by a prechemistry conformational transition of the active site. In multiple turnover condition, all three steps are controlled by slow product release, indicating enzyme processivity from one addition to the next. However, the processivity decreases as the enzyme progresses to complete the CCA synthesis. Together, these results suggest the existence of a network of diverse kinetic parameters that determines the overall rate of CCA addition for tRNA maturation.

  2. Dietary uptake efficiency of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl in yellow perch and rainbow trout: Role of dietary and body lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowska, H.; Fisher, S.W.; Dabrowski, K.; Staubus, A.E.

    1999-05-01

    Dietary uptake efficiency ({alpha}) and eliminate rate constants (k{sub d}) of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) were determined in two fish species, yellow perch and rainbow trout, to investigate the influence of dietary and body lipid levels on bioaccumulation. Groups of juvenile fish with significant differences in percent body lipid were fed with a low-fat(LF) or high-fat(HF) diet spiked with 5 or 50 ppb of {sup 14}C-HCBP for 32 d. Thereafter, fish were fed an uncontaminated LF or HF diet to allow for elimination of HCBP. Feeding and growth rates were quantified. There were eight fish lipid-dietary lipid-HCBP concentration exposure combinations for each species. Four fish from each exposure were collected at the beginning of the study and at 10--17-d intervals during exposure and elimination periods for lipid and {sup 14}C-HCBP analysis. The {alpha} values ranged from 74 to 95% in yellow perch and from 79 to 99% in rainbow trout. The greatest {alpha} values, of 95 to 99%, were found in fish given diets with 5 ppb HCBP. Uptake of HCBP was influenced by both dietary and body lipids and depended on the current status of both lipid pools. The elimination rate constants were in the range of 0.000 to 0.004 d{sup {minus}1} in yellow perch and 0.003 to 0.010 d{sup {minus}1} in rainbow trout. No significant differences in elimination rate constants between HF and LF fish groups were found. In fish on a constant dietary lipid regime, the k{sub d} values tended to be less in HF than in LF fish. However, in fish groups offered diets with a change in lipid regime. The k{sub d} tended to be greater. Lipid x time interactions in the HF and LF fish groups undergoing a change in lipid regime indicated that the k{sub d} values, like the {alpha} values, were influenced by both lipid pools. Changes in elimination rates due to dietary/body lipid status impacted BAFs more strongly than changes in uptake efficiencies. The BAFs were in the range of 1.11 to 2

  3. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  4. An Incompatibility between a Mitochondrial tRNA and Its Nuclear-Encoded tRNA Synthetase Compromises Development and Fitness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Siddiq, Mohammad A.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription, translation, and respiration require interactions between genes encoded in two distinct genomes, generating the potential for mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes to interact epistatically and cause incompatibilities that decrease fitness. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis for fitness has been documented within and between populations and species of diverse taxa, but rarely has the genetic or mechanistic basis of these mitochondrial–nuclear interactions been elucidated, limiting our understanding of which genes harbor variants causing mitochondrial–nuclear disruption and of the pathways and processes that are impacted by mitochondrial–nuclear coevolution. Here we identify an amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tyrosyl–tRNA synthetase that interacts epistatically with a polymorphism in the D. simulans mitochondrial-encoded tRNATyr to significantly delay development, compromise bristle formation, and decrease fecundity. The incompatible genotype specifically decreases the activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, III, and IV that contain mitochondrial-encoded subunits. Combined with the identity of the interacting alleles, this pattern indicates that mitochondrial protein translation is affected by this interaction. Our findings suggest that interactions between mitochondrial tRNAs and their nuclear-encoded tRNA synthetases may be targets of compensatory molecular evolution. Human mitochondrial diseases are often genetically complex and variable in penetrance, and the mitochondrial–nuclear interaction we document provides a plausible mechanism to explain this complexity. PMID:23382693

  5. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    B Pan; Y Xiong; T Steitz

    2011-12-31

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3' end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5'-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3' hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  6. The 51-63 base pair of tRNA confers specificity for binding by EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Lee E; Uhlenbeck, Olke C

    2007-06-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) exhibits significant specificity for the different elongator tRNA bodies in order to offset its variable affinity to the esterified amino acid. Three X-ray cocrystal structures reveal that while most of the contacts with the protein involve the phosphodiester backbone of tRNA, a single hydrogen bond is observed between the Glu390 and the amino group of a guanine in the 51-63 base pair in the T-stem of tRNA. Here we show that the Glu390Ala mutation of Thermus thermophilus EF-Tu selectively destabilizes binding of those tRNAs containing a guanine at either position 51 or 63 and that mutagenesis of the 51-63 base pair in several tRNAs modulates their binding affinities to EF-Tu. A comparison of Escherichia coli tRNA sequences suggests that this specificity mechanism is conserved across the bacterial domain. While this contact is an important specificity determinant, it is clear that others remain to be identified.

  7. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing.

  8. Review on the binding of anticancer drug doxorubicin with DNA and tRNA: Structural models and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Bourassa, P; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we have compared the results of multiple spectroscopic studies and molecular modeling of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) bindings to DNA and tRNA. DOX was intercalated into DNA duplex, while tRNA binding is via major and minor grooves. DOX-DNA intercalation is close to A-7, C-5, *C-19 (H-bonding with DOX NH2 group), G-6, T-8 and T-18 with the free binding energy of -4.99kcal/mol. DOX-tRNA groove bindings are near A-29, A-31, A-38, C-25, C-27, C-28, *G-30 (H-bonding) and U-41 with the free binding energy of -4.44kcal/mol. Drug intercalation induced a partial B to A-DNA transition, while tRNA remained in A-family structure. The structural differences observed between DOX bindings to DNA and tRNA can be the main reasons for drug antitumor activity. The results of in vitro MTT assay on SKC01 colon carcinoma are consistent with the observed DNA structural changes. Future research should be focused on finding suitable nanocarriers for delivery of DOX in vivo in order to exploit the full capacity of this very important anticancer drug.

  9. Bases in 16S rRNA Important for Subunit Association, tRNA binding, and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinying; Chiu, Katie; Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomes are the cellular machinery responsible for protein synthesis. A well-orchestrated step in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis is the precise translocation of the tRNA-mRNA complex within the ribosome. Here we report the application of a new in vitro modification-interference method for the identification of bases in 16S rRNA that are essential for translocation. Our results suggest that conserved bases U56, U723, A1306, A1319, and A1468 in 16S rRNA are important for translocation. These five bases were deleted or mutated in order to study their role in translation. Depending on the type of mutation, we observed inhibition of growth rate, subunit association, tRNA binding and/or translocation. Interestingly, deletion of U56 or A1319 or mutation of A1319 to C showed a lethal phenotype and were defective in protein synthesis in vitro. Further analysis showed that deletion of U56 or A1319 caused defects in 30S subunit assembly, subunit association and tRNA binding. In contrast, A1319C mutation showed no defects in subunit association; however, the extent of tRNA binding and translocation was significantly reduced. These results show that conserved bases located as far away as 100 Å from the tRNA binding sites can be important for translation. PMID:19545171

  10. N(6)-methyladenosine in mRNA disrupts tRNA selection and translation-elongation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhong; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Demirci, Hasan; Chen, Jin; Petrov, Alexey; Prabhakar, Arjun; O'Leary, Seán E; Dominissini, Dan; Rechavi, Gideon; Soltis, S Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2016-02-01

    N(6)-methylation of adenosine (forming m(6)A) is the most abundant post-transcriptional modification within the coding region of mRNA, but its role during translation remains unknown. Here, we used bulk kinetic and single-molecule methods to probe the effect of m(6)A in mRNA decoding. Although m(6)A base-pairs with uridine during decoding, as shown by X-ray crystallographic analyses of Thermus thermophilus ribosomal complexes, our measurements in an Escherichia coli translation system revealed that m(6)A modification of mRNA acts as a barrier to tRNA accommodation and translation elongation. The interaction between an m(6)A-modified codon and cognate tRNA echoes the interaction between a near-cognate codon and tRNA, because delay in tRNA accommodation depends on the position and context of m(6)A within codons and on the accuracy level of translation. Overall, our results demonstrate that chemical modification of mRNA can change translational dynamics.

  11. Global tRNA misacylation induced by anaerobiosis and antibiotic exposure broadly increases stress resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Waldbauer, Jacob R.; Zhang, Lichun; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    High translational fidelity is commonly considered a requirement for optimal cellular health and protein function. However, recent findings have shown that inducible mistranslation specifically with methionine engendered at the tRNA charging level occurs in mammalian cells, yeast and archaea, yet it was unknown whether bacteria were capable of mounting a similar response. Here, we demonstrate that Escherichia coli misacylates non-methionyl-tRNAs with methionine in response to anaerobiosis and antibiotic exposure via the methionyl–tRNA synthetase (MetRS). Two MetRS succinyl-lysine modifications independently confer high tRNA charging fidelity to the otherwise promiscuous, unmodified enzyme. Strains incapable of tRNA mismethionylation are less adept at growth in the presence of antibiotics and stressors. The presence of tRNA mismethionylation and its potential role in mistranslation within the bacterial domain establishes this response as a pervasive biological mechanism and connects it to diverse cellular functions and modes of fitness. PMID:27672035

  12. Role of modified nucleosides in tRNA: effect of modification of the 2-thiouridine derivative located at the 5'-end of the anticodon of yeast transfer RNA Lys2.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, G C; Ghosh, H P

    1976-01-01

    Yeast tRNA Lys2 codes preferentially for AAA and contains a 2-thiouridine derivative (U) at the 5'-position of the anticodon. Removal of the 2-thio group from U by treatment with CNBr did not affect the amino acid accepting activity of the modified tRNA Lys2. CNBr treated tRNA Lys2 was active in protein synthesis but with a much reduced efficiency. Although the modified tRNA Lys2 was recognized by elongation factor (EF) T, the EFT dependent binding to ribosomes to tRNA Lys2 (CNBr) was markedly decreased. PMID:775440

  13. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    PubMed

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  14. Duplication and Remolding of tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genome of Reduvius tenebrosus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pei; Li, Hu; Song, Fan; Cai, Yao; Wang, Jianyun; Liu, Jinpeng; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Most assassin bugs are predators that act as important natural enemies of insect pests. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes of these insects are double-strand circular DNAs that encode 37 genes. In the present study, we explore the duplication and rearrangement of tRNA genes in the mt genome of Reduvius tenebrosus, the first mt genome from the subfamily Reduviinae. The gene order rearranges from CR (control region)-trnI-trnQ-trnM-ND2 to CR-trnQ-trnI2-trnI1-trnM-ND2. We identified 23 tRNA genes, including 22 tRNAs commonly found in insects and an additional trnI (trnI2), which has high sequence similarity to trnM. We found several pseudo genes, such as pseudo-trnI, pseudo-CR, and pseudo-ND2, in the hotspot region of gene rearrangement (between the control region and ND2). These features provided evidence that this novel gene order could be explained by the tandem duplication/random loss (TDRL) model. The tRNA duplication/anticodon mutation mechanism further explains the presence of trnI2, which is remolded from a duplicated trnM in the TDRL process (through an anticodon mutation of CAT to GAT). Our study also raises new questions as to whether the two events proceed simultaneously and if the remolded tRNA gene is fully functional. Significantly, the duplicated tRNA gene in the mitochondrial genome has evolved independently at least two times within assassin bugs. PMID:27322247

  15. Selective rescue of selenoprotein expression in mice lacking a highly specialized methyl group in selenocysteine tRNA.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bradley A; Xu, Xue-Ming; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2005-02-18

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is the 21st amino acid in the genetic code. Its tRNA is variably methylated on the 2'-O-hydroxyl site of the ribosyl moiety at position 34 (Um34). Herein, we identified a role of Um34 in regulating the expression of some, but not all, selenoproteins. A strain of knock-out transgenic mice was generated, wherein the Sec tRNA gene was replaced with either wild type or mutant Sec tRNA transgenes. The mutant transgene yielded a tRNA that lacked two base modifications, N(6)-isopentenyladenosine at position 37 (i(6)A37) and Um34. Several selenoproteins, including glutathione peroxidases 1 and 3, SelR, and SelT, were not detected in mice rescued with the mutant transgene, whereas other selenoproteins, including thioredoxin reductases 1 and 3 and glutathione peroxidase 4, were expressed in normal or reduced levels. Northern blot analysis suggested that other selenoproteins (e.g. SelW) were also poorly expressed. This novel regulation of protein expression occurred at the level of translation and manifested a tissue-specific pattern. The available data suggest that the Um34 modification has greater influence than the i(6)A37 modification in regulating the expression of various mammalian selenoproteins and Um34 is required for synthesis of several members of this protein class. Many proteins that were poorly rescued appear to be involved in responses to stress, and their expression is also highly dependent on selenium in the diet. Furthermore, their mRNA levels are regulated by selenium and are subject to nonsense-mediated decay. Overall, this study described a novel mechanism of regulation of protein expression by tRNA modification that is in turn regulated by levels of the trace element, selenium.

  16. The 3' end CCA of mature tRNA is an antideterminant for eukaryotic 3'-tRNase.

    PubMed

    Mohan, A; Whyte, S; Wang, X; Nashimoto, M; Levinger, L

    1999-02-01

    Cytoplasmic tRNAs undergo posttranscriptional 5' and 3' end processing in the eukaryotic nucleus, and CCA (which forms the mature 3' end of all tRNAs) must be added by tRNA nucleotidyl transferase before tRNA can be aminoacylated and utilized in translation. Eukaryotic 3'-tRNase can endonucleolytically remove a 3' end trailer by cleaving on the 3' side of the discriminator base (the unpaired nucleotide 3' of the last base pair of the acceptor stem). This reaction proceeds despite a wide range in length and sequence of the 3' end trailer, except that mature tRNA containing the 3' terminal CCA is not a substrate for mouse 3'-tRNase (Nashimoto, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:1148-1154). Herein, we extend this result with Drosophila and pig 3'-tRNase, using Drosophila melanogaster tRNAHis as substrate. Mature tRNA is thus prevented from recycling through 3' end processing. We also tested a series of tRNAs ending at the discriminator base (-), with one C added (+C), two Cs added (+CC), and CCA added (+CCA) as 3'-tRNase inhibitors. Inhibition was competitive with both Drosophila and pig 3'-tRNase. The product of the 3'-tRNase reaction (-) is a good 3'-tRNase inhibitor, with a KI approximately two times KM for the normal 3'-tRNase substrate. KI increases with each nucleotide added beyond the discriminator base, until when tRNA+CCA is used as inhibitor, KI is approximately forty times the substrate KM. The 3'-tRNase can thus remain free to process precursors with 3' end trailers because it is barely inhibited by tRNA+CCA, ensuring that tRNA can progress to aminoacylation. The active site of 3'-tRNase may have evolved to make an especially poor fit with tRNA+CCA.

  17. Duplication and Remolding of tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genome of Reduvius tenebrosus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei; Li, Hu; Song, Fan; Cai, Yao; Wang, Jianyun; Liu, Jinpeng; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-06-16

    Most assassin bugs are predators that act as important natural enemies of insect pests. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes of these insects are double-strand circular DNAs that encode 37 genes. In the present study, we explore the duplication and rearrangement of tRNA genes in the mt genome of Reduvius tenebrosus, the first mt genome from the subfamily Reduviinae. The gene order rearranges from CR (control region)-trnI-trnQ-trnM-ND2 to CR-trnQ-trnI2-trnI1-trnM-ND2. We identified 23 tRNA genes, including 22 tRNAs commonly found in insects and an additional trnI (trnI2), which has high sequence similarity to trnM. We found several pseudo genes, such as pseudo-trnI, pseudo-CR, and pseudo-ND2, in the hotspot region of gene rearrangement (between the control region and ND2). These features provided evidence that this novel gene order could be explained by the tandem duplication/random loss (TDRL) model. The tRNA duplication/anticodon mutation mechanism further explains the presence of trnI2, which is remolded from a duplicated trnM in the TDRL process (through an anticodon mutation of CAT to GAT). Our study also raises new questions as to whether the two events proceed simultaneously and if the remolded tRNA gene is fully functional. Significantly, the duplicated tRNA gene in the mitochondrial genome has evolved independently at least two times within assassin bugs.

  18. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Savio T.; Rêgo, Thais G.; José, Marco V.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA) and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA), proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA. PMID:27023615

  19. MINTbase: a framework for the interactive exploration of mitochondrial and nuclear tRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Pliatsika, Venetia; Loher, Phillipe; Telonis, Aristeidis G.; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: It has been known that mature transfer RNAs (tRNAs) that are encoded in the nuclear genome give rise to short molecules, collectively known as tRNA fragments or tRFs. Recently, we reported that, in healthy individuals and in patients, tRFs are constitutive, arise from mitochondrial as well as from nuclear tRNAs, and have composition and abundances that depend on a person’s sex, population origin and race as well as on tissue, disease and disease subtype. Our findings as well as similar work by other groups highlight the importance of tRFs and presage an increase in the community’s interest in elucidating the roles of tRFs in health and disease. Results: We created MINTbase, a web-based framework that serves the dual-purpose of being a content repository for tRFs and a tool for the interactive exploration of these newly discovered molecules. A key feature of MINTbase is that it deterministically and exhaustively enumerates all possible genomic locations where a sequence fragment can be found and indicates which fragments are exclusive to tRNA space, and thus can be considered as tRFs: this is a very important consideration given that the genomes of higher organisms are riddled with partial tRNA sequences and with tRNA-lookalikes whose aberrant transcripts can be mistaken for tRFs. MINTbase is extremely flexible and integrates and presents tRF information from multiple yet interconnected vantage points (‘vistas’). Vistas permit the user to interactively personalize the information that is returned and the manner in which it is displayed. MINTbase can report comparative information on how a tRF is distributed across all anticodon/amino acid combinations, provides alignments between a tRNA and multiple tRFs with which the user can interact, provides details on published studies that reported a tRF as expressed, etc. Importantly, we designed MINTbase to contain all possible tRFs that could ever be produced by mature tRNAs: this allows us to report on

  20. On origin of genetic code and tRNA before translation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthesis of proteins is based on the genetic code - a nearly universal assignment of codons to amino acids (aas). A major challenge to the understanding of the origins of this assignment is the archetypal "key-lock vs. frozen accident" dilemma. Here we re-examine this dilemma in light of 1) the fundamental veto on "foresight evolution", 2) modular structures of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and 3) the updated library of aa-binding sites in RNA aptamers successfully selected in vitro for eight amino acids. Results The aa-binding sites of arginine, isoleucine and tyrosine contain both their cognate triplets, anticodons and codons. We have noticed that these cases might be associated with palindrome-dinucleotides. For example, one-base shift to the left brings arginine codons CGN, with CG at 1-2 positions, to the respective anticodons NCG, with CG at 2-3 positions. Formally, the concomitant presence of codons and anticodons is also expected in the reverse situation, with codons containing palindrome-dinucleotides at their 2-3 positions, and anticodons exhibiting them at 1-2 positions. A closer analysis reveals that, surprisingly, RNA binding sites for Arg, Ile and Tyr "prefer" (exactly as in the actual genetic code) the anticodon(2-3)/codon(1-2) tetramers to their anticodon(1-2)/codon(2-3) counterparts, despite the seemingly perfect symmetry of the latter. However, since in vitro selection of aa-specific RNA aptamers apparently had nothing to do with translation, this striking preference provides a new strong support to the notion of the genetic code emerging before translation, in response to catalytic (and possibly other) needs of ancient RNA life. Consistently with the pre-translation origin of the code, we propose here a new model of tRNA origin by the gradual, Fibonacci process-like, elongation of a tRNA molecule from a primordial coding triplet and 5'DCCA3' quadruplet (D is a base-determinator) to the eventual 76 base-long cloverleaf

  1. Complex organisation of the 5'-end of the human glycine tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed

    Mudge, S J; Williams, J H; Eyre, H J; Sutherland, G R; Cowan, P J; Power, D A

    1998-03-16

    Glycine tRNA synthetase (glyRS) catalyses the addition of the amino acid glycine to its cognate tRNA molecules. In the silk moth worm Bombyx mori, this gene is subject to complex transcriptional regulation because of the predominance of glycine in silk. In vertebrates, glycine is a major constituent of collagen but there have been no studies of glyRS regulation. In this study we have isolated and mapped a genomic clone containing the 5'-end of glyRS. Primer extension studies identified only one transcriptional start point (TSP) in three different cell lines. Expression of the transcript identified may be regulated translationally because it contains five potential initiation codons, three of which are in good context for initiation. The most 3' of the potential initiation codons has previously been predicted to be the initiating codon for cytoplasmic glyRS. Two of the upstream codons are in-frame with this codon, and both are predicted to extend the N-terminus of glyRS to include a mitochondrial targeting sequence. Sequencing of genomic DNA surrounding the TSP showed features common to the promoters of housekeeping genes, as well as a canonical TATA box at the unusual position of +9. Surprisingly, promoter activity in vitro was not specified by a 1.9 kb genomic fragment containing the TSP and TATA box, but by a contiguous 0.4 kb fragment immediately downstream. These studies suggest that the transcription of glyRS from a single start point requires downstream promoter elements.

  2. Insights into Folate/FAD-dependent tRNA Methyltransferase Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamdane, Djemel; Argentini, Manuela; Cornu, David; Myllykallio, Hannu; Skouloubris, Stéphane; Hui-Bon-Hoa, Gaston; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2011-01-01

    The flavoprotein TrmFO methylates specifically the C5 carbon of the highly conserved uridine 54 in tRNAs. Contrary to most methyltransferases, the 1- carbon unit transferred by TrmFO derives from 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate and not from S-adenosyl-l-methionine. The enzyme also employs the FAD hydroquinone as a reducing agent of the C5 methylene U54-tRNA intermediate in vitro. By analogy with the catalytic mechanism of thymidylate synthase ThyA, a conserved cysteine located near the FAD isoalloxazine ring was proposed to act as a nucleophile during catalysis. Here, we mutated this residue (Cys-53 in Bacillus subtilis TrmFO) to alanine and investigated its functional role. Biophysical characterization of this variant demonstrated the major structural role of Cys-53 in maintaining both the integrity and plasticity of the flavin binding site. Unexpectedly, gel mobility shift assays showed that, like the wild-type enzyme, the inactive C53A variant was capable of forming a covalent complex with a 5-fluorouridine-containing mini-RNA. This result confirms the existence of a covalent intermediate during catalysis but rules out a nucleophilic role for Cys-53. To identify the actual nucleophile, two other strictly conserved cysteines (Cys-192 and Cys-226) that are relatively far from the active site were replaced with alanine, and a double mutant C53A/C226A was generated. Interestingly, only mutations that target Cys-226 impeded TrmFO from forming a covalent complex and methylating tRNA. Altogether, we propose a revised mechanism for the m5U54 modification catalyzed by TrmFO, where Cys-226 attacks the C6 atom of the uridine, and Cys-53 plays the role of the general base abstracting the C5 proton. PMID:21846722

  3. Simulating movement of tRNA through the ribosome during hybrid-state formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitford, Paul C.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-09-01

    Biomolecular simulations provide a means for exploring the relationship between flexibility, energetics, structure, and function. With the availability of atomic models from X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), and rapid increases in computing capacity, it is now possible to apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to large biomolecular machines, and systematically partition the factors that contribute to function. A large biomolecular complex for which atomic models are available is the ribosome. In the cell, the ribosome reads messenger RNA (mRNA) in order to synthesize proteins. During this essential process, the ribosome undergoes a wide range of conformational rearrangements. One of the most poorly understood transitions is translocation: the process by which transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules move between binding sites inside of the ribosome. The first step of translocation is the adoption of a "hybrid" configuration by the tRNAs, which is accompanied by large-scale rotations in the ribosomal subunits. To illuminate the relationship between these rearrangements, we apply MD simulations using a multi-basin structure-based (SMOG) model, together with targeted molecular dynamics protocols. From 120 simulated transitions, we demonstrate the viability of a particular route during P/E hybrid-state formation, where there is asynchronous movement along rotation and tRNA coordinates. These simulations not only suggest an ordering of events, but they highlight atomic interactions that may influence the kinetics of hybrid-state formation. From these simulations, we also identify steric features (H74 and surrounding residues) encountered during the hybrid transition, and observe that flexibility of the single-stranded 3'-CCA tail is essential for it to reach the endpoint. Together, these simulations provide a set of structural and energetic signatures that suggest strategies for modulating the physical-chemical properties of protein synthesis by the

  4. Loss of wobble uridine modification in tRNA anticodons interferes with TOR pathway signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Viktor; Jüdes, André; Bär, Christian; Klassen, Roland; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in yeast has suggested that modification of tRNAs, in particular uridine bases in the anticodon wobble position (U34), is linked to TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling. Hence, U34 modification mutants were found to be hypersensitive to TOR inhibition by rapamycin. To study whether this involves inappropriate TOR signaling, we examined interaction between mutations in TOR pathway genes (tip41∆, sap190∆, ppm1∆, rrd1∆) and U34 modification defects (elp3∆, kti12∆, urm1∆, ncs2∆) and found the rapamycin hypersensitivity in the latter is epistatic to drug resistance of the former. Epistasis, however, is abolished in tandem with a gln3∆ deletion, which inactivates transcription factor Gln3 required for TOR-sensitive activation of NCR (nitrogen catabolite repression) genes. In line with nuclear import of Gln3 being under control of TOR and dephosphorylation by the Sit4 phosphatase, we identify novel TOR-sensitive sit4 mutations that confer rapamycin resistance and importantly, mislocalise Gln3 when TOR is inhibited. This is similar to gln3∆ cells, which abolish the rapamycin hypersensitivity of U34 modification mutants, and suggests TOR deregulation due to tRNA undermodification operates through Gln3. In line with this, loss of U34 modifications (elp3∆, urm1∆) enhances nuclear import of and NCR gene activation (MEP2, GAP1) by Gln3 when TOR activity is low. Strikingly, this stimulatory effect onto Gln3 is suppressed by overexpression of tRNAs that usually carry the U34 modifications. Collectively, our data suggest that proper TOR signaling requires intact tRNA modifications and that loss of U34 modifications impinges on the TOR-sensitive NCR branch via Gln3 misregulation. PMID:28357221

  5. Computational identification of the selenocysteine tRNA (tRNASec) in genomes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is known as the 21st amino acid, a cysteine analogue with selenium replacing sulphur. Sec is inserted co-translationally in a small fraction of proteins called selenoproteins. In selenoprotein genes, the Sec specific tRNA (tRNASec) drives the recoding of highly specific UGA codons from stop signals to Sec. Although found in organisms from the three domains of life, Sec is not universal. Many species are completely devoid of selenoprotein genes and lack the ability to synthesize Sec. Since tRNASec is a key component in selenoprotein biosynthesis, its efficient identification in genomes is instrumental to characterize the utilization of Sec across lineages. Available tRNA prediction methods fail to accurately predict tRNASec, due to its unusual structural fold. Here, we present Secmarker, a method based on manually curated covariance models capturing the specific tRNASec structure in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. We exploited the non-universality of Sec to build a proper benchmark set for tRNASec predictions, which is not possible for the predictions of other tRNAs. We show that Secmarker greatly improves the accuracy of previously existing methods constituting a valuable tool to identify tRNASec genes, and to efficiently determine whether a genome contains selenoproteins. We used Secmarker to analyze a large set of fully sequenced genomes, and the results revealed new insights in the biology of tRNASec, led to the discovery of a novel bacterial selenoprotein family, and shed additional light on the phylogenetic distribution of selenoprotein containing genomes. Secmarker is freely accessible for download, or online analysis through a web server at http://secmarker.crg.cat. PMID:28192430

  6. Queuosine modification of tRNA: its divergent role in cellular machinery.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Manjula; Pathak, Chandramani

    2009-11-23

    tRNAs possess a high content of modified nucleosides, which display an incredible structural variety. These modified nucleosides are conserved in their sequence and have important roles in tRNA functions. Most often, hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, which play a direct role in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, codon recognition, etc. One of such hypermodified base is queuine, which is a base analogue of guanine, found in the first anticodon position of specific tRNAs (tyrosine, histidine, aspartate and asparagine tRNAs). These tRNAs of the 'Q-family' originally contain guanine in the first position of anticodon, which is post-transcriptionally modified with queuine by an irreversible insertion during maturation. Queuine is ubiquitously present throughout the living system from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, including plants. Prokaryotes can synthesize queuine de novo by a complex biosynthetic pathway, whereas eukaryotes are unable to synthesize either the precursor or queuine. They utilize salvage system and acquire queuine as a nutrient factor from their diet or from intestinal microflora. The tRNAs of the Q-family are completely modified in terminally differentiated somatic cells. However, hypomodification of Q-tRNA (queuosine-modified tRNA) is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. The precise mechanisms of queuine- and Q-tRNA-mediated action are still a mystery. Direct or indirect evidence suggests that queuine or Q-tRNA participates in many cellular functions, such as inhibition of cell proliferation, control of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, bacterial virulence, etc. The role of Q-tRNA modification in cellular machinery and the signalling pathways involved therein is the focus of this review.

  7. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  8. Mitochondrial tRNA 5′-Editing in Dictyostelium discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Maria G.; Long, Yicheng; Kinchen, R. Dimitri; Schindel, Elinor T.; Gray, Michael W.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) 5′-editing was first described more than 20 years ago; however, the first candidates for 5′-editing enzymes were only recently identified in a eukaryotic microbe (protist), the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. In this organism, eight of 18 mt-tRNAs are predicted to be edited based on the presence of genomically encoded mismatched nucleotides in their aminoacyl-acceptor stem sequences. Here, we demonstrate that mt-tRNA 5′-editing occurs at all predicted sites in D. discoideum as evidenced by changes in the sequences of isolated mt-tRNAs compared with the expected sequences encoded by the mitochondrial genome. We also identify two previously unpredicted editing events in which G-U base pairs are edited in the absence of any other genomically encoded mismatches. A comparison of 5′-editing in D. discoideum with 5′-editing in another slime mold, Polysphondylium pallidum, suggests organism-specific idiosyncrasies in the treatment of U-G/G-U pairs. In vitro activities of putative D. discoideum editing enzymes are consistent with the observed editing reactions and suggest an overall lack of tRNA substrate specificity exhibited by the repair component of the editing enzyme. Although the presence of terminal mismatches in mt-tRNA sequences is highly predictive of the occurrence of mt-tRNA 5′-editing, the variability in treatment of U-G/G-U base pairs observed here indicates that direct experimental evidence of 5′-editing must be obtained to understand the complete spectrum of mt-tRNA editing events in any species. PMID:24737330

  9. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, Marissa A; Donner, Julia R; Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Rand, David M

    2015-08-01

    Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw(501) mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA) for tyrosine (tRNA(Tyr)) interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw(501) mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNA(Tyr) are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function.

  10. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Donner, Julia R.; Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Rand, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw501 mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA) for tyrosine (tRNATyr) interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw501 mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNATyr are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function. PMID:26035388

  11. Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro

    2015-06-28

    We have developed a novel type of biofunction-assisted aptasensor that harnesses ligand-dependent 3' processing of a premature amber suppressor tRNA and the subsequent amber suppression of a reporter gene in a wheat germ extract.

  12. Correction: Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro

    2015-08-14

    Correction for 'Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract' by Atsushi Ogawa et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 6681-6685.

  13. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  14. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  15. Characterization of the tRNA and ribosome-dependent pppGpp-synthesis by recombinant stringent factor from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Knutsson Jenvert, Rose-Marie; Holmberg Schiavone, Lovisa

    2005-02-01

    Stringent factor is a ribosome-dependent ATP:GTP pyrophosphoryl transferase that synthesizes (p)ppGpp upon nutrient deprivation. It is activated by unacylated tRNA in the ribosomal amino-acyl site (A-site) but it is unclear how activation occurs. A His-tagged stringent factor was isolated by affinity-chromatography and precipitation. This procedure yielded a protein of high purity that displayed (a) a low endogenous pyrophosphoryl transferase activity that was inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline; (b) a low ribosome-dependent activity that was inhibited by the A-site specific antibiotics thiostrepton, micrococcin, tetracycline and viomycin; (c) a tRNA- and ribosome-dependent activity amounting to 4500 pmol pppGpp per pmol stringent factor per minute. Footprinting analysis showed that stringent factor interacted with ribosomes that contained tRNAs bound in classical states. Maximal activity was seen when the ribosomal A-site was presaturated with unacylated tRNA. Less tRNA was required to reach maximal activity when stringent factor and unacylated tRNA were added simultaneously to ribosomes, suggesting that stringent factor formed a complex with tRNA in solution that had higher affinity for the ribosomal A-site. However, tRNA-saturation curves, performed at two different ribosome/stringent factor ratios and filter-binding assays, did not support this hypothesis.

  16. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-01-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  17. tRNA synthase suppression activates de novo cysteine synthesis to compensate for cystine and glutathione deprivation during ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Glutathione is a major endogenous reducing agent in cells, and cysteine is a limiting factor in glutathione synthesis. Cysteine is obtained by uptake or biosynthesis, and mammalian cells often rely on either one or the other pathway. Because of the scarcity of glutathione, blockade of cysteine uptake causes oxidative cell death known as ferroptosis. A new study suggests that tRNA synthetase suppression activates the endogenous biosynthesis of cysteine, compensates such cysteine loss, and thus makes cells resistant to ferroptosis.

  18. Dynamics of tRNA fragments and their targets in aging mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Karaiskos, Spyros; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: The progress of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled various non-coding RNAs that have previously been considered products of random degradation and attracted only minimal interest. Among small RNA families, microRNA (miRNAs) have traditionally been considered key post-transcriptional regulators. However, recent studies have reported evidence for widespread presence of fragments of tRNA molecules (tRFs) across a range of organisms and tissues, and of tRF involvement in Argonaute complexes.  Methods:To elucidate potential tRF functionality, we compared available RNA sequencing datasets derived from the brains of young, mid-aged and old rats. Using sliding 7-mer windows along a tRF, we searched for putative seed sequences with high numbers of conserved complementary sites within 3' UTRs of 23 vertebrate genomes. We analyzed Gene Ontology term enrichment of predicted tRF targets and compared their transcript levels with targets of miRNAs in the context of age.  Results and Discussion: We detected tRFs originating from 3’- and 5’-ends of tRNAs in rat brains at significant levels. These fragments showed dynamic changes: 3’ tRFs monotonously increased with age, while 5’ tRFs displayed less consistent patterns. Furthermore, 3’ tRFs showed a narrow size range compared to 5’ tRFs, suggesting a difference in their biogenesis mechanisms. Similar to our earlier results in Drosophila and compatible with other experimental findings, we found “seed” sequence locations on both ends of different tRFs. Putative targets of these fragments were found to be enriched in neuronal and developmental functions. Comparison of tRFs and miRNAs increasing in abundance with age revealed small, but distinct changes in brain target transcript levels for these two types of small RNA, with the higher proportion of tRF targets decreasing with age. We also illustrated the utility of tRF analysis for annotating tRNA genes in sequenced genomes. PMID

  19. Enzymology of tRNA modification in the bacterial MnmEG pathway.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M-Eugenia; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Prado, Silvia; Ruiz-Partida, Rafael; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Villarroya, Magda; Lomas, Rodrigo; Garzón, María J; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; Meseguer, Salvador; Navarro-González, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Among all RNAs, tRNA exhibits the largest number and the widest variety of post-transcriptional modifications. Modifications within the anticodon stem loop, mainly at the wobble position and purine-37, collectively contribute to stabilize the codon-anticodon pairing, maintain the translational reading frame, facilitate the engagement of the ribosomal decoding site and enable translocation of tRNA from the A-site to the P-site of the ribosome. Modifications at the wobble uridine (U34) of tRNAs reading two degenerate codons ending in purine are complex and result from the activity of two multi-enzyme pathways, the IscS-MnmA and MnmEG pathways, which independently work on positions 2 and 5 of the U34 pyrimidine ring, respectively, and from a third pathway, controlled by TrmL (YibK), that modifies the 2'-hydroxyl group of the ribose. MnmEG is the only common pathway to all the mentioned tRNAs, and involves the GTP- and FAD-dependent activity of the MnmEG complex and, in some cases, the activity of the bifunctional enzyme MnmC. The Escherichia coli MnmEG complex catalyzes the incorporation of an aminomethyl group into the C5 atom of U34 using methylene-tetrahydrofolate and glycine or ammonium as donors. The reaction requires GTP hydrolysis, probably to assemble the active site of the enzyme or to carry out substrate recognition. Inactivation of the evolutionarily conserved MnmEG pathway produces a pleiotropic phenotype in bacteria and mitochondrial dysfunction in human cell lines. While the IscS-MnmA pathway and the MnmA-mediated thiouridylation reaction are relatively well understood, we have limited information on the reactions mediated by the MnmEG, MnmC and TrmL enzymes and on the precise role of proteins MnmE and MnmG in the MnmEG complex activity. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge on these pathways and what we still need to know, with special emphasis on the MnmEG pathway.

  20. tRNA processing defects induce replication stress and Chk2-dependent disruption of piRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Vallés, Ana Maria; Ganem-Elbaz, Carine; Antoniewski, Christophe; Huynh, Jean-René

    2015-12-14

    RNase P is a conserved endonuclease that processes the 5' trailer of tRNA precursors. We have isolated mutations in Rpp30, a subunit of RNase P, and find that these induce complete sterility in Drosophila females. Here, we show that sterility is not due to a shortage of mature tRNAs, but that atrophied ovaries result from the activation of several DNA damage checkpoint proteins, including p53, Claspin, and Chk2. Indeed, we find that tRNA processing defects lead to increased replication stress and de-repression of transposable elements in mutant ovaries. We also report that transcription of major piRNA sources collapse in mutant germ cells and that this correlates with a decrease in heterochromatic H3K9me3 marks on the corresponding piRNA-producing loci. Our data thus link tRNA processing, DNA replication, and genome defense by small RNAs. This unexpected connection reveals constraints that could shape genome organization during evolution.

  1. Coadaptation of isoacceptor tRNA genes and codon usage bias for translation efficiency in Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Susanta K.; Severson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The transfer RNAs (tRNA) are essential components of translational machinery. We determined that tRNA isoacceptors (tRNAs with different anticodons but incorporating the same amino acid in protein synthesis) show differential copy number abundance, genomic distribution patterns and sequence evolution between Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. The tRNA-Ala genes are present in unusually high copy number in the Ae. aegypti genome but not in An. gambiae. Many of the tRNA-Ala genes of Ae. aegypti are flanked by a highly conserved sequence that is not observed in An. gambiae. The relative abundance of tRNA isoacceptor genes is correlated with preferred (or optimal) and non-preferred (or rare) codons for ~2–4% of the predicted protein coding genes in both species. The majority (~ 74–85%) of these genes are related to pathways involved with translation, energy metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism. Our results suggest these genes and the related pathways may be under translational selection in these mosquitoes. PMID:21040044

  2. The initiator methionine tRNA drives cell migration and invasion leading to increased metastatic potential in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Joanna; Clarke, Cassie J.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Campbell, Kirsteen; Mitchell, Louise; Liko, Dritan; Kalna, Gabriela; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Neilson, Matthew; Blyth, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell's repertoire of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been linked to cancer. Recently, the level of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) in stromal fibroblasts has been shown to influence extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion to drive tumour growth and angiogenesis. Here we show that increased tRNAiMet within cancer cells does not influence tumour growth, but drives cell migration and invasion via a mechanism that is independent from ECM synthesis and dependent on α5β1 integrin and levels of the translation initiation ternary complex. In vivo and ex vivo migration (but not proliferation) of melanoblasts is significantly enhanced in transgenic mice which express additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene. We show that increased tRNAiMet in melanoma drives migratory, invasive behaviour and metastatic potential without affecting cell proliferation and primary tumour growth, and that expression of RNA polymerase III-associated genes (which drive tRNA expression) are elevated in metastases by comparison with primary tumours. Thus, specific alterations to the cancer cell tRNA repertoire drive a migration/invasion programme that may lead to metastasis. PMID:27543055

  3. Origin of amino acid homochirality: relationship with the RNA world and origin of tRNA aminoacylation.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Koji

    2008-04-01

    The origin of homochirality of l-amino acids has long been a mystery. Aminoacylation of tRNA might have provided chiral selectivity, since it is the first process encountered by amino acids and RNA. An RNA minihelix (progenitor of the modern tRNA) was aminoacylated by an aminoacyl phosphate oligonucleotide that exhibited a clear preference for l- as opposed to d-amino acids. A mirror-image RNA system with l-ribose exhibited the opposite selectivity, i.e., it exhibited an apparent preference for the d-amino acid. The selectivity for l-amino acids is based on the stereochemistry of RNA. The side chain of d-amino acids is located much closer to the terminal adenosine of the minihelix, causing them collide and interfere during the amino acid-transfer step. These results suggest that the putative RNA world that preceded the protein theatre determined the homochirality of l-amino acids through tRNA aminoacylation.

  4. MINTmap: fast and exhaustive profiling of nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA fragments from short RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Loher, Phillipe; Telonis, Aristeidis G; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2017-02-21

    Transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) are an established class of constitutive regulatory molecules that arise from precursor and mature tRNAs. RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq) has greatly facilitated the study of tRFs. However, the repeat nature of the tRNA templates and the idiosyncrasies of tRNA sequences necessitate the development and use of methodologies that differ markedly from those used to analyze RNA-seq data when studying microRNAs (miRNAs) or messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Here we present MINTmap (for MItochondrial and Nuclear TRF mapping), a method and a software package that was developed specifically for the quick, deterministic and exhaustive identification of tRFs in short RNA-seq datasets. In addition to identifying them, MINTmap is able to unambiguously calculate and report both raw and normalized abundances for the discovered tRFs. Furthermore, to ensure specificity, MINTmap identifies the subset of discovered tRFs that could be originating outside of tRNA space and flags them as candidate false positives. Our comparative analysis shows that MINTmap exhibits superior sensitivity and specificity to other available methods while also being exceptionally fast. The MINTmap codes are available through https://github.com/TJU-CMC-Org/MINTmap/ under an open source GNU GPL v3.0 license.

  5. Structure of DRE, a retrotransposable element which integrates with position specificity upstream of Dictyostelium discoideum tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Marschalek, R; Hofmann, J; Schumann, G; Gösseringer, R; Dingermann, T

    1992-01-01

    Different Dictyostelium discoideum strains contain between 2 and 200 copies of a retrotransposable element termed DRE (Dictyostelium repetitive element). From the analysis of more than 50 elements, it can be concluded that DRE elements always occur 50 +/- 3 nucleotides upstream of tRNA genes. All analyzed clones contain DRE in a constant orientation relative to the tRNA gene, implying orientation specificity as well as position specificity. DRE contains two open reading frames which are flanked by nonidentical terminal repeats. Long terminal repeats (LTRs) are composed of three distinct modules, called A, B, and C. The tRNA gene-proximal LTR is characterized by one or multiple A modules followed by a single B module (AnB). With respect to the distal LTR, two different subforms of DRE have been isolated. The majority of isolated clones contains a distal LTR composed of a B module followed by a C module (BC), whereas the distal LTR of the other subform contains a consecutive array of a B module, a C module, a slightly altered A module, another B module, and another C module (BC.ABC). Full-length as well as smaller transcripts from DRE elements have been detected, but in comparison with the high copy number in D. discoideum strains derived from the wild-type strain NC4, transcription is rather poor. Images PMID:1309589

  6. MINTmap: fast and exhaustive profiling of nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA fragments from short RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Loher, Phillipe; Telonis, Aristeidis G.; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2017-01-01

    Transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) are an established class of constitutive regulatory molecules that arise from precursor and mature tRNAs. RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq) has greatly facilitated the study of tRFs. However, the repeat nature of the tRNA templates and the idiosyncrasies of tRNA sequences necessitate the development and use of methodologies that differ markedly from those used to analyze RNA-seq data when studying microRNAs (miRNAs) or messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Here we present MINTmap (for MItochondrial and Nuclear TRF mapping), a method and a software package that was developed specifically for the quick, deterministic and exhaustive identification of tRFs in short RNA-seq datasets. In addition to identifying them, MINTmap is able to unambiguously calculate and report both raw and normalized abundances for the discovered tRFs. Furthermore, to ensure specificity, MINTmap identifies the subset of discovered tRFs that could be originating outside of tRNA space and flags them as candidate false positives. Our comparative analysis shows that MINTmap exhibits superior sensitivity and specificity to other available methods while also being exceptionally fast. The MINTmap codes are available through https://github.com/TJU-CMC-Org/MINTmap/ under an open source GNU GPL v3.0 license. PMID:28220888

  7. TFAM detects co-evolution of tRNA identity rules with lateral transfer of histidyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, David H.; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2006-01-01

    We present TFAM, an automated, statistical method to classify the identity of tRNAs. TFAM, currently optimized for bacteria, classifies initiator tRNAs and predicts the charging identity of both typical and atypical tRNAs such as suppressors with high confidence. We show statistical evidence for extensive variation in tRNA identity determinants among bacterial genomes due to variation in overall tDNA base content. With TFAM we have detected the first case of eukaryotic-like tRNA identity rules in bacteria. An α-proteobacterial clade encompassing Rhizobiales, Caulobacter crescentus and Silicibacter pomeroyi, unlike a sister clade containing the Rickettsiales, Zymomonas mobilis and Gluconobacter oxydans, uses the eukaryotic identity element A73 instead of the highly conserved prokaryotic element C73. We confirm divergence of bacterial histidylation rules by demonstrating perfect covariation of α-proteobacterial tRNAHis acceptor stems and residues in the motif IIb tRNA-binding pocket of their histidyl-tRNA synthetases (HisRS). Phylogenomic analysis supports lateral transfer of a eukaryotic-like HisRS into the α-proteobacteria followed by in situ adaptation of the bacterial tDNAHis and identity rule divergence. Our results demonstrate that TFAM is an effective tool for the bioinformatics, comparative genomics and evolutionary study of tRNA identity. PMID:16473847

  8. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  9. tRNA modification activity is necessary for Tet(M)-mediated tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Burdett, V

    1993-01-01

    Tet(M) protein interacts with the protein biosynthetic machinery to render this process resistant to the tetracycline in vivo and in vitro (V. Burdett, J. Biol. Chem. 266:2872-2877, 1991). To understand this process more completely, a mutant of Escherichia coli which is altered in the ability of Tet(M) to confer resistance has been identified. This mutation maps to miaA and displays phenotypes characteristic of previously isolated miaA mutations. The miaA gene product modifies A37 adjacent to the anticodon of several tRNA species. Both the mutant isolated in this work and previously isolated miaA mutants confer tetracycline sensitivity in the presence of functional Tet(M), both share a slow growth phenotype, and in neither case is a wild-type phenotype restored in trans by F'112 carrying the 89- to 98-min region of the chromosome. These similar phenotypes further substantiate the assignment of the mutation described here to the miaA locus. PMID:8226667

  10. The selective tRNA aminoacylation mechanism based on a single G•U pair.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Masahiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Chong, Yeeting Esther; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming; Schimmel, Paul; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-06-26

    Ligation of tRNAs with their cognate amino acids, by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, establishes the genetic code. Throughout evolution, tRNA(Ala) selection by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) has depended predominantly on a single wobble base pair in the acceptor stem, G3•U70, mainly on the kcat level. Here we report the crystal structures of an archaeal AlaRS in complex with tRNA(Ala) with G3•U70 and its A3•U70 variant. AlaRS interacts with both the minor- and the major-groove sides of G3•U70, widening the major groove. The geometry difference between G3•U70 and A3•U70 is transmitted along the acceptor stem to the 3'-CCA region. Thus, the 3'-CCA region of tRNA(Ala) with G3•U70 is oriented to the reactive route that reaches the active site, whereas that of the A3•U70 variant is folded back into the non-reactive route. This novel mechanism enables the single wobble pair to dominantly determine the specificity of tRNA selection, by an approximate 100-fold difference in kcat.

  11. The selective tRNA aminoacylation mechanism based on a single G•U pair

    PubMed Central

    Naganuma, Masahiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Chong, Yeeting Esther; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming; Schimmel, Paul; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Ligation of tRNAs with their cognate amino acids, by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, establishes the genetic code. Throughout evolution, tRNAAla selection by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) has depended predominantly on a single wobble base pair in the acceptor stem, G3•U70, mainly on the kcat level. Here we report the crystal structures of an archaeal AlaRS in complex with tRNAAla with G3•U70 and its A3•U70 variant. AlaRS interacts with both the minor- and major-groove sides of G3•U70, widening the major groove. The geometry difference between G3•U70 and A3•U70 is transmitted along the acceptor stem to the 3′-CCA region. Thus, the 3′-CCA region of tRNAAla with G3•U70 is oriented to the reactive route that reaches the active site, whereas that of the A3•U70 variant is folded back into the “non-reactive route”. This novel mechanism enables the single wobble pair to dominantly determine the specificity of tRNA selection, by an approximate 100-fold difference in kcat. PMID:24919148

  12. Mitochondrial leucine tRNA level and PTCD1 are regulated in response to leucine starvation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Hahn, Dagmar; Schaller, André; Jackson, Christopher Benjamin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1 (PTCD1) is a novel human protein that was recently shown to decrease the levels of mitochondrial leucine tRNAs. The physiological role of this regulation, however, remains unclear. Here we show that amino acid starvation by leucine deprivation significantly increased the mRNA steady-state levels of PTCD1 in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. Amino acid starvation also increased the mitochondrially encoded leucine tRNA (tRNA(Leu(CUN))) and the mRNA for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2). Despite increased PTCD1 mRNA steady-state levels, amino acid starvation decreased PTCD1 on the protein level. Decreasing PTCD1 protein concentration increases the stability of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs, tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) as could be shown by RNAi experiments against PTCD1. Therefore, it is likely that decreased PTCD1 protein contributes to the increased tRNA(Leu(CUN)) levels in amino acid-starved cells. The stabilisation of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs and the upregulation of the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase LARS2 might play a role in adaptation of mitochondria to amino acid starvation.

  13. tRNA structure from a graph and quantum theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Johan F; Bermúdez, Clara I; Daza, Edgar E

    2006-06-21

    One of the objectives of theoretical biochemistry is to find a suitable representation of molecules allowing us to encode what we know about their structures, interactions and reactivity. Particularly, tRNA structure is involved in some processes like aminoacylation and genetic code translation, and for this reason these molecules represent a biochemical object of the utmost importance requiring characterization. We propose here two fundamental aspects for characterizing and modeling them. The first takes into consideration the connectivity patterns, i.e. the set of linkages between atoms or molecular fragments (a key tool for this purpose is the use of graph theory), and the second one requires the knowledge of some properties related to the interactions taking place within the molecule, at least in an approximate way, and perhaps of its reactivity in certain means. We used quantum mechanics to achieve this goal; specifically, we have used partial charges as a manifestation of the reply to structural changes. These charges were appropriately modified to be used as weighted factors for elements constituting the molecular graph. This new graph-tRNA context allow us to detect some structure-function relationships.

  14. The supercoiling sensitivity of a bacterial tRNA promoter parallels its responsiveness to stringent control.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bossi, N; Guérin, M; Rahmouni, R; Leng, M; Bossi, L

    1998-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, expression of the hisR locus, a tRNA operon, decreases upon inhibiting DNA gyrase. Here, the hisR promoter dependence on negative DNA supercoiling was examined in vivo and in vitro. Mutant analysis showed the sequence determinants of this dependence to lie in the region between the -10 box and the transcription start site. As with most promoters subject to stringent control, this portion of the hisR promoter is C-G-rich. Replacing a C/G bp with T/A at position -7 partially relieves the supercoiling response while changing the sequence between -5 and + 1 (-CCCCCG-) for -GTTAA- abolishes the response in vitro and in vivo. The relief of the supercoiling dependence closely correlates with increased promoter susceptibility to melting in vivo and a lesser requirement for initiating nucleotides in the formation of stable initiation complexes in vitro. Studies in isoleucine-starved cells showed that such sequence changes mitigate and abolish the hisR promoter response to stringent control, respectively. The data presented suggest that the hisR promoter's sensitivity to stringent regulation arises from the same physical property that confers supercoiling sensitivity, i.e. resistance to melting. We propose that the stringent control mechanism acts by hampering the ability of RNA polymerase to melt the DNA helix. PMID:9550733

  15. Crystal structures of the bifunctional tRNA methyltransferase Trm5a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caiyan; Jia, Qian; Chen, Ran; Wei, Yuming; Li, Juntao; Ma, Jie; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    tRNA methyltransferase Trm5 catalyses the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to G37 in eukaryotes and archaea. The N1-methylated guanosine is the product of the initial step of the wyosine hypermodification, which is essential for the maintenance of the reading frame during translation. As a unique member of this enzyme family, Trm5a from Pyrococcus abyssi (PaTrm5a) catalyses not only the methylation of N1, but also the further methylation of C7 on 4-demethylwyosine at position 37 to produce isowyosine, but the mechanism for the double methylation is poorly understood. Here we report four crystal structures of PaTrm5a ranging from 1.7- to 2.3-Å, in the apo form or in complex with various SAM analogues. These structures reveal that Asp243 specifically recognises the base moiety of SAM at the active site. Interestingly, the protein in our structures all displays an extended conformation, quite different from the well-folded conformation of Trm5b from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii reported previously, despite their similar overall architectures. To rule out the possibilities of crystallisation artefacts, we conducted the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. The FRET data suggested that PaTrm5a adopts a naturally extended conformation in solution, and therefore the open conformation is a genuine state of PaTrm5a. PMID:27629654

  16. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Leśniewska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency. PMID:28228471

  17. No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Fares, Mario A

    2009-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are crucial enzymes that join amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, thereby implementing the genetic code. These enzymes fall into two unrelated structural classes whose evolution has not been explained. The leading hypothesis, proposed by Rodin and Ohno, is that the two classes originated as a pair of sense-antisense genes encoded on opposite strands of a single DNA molecule. This unusual idea obtained its main support from reports of a "Rosetta stone": a locus where genes for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and an Nicotinamide adenine dinulecotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), which are structurally homologous to the two classes of aaRS, overlap extensively on complementary DNA strands. This remarkable locus was first characterized in the oomycete Achlya klebsiana and has since been reported in many other species. Here we present evidence that the open reading frames on the antisense strand of HSP70 genes are spurious, and we identify a more probable candidate for the gene encoding the oomycete NAD-GDH enzyme. These results cast extensive doubt on the Rosetta Stone argument.

  18. Essentiality of threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A), a universal tRNA modification, in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thiaville, Patrick C.; Yacoubi, Basma El; Köhrer, Caroline; Thiaville, Jennifer J.; Deutsch, Chris; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Bacusmo, Jo Marie; Armengaud, Jean; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Wetzel, Collin; Cao, Xiaoyu; Limbach, Patrick A.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) is a modified nucleoside universally conserved in tRNAs in all three kingdoms of life. The recently discovered genes for t6A synthesis, including tsaC and tsaD, are essential in model prokaryotes but not essential in yeast. These genes had been identified as antibacterial targets even before their functions were known. However, the molecular basis for this prokaryotic-specific essentiality has remained a mystery. Here, we show that t6A is a strong positive determinant for aminoacylation of tRNA by bacterial-type but not by eukaryotic-type isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases and might also be a determinant for the essential enzyme tRNAIle-lysidine synthetase. We confirm that t6A is essential in Escherichia coli and a survey of genome-wide essentiality studies shows that genes for t6A synthesis are essential in most prokaryotes. This essentiality phenotype is not universal in Bacteria as t6A is dispensable in Deinococcus radiodurans, Thermus thermophilus, Synechocystis PCC6803 and Streptococcus mutans. Proteomic analysis of t6A- D. radiodurans strains revealed an induction of the proteotoxic stress response and identified genes whose translation is most affected by the absence of t6A in tRNAs. Thus, although t6A is universally conserved in tRNAs, its role in translation might vary greatly between organisms. PMID:26337258

  19. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity.

  20. tRNA modified bases and oxidative stress in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity of two different environmental stresses have been characterized in Salmonella typhimurium. The toxicity of near-UV (NUV) light (300-400 nm) appeared to be mediated by oxidative mechanisms. The overproduction of NUV-absorbing proteins sensitized the cells to killing by NUV. Selenium also appeared to be toxic to S. typhimurium by oxidative mechanisms. At low concentrations, the main target for this toxicity appeared to be intracellular thiols. At higher concentrations, selenite toxicity appeared to have been mediated by oxygen radicals which we have shown to be produced by the reactions of selenite with sulfhydryl groups. Such radicals may also have been involved in the selenite mutagenicity we have observed in S. typhimurium. The function of two different modified bases with respect to such oxidative stress has been characterized. The isolation of mutants lacking these bases has facilitated this investigation. S. typhimurium contained a single seleno-modified base, 5-methylaminomethyl-2-selenouridine (mnm{sup 5}Se{sup 2}U). Mutants which were unable to incorporate selenium into their tRNA (selA) were isolated based on a pleiotropic defect in selenium metabolism.

  1. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Leśniewska, Ewa; Boguta, Magdalena

    2017-02-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency.

  2. Yeast ribosomal protein L10 helps coordinate tRNA movement through the large subunit

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey N.; Meskauskas, Arturas; Roshwalb, Sara C.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal protein L10 (E. coli L16) is located at the center of a topological nexus that connects many functional regions of the large subunit. This essential protein has previously been implicated in processes as diverse as ribosome biogenesis, translational fidelity and mRNA stability. Here, the inability to maintain the yeast Killer virus was used as a proxy for large subunit defects to identify a series of L10 mutants. These mapped to roughly four discrete regions of the protein. A detailed analysis of mutants located in the N-terminal ‘hook’ of L10, which inserts into the bulge of 25S rRNA helix 89, revealed strong effects on rRNA structure corresponding to the entire path taken by the tRNA 3′ end as it moves through the large subunit during the elongation cycle. The mutant-induced structural changes are wide-ranging, affecting ribosome biogenesis, elongation factor binding, drug resistance/hypersensitivity, translational fidelity and virus maintenance. The importance of L10 as a potential transducer of information through the ribosome, and of a possible role of its N-terminal domain in switching between the pre- and post-translocational states are discussed. PMID:18824477

  3. Selective charging of tRNA isoacceptors induced by amino-acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Kimberly A; Sørensen, Michael A; Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns; Pan, Tao

    2005-01-01

    Aminoacylated (charged) transfer RNA isoacceptors read different messenger RNA codons for the same amino acid. The concentration of an isoacceptor and its charged fraction are principal determinants of the translation rate of its codons. A recent theoretical model predicts that amino-acid starvation results in ‘selective charging' where the charging levels of some tRNA isoacceptors will be low and those of others will remain high. Here, we developed a microarray for the analysis of charged fractions of tRNAs and measured charging for all Escherichia coli tRNAs before and during leucine, threonine or arginine starvation. Before starvation, most tRNAs were fully charged. During starvation, the isoacceptors in the leucine, threonine or arginine families showed selective charging when cells were starved for their cognate amino acid, directly confirming the theoretical prediction. Codons read by isoacceptors that retain high charging can be used for efficient translation of genes that are essential during amino-acid starvation. Selective charging can explain anomalous patterns of codon usage in the genes for different families of proteins. PMID:15678157

  4. The role of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Kui; Le, Han-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alternations in mitochondrial genome resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) is known for its high frequencies of polymorphisms and mutations, however, the roles of these mutations and polymorphisms in lung cancer are among heated debates. To evaluate the possible roles of reported mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer, we examine recent published paper concerning three mt-tRNA mutations with lung cancer: A7460G in tRNASer (UCN) gene, G5563A in tRNATrp gene and A12172G in tRNAHis gene. We perform the phylogenetic approach to investigate the deleterious roles of these mutations in lung cancer, moreover, we use bioinformatics tool to predict the secondary structure of mt-tRNAs with and without these mutations. In addition, through the application of pathogenicity scoring system, we find that only the A12172G mutation is regarded as a pathogenic mutation, whereas other mutations may act as neutral polymorphisms in human population. Thus, our study provides the novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer. PMID:26550263

  5. The role of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Kui; Le, Han-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alternations in mitochondrial genome resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) is known for its high frequencies of polymorphisms and mutations, however, the roles of these mutations and polymorphisms in lung cancer are among heated debates. To evaluate the possible roles of reported mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer, we examine recent published paper concerning three mt-tRNA mutations with lung cancer: A7460G in tRNA(Ser (UCN)) gene, G5563A in tRNA(Trp) gene and A12172G in tRNA(His) gene. We perform the phylogenetic approach to investigate the deleterious roles of these mutations in lung cancer, moreover, we use bioinformatics tool to predict the secondary structure of mt-tRNAs with and without these mutations. In addition, through the application of pathogenicity scoring system, we find that only the A12172G mutation is regarded as a pathogenic mutation, whereas other mutations may act as neutral polymorphisms in human population. Thus, our study provides the novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer.

  6. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings. PMID:26844776

  7. Site-specific crosslinking of 4-thiouridine-modified human tRNA(3Lys) to reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Steitz, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped specific RNA-protein contacts between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I reverse transcriptase (RT) and its natural primer, human tRNA(3Lys), using a site-specific crosslinking strategy. Four different tRNA(3Lys) constructs with a single 32P-labeled 4-thiouridine (4-thioU) residue at positions -1, 16, 36 or 41 were synthesized. After incubation with RT followed by irradiation, crosslinks were localized to either the p66 or p51 subunit of RT by digestion with nuclease and SDS gel fractionation. 4-thioU at position -1 or 16 transferred label to the p66 subunit almost exclusively (> 90%), whereas position 36 labeled both p66 and p51 (3:1). Position 41 yielded no detectable crosslinks. The region of p66 contacted by position -1 of tRNA(3Lys) was localized to the 203 C-terminal amino acids of RT by CNBr cleavage, whereas a 127 amino acid-CNBr peptide (residues 230-357) from both p66 and p51 was labeled by position 36. Functionality of the 4-thioU-modified tRNA(3Lys)(-1) crosslinked to RT in the presence of an RNA but not a DNA template was demonstrated by the ability of the tRNA to be extended. These results localize the 5' half of the tRNA on the interface between the two RT subunits, closer to the RNase H domain than to the polymerase active site, in accord with previous suggestions. They argue further that a specific binding site for the 5' end of the primer tRNA(3Lys) may exist within the C-terminal portion of the p66 subunit, which could be important for the initiation of reverse transcription. Images PMID:7540137

  8. Ribonuclease PH plays a major role in the exonucleolytic maturation of CCA-containing tRNA precursors in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tingyi; Oussenko, Irina A; Pellegrini, Olivier; Bechhofer, David H; Condon, Ciarán

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to Escherichia coli, where all tRNAs have the CCA motif encoded by their genes, two classes of tRNA precursors exist in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Previous evidence had shown that ribonuclease Z (RNase Z) was responsible for the endonucleolytic maturation of the 3' end of those tRNAs lacking an encoded CCA motif, accounting for about one-third of its tRNAs. This suggested that a second pathway of tRNA maturation must exist for those precursors with an encoded CCA motif. In this paper, we examine the potential role of the four known exoribonucleases of B.subtilis, PNPase, RNase R, RNase PH and YhaM, in this alternative pathway. In the absence of RNase PH, precursors of CCA-containing tRNAs accumulate that are a few nucleotides longer than the mature tRNA species observed in wild-type strains or in the other single exonuclease mutants. Thus, RNase PH plays an important role in removing the last few nucleotides of the tRNA precursor in vivo. The presence of three or four exonuclease mutations in a single strain results in CCA-containing tRNA precursors of increasing size, suggesting that, as in E.coli, the exonucleolytic pathway consists of multiple redundant enzymes. Assays of purified RNase PH using in vitro-synthesized tRNA precursor substrates suggest that RNase PH is sensitive to the presence of a CCA motif. The division of labor between the endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic pathways observed in vivo can be explained by the inhibition of RNase Z by the CCA motif in CCA-containing tRNA precursors and by the inhibition of exonucleases by stable secondary structure in the 3' extensions of the majority of CCA-less tRNAs.

  9. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    McShane, Ariel; Hok, Eveline; Tomberlin, Jensen; Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings.

  10. Structural alterations of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase from Salmonella typhimurium affect tRNA substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J N; Björk, G R

    1999-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase (the product of the trmD gene) catalyzes the formation of m1G37, which is present adjacent and 3' of the anticodon (position 37) in seven tRNA species, two of which are tRNA(Pro)CGG and tRN(Pro)GGG. These two tRNA species also exist as +1 frameshift suppressor sufA6 and sufB2, respectively, both having an extra G in the anticodon loop next to and 3' of m1G37. The wild-type form of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase efficiently methylates these mutant tRNAs. We have characterized one class of mutant forms of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase that does not methylate the sufA6 tRNA and thereby induce extensive frameshifting resulting in a nonviable cell. Accordingly, pseudorevertants of strains containing such a mutated trmD allele in conjunction with the sufA6 allele had reduced frameshifting activity caused by either a 9-nt duplication in the sufA6tRNA or a deletion of its structural gene, or by an increased level of m1G37 in the sufA6tRNA. However, the sufB2 tRNA as well as the wild-type counterparts of these two tRNAs are efficiently methylated by this class of structural altered tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase. Two other mutations (trmD3, trmD10) were found to reduce the methylation of all potential tRNA substrates and therefore primarily affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme. We conclude that all mutations except two (trmD3 and trmD10) do not primarily affect the catalytic activity, but rather the substrate specificity of the tRNA, because, unlike the wild-type form of the enzyme, they recognize and methylate the wild-type but not an altered form of a tRNA. Moreover, we show that the TrmD peptide is present in catalytic excess in the cell. PMID:10094308

  11. Structural and functional analyses of the archaeal tRNA m2G/m22G10 methyltransferase aTrm11 provide mechanistic insights into site specificity of a tRNA methyltransferase that contains common RNA-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akira; Nishiyama, Seiji; Tamura, Toshihiro; Yamauchi, Ayano; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    N2-methylguanosine is one of the most universal modified nucleosides required for proper function in transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. In archaeal tRNA species, a specific S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent tRNA methyltransferase (MTase), aTrm11, catalyzes formation of N2-methylguanosine and N2,N2-dimethylguanosine at position 10. Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structures of aTrm11 from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tko), of the apo-form, and of its complex with SAM. The structures show that TkoTrm11 consists of three domains: an N-terminal ferredoxinlike domain (NFLD), THUMP domain and Rossmann-fold MTase (RFM) domain. A linker region connects the THUMP-NFLD and RFM domains. One SAM molecule is bound in the pocket of the RFM domain, suggesting that TkoTrm11 uses a catalytic mechanism similar to that of other tRNA MTases containing an RFM domain. Furthermore, the conformation of NFLD and THUMP domains in TkoTrm11 resembles that of other tRNA-modifying enzymes specifically recognizing the tRNA acceptor stem. Our docking model of TkoTrm11-SAM in complex with tRNA, combined with biochemical analyses and pre-existing evidence, provides insights into the substrate tRNA recognition mechanism: The THUMP domain recognizes a 3′-ACCA end, and the linker region and RFM domain recognize the T-stem, acceptor stem and V-loop of tRNA, thereby causing TkoTrm11 to specifically identify its methylation site. PMID:27325738

  12. A case of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody syndrome complicated by hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kota; Tamura, Masao; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Hosono, Yuji; Nakajima, Ran; Tsuboi, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takeo; Ogita, Chie; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Saito, Atsushi; Nishioka, Aki; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Kitano, Masayasu; Tsunoda, Shinichiro; Omura, Koichiro; Koyama, Hidenori; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Sano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

      A 48-year-old woman had suffered from a fever and general fatigue, and visited the other hospital for fever elevation in November 2013, at which time interstitial lung disease was revealed. In January 2014, she experienced an eruption in the hand and developed peripheral blood flow damage. Under a diagnosis of adult Still's disease, the patient was administered 0.5 mg of betamethasone as well as cyclosporin at 75 mg/day. In November 2014, general fatigue, fever, and headache were noted, while MRI revealed an enlarged hypophysis and laboratory findings were positive for the anti-pituitary cell antibody, thus a diagnosis of autoimmune hypophysitis was made. Although disease activity was low, she requested hospitalization and was admitted by the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at our hospital in May 2015, though only observed. Fever developed again, along with interstitial lung disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, and pain in the crural area again, and we considered the possibility of another disease. After stopping administration of betamethasone and cyclosporin, we made a diagnosis of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody syndrome, and administered methylprednisolone at 500 mg for 3 days as well as prednisolone at 35 mg/day following steroid pulse therapy. Although her condition soon improved, fever, muscle pain, and pancytopenia returned after 3 days. Bone marrow findings revealed the existence of hemophagocytosis, for which we again gave methylprednisolone at 500 mg for 3 days and cyclosporin at 125 mg/day. Thereafter, the patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital.

  13. Epoxyqueuosine Reductase Structure Suggests a Mechanism for Cobalamin-dependent tRNA Modification*

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Karl A. P.; Fisher, Karl; Sjuts, Hanno; Dunstan, Mark S.; Bellina, Bruno; Johannissen, Linus; Barran, Perdita; Hay, Sam; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Leys, David

    2015-01-01

    Queuosine (Q) is a hypermodified RNA base that replaces guanine in the wobble positions of 5′-GUN-3′ tRNA molecules. Q is exclusively made by bacteria, and the corresponding queuine base is a micronutrient salvaged by eukaryotic species. The final step in Q biosynthesis is the reduction of the epoxide precursor, epoxyqueuosine, to yield the Q cyclopentene ring. The epoxyqueuosine reductase responsible, QueG, shares distant homology with the cobalamin-dependent reductive dehalogenase (RdhA), however the role played by cobalamin in QueG catalysis has remained elusive. We report the solution and structural characterization of Streptococcus thermophilus QueG, revealing the enzyme harbors a redox chain consisting of two [4Fe-4S] clusters and a cob(II)alamin in the base-off form, similar to RdhAs. In contrast to the shared redox chain architecture, the QueG active site shares little homology with RdhA, with the notable exception of a conserved Tyr that is proposed to function as a proton donor during reductive dehalogenation. Docking of an epoxyqueuosine substrate suggests the QueG active site places the substrate cyclopentane moiety in close proximity of the cobalt. Both the Tyr and a conserved Asp are implicated as proton donors to the epoxide leaving group. This suggests that, in contrast to the unusual carbon-halogen bond chemistry catalyzed by RdhAs, QueG acts via Co-C bond formation. Our study establishes the common features of Class III cobalamin-dependent enzymes, and reveals an unexpected diversity in the reductive chemistry catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:26378237

  14. Functional assignment of KEOPS/EKC complex subunits in the biosynthesis of the universal t6A tRNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Perrochia, Ludovic; Guetta, Dorian; Hecker, Arnaud; Forterre, Patrick; Basta, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) is a universal tRNA modification essential for normal cell growth and accurate translation. In Archaea and Eukarya, the universal protein Sua5 and the conserved KEOPS/EKC complex together catalyze t6A biosynthesis. The KEOPS/EKC complex is composed of Kae1, a universal metalloprotein belonging to the ASHKA superfamily of ATPases; Bud32, an atypical protein kinase and two small proteins, Cgi121 and Pcc1. In this study, we investigated the requirement and functional role of KEOPS/EKC subunits for biosynthesis of t6A. We demonstrated that Pcc1, Kae1 and Bud32 form a minimal functional unit, whereas Cgi121 acts as an allosteric regulator. We confirmed that Pcc1 promotes dimerization of the KEOPS/EKC complex and uncovered that together with Kae1, it forms the tRNA binding core of the complex. Kae1 binds l-threonyl-carbamoyl-AMP intermediate in a metal-dependent fashion and transfers the l-threonyl-carbamoyl moiety to substrate tRNA. Surprisingly, we found that Bud32 is regulated by Kae1 and does not function as a protein kinase but as a P-loop ATPase possibly involved in tRNA dissociation. Overall, our data support a mechanistic model in which the final step in the biosynthesis of t6A relies on a strictly catalytic component, Kae1, and three partner proteins necessary for dimerization, tRNA binding and regulation. PMID:23945934

  15. Silent mutations in sight: co-variations in tRNA abundance as a key to unravel consequences of silent mutations.

    PubMed

    Czech, Andreas; Fedyunin, Ivan; Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2010-10-01

    Mutations that alter the amino acid sequence are known to potentially exert deleterious effects on protein function, whereas substitutions of nucleotides without amino acid change are assumed to be neutral for the protein's functionality. However, cumulative evidence suggests that synonymous substitutions might also induce phenotypic variability by affecting splicing accuracy, translation fidelity, and conformation and function of proteins. tRNA isoacceptors mediate the translation of codons to amino acids, and asymmetric tRNA abundance causes variations in the rate of translation of each single triplet. Consequently, the effect of a silent point mutation in the coding region could be significant due to differential abundances of the cognate tRNA(s), emphasizing the importance of precise assessment of tRNA composition. Here, we provide an overview of the methods used to quantitatively determine the concentrations of tRNA species and discuss synonymous mutations in the context of tRNA composition of the cell, thus providing a new twist on the detrimental impact of the silent mutations.

  16. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA) and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mualif, Siti Aisyah; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Chew, Yik Wei; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Ali, Syed A

    2015-01-01

    Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW) rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef), HIV-1 p24 (ca), and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3) E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  17. tRNA is entrapped in similar, but distinct, nuclear and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes, both of which contain vigilin and elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Grünweller, A; Willkomm, D K; Pfeiffer, T; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    1998-01-01

    Vigilin, which is found predominantly in cells and tissues with high levels of protein biosynthesis, was isolated in its native form from human HEp-2 cells (A.T.C.C. CCL23) by immunoaffinity chromatography. Here we demonstrate that vigilin is part of a novel large tRNA-binding ribonucleoprotein complex (tRNP), found not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nuclei of human cells. Compositional differences in the protein pattern were detected between the nuclear and cytoplasmic tRNPs, although some properties of the purified nuclear tRNP, such as tRNA protection against nuclease attack, were identical with those of the cytoplasmic tRNP. By using either a pool of total human nuclear RNA or radioactively labelled yeast tRNAAsp in rebinding experiments, we could show that tRNA is specifically recaptured by the RNA-depleted, vigilin-containing nuclear complex. We could also show that vigilin is capable of binding tRNA in vitro. Another tRNA-binding protein is elongation factor 1 alpha, which appears to be enriched in the cytoplasmic and nuclear tRNP complexes. This suggests that the cytoplasmic tRNP may be involved in the channelled tRNA cycle in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Our results also suggest that the nuclear vigilin-containing tRNP may be related to the nuclear export of tRNA. PMID:9445390

  18. A conserved and essential basic region mediates tRNA binding to the Elp1 subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator complex.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Rachael; Bandau, Susanne; Stark, Michael J R

    2014-06-01

    Elongator is a conserved, multi-protein complex discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of which confers a range of pleiotropic phenotypes. Elongator in higher eukaryotes is required for normal growth and development and a mutation in the largest subunit of human Elongator (Elp1) causes familial dysautonomia, a severe recessive neuropathy. Elongator promotes addition of mcm(5) and ncm(5) modifications to uridine in the tRNA anticodon 'wobble' position in both yeast and higher eukaryotes. Since these modifications are required for the tRNAs to function efficiently, a translation defect caused by hypomodified tRNAs may therefore underlie the variety of phenotypes associated with Elongator dysfunction. The Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain contains a highly conserved arginine/lysine-rich region that resembles a nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Using alanine substitution mutagenesis, we show that this region is essential for Elongator's function in tRNA wobble uridine modification. However, rather than acting to determine the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Elongator, we find that the basic region plays a critical role in a novel interaction between tRNA and the Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain. Thus the conserved basic region in Elp1 may be essential for tRNA wobble uridine modification by acting as tRNA binding motif.

  19. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Beerens, Nancy; Jepsen, Mette D E; Nechyporuk-Zloy, Volodymyr; Krüger, Asger C; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Kjems, Jørgen; Birkedal, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription. The mechanism of tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome was examined using ensemble and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assays, in which fluorescent donor and acceptor molecules were covalently attached to an RNA template mimicking the PBS region. The role of the viral nucleocapsid (NC) protein in tRNA annealing was studied. Both heat annealing and NC-mediated annealing of tRNAlys3 were found to change the FRET efficiency, and thus the conformation of the HIV-1 RNA template. The results are consistent with a model for tRNA annealing that involves an interaction between the tRNAlys3 molecule and the PAS sequence in the HIV-1 genome. The NC protein may stimulate the interaction of the tRNA molecule with the PAS, thereby regulating the initiation of reverse transcription.

  20. Methylation at position 32 of tRNA catalyzed by TrmJ alters oxidative stress response in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jaroensuk, Juthamas; Atichartpongkul, Sopapan; Chionh, Yok Hian; Wong, Yee Hwa; Liew, Chong Wai; McBee, Megan E.; Thongdee, Narumon; Prestwich, Erin G.; DeMott, Michael S.; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Dedon, Peter C.; Lescar, Julien; Fuangthong, Mayuree

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria respond to environmental stresses using a variety of signaling and gene expression pathways, with translational mechanisms being the least well understood. Here, we identified a tRNA methyltransferase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, trmJ, which confers resistance to oxidative stress. Analysis of tRNA from a trmJ mutant revealed that TrmJ catalyzes formation of Cm, Um, and, unexpectedly, Am. Defined in vitro analyses revealed that tRNAMet(CAU) and tRNATrp(CCA) are substrates for Cm formation, tRNAGln(UUG), tRNAPro(UGG), tRNAPro(CGG) and tRNAHis(GUG) for Um, and tRNAPro(GGG) for Am. tRNASer(UGA), previously observed as a TrmJ substrate in Escherichia coli, was not modified by PA14 TrmJ. Position 32 was confirmed as the TrmJ target for Am in tRNAPro(GGG) and Um in tRNAGln(UUG) by mass spectrometric analysis. Crystal structures of the free catalytic N-terminal domain of TrmJ show a 2-fold symmetrical dimer with an active site located at the interface between the monomers and a flexible basic loop positioned to bind tRNA, with conformational changes upon binding of the SAM-analog sinefungin. The loss of TrmJ rendered PA14 sensitive to H2O2 exposure, with reduced expression of oxyR-recG, katB-ankB, and katE. These results reveal that TrmJ is a tRNA:Cm32/Um32/Am32 methyltransferase involved in translational fidelity and the oxidative stress response. PMID:27683218

  1. Modeling of tRNA-assisted mechanism of Arg activation based on a structure of Arg-tRNA synthetase, tRNA, and an ATP analog (ANP).

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiko; Sumida, Tomomi; Uchikawa, Emiko; Mori, Yukie; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeuki

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalyzed by Arg-tRNA, Gln-tRNA and Glu-tRNA synthetases requires the assistance of the cognate tRNA. tRNA also assists Arg-tRNA synthetase in catalyzing the pyrophosphorolysis of synthetic Arg-AMP at low pH. The mechanism by which the 3'-end A76, and in particular its hydroxyl group, of the cognate tRNA is involved with the exchange reaction catalyzed by those enzymes has yet to be established. We determined a crystal structure of a complex of Arg-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii, tRNA(Arg)(CCU) and an ATP analog with Rfactor = 0.213 (Rfree = 0.253) at 2.0 A resolution. On the basis of newly obtained structural information about the position of ATP bound on the enzyme, we constructed a structural model for a mechanism in which the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 2'-OH group of A76 of tRNA and the carboxyl group of Arg induces both formation of Arg-AMP (Arg + ATP --> Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate) and pyrophosphorolysis of Arg-AMP (Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate --> Arg + ATP) at low pH. Furthermore, we obtained a structural model of the molecular mechanism for the Arg-tRNA synthetase-catalyzed deacylation of Arg-tRNA (Arg-tRNA + AMP --> Arg-AMP + tRNA at high pH), in which the deacylation of aminoacyl-tRNA bound on Arg-tRNA synthetase and Glu-tRNA synthetase is catalyzed by a quite similar mechanism, whereby the proton-donating group (-NH-C+(NH2)2 or -COOH) of Arg and Glu assists the aminoacyl transfer from the 2'-OH group of tRNA to the phosphate group of AMP at high pH.

  2. The identities of stop codon reassignments support ancestral tRNA stop codon decoding activity as a facilitator of gene duplication and evolution of novel function.

    PubMed

    Massey, Steven E

    2017-03-27

    Stop codon reassignments are widely distributed in prokaryotic, eukaryotic and organellar genomes, but are remarkably convergent in terms of the stop codons and amino acids reassigned. Strikingly, the identities of stop codon reassignments are closely matched to the properties of naturally occurring nonsense suppressor (NONS) tRNAs, suggesting that pre-existing nonsense suppression in an ancestral tRNA facilitated the occurrence of stop codon reassignments. Here this idea is expanded, by exploring the mechanism by which the gene duplication of tRNAs has occurred, leading to the reassignment of stop codons. Two types of stop codon reassignment are identified: those that necessitate a tRNA gene duplication, and those that do not because a single tRNA can recognize the reassigned stop codon and the canonical codon(s) for the cognate amino acid. Where tRNA gene duplication has occurred, this implies a multi-functional ancestral NONS tRNA, followed by adaptive mutation in the anticodon of one of the gene duplicates to become complementary to the stop codon, constituting a clear example of escape from adaptive conflict. The best exemplar is the UAA+UAG - >gln reassignment, which has occurred 9 times independently in a diverse range of genomes, and appears to reflect the widespread occurrence of naturally occurring nonsense suppression of the UAA+UAG stop codons by glutamine tRNAs. Consideration of pre-existing tRNA functionality and the mechanism of gene duplication provide new insights into the process of stop codon reassignment.

  3. Corpus based learning of stochastic, context-free grammars combined with Hidden Markov Models for tRNA modelling.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Juan Miguel; Benedi, Jose Miguel; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for modelling tRNA secondary structures is presented. This method is based on the combination of stochastic context-free grammars (SCFG) and Hidden Markov Models (HMM). HMM are used to capture the local relations in the loops of the molecule (nonstructured regions) and SCFG are used to capture the long term relations between nucleotides of the arms (structured regions). Given annotated public databases, the HMM and SCFG models are learned by means of automatic inductive learning methods. Two SCFG learning methods have been explored. Both of them take advantage of the structural information associated with the training sequences: one of them is based on a stochastic version of the Sakakibara algorithm and the other one is based on a Corpus based algorithm. A final model is then obtained by merging of the HMM of the nonstructured regions and the SCFG of the structured regions. Finally, the performed experiments on the tRNA sequence corpus and the non-tRNA sequence corpus give significant results. Comparative experiments with another published method are also presented.

  4. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection

    PubMed Central

    Au, Hilda H.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E.; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E.; Jan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame. PMID:26554019

  5. GidA, a tRNA Modification Enzyme, Contributes to the Growth, and Virulence of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ting; Tan, Meifang; Liu, Wanquan; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Tengfei; Zheng, Linlin; Zhu, Jiawen; Li, Lu; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA), is a tRNA modification enzyme functioning together with MnmE in the addition of a carboxymethylaminomethyl group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine of tRNA. Here, we report a GidA homolog from a Chinese isolate SC-19 of the zoonotic Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2). gidA disruption led to a defective growth, increased capsule thickness, and reduced hemolytic activity. Moreover, the gidA deletion mutant (ΔgidA) displayed reduced mortality and bacterial loads in mice, reduced ability of adhesion to and invasion in epithelial cells, and increased sensitivity to phagocytosis. The iTRAQ analysis identified 372 differentially expressed (182 up- and 190 down-regulated) proteins in ΔgidA and SC-19. Numerous DNA replication, cell division, and virulence associated proteins were downregulated, whereas many capsule synthesis enzymes were upregulated by gidA disruption. This is consistent with the phenotypes of the mutant. Thus, GidA is a translational regulator that plays an important role in the growth, cell division, capsule biosynthesis, and virulence of SS2. Our findings provide new insight into the regulatory function of GidA in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27148493

  6. GidA, a tRNA Modification Enzyme, Contributes to the Growth, and Virulence of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Tan, Meifang; Liu, Wanquan; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Tengfei; Zheng, Linlin; Zhu, Jiawen; Li, Lu; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA), is a tRNA modification enzyme functioning together with MnmE in the addition of a carboxymethylaminomethyl group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine of tRNA. Here, we report a GidA homolog from a Chinese isolate SC-19 of the zoonotic Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2). gidA disruption led to a defective growth, increased capsule thickness, and reduced hemolytic activity. Moreover, the gidA deletion mutant (ΔgidA) displayed reduced mortality and bacterial loads in mice, reduced ability of adhesion to and invasion in epithelial cells, and increased sensitivity to phagocytosis. The iTRAQ analysis identified 372 differentially expressed (182 up- and 190 down-regulated) proteins in ΔgidA and SC-19. Numerous DNA replication, cell division, and virulence associated proteins were downregulated, whereas many capsule synthesis enzymes were upregulated by gidA disruption. This is consistent with the phenotypes of the mutant. Thus, GidA is a translational regulator that plays an important role in the growth, cell division, capsule biosynthesis, and virulence of SS2. Our findings provide new insight into the regulatory function of GidA in bacterial pathogens.

  7. Functional specificity of amino acid at position 246 in the tRNA mimicry domain of bacterial release factor 2.

    PubMed

    Uno, M; Ito, K; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    The termination of protein synthesis in bacteria requires codon-specific polypeptide release factors RF-1 (UAG/UAA specific) and RF-2 (UGA/UAA specific). We have proposed that release factors mimic tRNA and recognize the stop codon for polypeptide release (Nakamura et al (1996) Cell 87, 147-150). In contrast to the textbook view, genetic experiments have indicated that Escherichia coli RF-2 terminates translation very weakly at UAA while Salmonella RF-2 decodes this signal efficiently. Moreover, an excess of E coli RF-2 was toxic to cells while an excess of Salmonella RF-2 was not. These two RF-2 proteins are identical except for 16 out of 365 amino acids. Fragment swap experiments and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a residue at position 246 is solely responsible for these two phenotypes. Upon substituting Ala (equivalent to Salmonella RF-2) for Thr-246 of E coli RF-2, the protein acquired increased release activity for UAA as well as for UGA. These results led us to conclude that E coli RF-2 activity is potentially weak and that the amino acid at position 246 plays a crucial role, not for codon discrimination, but for stop codon recognition or polypeptide release, presumably constituting an essential moiety of tRNA mimicry or interacting with peptidyltransferase centers of the ribosome.

  8. Distinct tRNA Accommodation Intermediates Observed on the Ribosome with the Antibiotics Hygromycin A and A201A.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Starosta, Agata L; Juette, Manuel F; Altman, Roger B; Terry, Daniel S; Lu, Wanli; Burnett, Benjamin J; Dinos, George; Reynolds, Kevin A; Blanchard, Scott C; Steitz, Thomas A; Wilson, Daniel N

    2015-06-04

    The increase in multi-drug-resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of currently approved antibiotics, leading to a renewed interest in antibiotics with distinct chemical scaffolds. We have solved the structures of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome with A-, P-, and E-site tRNAs bound and in complex with either the aminocyclitol-containing antibiotic hygromycin A (HygA) or the nucleoside antibiotic A201A. Both antibiotics bind at the peptidyl transferase center and sterically occlude the CCA-end of the A-tRNA from entering the A site of the peptidyl transferase center. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments reveal that HygA and A201A specifically interfere with full accommodation of the A-tRNA, leading to the presence of tRNA accommodation intermediates and thereby inhibiting peptide bond formation. Thus, our results provide not only insight into the mechanism of action of HygA and A201A, but also into the fundamental process of tRNA accommodation during protein synthesis.

  9. Origin and evolution of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase WHEP domains reveal evolutionary relationships within Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering "missing links" in the tree of life.

  10. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  11. Structural and functional insights into tRNA binding and adenosine N1-methylation by an archaeal Trm10 homologue

    PubMed Central

    Van Laer, Bart; Roovers, Martine; Wauters, Lina; Kasprzak, Joanna M.; Dyzma, Michal; Deyaert, Egon; Kumar Singh, Ranjan; Feller, André; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Droogmans, Louis; Versées, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Purine nucleosides on position 9 of eukaryal and archaeal tRNAs are frequently modified in vivo by the post-transcriptional addition of a methyl group on their N1 atom. The methyltransferase Trm10 is responsible for this modification in both these domains of life. While certain Trm10 orthologues specifically methylate either guanosine or adenosine at position 9 of tRNA, others have a dual specificity. Until now structural information about this enzyme family was only available for the catalytic SPOUT domain of Trm10 proteins that show specificity toward guanosine. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a full length Trm10 orthologue specific for adenosine, revealing next to the catalytic SPOUT domain also N- and C-terminal domains. This structure hence provides crucial insights in the tRNA binding mechanism of this unique monomeric family of SPOUT methyltransferases. Moreover, structural comparison of this adenosine-specific Trm10 orthologue with guanosine-specific Trm10 orthologues suggests that the N1 methylation of adenosine relies on additional catalytic residues. PMID:26673726

  12. Genetic code translation displays a linear trade-off between efficiency and accuracy of tRNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Magnus; Zhang, Jingji; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and accurate translation of the genetic code into protein is fundamental to life. Yet due to lack of a suitable assay, little is known about the accuracy-determining parameters and their correlation with translational speed. Here, we develop such an assay, based on Mg2+ concentration changes, to determine maximal accuracy limits for a complete set of single-mismatch codon–anticodon interactions. We found a simple, linear trade-off between efficiency of cognate codon reading and accuracy of tRNA selection. The maximal accuracy was highest for the second codon position and lowest for the third. The results rationalize the existence of proofreading in code reading and have implications for the understanding of tRNA modifications, as well as of translation error-modulating ribosomal mutations and antibiotics. Finally, the results bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro translation and allow us to calibrate our test tube conditions to represent the environment inside the living cell. PMID:22190491

  13. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-07

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development.

  14. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  15. A role for [Fe4S4] clusters in tRNA recognition—a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Stiebritz, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, structural studies have led to the unexpected discovery of iron–sulfur clusters in enzymes that are involved in DNA replication/repair and protein biosynthesis. Although these clusters are generally well-studied cofactors, their significance in the new contexts often remains elusive. One fascinating example is a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima, TmTrpRS, that has recently been structurally characterized. It represents an unprecedented connection among a primordial iron–sulfur cofactor, RNA and protein biosynthesis. Here, a possible role of the [Fe4S4] cluster in tRNA anticodon-loop recognition is investigated by means of density functional theory and comparison with the structure of a human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA complex. It turns out that a cluster-coordinating cysteine residue, R224, and polar main chain atoms form a characteristic structural motif for recognizing a putative 5′ cytosine or 5′ 2-thiocytosine moiety in the anticodon loop of the tRNA molecule. This motif provides not only affinity but also specificity by creating a structural and energetical penalty for the binding of other bases, such as uracil. PMID:24753428

  16. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    José, Marco V.; Morgado, Eberto R.; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R.; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  17. The Cm56 tRNA modification in archaea is catalyzed either by a specific 2′-O-methylase, or a C/D sRNP

    PubMed Central

    RENALIER, MARIE-HÉLÈNE; JOSEPH, NICOLE; GASPIN, CHRISTINE; THEBAULT, PATRICIA; MOUGIN, ANNIE

    2005-01-01

    We identified the first archaeal tRNA ribose 2′-O-methylase, aTrm56, belonging to the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) 1303 that contains archaeal genes only. The corresponding protein exhibits a SPOUT S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase domain found in bacterial and yeast G18 tRNA 2′-O-methylases (SpoU, Trm3). We cloned the Pyrococcus abyssi PAB1040 gene belonging to this COG, expressed and purified the corresponding protein, and showed that in vitro, it specifically catalyzes the AdoMet-dependent 2′-O-ribose methylation of C at position 56 in tRNA transcripts. This tRNA methylation is present only in archaea, and the gene for this enzyme is present in all the archaeal genomes sequenced up to now, except in the crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum. In this archaea, the C56 2′-O-methylation is provided by a C/D sRNP. Our work is the first demonstration that, within the same kingdom, two different mechanisms are used to modify the same nucleoside in tRNAs. PMID:15987815

  18. Formation of the chlorophyll precursor. gamma. -aminolevulinic acid in cyanobacteria requires aminoacylation of a tRNA sup Glu species. [Synechocystis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Nell, G.P.; Peterson, D.M.; Schoen, A., Chen, Minwei; Soell, D. )

    1988-09-01

    In the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, the biosynthesis of the chlorophyll precursor {gamma}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) involves at least three enzymes and a tRNA species. Here we demonstrate that in cell extracts of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 ALA was formed from glutamate in a series of reactions in which activation of glutamate by glutamyl-tRNA{sup Glu} formation was the first step. The activated glutamate was reduced by a dehydrogenase which displayed tRNA sequence specificity. Fractionation of strain 6803 tRNA by reverse-phase chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yielded two pure tRNA{sup Glu} species which stimulated ALA synthesis in vitro. These tRNAs had identical primary sequence but differed in the nucleotide modification of their anticodon. The 6803 tRNA{sup Glu} was similar to the sequence of tRNA{sup Glu} species or tRNA genes from Escherichia coli and from chloroplasts of Euglena gracilis and higher plants. Southern blot analysis revealed at least two tRNA{sup Glu} gene copies in the 6803 chromosome. A glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase, the terminal enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to ALA in chloroplasts, was detected in 6803 cell extracts by the conversion of glutamate-1-semialdehyde to ALA and by the inhibition of this reaction by gabaculin.

  19. RtcB, a novel RNA ligase, can catalyze tRNA splicing and HAC1 mRNA splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-09-02

    RtcB enzymes are novel RNA ligases that join 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. The phylogenetic distribution of RtcB points to its candidacy as a tRNA splicing/repair enzyme. Here we show that Escherichia coli RtcB is competent and sufficient for tRNA splicing in vivo by virtue of its ability to complement growth of yeast cells that lack the endogenous "healing/sealing-type" tRNA ligase Trl1. RtcB also protects yeast trl1Δ cells against a fungal ribotoxin that incises the anticodon loop of cellular tRNAs. Moreover, RtcB can replace Trl1 as the catalyst of HAC1 mRNA splicing during the unfolded protein response. Thus, RtcB is a bona fide RNA repair enzyme with broad physiological actions. Biochemical analysis of RtcB highlights the uniqueness of its active site and catalytic mechanism. Our findings draw attention to tRNA ligase as a promising drug target.

  20. Sulfur transfer and activation by ubiquitin-like modifier system Uba4•Urm1 link protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jüdes, André; Bruch, Alexander; Klassen, Roland; Helm, Mark; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2016-01-01

    Urm1 is a unique dual-function member of the ubiquitin protein family and conserved from yeast to man. It acts both as a protein modifier in ubiquitin-like urmylation and as a sulfur donor for tRNA thiolation, which in concert with the Elongator pathway forms 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2) modified wobble uridines (U34) in anticodons. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to study a relationship between these two functions, we examined whether cultivation temperature and sulfur supply previously implicated in the tRNA thiolation branch of the URM1 pathway also contribute to proper urmylation. Monitoring Urm1 conjugation, we found urmylation of the peroxiredoxin Ahp1 is suppressed either at elevated cultivation temperatures or under sulfur starvation. In line with this, mutants with sulfur transfer defects that are linked to enzymes (Tum1, Uba4) required for Urm1 activation by thiocarboxylation (Urm1-COSH) were found to maintain drastically reduced levels of Ahp1 urmylation and mcm5s2U34 modification. Moreover, as revealed by site specific mutagenesis, the S-transfer rhodanese domain (RHD) in the E1-like activator (Uba4) crucial for Urm1-COSH formation is critical but not essential for protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation. In sum, sulfur supply, transfer and activation chemically link protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation. These are features that distinguish the ubiquitin-like modifier system Uba4•Urm1 from canonical ubiquitin family members and will help elucidate whether, in addition to their mechanistic links, the protein and tRNA modification branches of the URM1 pathway may also relate in function to one another. PMID:28357324

  1. Methyldeficient mammalian 4S RNA: evidence for L-ethionine-induced inhibition of N6-dimethyladenosine synthesis in rat liver tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wildenauer, Dieter; Gross, Hans J.

    1974-01-01

    The nucleotide composition of 4s RNA from livers of rats fed with a diet containing 0.3% D-ethionine was found to be identical with that from untreated animals. In contrast, one single modified nucleotide was absent in 4s RNA from livers of rats fed with a 0.3% L-ethionine diet. The minor nucleo=tide was also absent in liver 4s RNA from rats fed with a 0.3% L-ethionine diet followed by ten days of normal food. It was identified after dephosphorylation by ultraviolet absorption spectra, cochromatography with authentic material and mass spectra as N6-dimethyladenosine. It is concluded that S-adenosylethionine, the primary product of L-ethionine in the liver, causes strong and selective inhibition of the specific RNA-methylase responsible for adenosine to N6-dimethyl=adenosine methylation in rat liver 4s RNA. Compared to the strong inhibition of N6-dimethyladenosine formation described here, L-ethionine-dependent ethylation of liver 4s RNA is far less efficient. The quantitation of l-methyladenosine, ribothymidine and 3′-terminal adenosine in this 4s RNA as well as its aminoacid acceptor activity is typical for tRNA; hence it may be concluded that N6-dimethyladenosine is a component of rat liver tRNA. This may demonstrate the first evidence for the existence of specifically methyl-deficient mammalian tRNA. A possible correlation between the activity of L-ethionine as a liver carcinogen and its ability to induce the formation of methyl-deficient tRNA by selectively inhibiting the synthesis of N6-dimethyladenosine on the tRNA level in the same organ is discussed. PMID:4414662

  2. Rational protein engineering in action: The first crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, Artem G.; Mekel, Marlene; Hutchings, Kim; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Holler, Tod; McGrath, Teresa; Beattie, Bryan; Fauman, Eric; Yan, Chunhong; Heaslet, Holly; Walter, Richard; Finzel, Barry; Ohren, Jeffrey; McConnell, Patrick; Braden, Timothy; Sun, Fang; Spessard, Cindy; Banotai, Craig; Al-Kassim, Loola; Ma, Weijun; Wengender, Paul; Kole, Denis; Garceau, Norman; Toogood, Peter; Liu, Jia

    2008-07-08

    In this article, we describe for the first time the high-resolution crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus. We demonstrate the subtle yet important structural differences between this enzyme and the previously described Thermus thermophilus ortholog. We also explain the structure-activity relationship of several recently reported inhibitors. The native enzyme crystals were of poor quality -- they only diffracted X-rays to 3--5 {angstrom} resolution. Therefore, we have executed a rational surface mutagenesis strategy that has yielded crystals of this 2300-amino acid multidomain protein, diffracting to 2 {angstrom} or better. This methodology is discussed and contrasted with the more traditional domain truncation approach.

  3. Diversity of the biosynthesis pathway for threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A), a universal modification of tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Thiaville, Patrick C; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The tRNA modification field has a rich literature covering biochemical analysis going back more than 40 years, but many of the corresponding genes were only identified in the last decade. In recent years, comparative genomic-driven analysis has allowed for the identification of the genes and subsequent characterization of the enzymes responsible for N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A). This universal modification, located in the anticodon stem-loop at position 37 adjacent to the anticodon of tRNAs, is found in nearly all tRNAs that decode ANN codons. The t6A biosynthesis enzymes and synthesis pathways have now been identified, revealing both a core set of enzymes and kingdom-specific variations. This review focuses on the elucidation of the pathway, diversity of the synthesis genes, and proposes a new nomenclature for t6A synthesis enzymes. PMID:25629598

  4. Identification and Sequence Analysis of Metazoan tRNA 3′-End Processing Enzymes tRNase Zs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhikang; Zheng, Jia; Zhang, Xiaojie; Peng, Jingjing; Liu, Jinyu; Huang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    tRNase Z is the endonuclease responsible for removing the 3'-trailer sequences from precursor tRNAs, a prerequisite for the addition of the CCA sequence. It occurs in the short (tRNase ZS) and long (tRNase ZL) forms. Here we report the identification and sequence analysis of candidate tRNase Zs from 81 metazoan species. We found that the vast majority of deuterostomes, lophotrochozoans and lower metazoans have one tRNase ZS and one tRNase ZL genes, whereas ecdysozoans possess only a single tRNase ZL gene. Sequence analysis revealed that in metazoans, a single nuclear tRNase ZL gene is likely to encode both the nuclear and mitochondrial forms of tRNA 3′-end processing enzyme through mechanisms that include alternative translation initiation from two in-frame start codons and alternative splicing. Sequence conservation analysis revealed a variant PxKxRN motif, PxPxRG, which is located in the N-terminal region of tRNase ZSs. We also identified a previously unappreciated motif, AxDx, present in the C-terminal region of both tRNase ZSs and tRNase ZLs. The AxDx motif consisting mainly of a very short loop is potentially close enough to form hydrogen bonds with the loop containing the PxKxRN or PxPxRG motif. Through complementation analysis, we demonstrated the likely functional importance of the AxDx motif. In conclusion, our analysis supports the notion that in metazoans a single tRNase ZL has evolved to participate in both nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3′-end processing, whereas tRNase ZS may have evolved new functions. Our analysis also unveils new evolutionarily conserved motifs in tRNase Zs, including the C-terminal AxDx motif, which may have functional significance. PMID:22962606

  5. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  6. Transition Energies and Absorption Oscillator Strengths for {{c}_{4}}^{\\prime 1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{u}}^{+}-{{\\rm{X}}}^{1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{g}}^{+}, {b}^{\\prime 1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{u}}^{+}-{{\\rm{X}}}^{1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{g}}^{+}, and {{c}_{5}}^{\\prime 1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{u}}^{+}-{{\\rm{X}}}^{1}{{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{g}}^{+} Band Systems in N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavín, C.; Velasco, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical transition energies and absorption oscillator strengths for the {{c}4}\\prime 1{{{{Σ }}}u}+ (v‧ = 0–2, 5, 7, 8) ‑ {{{X}}}1{{{{Σ }}}g}+(v\\prime\\prime =0{--}14) and {{c}5}\\prime 1{{{{Σ }}}u}+ (v‧ = 0, 2) ‑ {{{X}}}1{{{{Σ }}}g}+ (v″ = 0–14) Rydberg bands, and {b}\\prime 1{{{{Σ }}}u}+ (v‧ = 0–9, 11, 12, 14–19, 21, 22) ‑ {{{X}}}1{{{{Σ }}}g}+ (v″ = 0–14) valence bands of molecular nitrogen are reported. The strong interaction between {}1{{{{Σ }}}u}+ states has been dealt with through a vibronic interaction matrix. As a consequence of the Rydberg-valence interaction, irregularities in the vibrational structure of the above band systems are observed. Good agreement is found with the scarce high-resolution data that are available for oscillator strengths. The new band oscillator strengths reported here may be useful for a reliable interpretation of the spectra from atmospheres of the Earth, Titan, and Triton, where {{{N}}}2 is the mayor constituent.

  7. A platform for discovery and quantification of modified ribonucleosides in RNA: Application to stress-induced reprogramming of tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weiling Maggie; Chionh, Yok Hian; Hia, Fabian; Gu, Chen; Kellner, Stefanie; McBee, Megan E.; Ng, Chee Sheng; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; Prestwich, Erin G.; Lim, Kok Seong; Babu, I. Ramesh; Begley, Thomas J.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe an analytical platform for systems-level quantitative analysis of modified ribonucleosides in any RNA species, with a focus on stress-induced reprogramming of tRNA as part of a system of translational control of cell stress response. The chapter emphasizes strategies and caveats for each of the seven steps of the platform workflow: 1) RNA isolation, 2) RNA purification, 3) RNA hydrolysis to individual ribonucleosides, 4) chromatographic resolution of ribonucleosides, 5) identification of the full set of modified ribonucleosides, 6) mass spectrometric quantification of ribonucleosides, 6) interrogation of ribonucleoside datasets, and 7) mapping the location of stress-sensitive modifications in individual tRNA molecules. We have focused on the critical determinants of analytical sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy in an effort to ensure the most biologically meaningful data on mechanisms of translational control of cell stress response. The methods described here should find wide use in virtually any analysis involving RNA modifications. PMID:26253965

  8. N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase contains both nuclear and mitochondrial targeting signals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The TRM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a tRNA modification enzyme, N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase, which modifies both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNAs. The enzyme is targeted to mitochondria for the modification of mitochondrial tRNAs. Cellular fractionation and indirect immunofluorescence studies reported here demonstrate that this enzyme is also localized to the nucleus. Further, immunofluorescence experiments using strains that overproduce the enzyme show a staining at the periphery of the nucleus suggesting that the enzyme is found in a subnuclear destination near or at the nuclear membrane. There is no obvious cytoplasmic staining in these overproducing strains. Fusion protein technology was used to begin to localize sequences involved in the nuclear targeting of this enzyme. Indirect immunofluorescence studies indicate that sequences between the first 70 and 213 NH2-terminal amino acids of the methyltransferase are sufficient to target Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase to nuclei. PMID:2677019

  9. RNA-Seq analyses reveal the order of tRNA processing events and the maturation of C/D box and CRISPR RNAs in the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Su, Andreas A H; Tripp, Vanessa; Randau, Lennart

    2013-07-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri grows near the upper temperature limit for life. Genome analyses revealed strategies to adapt to these harsh conditions and elucidated a unique transfer RNA (tRNA) C-to-U editing mechanism at base 8 for 30 different tRNA species. Here, RNA-Seq deep sequencing methodology was combined with computational analyses to characterize the small RNome of this hyperthermophilic organism and to obtain insights into the RNA metabolism at extreme temperatures. A large number of 132 small RNAs were identified that guide RNA modifications, which are expected to stabilize structured RNA molecules. The C/D box guide RNAs were shown to exist as circular RNA molecules. In addition, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats RNA processing and potential regulatory RNAs were identified. Finally, the identification of tRNA precursors before and after the unique C8-to-U8 editing activity enabled the determination of the order of tRNA processing events with termini truncation preceding intron removal. This order of tRNA maturation follows the compartmentalized tRNA processing order found in Eukaryotes and suggests its conservation during evolution.

  10. Conformational energy and structure in canonical and noncanonical forms of tRNA determined by temperature analysis of the rate of s(4)U8-C13 photocrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Wayne; Shapkina, Tatjana; Wollenzien, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial tRNAs frequently have 4-thiouridine (s(4)U) modification at position 8, which is adjacent to the C13-G22-m(7)G46 base triple in the elbow region of the tRNA tertiary structure. Irradiation with light in the UVA range induces an efficient photocrosslink between s(4)U8 and C13. The temperature dependence of the rate constants for photocrosslinking between the s(4)U8 and C13 has been used to investigate the tRNA conformational energy and structure in Escherichia coli tRNA(Val), tRNA(Phe), and tRNA(fMet) under different conditions. Corrections have been made in the measured rate constants to compensate for differences in the excited state lifetimes due to tRNA identity, buffer conditions, and temperature. The resulting rate constants are related to the rate at which the s(4)U8 and C13 come into the alignment needed for photoreaction; this depends on an activation energy, attributable to the conformational potential energy that occurs during the photoreaction, and on the extent of the structural change. Different photocrosslinking rate constants and temperature dependencies occur in the three tRNAs, and these differences are due both to modest differences in the activation energies and in the apparent s(4)U8-C13 geometries. Analysis of tRNA(Val) in buffers without Mg(2+) indicate a smaller activation energy (~13 kJ mol(-1)) and a larger apparent s(4)U8-C13 distance (~12 A) compared to values for the same parameters in buffers with Mg(2+) (~26 kJ mol(-1) and 0.36 A, respectively). These measurements are a quantitative indication of the strong constraint that Mg(2+) imposes on the tRNA flexibility and structure.

  11. A tRNA body with high affinity for EF-Tu hastens ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2014-05-01

    There is evidence that tRNA bodies have evolved to reduce differences between aminoacyl-tRNAs in their affinity to EF-Tu. Here, we study the kinetics of incorporation of L-amino acids (AAs) Phe, Ala allyl-glycine (aG), methyl-serine (mS), and biotinyl-lysine (bK) using a tRNA(Ala)-based body (tRNA(AlaB)) with a high affinity for EF-Tu. Results are compared with previous data on the kinetics of incorporation of the same AAs using a tRNA(PheB) body with a comparatively low affinity for EF-Tu. All incorporations exhibited fast and slow phases, reflecting the equilibrium fraction of AA-tRNA in active ternary complex with EF-Tu:GTP before the incorporation reaction. Increasing the concentration of EF-Tu increased the amplitude of the fast phase and left its rate unaltered. This allowed estimation of the affinity of each AA-tRNA to EF-Tu:GTP during translation, showing about a 10-fold higher EF-Tu affinity for AA-tRNAs formed from the tRNA(AlaB) body than from the tRNA(PheB) body. At ∼1 µM EF-Tu, tRNA(AlaB) conferred considerably faster incorporation kinetics than tRNA(PheB), especially in the case of the bulky bK. In contrast, the swap to the tRNA(AlaB) body did not increase the fast phase fraction of N-methyl-Phe incorporation, suggesting that the slow incorporation of N-methyl-Phe had a different cause than low EF-Tu:GTP affinity. The total time for AA-tRNA release from EF-Tu:GDP, accommodation, and peptidyl transfer on the ribosome was similar for the tRNA(AlaB) and tRNA(PheB) bodies. We conclude that a tRNA body with high EF-Tu affinity can greatly improve incorporation of unnatural AAs in a potentially generalizable manner.

  12. A tRNA body with high affinity for EF-Tu hastens ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that tRNA bodies have evolved to reduce differences between aminoacyl-tRNAs in their affinity to EF-Tu. Here, we study the kinetics of incorporation of L-amino acids (AAs) Phe, Ala allyl-glycine (aG), methyl-serine (mS), and biotinyl-lysine (bK) using a tRNAAla-based body (tRNAAlaB) with a high affinity for EF-Tu. Results are compared with previous data on the kinetics of incorporation of the same AAs using a tRNAPheB body with a comparatively low affinity for EF-Tu. All incorporations exhibited fast and slow phases, reflecting the equilibrium fraction of AA-tRNA in active ternary complex with EF-Tu:GTP before the incorporation reaction. Increasing the concentration of EF-Tu increased the amplitude of the fast phase and left its rate unaltered. This allowed estimation of the affinity of each AA-tRNA to EF-Tu:GTP during translation, showing about a 10-fold higher EF-Tu affinity for AA-tRNAs formed from the tRNAAlaB body than from the tRNAPheB body. At ∼1 µM EF-Tu, tRNAAlaB conferred considerably faster incorporation kinetics than tRNAPheB, especially in the case of the bulky bK. In contrast, the swap to the tRNAAlaB body did not increase the fast phase fraction of N-methyl-Phe incorporation, suggesting that the slow incorporation of N-methyl-Phe had a different cause than low EF-Tu:GTP affinity. The total time for AA-tRNA release from EF-Tu:GDP, accommodation, and peptidyl transfer on the ribosome was similar for the tRNAAlaB and tRNAPheB bodies. We conclude that a tRNA body with high EF-Tu affinity can greatly improve incorporation of unnatural AAs in a potentially generalizable manner. PMID:24671767

  13. Structure of the acceptor stem of Escherichia coli tRNA Ala: role of the G3.U70 base pair in synthetase recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A; Varani, G

    1997-01-01

    The fidelity of translation of the genetic code depends on accurate tRNA aminoacylation by cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Thus, each tRNA has specificity not only for codon recognition, but also for amino acid identity; this aminoacylation specificity is referred to as tRNA identity. The primary determinant of the acceptor identity of Escherichia coli tRNAAlais a wobble G3.U70 pair within the acceptor stem. Despite extensive biochemical and genetic data, the mechanism by which the G3.U70 pair marks the acceptor end of tRNAAla for aminoacylation with alanine has not been clarified at the molecular level. The solution structure of a microhelix derived from the tRNAAla acceptor end has been determined at high precision using a very extensive set of experimental constraints (approximately 32 per nt) obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods. The tRNAAla acceptor end is overall similar to A-form RNA, but important differences are observed. The G3.U70 wobble pair distorts the conformation of the phosphodiester backbone and presents the functional groups of U70 in an unusual spatial location. The discriminator base A73 has extensive stacking overlap with G1 within the G1.C72 base pair at the end of the double helical stem and the -CCA end is significantly less ordered than the rest of the molecule. PMID:9153306

  14. Phenotypic suppression of DNA gyrase deficiencies by a deletion lowering the gene dosage of a major tRNA in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc-Potard, A B; Bossi, L

    1994-01-01

    One of the pleiotropic phenotypes of mutations affecting DNA gyrase activity in Salmonella typhimurium is the constitutive deattenuation of the histidine operon. In the present work, we isolated and characterized a suppressor mutation which restores his attenuation in the presence of a defective gyrase. Such a suppressor, initially named sgdA1 (for suppressor gyrase deficiency), was found to correct additional phenotypes associated with defective gyrase function. These include the aberrant nucleoid partitioning of a gyrB mutant and the conditional lethality of a gyrA mutation. Furthermore, the sgdA1 mutation was found to confer low-level resistance to nalidixic acid. The last phenotype permitted isolation of a number of additional sgdA mutants. Genetic analysis established the recessive character of these alleles as well as the position of the sgdA locus at 57 U on the Salmonella genetic map. All of the sgdA mutants result from the same molecular event: a deletion removing three of the four tandemly repeated copies of argV, the gene which specifies tRNA(2Arg), the major arginine isoacceptor tRNA. These findings, combined with the observation of some Sgd-like phenotypes in a tRNA modification mutant (hisT mutant), lead us to propose that protein synthesis contributes, directly or indirectly, to the pathology of gyrase alterations in growing bacteria. We discuss plausible mechanisms which may be responsible for these effects. Images PMID:7512550

  15. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: Roles of 5-substituents of tRNA wobble uridines in the recognition of purine-ending codons

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Kazuyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2003-01-01

    Many tRNA molecules that recognize the purine-ending codons but not the pyrimidine-ending codons have a modified uridine at the wobble position, in which a methylene carbon is attached directly to position 5 of the uracil ring. Although several models have been proposed concerning the mechanism by which the 5-substituents regulate codon-reading properties of the tRNAs, none could explain recent results of the experiments utilizing well-characterized modification-deficient strains of Escherichia coli. Here, we first summarize previous studies on the codon-reading properties of tRNA molecules with a U derivative at the wobble position. Then, we propose a hypothetical mechanism of the reading of the G-ending codons by such tRNA molecules that could explain the experimental results. The hypothesis supposes unconventional base pairs between a protonated form of the modified uridines and the G at the third position of the codon stabilized by two direct hydrogen bonds between the bases. The hypothesis also addresses differences between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic decoding systems. PMID:14602896

  16. Perspectives and Insights into the Competition for Aminoacyl-tRNAs between the Translational Machinery and for tRNA Dependent Non-Ribosomal Peptide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Angela W. S.; Payoe, Roshani; Fahlman, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases catalyze the transfer of amino acids from aminoacyl-tRNAs to polypeptide substrates. Different forms of these enzymes are found in the different kingdoms of life and have been identified to be central to a wide variety of cellular processes. L/F-transferase is the sole member of this class of enzyme found in Escherichia coli and catalyzes the transfer of leucine to the N-termini of proteins which result in the targeted degradation of the modified protein. Recent investigations on the tRNA specificity of L/F-transferase have revealed the unique recognition nucleotides for a preferred Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptor substrate. In addition to discussing this tRNA selectivity by L/F-transferase, we present and discuss a hypothesis and its implications regarding the apparent competition for this aminoacyl-tRNA between L/F-transferase and the translational machinery. Our discussion reveals a hypothetical involvement of the bacterial stringent response that occurs upon amino acid limitation as a potential cellular event that may reduce this competition and provide the opportunity for L/F-transferase to readily increase its access to the pool of aminoacylated tRNA substrates. PMID:26729173

  17. The yeast protein Arc1p binds to tRNA and functions as a cofactor for the methionyl- and glutamyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Simos, G; Segref, A; Fasiolo, F; Hellmuth, K; Shevchenko, A; Mann, M; Hurt, E C

    1996-01-01

    Arc1p was found in a screen for components that interact genetically with Los1p, a nuclear pore-associated yeast protein involved in tRNA biogenesis. Arc1p is associated with two proteins which were identified as methionyl-tRNA and glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS and GluRS) by a new mass spectrometry method. ARC1 gene disruption leads to slow growth and reduced MetRS activity, and synthetically lethal arc1- mutants are complemented by the genes for MetRS and GluRS. Recombinant Arc1p binds in vitro to purified monomeric yeast MetRS, but not to an N-terminal truncated form, and strongly increases its apparent affinity for tRNAMet. Furthermore, Arc1p, which is allelic to the quadruplex nucleic acid binding protein G4p1, exhibits specific binding to tRNA as determined by gel retardation and UV-cross-linking. Arc1p is, therefore, a yeast protein with dual specificity: it associates with tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. This functional interaction may be required for efficient aminoacylation in vivo. Images PMID:8895587

  18. Crystal structure of the two-subunit tRNA m1A58 methyltransferase TRM6-TRM61 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxing; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Fan, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Xuguang; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Qiao, Zhi; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The N1 methylation of adenine at position 58 (m1A58) of tRNA is an important post-transcriptional modification, which is vital for maintaining the stability of the initiator methionine tRNAiMet. In eukaryotes, this modification is performed by the TRM6-TRM61 holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanism that underlies the cooperation of TRM6 and TRM61 in the methyl transfer reaction, we determined the crystal structure of TRM6-TRM61 holoenzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence and absence of its methyl donor S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM). In the structures, two TRM6-TRM61 heterodimers assemble as a heterotetramer. Both TRM6 and TRM61 subunits comprise an N-terminal β-barrel domain linked to a C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain. TRM61 functions as the catalytic subunit, containing a methyl donor (SAM) binding pocket. TRM6 diverges from TRM61, lacking the conserved motifs used for binding SAM. However, TRM6 cooperates with TRM61 forming an L-shaped tRNA binding regions. Collectively, our results provide a structural basis for better understanding the m1A58 modification of tRNA occurred in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:27582183

  19. Halving the Casimir force with Conductive Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Man, S.; Heeck, K.; Wijngaarden, R. J.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2009-07-01

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals.

  20. Resistivity of Carbon-Carbon Composites Halved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have become the material of choice for applications requiring strength and stiffness at very high temperatures (above 2000 C). These composites comprise carbon or graphite fibers embedded in a carbonized or graphitized matrix. In some applications, such as shielding sensitive electronics in very high temperature environments, the performance of these materials would be improved by lowering their electrical resistivity. One method to lower the resistivity of the composites is to lower the resistivity of the graphite fibers, and a proven method to accomplish that is intercalation. Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules into a host lattice. In this study the host fibers were highly graphitic pitch-based graphite fibers, or vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCF), and the intercalate was bromine. Intercalation compounds of graphite are generally thought of as being only metastable, but it has been shown that the residual bromine graphite fiber intercalation compound is remarkably stable, resisting decomposition even at temperatures at least as high as 1000 C. The focus of this work was to fabricate composite preforms, determine whether the fibers they were made from were still intercalated with bromine after processing, and determine the effect on composite resistivity. It was not expected that the resistivity would be lowered as dramatically as with graphite polymer composites because the matrix itself would be much more conductive, but it was hoped that the gains would be substantial enough to warrant its use in high-performance applications. In a collaborative effort supporting a Space Act Agreement between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, OH), laminar preforms were fabricated with pristine and bromine-intercalated pitch-based fibers (P100 and P100-Br) and VGCF (Pyro I and Pyro I-Br). The green preforms were carbonized at 1000 C and then heat treated to 3000 C. To determine whether the fibers in the samples were still intercalated after composite fabrication, they were subjected to X-ray diffraction. The composites containing intercalated graphite fibers showed much higher background scatter than that of pristine fibers, indicating the presence of bromine in the samples. More importantly, faint features indicative of intercalation were visible in the diffraction pattern, showing that the fibers were still intercalated.

  1. Islander: A database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes

    DOE PAGES

    Hudson, Corey M.; Lau, Britney Y.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islandsmore » in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution.« less

  2. Islander: A database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Lau, Britney Y.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islands in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution.

  3. Specificity determinants for the two tRNA substrates of the cyclodipeptide synthase AlbC from Streptomyces noursei

    PubMed Central

    Moutiez, Mireille; Seguin, Jérôme; Fonvielle, Matthieu; Belin, Pascal; Jacques, Isabelle Béatrice; Favry, Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel; Gondry, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs) use two aminoacyl-tRNA substrates in a sequential ping-pong mechanism to form a cyclodipeptide. The crystal structures of three CDPSs have been determined and all show a Rossmann-fold domain similar to the catalytic domain of class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). Structural features and mutational analyses however suggest that CDPSs and aaRSs interact differently with their tRNA substrates. We used AlbC from Streptomyces noursei that mainly produces cyclo(l-Phe-l-Leu) to investigate the interaction of a CDPS with its substrates. We demonstrate that Phe-tRNAPhe is the first substrate accommodated by AlbC. Its binding to AlbC is dependent on basic residues located in the helix α4 that form a basic patch at the surface of the protein. AlbC does not use all of the Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptors as a second substrate. We show that the G1-C72 pair of the acceptor stem is essential for the recognition of the second substrate. Substitution of D163 located in the loop α6–α7 or D205 located in the loop β6–α8 affected Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptors specificity, suggesting the involvement of these residues in the binding of the second substrate. This is the first demonstration that the two substrates of CDPSs are accommodated in different binding sites. PMID:24782519

  4. ARM-Seq: AlkB-facilitated RNA methylation sequencing reveals a complex landscape of modified tRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cozen, Aaron E.; Quartley, Erin; Holmes, Andrew D.; Robinson, Eva H.; Phizicky, Eric M.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    High throughput RNA sequencing has accelerated discovery of the complex regulatory roles of small RNAs, but RNAs containing modified nucleosides may escape detection when those modifications interfere with reverse transcription during RNA-seq library preparation. Here we describe AlkB-facilitated RNA Methylation sequencing (ARM-Seq) which uses pre-treatment with Escherichia coli AlkB to demethylate 1-methyladenosine, 3-methylcytidine, and 1-methylguanosine, all commonly found in transfer RNAs. Comparative methylation analysis using ARM-Seq provides the first detailed, transcriptome-scale map of these modifications, and reveals an abundance of previously undetected, methylated small RNAs derived from tRNAs. ARM-Seq demonstrates that tRNA-derived small RNAs accurately recapitulate the m1A modification state for well-characterized yeast tRNAs, and generates new predictions for a large number of human tRNAs, including tRNA precursors and mitochondrial tRNAs. Thus, ARM-Seq provides broad utility for identifying previously overlooked methyl-modified RNAs, can efficiently monitor methylation state, and may reveal new roles for tRNA-derived RNAs as biomarkers or signaling molecules. PMID:26237225

  5. Islander: a database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Lau, Britney Y.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islands in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution. PMID:25378302

  6. Introduction of a leucine half-zipper engenders multiple high-quality crystals of a recalcitrant tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-03-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase is recalcitrant to crystallization. A group of leucine substitutions has transformed the protein. Although Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase was among the first tRNA synthetases to be sequenced and extensively studied by functional analysis, it has proved to be recalcitrant to crystallization. This challenge remained even for crystallization of the catalytic fragment. By mutationally introducing three stacked leucines onto the solvent-exposed side of an α-helix, an engineered catalytic fragment of the synthetase was obtained that yielded multiple high-quality crystals and cocrystals with different ligands. The engineered α-helix did not form a leucine zipper that interlocked with the same α-helix from another molecule. Instead, using the created hydrophobic spine, it interacted with other surfaces of the protein as a leucine half-zipper (LHZ) to enhance the crystal lattice interactions. The LHZ made crystal lattice contacts in all crystals of different space groups. These results illustrate the power of introducing an LHZ into helices to facilitate crystallization. The authors propose that the method can be unified with surface-entropy reduction and can be broadly used for protein-surface optimization in crystallization.

  7. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  8. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the Wobble-Specific tRNA Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Malashkevich, V.; Roday, S.; Lisbin, M.; Schramm, V.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The essential tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase catalyzes the deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNAs. This modification allows for a single tRNA species to recognize multiple synonymous codons containing A, C, or U in the last (3'-most) position and ensures that all sense codons are appropriately decoded. We report the first combined structural and kinetic characterization of a wobble-specific deaminase. The structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme clearly defines the dimer interface and the coordination of the catalytically essential zinc ion. The structure also identifies the nucleophilic water and highlights residues near the catalytic zinc likely to be involved in recognition and catalysis of polymeric RNA substrates. A minimal 19 nucleotide RNA stem substrate has permitted the first steady-state kinetic characterization of this enzyme (k{sub cat} = 13 {+-} 1 min{sup -1} and K{sub M} = 0.83 {+-} 0.22 {micro}M). A continuous coupled assay was developed to follow the reaction at high concentrations of polynucleotide substrates (>10 {micro}M). This work begins to define the chemical and structural determinants responsible for catalysis and substrate recognition and lays the foundation for detailed mechanistic analysis of this essential enzyme.

  9. Reliable semi-synthesis of hydrolysis-resistant 3'-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates containing genuine tRNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Graber, Dagmar; Moroder, Holger; Steger, Jessica; Trappl, Krista; Polacek, Norbert; Micura, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    The 3'-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates that possess a hydrolysis-resistant ribose-3'-amide linkage instead of the natural ester linkage would represent valuable substrates for ribosomal studies. Up to date, access to these derivatives is severely limited. Here, we present a novel approach for the reliable synthesis of non-hydrolyzable 3'-peptidyl-tRNAs that contain all the respective genuine nucleoside modifications. In short, the approach is based on tRNAs from natural sources that are site-specifically cleaved within the TΨC loop by using DNA enzymes to obtain defined tRNA 5'-fragments carrying the modifications. After dephosphorylation of the 2',3'-cyclophosphate moieties from these fragments, they are ligated to the respective 3'-peptidylamino-tRNA termini that were prepared following the lines of a recently reported solid-phase synthesis. By this novel concept, non-hydrolyzable 3'-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates possessing all natural nucleoside modifications are accessible in highly efficient manner.

  10. Structure and tRNA Specificity of MibB, a Lantibiotic Dehydratase from Actinobacteria Involved in NAI-107 Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Manuel A; Hao, Yue; Walker, Mark C; Donadio, Stefano; Sosio, Margherita; Nair, Satish K; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-03-17

    Class I lantibiotic dehydratases dehydrate selected Ser/Thr residues of a precursor peptide. Recent studies demonstrated the requirement of glutamyl-tRNA(Glu) for Ser/Thr activation by one of these enzymes (NisB) from the Firmicute Lactococcus lactis. However, the generality of glutamyl-tRNA(Glu) usage and the tRNA specificity of lantibiotic dehydratases have not been established. Here we report the 2.7-Å resolution crystal structure, along with the glutamyl-tRNA(Glu) utilization of MibB, a lantibiotic dehydratase from the Actinobacterium Microbispora sp. 107891 involved in the biosynthesis of the clinical candidate NAI-107. Biochemical assays revealed nucleotides A73 and U72 within the tRNA(Glu) acceptor stem to be important for MibB glutamyl-tRNA(Glu) usage. Using this knowledge, an expression system for the production of NAI-107 analogs in Escherichia coli was developed, overcoming the inability of MibB to utilize E. coli tRNA(Glu). Our work provides evidence for a common tRNA(Glu)-dependent dehydration mechanism, paving the way for the characterization of lantibiotics from various phyla.

  11. Local definition of Ty1 target preference by long terminal repeats and clustered tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Nurjana; Eby, Yolanda; Boeke, Jef D

    2004-07-01

    LTR-containing retrotransposons reverse transcribe their RNA genomes, and the resulting cDNAs are integrated into the genome by the element-encoded integrase protein. The yeast LTR retrotransposon Ty1 preferentially integrates into a target window upstream of tDNAs (tRNA genes) in the yeast genome. We investigated the nature of these insertions and the target window on a genomic scale by analyzing several hundred de novo insertions upstream of tDNAs in two different multicopy gene families. The pattern of insertion upstream of tDNAs was nonrandom and periodic, with peaks separated by approximately 80 bp. Insertions were not distributed equally throughout the genome, as certain tDNAs within a given family received higher frequencies of upstream Ty1 insertions than others. We showed that the presence and relative position of additional tDNAs and LTRs surrounding the target tDNA dramatically influenced the frequency of insertion events upstream of that target.

  12. Trade-offs between tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure support smoothing of translation elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    Gorochowski, Thomas E.; Ignatova, Zoya; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Roubos, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of protein from mRNA is a complex multi-step process that occurs at a non-uniform rate. Variability in ribosome speed along an mRNA enables refinement of the proteome and plays a critical role in protein biogenesis. Detailed single protein studies have found both tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure as key modulators of translation elongation rate, but recent genome-wide ribosome profiling experiments have not observed significant influence of either on translation efficiency. Here we provide evidence that this results from an inherent trade-off between these factors. We find codons pairing to high-abundance tRNAs are preferentially used in regions of high secondary structure content, while codons read by significantly less abundant tRNAs are located in lowly structured regions. By considering long stretches of high and low mRNA secondary structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli and comparing them to randomized-gene models and experimental expression data, we were able to distinguish clear selective pressures and increased protein expression for specific codon choices. The trade-off between secondary structure and tRNA-concentration based codon choice allows for compensation of their independent effects on translation, helping to smooth overall translational speed and reducing the chance of potentially detrimental points of excessively slow or fast ribosome movement. PMID:25765653

  13. Novel base-pairing interactions at the tRNA wobble position crucial for accurate reading of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Khusainov, Iskander; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications at the wobble position of transfer RNAs play a substantial role in deciphering the degenerate genetic code on the ribosome. The number and variety of modifications suggest different mechanisms of action during messenger RNA decoding, of which only a few were described so far. Here, on the basis of several 70S ribosome complex X-ray structures, we demonstrate how Escherichia coli tRNALysUUU with hypermodified 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) at the wobble position discriminates between cognate codons AAA and AAG, and near-cognate stop codon UAA or isoleucine codon AUA, with which it forms pyrimidine–pyrimidine mismatches. We show that mnm5s2U forms an unusual pair with guanosine at the wobble position that expands general knowledge on the degeneracy of the genetic code and specifies a powerful role of tRNA modifications in translation. Our models consolidate the translational fidelity mechanism proposed previously where the steric complementarity and shape acceptance dominate the decoding mechanism. PMID:26791911

  14. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories. PMID:26670257

  15. Islander: a database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey M; Lau, Britney Y; Williams, Kelly P

    2015-01-01

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islands in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution.

  16. The effect of chemical modification of 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine on tRNA function.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S

    1979-08-10

    The minor base 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine (acp3U) in Escherichia coli tRNAPhe was acylated with the N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of acetic, phenoxy-acetic, and naphthoxyacetic acid, as well as the ester of 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl (dansyl)-glycine. The derivatives of tRNAPhe formed were all capable of accepting phenylalanine. There were only minor effects on the kinetic parameters of these derivatives for E. coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. There was no effect on the ability of tRNAPhe to participate in poly(U)- or poly(ACU)-directed polypeptide synthesis or in the poly(U)-stimulated binding to E. coli ribosomes. The rate of photodynamic cross-linking of 4-Srd 8 to Cyd 13 was decreased in tRNAs containing the acetyl and dansyl-glycyl derivatives of acp3U, indicating that acylation of this base may perturb the tertiary structure of the tRNA. This base in tRNAPhe does not appear to play any role in the known biological functions of tRNAPhe.

  17. Structure-function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    SciTech Connect

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-06-05

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure-activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  18. Phylogenetic information from three mitochondrial genomes of Terebelliformia (Annelida) worms and duplication of the methionine tRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Struck, Torsten H; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-06-15

    Mitochondrial genomes have been useful for inferring animal phylogeny across a wide range of clades, however they are still poorly sampled in some animal taxa, limiting our knowledge of mtDNA evolution. For example, despite being one of the most diverse animal phyla, only 5 complete annelid mitochrondial genomes have been published. To address this paucity of information, we obtained complete mitochondrial genomic sequences from Pista cristata (Terebellidae) and Terebellides stroemi (Trichobranchidae) as well as one nearly complete mitochondrial genome from Eclysippe vanelli (Ampharetidae). These taxa are within Terebelliformia (Annelida), which include spaghetti worms, icecream cone worms and their relatives. In contrast to the 37 genes found in most bilaterian metazoans, we recover 38 genes in the mitochondrial genomes of T. stroemi and P. cristata due to the presence of a second methionine tRNA (trnM). Interestingly, the two trnMs are located next to each other and are possibly a synapomorphy of these two taxa. The E. vanelli partial mitochondrial genome lacks this additional trnM at the same position, but it may be present in the region not sampled. Compared to other annelids, gene orders of these three mitochondrial genomes are generally conserved except for the atp6-mSSU region. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that mtDNA data strongly supports a Trichobranchidae/Terebellidae clade.

  19. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  20. Reconstitution and characterization of eukaryotic N6-threonylcarbamoylation of tRNA using a minimal enzyme system

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Leo C. K.; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Neculai, Dante; Strecker, Jonathan; Chiovitti, David; Kurinov, Igor; Poda, Gennadiy; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Yuan, Fang; Szilard, Rachel K.; Lissina, Elena; Nislow, Corey; Caudy, Amy A.; Durocher, Daniel; Sicheri, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The universally conserved Kae1/Qri7/YgjD and Sua5/YrdC protein families have been implicated in growth, telomere homeostasis, transcription and the N6-threonylcarbamoylation (t6A) of tRNA, an essential modification required for translational fidelity by the ribosome. In bacteria, YgjD orthologues operate in concert with the bacterial-specific proteins YeaZ and YjeE, whereas in archaeal and eukaryotic systems, Kae1 operates as part of a larger macromolecular assembly called KEOPS with Bud32, Cgi121, Gon7 and Pcc1 subunits. Qri7 orthologues function in the mitochondria and may represent the most primitive member of the Kae1/Qri7/YgjD protein family. In accordance with previous findings, we confirm that Qri7 complements Kae1 function and uncover that Qri7 complements the function of all KEOPS subunits in growth, t6A biosynthesis and, to a partial degree, telomere maintenance. These observations suggest that Kae1 provides a core essential function that other subunits within KEOPS have evolved to support. Consistent with this inference, Qri7 alone is sufficient for t6A biosynthesis with Sua5 in vitro. In addition, the 2.9 Å crystal structure of Qri7 reveals a simple homodimer arrangement that is supplanted by the heterodimerization of YgjD with YeaZ in bacteria and heterodimerization of Kae1 with Pcc1 in KEOPS. The partial complementation of telomere maintenance by Qri7 hints that KEOPS has evolved novel functions in higher organisms. PMID:23620299

  1. The frequency of translational misreading errors in E. coli is largely determined by tRNA competition.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Emily B; Farabaugh, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of missense error rates (misreading) during protein synthesis vary from 10(-3) to 10(-4) per codon. The experiments reporting these rates have measured several distinct errors using several methods and reporter systems. Variation in reported rates may reflect real differences in rates among the errors tested or in sensitivity of the reporter systems. To develop a more accurate understanding of the range of error rates, we developed a system to quantify the frequency of every possible misreading error at a defined codon in Escherichia coli. This system uses an essential lysine in the active site of firefly luciferase. Mutations in Lys529 result in up to a 1600-fold reduction in activity, but the phenotype varies with amino acid. We hypothesized that residual activity of some of the mutant genes might result from misreading of the mutant codons by tRNA(Lys) (UUUU), the cognate tRNA for the lysine codons, AAA and AAG. Our data validate this hypothesis and reveal details about relative missense error rates of near-cognate codons. The error rates in E. coli do, in fact, vary widely. One source of variation is the effect of competition by cognate tRNAs for the mutant codons; higher error frequencies result from lower competition from low-abundance tRNAs. We also used the system to study the effect of ribosomal protein mutations known to affect error rates and the effect of error-inducing antibiotics, finding that they affect misreading on only a subset of near-cognate codons and that their effect may be less general than previously thought.

  2. Complex RNA maturation pathway for a chloroplast ribosomal protein operon with an internal tRNA cistron.

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, D A; Hallick, R B

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the expression of a large chloroplast ribosomal protein operon from Euglena gracilis that resembles the Escherichia coli S10 and spc ribosomal protein operons. We present evidence that 11 ribosomal protein genes, a tRNA gene, and a new locus, orf214/orf302, are expressed as a single transcription unit. The primary transcript also contains at least 15 group II and group III introns. Gene-specific probes for each ribosomal protein gene, orf214/orf302, and for trnl hybridized to a common pre-mRNA of an estimated size of 8.3 kilobases. This is the RNA size predicted for a full-length transcript of the entire operon after splicing of all 15 introns. Polycistronic ribosomal protein mRNAs accumulated primarily as spliced hepta-, hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri-, and dicistronic mRNAs, which were presumed to arise by stepwise processing of the 8.3-kilobase pre-mRNA. A novel finding was the cotranscription of the trnl gene as an internal cistron within the ribosomal protein operon. Several combined mRNA/tRNA molecules, such as the pentacistronic rpl5-rps8-rpl36-trnl-rps14, were characterized. The occurrence of the orf214/orf302 is a unique feature of the Euglena operon, distinguishing it from all chloroplast and prokaryotic ribosomal protein operons characterized to date. The orf214/orf302 are not similar to any known genes but are cotranscribed with the ribosomal protein loci and encode stable RNA species of 2.4, 1.8, and 1.4 kilobases. PMID:2136640

  3. Wheat cytoplasmic arginine tRNA isoacceptor with a U*CG anticodon is an efficient UGA suppressor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baum, M; Beier, H

    1998-03-15

    Many RNA viruses express part of their genomic information by read-through over internal termination codons. We have recently characterized tobacco cytoplasmic (cyt) and chloroplast (chl) tRNACmCATrp and tRNAGCACys as natural suppressor tRNAs that are able to read the leaky UGA codon in RNA-1 of tobacco rattle virus, albeit with different efficiencies. Here we have identified a third natural UGA suppressor in plants. We have purified and sequenced four cyt tRNAArg isoacceptors with ICG, CCG, U*CG and CCU anticodons from wheat germ. With the exception of tRNAICGArg, these are the first sequences of plant tRNAsArg. In order to study the potential suppressor activity of wheat tRNAsArg we have used in vitro synthesized mRNA transcripts in which different viral read-through regions had been placed. In vitro translation was carried out in a homologous wheat germ extract. We found that tRNAU*CGArg is an efficient UGA suppressor in vitro, whereas the other three tRNAArg isoacceptors exhibit no or very low suppressor activity. Interaction of tRNAU*CGArg with the UGA codon requires a G:U base pair at the third anticodon position. This is the first time that an arginine-accepting tRNA has been characterized as a natural UGA suppressor. A remarkable feature of cyt tRNAU*CGArg is its ability to misread the UGA at the end of the coat protein cistron in RNA-1 of pea enation mosaic virus, which is not accomplished by cyt tRNACmCATrp or cyt tRNAGCACys, due to an unfavourable codon context.

  4. Adenosine conformations of nucleotides bound to methionyl tRNA synthetase by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Murali, N; Lin, Y; Mechulam, Y; Plateau, P; Rao, B D

    1997-01-01

    The conformations of MgATP and AMP bound to a monomeric tryptic fragment of methionyl tRNA synthetase have been investigated by two-dimensional proton transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (TRNOESY). The sample protocol was chosen to minimize contributions from adventitious binding of the nucleotides to the observed NOE. The experiments were performed at 500 MHz on three different complexes, E.MgATP, E.MgATP.L-methioninol, and E.AMP.L-methioninol. A starter set of distances obtained by fitting NOE build-up curves (not involving H5' and H5") were used to determine a CHARMm energy-minimized structure. The positioning of the H5' and H5" protons was determined on the basis of a conformational search of the torsion angle to obtain the best fit with the observed NOEs for their superposed resonance. Using this structure, a relaxation matrix was set up to calculate theoretical build-up curves for all of the NOEs and compare them with the observed curves. The final structures deduced for the adenosine moieties in the three complexes are very similar, and are described by a glycosidic torsion angle (chi) of 56 degrees +/- 5 degrees and a phase angle of pseudorotation (P) in the range of 47 degrees to 52 degrees, describing a 3(4)T-4E sugar pucker. The glycosidic torsion angle, chi, deduced here for this adenylyl transfer enzyme and those determined previously for three phosphoryl transfer enzymes (creatine kinase, arginine kinase, and pyruvate kinase), and one pyrophosphoryl enzyme (PRibPP synthetase), are all in the range 52 degrees +/- 8 degrees. The narrow range of values suggests a possible common motif for the recognition and binding of the adenosine moiety at the active sites of ATP-utilizing enzymes, irrespective of the point of cleavage on the phosphate chain. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9129831

  5. Yeast mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNA isoacceptors by distinct mechanisms and promotes CUN codon reassignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Jiqiang; Peterson, Kaitlyn M.; Simonovic, Ivana; Cho, Chris; Soll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan

    2014-03-12

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ensure faithful translation of mRNA into protein by coupling an amino acid to a set of tRNAs with conserved anticodon sequences. Here, we show that in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a single aaRS (MST1) recognizes and aminoacylates two natural tRNAs that contain anticodon loops of different size and sequence. Besides a regular ?? with a threonine (Thr) anticodon, MST1 also recognizes an unusual ??, which contains an enlarged anticodon loop and an anticodon triplet that reassigns the CUN codons from leucine to threonine. Our data show that MST1 recognizes the anticodon loop in both tRNAs, but employs distinct recognition mechanisms. The size but not the sequence of the anticodon loop is critical for ?? recognition, whereas the anticodon sequence is essential for aminoacylation of ??. The crystal structure of MST1 reveals that, while lacking the N-terminal editing domain, the enzyme closely resembles the bacterial threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS). A detailed structural comparison with Escherichia coli ThrRS, which is unable to aminoacylate ??, reveals differences in the anticodon-binding domain that probably allow recognition of the distinct anticodon loops. Finally, our mutational and modeling analyses identify the structural elements in MST1 (e.g., helix {alpha}11) that define tRNA selectivity. Thus, MTS1 exemplifies that a single aaRS can recognize completely divergent anticodon loops of natural isoacceptor tRNAs and that in doing so it facilitates the reassignment of the genetic code in yeast mitochondria.

  6. MOD5 translation initiation sites determine N6-isopentenyladenosine modification of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, E C; Slusher, L B; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K

    1991-01-01

    MOD5 is one of several genes that code for enzymes found in mitochondria and another cellular compartment. Like other such genes, it contains two in-frame ATGs that could be used to produce two proteins, differing from each other by an amino-terminal extension. Certain other genes produce heterogeneous mRNAs with some 5' ends falling upstream of the longest open reading frame and some 5' ends falling between the first and second ATGs. In these cases, selection of transcription start sites appears to play a significant role in translation start site selection. MOD5, in contrast, produces mRNAs with 5' ends that all fall upstream of both ATGs. To determine how MOD5 encodes isozymes that are located in different cellular compartments and to determine whether they differ in structure, we constructed MOD5 and MOD5-COXIV fusions with mutations of the first, second, or both ATGs. The effect of these alterations on protein production, tRNA modification, and cellular location was assessed. Both the first and second ATGs are used to produce MOD5 protein in vivo, but only the long form of the protein is imported into mitochondria. Thus, the first 11 amino acids present on the amino-terminal extended protein are necessary for mitochondrial import. Surprisingly, this extension does not promote complete import of the long form of the protein, but rather a functional pool of the extended protein remains in the cytoplasm. The amino-terminal extension is also unusual because it is probably not proteolytically removed upon import and therefore does not constitute part of a mitochondrial presequence. Images PMID:1850093

  7. Mutations in the mitochondrial tRNA Ser(AGY) gene are associated with deafness, retinal degeneration, myopathy and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tuppen, Helen A L; Naess, Karin; Kennaway, Nancy G; Al-Dosary, Mazhor; Lesko, Nicole; Yarham, John W; Bruhn, Helene; Wibom, Rolf; Nennesmo, Inger; Weleber, Richard G; Blakely, Emma L; Taylor, Robert W; McFarland, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Although over 200 pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been reported to date, determining the genetic aetiology of many cases of mitochondrial disease is still not straightforward. Here, we describe the investigations undertaken to uncover the underlying molecular defect(s) in two unrelated Caucasian patients with suspected mtDNA disease, who presented with similar symptoms of myopathy, deafness, neurodevelopmental delay, epilepsy, marked fatigue and, in one case, retinal degeneration. Histochemical and biochemical evidence of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency was observed in the patient muscle biopsies and both patients were discovered to harbour a novel heteroplasmic mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA)(Ser(AGY)) (MTTS2) mutation (m.12264C>T and m.12261T>C, respectively). Clear segregation of the m.12261T>C mutation with the biochemical defect, as demonstrated by single-fibre radioactive RFLP, confirmed the pathogenicity of this novel variant in patient 2. However, unusually high levels of m.12264C>T mutation within both COX-positive (98.4 ± 1.5%) and COX-deficient (98.2 ± 2.1%) fibres in patient 1 necessitated further functional investigations to prove its pathogenicity. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the detrimental effect of the m.12264C>T mutation on mt-tRNA(Ser(AGY)) stability, ultimately resulting in decreased steady-state levels of fully assembled complexes I and IV, as shown by blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our findings expand the spectrum of pathogenic mutations associated with the MTTS2 gene and highlight MTTS2 mutations as an important cause of retinal and syndromic auditory impairment.

  8. The yfiC gene of E. coli encodes an adenine-N6 methyltransferase that specifically modifies A37 of tRNA1Val(cmo5UAC)

    PubMed Central

    Golovina, Anna Y.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Demina, Irina; Govorun, Vadim M.; Dontsova, Olga A.

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNA is highly modified. Nucleotide 37 of the anticodon loop is represented by various modified nucleotides. In Escherichia coli, the valine-specific tRNA (cmo5UAC) contains a unique modification, N6-methyladenosine, at position 37; however, the enzyme responsible for this modification is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the yfiC gene of E. coli encodes an enzyme responsible for the methylation of A37 in tRNA1Val. Inactivation of yfiC gene abolishes m6A formation in tRNA1Val, while expression of the yfiC gene from a plasmid restores the modification. Additionally, unmodified tRNA1Val can be methylated by recombinant YfiC protein in vitro. Although the methylation of m6A in tRNA1Val by YfiC has little influence on the cell growth under standard conditions, the yfiC gene confers a growth advantage under conditions of osmotic and oxidative stress. PMID:19383770

  9. The yfiC gene of E. coli encodes an adenine-N6 methyltransferase that specifically modifies A37 of tRNA1Val(cmo5UAC).

    PubMed

    Golovina, Anna Y; Sergiev, Petr V; Golovin, Andrey V; Serebryakova, Marina V; Demina, Irina; Govorun, Vadim M; Dontsova, Olga A

    2009-06-01

    Transfer RNA is highly modified. Nucleotide 37 of the anticodon loop is represented by various modified nucleotides. In Escherichia coli, the valine-specific tRNA (cmo(5)UAC) contains a unique modification, N(6)-methyladenosine, at position 37; however, the enzyme responsible for this modification is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the yfiC gene of E. coli encodes an enzyme responsible for the methylation of A37 in tRNA(1)(Val). Inactivation of yfiC gene abolishes m(6)A formation in tRNA(1)(Val), while expression of the yfiC gene from a plasmid restores the modification. Additionally, unmodified tRNA(1)(Val) can be methylated by recombinant YfiC protein in vitro. Although the methylation of m(6)A in tRNA(1)(Val) by YfiC has little influence on the cell growth under standard conditions, the yfiC gene confers a growth advantage under conditions of osmotic and oxidative stress.

  10. tRNomics: analysis of tRNA genes from 50 genomes of Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria reveals anticodon-sparing strategies and domain-specific features.

    PubMed Central

    Marck, Christian; Grosjean, Henri

    2002-01-01

    From 50 genomes of the three domains of life (7 eukarya, 13 archaea, and 30 bacteria), we extracted, analyzed, and compared over 4,000 sequences corresponding to cytoplasmic, nonorganellar tRNAs. For each genome, the complete set of tRNAs required to read the 61 sense codons was identified, which permitted revelation of three major anticodon-sparing strategies. Other features and sequence peculiarities analyzed are the following: (1) fit to the standard cloverleaf structure, (2) characteristic consensus sequences for elongator and initiator tDNAs, (3) frequencies of bases at each sequence position, (4) type and frequencies of conserved 2D and 3D base pairs, (5) anticodon/tDNA usages and anticodon-sparing strategies, (6) identification of the tRNA-Ile with anticodon CAU reading AUA, (7) size of variable arm, (8) occurrence and location of introns, (9) occurrence of 3'-CCA and 5'-extra G encoded at the tDNA level, and (10) distribution of the tRNA genes in genomes and their mode of transcription. Among all tRNA isoacceptors, we found that initiator tDNA-iMet is the most conserved across the three domains, yet domain-specific signatures exist. Also, according to which tRNA feature is considered (5'-extra G encoded in tDNAs-His, AUA codon read by tRNA-Ile with anticodon CAU, presence of intron, absence of "two-out-of-three" reading mode and short V-arm in tDNA-Tyr) Archaea sequester either with Bacteria or Eukarya. No common features between Eukarya and Bacteria not shared with Archaea could be unveiled. Thus, from the tRNomic point of view, Archaea appears as an "intermediate domain" between Eukarya and Bacteria. PMID:12403461

  11. Structural Alterations of the Cysteine Desulfurase IscS of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveal Substrate Specificity of IscS in tRNA Thiolation

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Hans K.; Björk, Glenn R.

    2006-01-01

    The cysteine desulfurase IscS in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is required for the formation of all four thiolated nucleosides in tRNA, which is thought to occur via two principally different biosynthetic pathways. The synthesis of 4-thiouridine (s4U) and 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) occurs by a transfer of sulfur from IscS via various proteins to the target nucleoside in the tRNA, and no iron-sulfur cluster protein participates, whereas the synthesis of 2-thiocytidine (s2C) and N6-(4-hydroxyisopentenyl)-2-methylthioadenosine (ms2io6A) is dependent on iron-sulfur cluster proteins, whose formation and maintenance depend on IscS. Accordingly, inactivation of IscS should result in decreased synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides. We selected mutants defective either in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (mnm5s2U) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-independent pathway or in the synthesis of a thiolated nucleoside (ms2io6A) specific for the iron-sulfur protein-dependent pathway. Although we found altered forms of IscS that influenced the synthesis of all thiolated nucleosides, consistent with the model, we also found mutants defective in subsets of thiolated nucleosides. Alterations in the C-terminal region of IscS reduced the level of only ms2io6A, suggesting that the synthesis of this nucleoside is especially sensitive to minor aberrations in iron-sulfur cluster transfer activity. Our results suggest that IscS has an intrinsic substrate specificity in how it mediates sulfur mobilization and/or iron-sulfur cluster formation and maintenance required for thiolation of tRNA. PMID:16585765

  12. Effect of chemical carcinogens and partial hepatectomy on in vivo ( sup 35 S)methionine interaction with rat liver tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kanduc, D.; Aresta, A.; Rossiello, M.R.; Ranieri, T.; Quagliariello, E. )

    1989-09-29

    The effect of carcinogens given by a single or multiple injections on the extent of ({sup 35}S)methionine interaction with hepatic tRNA was studied in normal and partially hepatectomized rats. Either partial hepatectomy or administration of ethionine (100 or 330 mg/kg body weight) and dimethylnitrosamine (120 mg/kg body weight) by multiple i.p. injections inhibited the ({sup 35}S)methionine-tRNA interaction, while administration of hepatocarcinogenic chemicals plus PH resulted rather in a stimulation. Methylnitrosourea enhanced the extent of interaction when administered in a single dose (100 mg per kg body weight) 18 h after partial hepatectomy.

  13. Impact of P-Site tRNA and Antibiotics on Ribosome Mediated Protein Folding: Studies Using the Escherichia coli Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Surojit; Pathak, Bani Kumar; Ray, Sutapa; Barat, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    Background The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3′ –CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA) also displays chaperoning activity. Results The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin) and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin) on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3′–CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC) is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA) to be important for its chaperoning ability. Conclusion Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions. PMID:25000563

  14. Cluster M Mycobacteriophages Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey with Unusually Large Repertoires of tRNA Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Welkin H.; Anders, Kirk R.; Baird, Madison; Bowman, Charles A.; Boyle, Michelle M.; Broussard, Gregory W.; Chow, Tiffany; Clase, Kari L.; Cooper, Shannon; Cornely, Kathleen A.; DeJong, Randall J.; Delesalle, Veronique A.; Deng, Lisa; Dunbar, David; Edgington, Nicholas P.; Ferreira, Christina M.; Weston Hafer, Kathleen; Hartzog, Grant A.; Hatherill, J. Robert; Hughes, Lee E.; Ipapo, Khristina; Krukonis, Greg P.; Meier, Christopher G.; Monti, Denise L.; Olm, Matthew R.; Page, Shallee T.; Peebles, Craig L.; Rinehart, Claire A.; Rubin, Michael R.; Russell, Daniel A.; Sanders, Erin R.; Schoer, Morgan; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Wherley, James; Vazquez, Edwin; Yuan, Han; Zhang, Daiyuan; Cresawn, Steven G.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic analysis of a large set of phages infecting the common host Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 shows that they span considerable genetic diversity. There are more than 20 distinct types that lack nucleotide similarity with each other, and there is considerable diversity within most of the groups. Three newly isolated temperate mycobacteriophages, Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey, constitute a new group (cluster M), with the closely related phages Bongo and PegLeg forming subcluster M1 and the more distantly related Rey forming subcluster M2. The cluster M mycobacteriophages have siphoviral morphologies with unusually long tails, are homoimmune, and have larger than average genomes (80.2 to 83.7 kbp). They exhibit a variety of features not previously described in other mycobacteriophages, including noncanonical genome architectures and several unusual sets of conserved repeated sequences suggesting novel regulatory systems for both transcription and translation. In addition to containing transfer-messenger RNA and RtcB-like RNA ligase genes, their genomes encode 21 to 24 tRNA genes encompassing complete or nearly complete sets of isotypes. We predict that these tRNAs are used in late lytic growth, likely compensating for the degradation or inadequacy of host tRNAs. They may represent a complete set of tRNAs necessary for late lytic growth, especially when taken together with the apparent lack of codons in the same late genes that correspond to tRNAs that the genomes of the phages do not obviously encode. IMPORTANCE The bacteriophage population is vast, dynamic, and old and plays a central role in bacterial pathogenicity. We know surprisingly little about the genetic diversity of the phage population, although metagenomic and phage genome sequencing indicates that it is great. Probing the depth of genetic diversity of phages of a common host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, provides a higher resolution of the phage population and how it has evolved. Three new phages

  15. A kinetic framework for tRNA ligase and enforcement of a 2'-phosphate requirement for ligation highlights the design logic of an RNA repair machine.

    PubMed

    Remus, Barbara S; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-01

    tRNA ligases are essential components of informational and stress-response pathways entailing repair of RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. Plant and fungal tRNA ligases comprise three catalytic domains. Phosphodiesterase and kinase modules heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO₄, and 5'-PO₄ required for sealing by the ligase. We exploit RNA substrates with different termini to define rates of individual steps or subsets of steps along the repair pathway of plant ligase AtRNL. The results highlight rate-limiting transactions, how repair is affected by active-site mutations, and how mutations are bypassed by RNA alterations. We gain insights to 2'-PO₄ specificity by showing that AtRNL is deficient in transferring AMP to pRNAOH to form AppRNAOH but proficient at sealing pre-adenylylated AppRNAOH. This strategy for discriminating 2'-PO₄ versus 2'-OH ends provides a quality-control checkpoint to ensure that only purposeful RNA breaks are sealed and to avoid nonspecific "capping" of 5'-PO₄ ends.

  16. Inhibition of selenocysteine tRNA[Ser]Sec aminoacylation provides evidence that aminoacylation is required for regulatory methylation of this tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Carlson, Bradley A.; Xu, Xue-Ming; Zeng, Yu; Chen, Shawn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2011-01-01

    There are two isoforms of selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA[Ser]Sec that differ by a single methyl group, Um34. The non-Um34 isoform supports the synthesis of a subclass of selenoproteins, designated housekeeping, while the Um34 isoform supports the expression of another subclass, designated stress-related selenoproteins. Herein, we investigated the relationship between tRNA[Ser]Sec aminoacylation and Um34 synthesis which is the last step in the maturation of this tRNA. Mutation of the discriminator base at position 73 in tRNA[Ser]Sec dramatically reduced aminoacylation with serine, as did an inhibitor of seryl-tRNA synthetase, SB-217452. Although both the mutation and the inhibitor prevented Um34 synthesis, neither precluded the synthesis of any other of the known base modifications on tRNA[Ser]Sec following microinjection and incubation of the mutant tRNA[Ser]Sec transcript, or the wild type transcript along with inhibitor, in Xenopus oocytes. The data demonstrate that Sec tRNA[Ser]Sec must be aminoacylated for Um34 addition. The fact that selenium is required for Um34 methylation suggests that Sec must be attached to its tRNA for Um34 methylation. This would explain why selenium is essential for the function of Um34 methylase and provides further insights into the hierarchy of selenoprotein expression. PMID:21624347

  17. Association between allelic variation due to short tandem repeats in tRNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Virendra; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Mittal, Balraj; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-05-01

    Genotypes of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) may contribute clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis such as amoebic liver abscess (ALA), dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passers state. Hence, we evaluated allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. Asymptomatic cyst passers (n=24), patients with dysentery (n=56) and ALA (n=107) were included. Extracted DNA from stool (dysentery, asymptomatic cyst passers) and liver aspirate was amplified using 6 E. histolytica specific tRNA-linked STRs (D-A, A-L, N-K2, R-R, S-Q, and S(TGA)-D) primers. PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Association between allelic variation and clinical phenotypes was analyzed. A total of 9 allelic variations were found in D-A, 8 in A-L, 4 in N-K2, 5 in R-R, 10 in S(TAG)-D and 7 in S-Q loci. A significant association was found between allelic variants and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. This study reveals that allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica is associated different clinical outcome of amoebiasis.

  18. Empower multiplex cell and tissue-specific CRISPR-mediated gene manipulation with self-cleaving ribozymes and tRNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Lixia; Gao, Yandi; Xu, Jing; Han, Renzhi

    2016-10-30

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system has emerged in recent years as a highly efficient RNA-guided gene manipulation platform. Simultaneous editing or transcriptional activation/suppression of different genes becomes feasible with the co-delivery of multiple guide RNAs (gRNAs). Here, we report that multiple gRNAs linked with self-cleaving ribozymes and/or tRNA could be simultaneously expressed from a single U6 promoter to exert genome editing of dystrophin and myosin binding protein C3 in human and mouse cells. Moreover, this strategy allows the expression of multiple gRNAs for synergistic transcription activation of follistatin when used with catalytically inactive dCas9-VP64 or dCas9-p300(core) fusions. Finally, the gRNAs linked by the self-cleaving ribozymes and tRNA could be expressed from RNA polymerase type II (pol II) promoters such as generic CMV and muscle/heart-specific MHCK7. This is particularly useful for in vivo applications when the packaging capacity of recombinant adeno-associated virus is limited while tissue-specific delivery of gRNAs and Cas9 is desired. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy to enable tissue-specific expression of more than one gRNAs for multiplex gene editing from a single pol II promoter.

  19. Queuine, a tRNA anticodon wobble base, maintains the proliferative and pluripotent potential of HL-60 cells in the presence of the differentiating agent 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Patrick, D E; Grever, M R; Trewyn, R W

    1991-01-15

    6-Thioguanine (6-TG)-induced differentiation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8)-deficient HL-60 cells is characterized by 2 days of growth, after which morphological differentiation proceeds. Addition of the tRNA wobble base queuine, in the presence of 6-TG, maintains the proliferative capability of the cells. The ability of 6-TG to induce differentiation correlates with c-myc mRNA down-regulation, but queuine has no effect on this parameter. Treatment with 6-TG for 2-3 days commits HL-60 cells to granulocytic differentiation, and, once committed, these cells do not respond to the monocytic inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Nonetheless, when cells are treated with queuine and 6-TG, they maintain the promyelocytic morphology and are capable of being induced down the monocytic pathway by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as indicated by stabilization of c-fms mRNA and cell adherence. In the absence of queuine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is incapable of inducing monocytic markers in the 6-TG-treated cells. The data presented indicate that 6-TG-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells is a tRNA-facilitated event and that the tRNA wobble base queuine is capable of maintaining both the proliferative and pluripotent potential of the cells.

  20. Biofunction-assisted DNA detection through RNase H-enhanced 3' processing of a premature tRNA probe in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro; Doi, Yasunori; Takamatsu, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel type of biofunction-assisted, signal-turn-on sensor for simply and homogenously detecting DNA. This sensor system is composed of two types of in vitro-transcribed label-free RNAs (a 3' premature amber suppressor tRNA probe and an amber-mutated mRNA encoding a reporter protein), RNase H, and a wheat germ extract (WGE). A target DNA induces the 3' end maturation of the tRNA probe, which is enhanced by RNase H and leads to the expression of a full-length reporter protein through amber suppression in WGE, while there is almost no expression without the target due to the inactivity of the premature probe. Therefore, the target can be readily detected with the activity of the translated reporter. The catalytic reuse of the target with the help of RNase H in addition to various bioprocesses in WGE enables this sensor system to exhibit relatively high selectivity and sensitivity.

  1. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Domain movements during CCA-addition: A new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3′-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3′-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis. PMID:25849199

  3. MTO1 mediates tissue specificity of OXPHOS defects via tRNA modification and translation optimization, which can be bypassed by dietary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tischner, Christin; Hofer, Annette; Wulff, Veronika; Stepek, Joanna; Dumitru, Iulia; Becker, Lore; Haack, Tobias; Kremer, Laura; Datta, Alexandre N.; Sperl, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia; De Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Klopstock, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Wenz, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases often exhibit tissue-specific pathologies, but this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here we present regulation of mitochondrial translation by the Mitochondrial Translation Optimization Factor 1, MTO1, as a novel player in this scenario. We demonstrate that MTO1 mediates tRNA modification and controls mitochondrial translation rate in a highly tissue-specific manner associated with tissue-specific OXPHOS defects. Activation of mitochondrial proteases, aberrant translation products, as well as defects in OXPHOS complex assembly observed in MTO1 deficient mice further imply that MTO1 impacts translation fidelity. In our mouse model, MTO1-related OXPHOS deficiency can be bypassed by feeding a ketogenic diet. This therapeutic intervention is independent of the MTO1-mediated tRNA modification and involves balancing of mitochondrial and cellular secondary stress responses. Our results thereby establish mammalian MTO1 as a novel factor in the tissue-specific regulation of OXPHOS and fine tuning of mitochondrial translation accuracy. PMID:25552653

  4. A Nutrient-Driven tRNA Modification Alters Translational Fidelity and Genome-wide Protein Coding across an Animal Genus

    PubMed Central

    Zaborske, John M.; Bauer DuMont, Vanessa L.; Wallace, Edward W. J.; Pan, Tao; Aquadro, Charles F.; Drummond, D. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection favors efficient expression of encoded proteins, but the causes, mechanisms, and fitness consequences of evolved coding changes remain an area of aggressive inquiry. We report a large-scale reversal in the relative translational accuracy of codons across 12 fly species in the Drosophila/Sophophora genus. Because the reversal involves pairs of codons that are read by the same genomically encoded tRNAs, we hypothesize, and show by direct measurement, that a tRNA anticodon modification from guanosine to queuosine has coevolved with these genomic changes. Queuosine modification is present in most organisms but its function remains unclear. Modification levels vary across developmental stages in D. melanogaster, and, consistent with a causal effect, genes maximally expressed at each stage display selection for codons that are most accurate given stage-specific queuosine modification levels. In a kinetic model, the known increased affinity of queuosine-modified tRNA for ribosomes increases the accuracy of cognate codons while reducing the accuracy of near-cognate codons. Levels of queuosine modification in D. melanogaster reflect bioavailability of the precursor queuine, which eukaryotes scavenge from the tRNAs of bacteria and absorb in the gut. These results reveal a strikingly direct mechanism by which recoding of entire genomes results from changes in utilization of a nutrient. PMID:25489848

  5. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  6. Queuine, a tRNA anticodon wobble base, maintains the proliferative and pluripotent potential of HL-60 cells in the presence of the differentiating agent 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed Central

    French, B T; Patrick, D E; Grever, M R; Trewyn, R W

    1991-01-01

    6-Thioguanine (6-TG)-induced differentiation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8)-deficient HL-60 cells is characterized by 2 days of growth, after which morphological differentiation proceeds. Addition of the tRNA wobble base queuine, in the presence of 6-TG, maintains the proliferative capability of the cells. The ability of 6-TG to induce differentiation correlates with c-myc mRNA down-regulation, but queuine has no effect on this parameter. Treatment with 6-TG for 2-3 days commits HL-60 cells to granulocytic differentiation, and, once committed, these cells do not respond to the monocytic inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Nonetheless, when cells are treated with queuine and 6-TG, they maintain the promyelocytic morphology and are capable of being induced down the monocytic pathway by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as indicated by stabilization of c-fms mRNA and cell adherence. In the absence of queuine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is incapable of inducing monocytic markers in the 6-TG-treated cells. The data presented indicate that 6-TG-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells is a tRNA-facilitated event and that the tRNA wobble base queuine is capable of maintaining both the proliferative and pluripotent potential of the cells. Images PMID:1988936

  7. Rho-independent transcription terminators inhibit RNase P processing of the secG leuU and metT tRNA polycistronic transcripts in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Bijoy K.; Kushner, Sidney R.

    2008-01-01

    The widely accepted model for the processing of tRNAs in Escherichia coli involves essential initial cleavages by RNase E within polycistronic transcripts to generate pre-tRNAs that subsequently become substrates for RNase P. However, recently we identified two polycistronic tRNA transcripts whose endonucleolytic processing was solely dependent on RNase P. Here we show that the processing of the secG leuU and metT leuW glnU glnW metU glnV glnX polycistronic transcripts takes place through a different type of maturation pathway. Specifically, RNase P separates the tRNA units within each operon following the endonucleolytic removal of the distal Rho-independent transcription terminator, primarily by RNase E. Failure to remove the Rho-independent transcription terminator inhibits RNase P processing of both transcripts leading to a decrease in mature tRNA levels and dramatically increased levels of full-length transcripts in an RNase E deletion strain. Furthermore, we show for the first time that RNase G also removes the Rho-independent transcription terminator associated with the secG leuU operon. Our data also demonstrate that the Rne-1 protein retains significant activity on tRNA substrates at the non-permissive temperature. Taken together it is clear that there are multiple pathways involved in the maturation of tRNAs in E. coli. PMID:18033800

  8. Amino-terminal extension generated from an upstream AUG codon increases the efficiency of mitochondrial import of yeast N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, S R; Hopper, A K; Martin, N C

    1989-01-01

    Fusions between the TRM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and COXIV or DHFR were made to examine the mitochondrial targeting signals of N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase [tRNA (m2(2)G)dimethyltransferase]. This enzyme is responsible for the modification of both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNAs. We have previously shown that two forms of the enzyme are translated from two in-frame ATGs in this gene, that they differ by a 16-amino-acid amino-terminal extension, and that both the long and short forms are imported into mitochondria. Results of studies to test the ability of various TRM1 sequences to serve as surrogate mitochondrial targeting signals for passenger protein import in vitro and in vivo showed that the most efficient signal derived from tRNA (m2(2)G)dimethyltransferase included a combination of sequences from both the amino-terminal extension and the amino terminus of the shorter form of the enzyme. The amino-terminal extension itself did not serve as an independent mitochondrial targeting signal, whereas the amino terminus of the shorter form of tRNA (m2(2)G)dimethyltransferase did function in this regard, albeit inefficiently. We analyzed the first 48 amino acids of tRNA (m2(2)G)dimethyltransferase for elements of primary and secondary structure shared with other known mitochondrial targeting signals. The results lead us to propose that the most efficient signal spans the area around the second ATG of TRM1 and is consistent with the idea that there is a mitochondrial targeting signal present at the amino terminus of the shorter form of the enzyme and that the amino-terminal extension augments this signal by extending it to form a larger, more efficient mitochondrial targeting signal. Images PMID:2657400

  9. Binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A and P sites protects two distinct sets of nucleotides in 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Noller, H F

    1990-01-05

    Transfer RNA protects a characteristic set of bases in 16 S rRNA from chemical probes when it binds to ribosomes. We used several criteria, based on construction of well-characterized in vitro ribosome-tRNA complexes, to assign these proteins to A or P-site binding. All of these approaches lead to similar conclusions. In the A site, tRNA caused protection of G529, G530, A1492 and A1493 (strongly), and A1408 and G1494 (weakly). In the P site, the protected bases are G693, A794, C795, G926 and G1401 (strong), and A532, G966, G1338 and G1339 (weak). In contrast to what is observed for 23 S rRNA, blocking the release of EF-Tu.GDP from the ribosome by kirromycin has no detectable effect on the protection of bases in 16 S rRNA.

  10. Identification and modeling of a phosphatase-like domain in a tRNA 2′-O-ribosyl phosphate transferase Rit1p

    PubMed Central

    Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic initiator tRNAs from plants and fungi are excluded from participating in translational elongation by the presence of a unique 2′-phosphoribosyl modification of purine 64, introduced posttranscriptionally by the enzyme Rit1p. Members of the Rit1p family show no obvious similarity to other proteins or domains, there is no structural information available to guide experimental analyses, and the mechanism of action of this enzyme remains a mystery. Using protein fold recognition, we identified a phosphatase-like domain in the C-terminal part of Rit1p. A comparative model of the C-terminal domain was constructed and used to predict the function of conserved residues and to propose the mechanism of action of Rit1p. The model will facilitate experimental analyses of Rit1p and its interactions with the initiator tRNA substrate. PMID:22030622

  11. Role of Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase in biogenesis of rRNA, mRNA and tRNA in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Domanska, Anna; Kaminska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase is required for ubiquitination of a wide variety of proteins involved in essential processes. Rsp5 was shown to be involved in regulation of lipid biosynthesis, intracellular trafficking of proteins, response to various stresses, and many other processes. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of Rsp5 with a focus on biogenesis of different RNAs. We also briefly describe the participation of Rsp5 in the regulation of the RNA polymerase II complex, and its potential role in the regulation of other RNA polymerases. Moreover, we emphasize the function of Rsp5 in the coordination of the different steps of rRNA, mRNA and tRNA metabolism in the context of protein biosynthesis. Finally, we highlight the involvement of Rsp5 in controlling diverse cellular mechanisms at multiple levels and in adaptation of the cell to changing growth conditions. PMID:26403176

  12. Effects of N-terminal deletions of the Escherichia coli protein Fis on growth rate, tRNA(2Ser) expression and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Spaeny-Dekking, L; Nilsson, L; von Euler, A; van de Putte, P; Goosen, N

    1995-01-20

    The Escherichia coli Fis protein is known to be involved in a variety of processes, including the activation of stable RNA operons. In this paper we study the ability of a set of N-terminal Fis deletion mutants to stimulate transcription of the tRNA(2Ser) gene. The results indicate that the domain of the Fis protein containing residues 1-26 is not required for transcription activation. The Fis mutants that are still active in transcription stimulation can also complement the reduced growth rates of Fis- cells, suggesting that the same activating domain is involved in this phenomenon. In addition, we show that in fast growing cultures in the absence of an active Fis protein, minicells are formed. These minicells seem to arise from septum formation near the cell poles. Suppression of minicell formation by Fis also does not require the presence of the N-terminal domain of the protein.

  13. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  14. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  15. Free-Energy Landscape of Reverse tRNA Translocation through the Ribosome Analyzed by Electron Microscopy Density Maps and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of reverse tRNA translocation in the ribosome, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the ribosome-tRNAs-mRNA-EFG complex were performed. The complex at the post-translocational state was directed towards the translocational and pre-translocational states by fitting the complex into cryo-EM density maps. Between a series of the fitting simulations, umbrella sampling simulations were performed to obtain the free-energy landscape. Multistep structural changes, such as a ratchet-like motion and rotation of the head of the small subunit were observed. The free-energy landscape showed that there were two main free-energy barriers: one between the post-translocational and intermediate states, and the other between the pre-translocational and intermediate states. The former corresponded to a clockwise rotation, which was coupled to the movement of P-tRNA over the P/E-gate made of G1338, A1339 and A790 in the small subunit. The latter corresponded to an anticlockwise rotation of the head, which was coupled to the location of the two tRNAs in the hybrid state. This indicates that the coupled motion of the head rotation and tRNA translocation plays an important role in opening and closing of the P/E-gate during the ratchet-like movement in the ribosome. Conformational change of EF-G was interpreted to be the result of the combination of the external motion by L12 around an axis passing near the sarcin-ricin loop, and internal hinge-bending motion. These motions contributed to the movement of domain IV of EF-G to maintain its interaction with A/P-tRNA. PMID:24999999

  16. Mitochondrial tRNAs in the lower fungus Spizellomyces punctatus: tRNA editing and UAG 'stop' codons recognized as leucine.

    PubMed Central

    Laforest, M J; Roewer, I; Lang, B F

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatusen codes only eight tRNAs, although a minimal set of 24-25 tRNAs is normally found in fungi. One of these tRNAs has a CAU anticodon and is structurally related to leucine tRNAs, which would permit the translation of the UAG 'stop' codons that occur in most of its protein genes. The predicted structures of all S. punctatus tRNAs have the common feature of containing one to three mis-pairings in the first three positions of their acceptor stems. Such mis-pairing is expected to impair proper folding and processing of tRNAs from their precursors. Five of these eight RNAs were shown to be edited at the RNA level, in the 5'portion of the molecules. These changes include both pyrimidine to purine and A to G substitutions that restore normal pairing in the acceptor stem. Editing was not found at other positions of the tRNAs, or in the mitochondrial mRNAs of S. punctatus. While tRNA editing has not been observed in other fungi, the editing pattern inS.punctatus is virtually identical to that described in the amoeboid protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii. If this type of mitochondrial tRNA editing has originated from their common ancestor, one has to assume that it was independently lost in plants, animals and in most fungi. Alternatively, editing might have evolved independently, or the genes coding for the components of the editing machinery were laterally transferred. PMID:9016605

  17. Variations in clique and community patterns in protein structures during allosteric communication: investigation of dynamically equilibrated structures of methionyl tRNA synthetase complexes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2008-11-04

    The allosteric concept has played a key role in understanding the biological functions of proteins. The rigidity or plasticity and the conformational population are the two important ideas invoked in explaining the allosteric effect. Although molecular insights have been gained from a large number of structures, a precise assessment of the ligand-induced conformational changes in proteins at different levels, ranging from gross topology to intricate details, remains a challenge. In this study, we have explored the conformational changes in the complexes of methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) through novel network parameters such as cliques and communities, which identify the rigid regions in the protein structure networks (PSNs) constructed from the noncovalent interactions of amino acid side chains. MetRS belongs to the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS) family that plays a crucial role in the translation of genetic code. These enzymes are modular with distinct domains from which extensive genetic, kinetic, and structural data are available, highlighting the role of interdomain communication. The network parameters evaluated here on the conformational ensembles of MetRS complexes, generated from molecular dynamics simulations, have enabled us to understand the interdomain communication in detail. Additionally, the characterization of conformational changes in terms of cliques and communities has also become possible, which had eluded conventional analyses. Furthermore, we find that most of the residues participating in cliques and communities are strikingly different from those that take part in long-range communication. The cliques and communities evaluated here for the first time on PSNs have beautifully captured the local geometries in detail within the framework of global topology. Here the allosteric effect is revealed at the residue level via identification of the important residues specific for structural rigidity and functional flexibility in MetRS. This ought

  18. Structural Basis for Fe-S Cluster Assembly and tRNA Thiolation Mediated by IscS Protein-Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; Villarroya, Magda; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Zhang, Linhua; Trempe, Jean-François; Matte, Allan; Armengod, M Eugenia; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2010-05-04

    The cysteine desulfurase IscS is a highly conserved master enzyme initiating sulfur transfer via persulfide to a range of acceptor proteins involved in Fe-S cluster assembly, tRNA modifications, and sulfur-containing cofactor biosynthesis. Several IscS-interacting partners including IscU, a scaffold for Fe-S cluster assembly; TusA, the first member of a sulfur relay leading to sulfur incorporation into the wobble uridine of several tRNAs; ThiI, involved in tRNA modification and thiamine biosynthesis; and rhodanese RhdA are sulfur acceptors. Other proteins, such as CyaY/frataxin and IscX, also bind to IscS, but their functional roles are not directly related to sulfur transfer. We have determined the crystal structures of IscS-IscU and IscS-TusA complexes providing the first insight into their different modes of binding and the mechanism of sulfur transfer. Exhaustive mutational analysis of the IscS surface allowed us to map the binding sites of various partner proteins and to determine the functional and biochemical role of selected IscS and TusA residues. IscS interacts with its partners through an extensive surface area centered on the active site Cys328. The structures indicate that the acceptor proteins approach Cys328 from different directions and suggest that the conformational plasticity of a long loop containing this cysteine is essential for the ability of IscS to transfer sulfur to multiple acceptor proteins. The sulfur acceptors can only bind to IscS one at a time, while frataxin and IscX can form a ternary complex with IscU and IscS. Our data support the role of frataxin as an iron donor for IscU to form the Fe-S clusters.

  19. tRNA N6-adenosine threonylcarbamoyltransferase defect due to KAE1/TCS3 (OSGEP) mutation manifest by neurodegeneration and renal tubulopathy.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, Simon; Prunetti, Laurence; Arraf, Aiman; Haas, Drago; Bacusmo, Jo Marie; Hu, Jennifer F; Ta-Shma, Asas; Dedon, Peter C; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Elpeleg, Orly

    2017-03-08

    Post-transcriptional tRNA modifications are numerous and require a large set of highly conserved enzymes in humans and other organisms. In yeast, the loss of many modifications is tolerated under unstressed conditions; one exception is the N(6)-threonyl-carbamoyl-adenosine (t(6)A) modification, loss of which causes a severe growth phenotype. Here we aimed at a molecular diagnosis in a brother and sister from a consanguineous family who presented with global developmental delay, failure to thrive and a renal defect manifesting in proteinuria and hypomagnesemia. Using exome sequencing, the patients were found to be homozygous for the c.974G>A (p.(Arg325Gln)) variant of the KAE1 gene. KAE1 is a constituent of the KEOPS complex, a five-subunit complex that catalyzes the second biosynthetic step of t(6)A in the cytosol. The yeast KAE1 allele carrying the equivalent mutation did not rescue the t(6)A deficiency of the kae1Δ yeast strain as efficiently as the WT allele; furthermore, t(6)A levels quantified by LC-MS/MS were lower in the kae1Δ strain which was complemented by the mutation than in the kae1Δ strain, which was complemented by the WT allele. We conclude that homozygosity for c.974G>A (p.(Arg325Gln)) in KAE1 likely exerts its pathogenic effect by perturbing t(6)A synthesis, thereby interfering with global protein production. This is the first report of t(6)A biosynthesis defect in human. KAE1 joins the growing list of cytoplasmic tRNA modification enzymes, all associated with severe neurological disorders.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 8 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.30.

  20. A trilogy on. delta. -aminolevulinic acid biosynthesis in plants and algae: I. Glutamate is the sole precursor to protoheme and heme a in maize. II. The UUC glutamate anticodon is a general feature of the tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis. III. Protein and ALA biosynthesis use the same tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Schneegurt, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled substrates can be used to determine whether the heme and chlorophyll precursor {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is synthesized via the fife-carbon pathway (incorporation from L-1-({sup 14}C)glutamate) or ALA synthase (incorporation from 2-({sup 14}C)glycine). In etiolated maize epicotyl sections, highly purified total cellular protoheme was labeled 29.7 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Mitochondrial heme {alpha} was labeled 4.1 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Cell-free plant and algal preparations require tRNA for the enzymatic conversion of glutamate to ALA. The tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis ahs been shown to contain the UUC glutamate anticodon, as determined by its specific retention through anticodon:anticodon interactions by tRNA{sup Phe(GAA)}-acrylamide. A fraction that was highly enriched in the RNA which supported ALA formation was obtained by affinity chromatography of RNA extracts from Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena garcilis, Cyanidium caldarium, Synechocystis, sp. PCC 6803, pea, and spinach. Other glutamate-accepting RNAs that were not retained by the affinity column were ineffective in supporting ALA formation.

  1. Selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs at sense codons: the size of the tRNA variable loop determines whether the immediate 3' nucleotide to the codon has a context effect.

    PubMed Central

    Curran, J F; Poole, E S; Tate, W P; Gross, B L

    1995-01-01

    Codon context can affect translational efficiency by several molecular mechanisms. The base stacking interactions between a codon-anticodon complex and the neighboring nucleotide immediately 3' can facilitate translation by amber suppressors and the tRNA structure is also known to modulate the sensitivity to context. In this study the relative rates of aminoacyl-tRNA selection were measured at four sense codons (UGG, CUC, UUC and UCA), in all four 3' nucleotide contexts, through direct competition with a programmed frameshift at a site derived from the release factor 2 gene. Two codons (UGG and UUC) are read by tRNAs with small variable regions and their rates of aminoacyl-tRNA selection correlated with the potential base stacking strength of the 3' neighboring nucleotide. The other two codons (CUC and UCA) are read by tRNAs with large variable regions and the rate of selection of the aminoacyl-tRNAs in these cases varied little among the four contexts. Re-examination of published data on amber suppression also revealed an inverse correlation between context sensitivity and the size of the variable region. Collectively the data suggest that a large variable loop in a tRNA decreases the influence of the 3' context on tRNA selection, probably by strengthening tRNA-ribosomal interactions. PMID:7479072

  2. Peptidyl-CCA deacylation on the ribosome promoted by induced fit and the O3'-hydroxyl group of A76 of the unacylated A-site tRNA.

    PubMed

    Simonović, Miljan; Steitz, Thomas A

    2008-11-01

    The last step in ribosome-catalyzed protein synthesis is the hydrolytic release of the newly formed polypeptide from the P-site bound tRNA. Hydrolysis of the ester link of the peptidyl-tRNA is stimulated normally by the binding of release factors (RFs). However, an unacylated tRNA or just CCA binding to the ribosomal A site can also stimulate deacylation under some nonphysiological conditions. Although the sequence of events is well described by biochemical studies, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. Two new structures of the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui complexed with a peptidyl-tRNA analog in the P site and two oligonucleotide mimics of unacylated tRNA, CCA and CA, in the A site show that the binding of either CA or CCA induces a very similar conformational change in the peptidyl-transferase center as induced by aminoacyl-CCA. However, only CCA positions a water molecule appropriately to attack the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl-tRNA and stabilizes the proper orientation of the ester link for hydrolysis. We, thus, conclude that both the ability of the O3'-hydroxyl group of the A-site A76 to position the water and the A-site CCA induced conformational change of the PTC are critical for the catalysis of the deacylation of the peptidyl-tRNA by CCA, and perhaps, an analogous mechanism is used by RFs.

  3. Peptidyl-CCA deacylation on the ribosome promoted by induced fit and the O3′-hydroxyl group of A76 of the unacylated A-site tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Simonović, Miljan; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2008-11-24

    The last step in ribosome-catalyzed protein synthesis is the hydrolytic release of the newly formed polypeptide from the P-site bound tRNA. Hydrolysis of the ester link of the peptidyl-tRNA is stimulated normally by the binding of release factors (RFs). However, an unacylated tRNA or just CCA binding to the ribosomal A site can also stimulate deacylation under some nonphysiological conditions. Although the sequence of events is well described by biochemical studies, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. Two new structures of the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui complexed with a peptidyl-tRNA analog in the P site and two oligonucleotide mimics of unacylated tRNA, CCA and CA, in the A site show that the binding of either CA or CCA induces a very similar conformational change in the peptidyl-transferase center as induced by aminoacyl-CCA. However, only CCA positions a water molecule appropriately to attack the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl-tRNA and stabilizes the proper orientation of the ester link for hydrolysis. We, thus, conclude that both the ability of the O3'-hydroxyl group of the A-site A76 to position the water and the A-site CCA induced conformational change of the PTC are critical for the catalysis of the deacylation of the peptidyl-tRNA by CCA, and perhaps, an analogous mechanism is used by RFs.

  4. Importance of tRNA interactions with 23S rRNA for peptide bond formation on the ribosome: studies with substrate analogs.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Malte; Rodnina, Marina V

    2007-07-01

    The major enzymatic activity of the ribosome is the catalysis of peptide bond formation. The active site -- the peptidyl transferase center -- is composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and interactions between rRNA and the reactants, peptidyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA, are crucial for the reaction to proceed rapidly and efficiently. Here, we describe the influence of rRNA interactions with cytidine residues in A-site substrate analogs (C-puromycin or CC-puromycin), mimicking C74 and C75 of tRNA on the reaction. Base-pairing of C75 with G2553 of 23S rRNA accelerates peptide bond formation, presumably by stabilizing the peptidyl transferase center in its productive conformation. When C74 is also present in the substrate analog, the reaction is slowed down considerably, indicating a slow step in substrate binding to the active site, which limits the reaction rate. The tRNA-rRNA interactions lead to a robust reaction that is insensitive to pH changes or base substitutions in 23S rRNA at the active site of the ribosome.

  5. Thio-Modification of tRNA at the Wobble Position as Regulator of the Kinetics of Decoding and Translocation on the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Namit; Rodnina, Marina V

    2017-04-13

    Uridine 34 (U34) at the wobble position of the tRNA anticodon is post-transcriptionally modified, usually to mcm(5)s(2), mcm(5), or mnm(5). The lack of the mcm(5) or s(2) modification at U34 of tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Glu), and tRNA(Gln) causes ribosome pausing at the respective codons in yeast. The pauses occur during the elongation step, but the mechanism that triggers ribosome pausing is not known. Here, we show how the s(2) modification in yeast tRNA(Lys) affects mRNA decoding and tRNA-mRNA translocation. Using real-time kinetic analysis we show that mcm(5)-modified tRNA(Lys) lacking the s(2) group has a lower affinity of binding to the cognate codon and is more efficiently rejected than the fully modified tRNA(Lys). The lack of the s(2) modification also slows down the rearrangements in the ribosome-EF-Tu-GDP-Pi-Lys-tRNA(Lys) complex following GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu. Finally, tRNA-mRNA translocation is slower with the s(2)-deficient tRNA(Lys). These observations explain the observed ribosome pausing at AAA codons during translation and demonstrate how the s(2) modification helps to ensure the optimal translation rates that maintain proteome homeostasis of the cell.

  6. Reliable semi-synthesis of hydrolysis-resistant 3′-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates containing genuine tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Dagmar; Moroder, Holger; Steger, Jessica; Trappl, Krista; Polacek, Norbert; Micura, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The 3′-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates that possess a hydrolysis-resistant ribose-3′-amide linkage instead of the natural ester linkage would represent valuable substrates for ribosomal studies. Up to date, access to these derivatives is severely limited. Here, we present a novel approach for the reliable synthesis of non-hydrolyzable 3′-peptidyl-tRNAs that contain all the respective genuine nucleoside modifications. In short, the approach is based on tRNAs from natural sources that are site-specifically cleaved within the TΨC loop by using DNA enzymes to obtain defined tRNA 5′-fragments carrying the modifications. After dephosphorylation of the 2′,3′-cyclophosphate moieties from these fragments, they are ligated to the respective 3′-peptidylamino-tRNA termini that were prepared following the lines of a recently reported solid-phase synthesis. By this novel concept, non-hydrolyzable 3′-peptidyl-tRNA conjugates possessing all natural nucleoside modifications are accessible in highly efficient manner. PMID:20525967

  7. Structure of the Kti11/Kti13 heterodimer and its double role in modifications of tRNA and eukaryotic elongation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Sebastian; Zabel, Rene; Vonkova, Ivana; Kumar, Amit; Netz, Daili J; Pierik, Antonio J; Rybin, Vladimir; Lill, Roland; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Balbach, Jochen; Breunig, Karin D; Müller, Christoph W

    2015-01-06

    The small, highly conserved Kti11 alias Dph3 protein encoded by the Kluyveromyces lactis killer toxin insensitive gene KTI11/DPH3 is involved in the diphthamide modification of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 and, together with Kti13, in Elongator-dependent tRNA wobble base modifications, thereby affecting the speed and accuracy of protein biosynthesis through two distinct mechanisms. We have solved the crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kti13 and the Kti11/Kti13 heterodimer at 2.4 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively, and validated interacting residues through mutational analysis in vitro and in vivo. We show that metal coordination by Kti11 and its heterodimerization with Kti13 are essential for both translational control mechanisms. Our structural and functional analyses identify Kti13 as an additional component of the diphthamide modification pathway and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that allow the Kti11/Kti13 heterodimer to coregulate two consecutive steps in ribosomal protein synthesis.

  8. Long-Range Structural Effects of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease-Causing Mutation in Human Glycyl-TRNA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, W.; Nangle, L.A.; Zhang, W.; Schimmel, P.; Yang, X.-L.

    2009-06-04

    Functional expansion of specific tRNA synthetases in higher organisms is well documented. These additional functions may explain why dominant mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the most common heritable disease of the peripheral nervous system. At least 10 disease-causing mutant alleles of GlyRS have been annotated. These mutations scatter broadly across the primary sequence and have no apparent unifying connection. Here we report the structure of wild type and a CMT-causing mutant (G526R) of homodimeric human GlyRS. The mutation is at the site for synthesis of glycyl-adenylate, but the rest of the two structures are closely similar. Significantly, the mutant form diffracts to a higher resolution and has a greater dimer interface. The extra dimer interactions are located {approx}30 {angstrom} away from the G526R mutation. Direct experiments confirm the tighter dimer interaction of the G526R protein. The results suggest the possible importance of subtle, long-range structural effects of CMT-causing mutations at the dimer interface. From analysis of a third crystal, an appended motif, found in higher eukaryote GlyRSs, seems not to have a role in these long-range effects.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  10. The isolated carboxy-terminal domain of human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescues the pathological phenotype of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Perli, Elena; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Campese, Antonio F; Reyes, Aurelio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Nasca, Alessia; Tuppen, Helen A; Orlandi, Maurizia; Di Micco, Patrizio; Poser, Elena; Taylor, Robert W; Colotti, Gianni; Francisci, Silvia; Morea, Veronica; Frontali, Laura; Zeviani, Massimo; d'Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) diseases are multisystem disorders due to mutations in nuclear or mtDNA genes. Among the latter, more than 50% are located in transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and are responsible for a wide range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available at present. We show that three human mt aminoacyl-tRNA syntethases, namely leucyl-, valyl-, and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase are able to improve both viability and bioenergetic proficiency of human transmitochondrial cybrid cells carrying pathogenic mutations in the mt-tRNAIle gene. Importantly, we further demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase is both necessary and sufficient to improve the pathologic phenotype associated either with these “mild” mutations or with the “severe” m.3243A>G mutation in the mt-tRNALeu(UUR) gene. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this small, non-catalytic domain is able to directly and specifically interact in vitro with human mt-tRNALeu(UUR) with high affinity and stability and, with lower affinity, with mt-tRNAIle. Taken together, our results sustain the hypothesis that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase can be used to correct mt dysfunctions caused by mt-tRNA mutations. PMID:24413190

  11. Dual Role of the Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis Protein MOCS3 in tRNA Thiolation and Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Humans*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mita Mullick; Dosche, Carsten; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Leimkühler, Silke

    2012-01-01

    We studied two pathways that involve the transfer of persulfide sulfur in humans, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and tRNA thiolation. Investigations using human cells showed that the two-domain protein MOCS3 is shared between both pathways. MOCS3 has an N-terminal adenylation domain and a C-terminal rhodanese-like domain. We showed that MOCS3 activates both MOCS2A and URM1 by adenylation and a subsequent sulfur transfer step for the formation of the thiocarboxylate group at the C terminus of each protein. MOCS2A and URM1 are β-grasp fold proteins that contain a highly conserved C-terminal double glycine motif. The role of the terminal glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 was examined for the interaction and the cellular localization with MOCS3. Deletion of the C-terminal glycine of either MOCS2A or URM1 resulted in a loss of interaction with MOCS3. Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein fusions of the proteins were constructed, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was determined by the decrease in the donor lifetime. The cellular localization results showed that extension of the C terminus with an additional glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 altered the localization of MOCS3 from the cytosol to the nucleus. PMID:22453920

  12. A tRNA gene mapping within the chloroplast rDNA cluster is differentially expressed during the development of Daucus carota.

    PubMed Central

    Manna, F; Massardo, D R; Wolf, K; Luccarini, G; Carlomagno, M S; Rivellini, F; Alifano, P; Del Giudice, L

    1994-01-01

    In vivo analysis of expression of the chloroplast rDNA cluster during somatic embryogenesis of Daucus carota (D.carota) was performed by Northern-blot analysis with different DNA probes, spanning both the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S-23S rRNA spacer, which contains the two mosaic tRNA genes tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala), and the region upstream of the 16S rRNA gene, where a tRNA(Val) maps. We show that expression both of the spacer tRNAs tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) is not significantly regulated during development whereas the amount of the transcript corresponding to tRNA(Val) is not detectable during early embryonic stages and progressively accumulates during late phases. Multiple transcription start sites have been identified upstream of the tRNA(Val) gene by S1 mapping analysis, which are activated late during the embryogenesis. These data indicate that developmental control mechanisms act on plastid gene expression during embryogenesis in carrot. Images PMID:8202376

  13. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 Homolog Required for Wobble Uridine tRNA Thiolation Is Associated with Ubiquitin-Proteasome, Translation, and RNA Processing System Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria, Nikita E.; Hwang, Sungmin; Cao, Shiyun; Fu, Xian; Holman, Mary; Elbanna, Dina; Rodriguez, Suzanne; Arrington, Deanna; Englert, Markus; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Söll, Dieter; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6) and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1) are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii) that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNALysUUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN)-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1). Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNALysUUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems. PMID:24906001

  14. Near-UV stress in salmonella typhimurium: 4-thiouridine in tRNA, ppGpp, and ApppGpp as components of an adaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.F.; Baker, J.C.; Ames, B.N.

    1988-05-01

    We have examined the role of 4-thiouridine in the responses of Salmonella typhimurium to near-UV irradiation. Mutants lacking 4-thiouridine (nuv) and mutants defective in the synthesis of ppGpp (guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate) (relA) were found to be sensitive to killing by near-UV. Near-UV induced the synthesis of a set of proteins that were not induced in the nuv mutant. Some of these proteins were identified as oxidative defense proteins, and others were identified as ppGpp-inducible proteins. Over 100-fold increases in ApppGpp (adenoisine 5', 5'''-triphosphoguanosine-3'''-diphosphate, the adenylylated form of ppGpp) were observed in wild-type cells after near-UV irradiation but not in the 4-thiouridine-deficient mutant. These data support a model in which ppGpp and ApppGpp, a dinucleotide proposed to be synthesized by tRNA-aminoacyl synthetases as a response to the cross-linking of 4-thiouridine in tRNA by near-UV, induce the synthesis of proteins necessary for resistance to near-UV irradiation.

  15. How a CCA sequence protects mature tRNAs and tRNA precursors from action of the processing enzyme RNase BN/RNase Z.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Tanmay; Malhotra, Arun; Deutscher, Murray P

    2013-10-18

    In many organisms, 3' maturation of tRNAs is catalyzed by the endoribonuclease, RNase BN/RNase Z, which cleaves after the discriminator nucleotide to generate a substrate for addition of the universal CCA sequence. However, tRNAs or tRNA precursors that already contain a CCA sequence are not cleaved, thereby avoiding a futile cycle of removal and readdition of these essential residues. We show here that the adjacent C residues of the CCA sequence and an Arg residue within a highly conserved sequence motif in the channel leading to the RNase catalytic site are both required for the protective effect of the CCA sequence. When both of these determinants are present, CCA-containing RNAs in the channel are unable to move into the catalytic site; however, substitution of either of the C residues by A or U or mutation of Arg(274) to Ala allows RNA movement and catalysis to proceed. These data define a novel mechanism for how tRNAs are protected against the promiscuous action of a processing enzyme.

  16. Chloroplast protein and centrosomal genes, a tRNA intron, and odd telomeres in an unusually compact eukaryotic genome, the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    PubMed

    Zauner, S; Fraunholz, M; Wastl, J; Penny, S; Beaton, M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U G; Douglas, S

    2000-01-04

    Cells of several major algal groups are evolutionary chimeras of two radically different eukaryotic cells. Most of these "cells within cells" lost the nucleus of the former algal endosymbiont. But after hundreds of millions of years cryptomonads still retain the nucleus of their former red algal endosymbiont as a tiny relict organelle, the nucleomorph, which has three minute linear chromosomes, but their function and the nature of their ends have been unclear. We report extensive cryptomonad nucleomorph sequences (68.5 kb), from one end of each of the three chromosomes of Guillardia theta. Telomeres of the nucleomorph chromosomes differ dramatically from those of other eukaryotes, being repeats of the 23-mer sequence (AG)(7)AAG(6)A, not a typical hexamer (commonly TTAGGG). The subterminal regions comprising the rRNA cistrons and one protein-coding gene are exactly repeated at all three chromosome ends. Gene density (one per 0.8 kb) is the highest for any cellular genome. None of the 38 protein-coding genes has spliceosomal introns, in marked contrast to the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorph. Most identified nucleomorph genes are for gene expression or protein degradation; histone, tubulin, and putatively centrosomal ranbpm genes are probably important for chromosome segregation. No genes for primary or secondary metabolism have been found. Two of the three tRNA genes have introns, one in a hitherto undescribed location. Intergenic regions are exceptionally short; three genes transcribed by two different RNA polymerases overlap their neighbors. The reported sequences encode two essential chloroplast proteins, FtsZ and rubredoxin, thus explaining why cryptomonad nucleomorphs persist.

  17. Chloroplast protein and centrosomal genes, a tRNA intron, and odd telomeres in an unusually compact eukaryotic genome, the cryptomonad nucleomorph

    PubMed Central

    Zauner, Stefan; Fraunholz, Martin; Wastl, Jürgen; Penny, Susanne; Beaton, Margaret; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Maier, Uwe-G.; Douglas, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Cells of several major algal groups are evolutionary chimeras of two radically different eukaryotic cells. Most of these “cells within cells” lost the nucleus of the former algal endosymbiont. But after hundreds of millions of years cryptomonads still retain the nucleus of their former red algal endosymbiont as a tiny relict organelle, the nucleomorph, which has three minute linear chromosomes, but their function and the nature of their ends have been unclear. We report extensive cryptomonad nucleomorph sequences (68.5 kb), from one end of each of the three chromosomes of Guillardia theta. Telomeres of the nucleomorph chromosomes differ dramatically from those of other eukaryotes, being repeats of the 23-mer sequence (AG)7AAG6A, not a typical hexamer (commonly TTAGGG). The subterminal regions comprising the rRNA cistrons and one protein-coding gene are exactly repeated at all three chromosome ends. Gene density (one per 0.8 kb) is the highest for any cellular genome. None of the 38 protein-coding genes has spliceosomal introns, in marked contrast to the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorph. Most identified nucleomorph genes are for gene expression or protein degradation; histone, tubulin, and putatively centrosomal ranbpm genes are probably important for chromosome segregation. No genes for primary or secondary metabolism have been found. Two of the three tRNA genes have introns, one in a hitherto undescribed location. Intergenic regions are exceptionally short; three genes transcribed by two different RNA polymerases overlap their neighbors. The reported sequences encode two essential chloroplast proteins, FtsZ and rubredoxin, thus explaining why cryptomonad nucleomorphs persist. PMID:10618395

  18. A highly specific phosphatase that acts on ADP-ribose 1″-phosphate, a metabolite of tRNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shull, Neil P.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phizicky, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    One molecule of ADP-ribose 1″,2″-cyclic phosphate (Appr>p) is formed during each of the approximately 500 000 tRNA splicing events per Saccharomyces cerevisiae generation. The metabolism of Appr>p remains poorly defined. A cyclic phosphodiesterase (Cpd1p) has been shown to convert Appr>p to ADP-ribose-1″-phosphate (Appr1p). We used a biochemical genomics approach to identify two yeast phosphatases that can convert Appr1p to ADP-ribose: the product of ORF YBR022w (now Poa1p), which is completely unrelated to other known phosphatases; and Hal2p, a known 3′-phosphatase of 5′,3′-pAp. Poa1p is highly specific for Appr1p, and thus likely acts on this molecule in vivo. Poa1 has a relatively low KM for Appr1p (2.8 μM) and a modest kcat (1.7 min−1), but no detectable activity on several other substrates. Furthermore, Poa1p is strongly inhibited by ADP-ribose (KI, 17 μM), modestly inhibited by other nucleotides containing an ADP-ribose moiety and not inhibited at all by other tested molecules. In contrast, Hal2p is much more active on pAp than on Appr1p, and several other tested molecules were Hal2p substrates or inhibitors. poa1-Δ mutants have no obvious growth defect at different temperatures in rich media, and analysis of yeast extracts suggests that ∼90% of Appr1p processing activity originates from Poa1p. PMID:15684411

  19. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  20. A Novel Pathogenicity Island Integrated Adjacent to the thrW tRNA Gene of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Encodes a Vacuolating Autotransporter Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, V. R.; Gyles, C. L.

    2003-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and genetic organization of the Vat-encoding pathogenicity island (PAI) of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain Ec222. The 22,139-bp PAI is situated adjacent to the 3′ terminus of the thrW tRNA gene, has a G+C content of 41.2%, and includes a bacteriophage SfII integrase gene, mobile genetic elements, two open reading frames with products exhibiting sequence similarity to known proteins, and several other open reading frames of unknown function. The PAI encodes an autotransporter protein, Vat (vacuolating autotransporter toxin), which induces the formation of intracellular vacuoles resulting in cytotoxic effects similar to those caused by the VacA toxin from Helicobacter pylori. The predicted 148.3-kDa protein product possesses the three domains that are typical of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae: an N-terminal signal sequence of 55 amino acids, a 111.8-kDa passenger domain containing a modified serine protease site (ATSGSG), and a C-terminal outer membrane translocator of 30.5 kDa. Vat has 75% protein homology with the hemagglutinin Tsh, an autotransporter of avian pathogenic E. coli. A vat deletion mutant of Ec222 showed no virulence in respiratory and cellulitis infection models of disease in broiler chickens. We conclude that the newly described PAI and Vat may be involved in the pathogenicity of avian septicemic E. coli strain Ec222 and other avian pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:12933851

  1. Multiple loci of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae are involved in pathogenicity on bean: restoration of one lesion-deficient mutant requires two tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, J J; Willis, D K

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of lesion-forming ability was undertaken in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of bacterial brown spot disease of bean. Following a screen of 6,401 Tn5-containing derivatives of B728a on bean pods, 26 strains that did not form disease lesions were identified. Nine of the mutant strains were defective in the ability to elicit the hypersensitive reaction (HR) and were shown to contain Tn5 insertions within the P. syringae pv. syringae hrp region. Ten HR+ mutants were defective in the production of the toxin syringomycin, and a region of the chromosome implicated in the biosynthesis of syringomycin was deleted in a subset of these mutants. The remaining seven lesion-defective mutants retained the ability to produce protease and syringomycin. Marker exchange mutagenesis confirmed that the Tn5 insertion was causal to the mutant phenotype in several lesion-defective, HR+ strains. KW239, a lesion- and syringomycin-deficient mutant, was characterized at the molecular level. Sequence analysis of the chromosomal region flanking the Tn5 within KW239 revealed strong similarities to a number of known Escherichia coli gene products and DNA sequences: the nusA operon, including the complete initiator tRNA(Met) gene, metY; a tRNA(Leu) gene; the tpiA gene product; and the MrsA protein. Removal of sequences containing the two potential tRNA genes prevented restoration of mutant KW239 in trans. The Tn5 insertions within the lesion-deficient strains examined, including KW239, were not closely linked to each other or to the lemA or gacA genes previously identified as involved in lesion formation by P. syringae pv. syringae. PMID:9079910

  2. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis.

  3. The 3' addition of CCA to mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) is specifically impaired in patients with mutations in the tRNA nucleotidyl transferase TRNT1.

    PubMed

    Sasarman, Florin; Thiffault, Isabelle; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Salomon, Steven; Maftei, Catalina; Gauthier, Julie; Ellazam, Benjamin; Webb, Neil; Antonicka, Hana; Janer, Alexandre; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Elpeleg, Orly; Mitchell, Grant; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-05-15

    Addition of the trinucleotide cytosine/cytosine/adenine (CCA) to the 3' end of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is essential for translation and is catalyzed by the enzyme TRNT1 (tRNA nucleotidyl transferase), which functions in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Exome sequencing revealed TRNT1 mutations in two unrelated subjects with different clinical features. The first presented with acute lactic acidosis at 3 weeks of age and developed severe developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, seizures, progressive cortical atrophy, neurosensorial deafness, sideroblastic anemia and renal Fanconi syndrome, dying at 21 months. The second presented at 3.5 years with gait ataxia, dysarthria, gross motor regression, hypotonia, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia and had abnormal signals in brainstem and dentate nucleus. In subject 1, muscle biopsy showed combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects, but there was no OXPHOS deficiency in fibroblasts from either subject, despite a 10-fold-reduction in TRNT1 protein levels in fibroblasts of the first subject. Furthermore, in normal controls, TRNT1 protein levels are 10-fold lower in muscle than in fibroblasts. High resolution northern blots of subject fibroblast RNA suggested incomplete CCA addition to the non-canonical mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), but no obvious qualitative differences in other mitochondrial or cytoplasmic tRNAs. Complete knockdown of TRNT1 in patient fibroblasts rendered mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)) undetectable, and markedly reduced mitochondrial translation, except polypeptides lacking Ser(AGY) codons. These data suggest that the clinical phenotypes associated with TRNT1 mutations are largely due to impaired mitochondrial translation, resulting from defective CCA addition to mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), and that the severity of this biochemical phenotype determines the severity and tissue distribution of clinical features.

  4. Evolutionary Adaptation of the Essential tRNA Methyltransferase TrmD to the Signaling Molecule 3′,5′-cAMP in Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Agrebi, Rym; Bellows, Lauren E.; Collet, Jean-François; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-01-01

    The nucleotide signaling molecule 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (3′,5′-cAMP) plays important physiological roles, ranging from carbon catabolite repression in bacteria to mediating the action of hormones in higher eukaryotes, including human. However, it remains unclear whether 3′,5′-cAMP is universally present in the Firmicutes group of bacteria. We hypothesized that searching for proteins that bind 3′,5′-cAMP might provide new insight into this question. Accordingly, we performed a genome-wide screen and identified the essential Staphylococcus aureus tRNA m1G37 methyltransferase enzyme TrmD, which is conserved in all three domains of life as a tight 3′,5′-cAMP-binding protein. TrmD enzymes are known to use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as substrate; we have shown that 3′,5′-cAMP binds competitively with AdoMet to the S. aureus TrmD protein, indicating an overlapping binding site. However, the physiological relevance of this discovery remained unclear, as we were unable to identify a functional adenylate cyclase in S. aureus and only detected 2′,3′-cAMP but not 3′,5′-cAMP in cellular extracts. Interestingly, TrmD proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, organisms known to synthesize 3′,5′-cAMP, did not bind this signaling nucleotide. Comparative bioinformatics, mutagenesis, and biochemical analyses revealed that the highly conserved Tyr-86 residue in E. coli TrmD is essential to discriminate between 3′,5′-cAMP and the native substrate AdoMet. Combined with a phylogenetic analysis, these results suggest that amino acids in the substrate binding pocket of TrmD underwent an adaptive evolution to accommodate the emergence of adenylate cyclases and thus the signaling molecule 3′,5′-cAMP. Altogether this further indicates that S. aureus does not produce 3′,5′-cAMP, which would otherwise competitively inhibit an essential enzyme. PMID:27881678

  5. The i6A37 tRNA modification is essential for proper decoding of UUX-Leucine codons during rpoS and iraP translation.

    PubMed

    Aubee, Joseph I; Olu, Morenike; Thompson, Karl M

    2016-05-01

    The translation of rpoS(σ(S)), the general stress/stationary phase sigma factor, is tightly regulated at the post-transcriptional level by several factors via mechanisms that are not clearly defined. One of these factors is MiaA, the enzyme necessary for the first step in theN(6)-isopentyl-2-thiomethyl adenosinemethyl adenosine 37 (ms(2)i(6)A37) tRNA modification. We tested the hypothesis that an elevated UUX-Leucine/total leucine codon ratio can be used to identify transcripts whose translation would be sensitive to loss of the MiaA-dependent modification. We identified iraPas another candidate MiaA-sensitive gene, based on the UUX-Leucine/total leucine codon ratio. AniraP-lacZ fusion was significantly decreased in the abse nce of MiaA, consistent with our predictive model. To determine the role of MiaA in UUX-Leucine decoding in rpoS and iraP, we measured β-galactosidase-specific activity of miaA(-)rpo Sandira P translational fusions upon overexpression of leucine tRNAs. We observed suppression of the MiaA effect on rpoS, and notira P, via overexpression of tRNA(LeuX)but not tRNA(LeuZ) We also tested the hypothesis that the MiaA requirement for rpoS and iraP translation is due to decoding of UUX-Leucine codons within the rpoS and iraP transcripts, respectively. We observed a partial suppression of the MiaA requirement for rpoS and iraP translational fusions containing one or both UUX-Leucine codons removed. Taken together, this suggests that MiaA is necessary for rpoS and iraP translation through proper decoding of UUX-Leucine codons and that rpoS and iraP mRNAs are both modification tunable transcripts (MoTTs) via the presence of the modification.

  6. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  7. Actual Minds of Two Halves: Measurement, Metaphor and the Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    This article takes "measurement" as a will to determine or fix space and time, which allows for a comparison of ontological models of space and time from Western and Maori traditions. The spirit of "measurement" is concomitantly one of fixing meaning, which is suggested as the essence of the growth of the scientific genre of…

  8. Non-Symbolic Halving in an Amazonian Indigene Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pica, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Much research supports the existence of an Approximate Number System (ANS) that is recruited by infants, children, adults, and non-human animals to generate coarse, non-symbolic representations of number. This system supports simple arithmetic operations such as addition, subtraction, and ordering of amounts. The current study tests whether an…

  9. The effect of cold on serum thyroid hormones and hepatic 5 prime mono-deiodinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hesslink, R.L. Jr.; Quesada, M.; D'Alesandro, M.; Homer, L.D.; Reed, J.L.; Christopherson, R.; Young, B.A. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Cold exposed swine have an increases serum concentration of triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and increased T{sub 3} production rate. It is thought that hepatic thyroxine (T{sub 4}) deiodination (5DI) contributes to circulating T{sub 3} concentrations. The authors investigated the effects of cold exposure (14 days) on energy intake, serum free T{sub 3} (FT{sub 3}) and free T{sub 4} (FT{sub 4}) levels; and 5DI in 5-month boars. Hepatic 5DI activity was determined by measuring the {sup 125}I generated from trace amounts of {sup 125}I T{sub 4}. FT{sub 3} and FT{sub 4} were assayed by RIA. Swine were housed in either 20C (control; n = 5) or 4C (cold; n = 7) chambers and given food ad libitum. Cold exposure increased energy intake by 42%. The increase (93%) in hepatic 5DI V{sub max} after cold exposure parallels the increase in whole animal T{sub 3} production and may account for FT{sub 3} values found after cold exposure.

  10. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Karicheva, Olga Z; Kolesnikova, Olga A; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A; Martin, Robert P; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNA(Leu(UUR)) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders.

  11. [Investigation into the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, tRNA gene and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene variations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Jiao, J; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Li, Y H; Zhang, H L; Yang, Q Y; Xu, X R; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; He, L H; Zheng, Y X; Yu, S F

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To explore the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene variation, tRNA gene variation and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene point mutations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Methods: A nested case-control study was performed that followed a cohort of 7 445 noise-exposed workers in a steel factory in Henan province, China, from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Subjects whose average hearing threshold was more than 40 dB(A) in high frequency were defined as the case group, and subjects whose average hearing threshold was less than 35 dB(A) in high frequency and less than 25 dB (A) in speech frequency were defined as the control group. Subjects was recruited into the case group (n=286) and the control group (n=286) according to gender, age, job category and time of exposure to noise, and a 1∶1 case-control study was carried out. We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, the mitochondrial tRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene using SNPscan high-throughput genotyping technology from the recruited subjects. The relationship between polymorphic sites and NIHL, adjusted for covariates, was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis, as were the subgroup data. Results: The average age of the recruited subjects was (40.3±8.1) years and the length of service exposure to noise was (18.6±8.9) years. The range of noise exposed levels and cumulative noise exposure (CNE) was 80.1- 93.4 dB (A) and 86.8- 107.9 dB (A) · year, respectively. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 1.88 (1.16-3.05) compared with non-smokers; for workers exposed to noise at a CNE level ≥98 dB(A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 2.53 (1.49- 4.30) compared with non-smokers. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, the results of univariate analysis and multifactor analysis

  12. Biochemical Evidence for a Nuclear Modifier Allele (A10S) in TRMU (Methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase) Related to Mitochondrial tRNA Modification in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Deafness-associated 12S rRNA Mutation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Feilong; Cang, Xiaohui; Peng, Yanyan; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zhengyue; Li, Fushan; Fan, Qingqing; Guan, Anna S; Fischel-Ghosian, Nathan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-02-17

    Nuclear modifier gene(s) was proposed to modulate the phenotypic expression of mitochondrial DNA mutation(s). Our previous investigations revealed that a nuclear modifier allele (A10S) in TRMU (methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase) related to tRNA modification interacts with 12S rRNA 1555A→G mutation to cause deafness. The A10S mutation resided at a highly conserved residue of the N-terminal sequence. It was hypothesized that the A10S mutation altered the structure and function of TRMU, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we showed that the A10S mutation introduced the Ser(10) dynamic electrostatic interaction with the Lys(106) residue of helix 4 within the catalytic domain of TRMU. The Western blotting analysis displayed the reduced levels of TRMU in mutant cells carrying the A10S mutation. The thermal shift assay revealed the Tm value of mutant TRMU protein, lower than that of the wild-type counterpart. The A10S mutation caused marked decreases in 2-thiouridine modification of U34 of tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln) However, the A10S mutation mildly increased the aminoacylated efficiency of tRNAs. The altered 2-thiouridine modification worsened the impairment of mitochondrial translation associated with the m.1555A→G mutation. The defective translation resulted in the reduced activities of mitochondrial respiration chains. The respiratory deficiency caused the reduction of mitochondrial ATP production and elevated the production of reactive oxidative species. As a result, mutated TRMU worsened mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with m.1555A→G mutation, exceeding the threshold for expressing a deafness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited deafness that was manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and nuclear modifier gene.

  13. The Crystal Structure and Small-Angle X-Ray Analysis of CsdL/TcdA Reveal a New tRNA Binding Motif in the MoeB/E1 Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E.; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (‘cyclic t6A’, ct6A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA. PMID:25897750

  14. An investigation of the adsorption characteristics of 5 prime ATP and 5 prime AMP onto the surface of CaSO sub 4 x 2H sub 2 O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calderon, J.; Sweeney, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    A model has been proposed (Lahev and Chans, 1982) in which solid surfaces can act as a site for catalytic activity of condensation reactions for certain biomolecules. From this model, the adsorption characteristics of 5'ATP and 5'AMP onto the surface of CaSO4 2H2O was chosen for study. It has been proven that 5'ATP and 5'AMP do adsorb onto the surface of CaSO4. Studies were then made to determine the dependence of adsorption versus time, concentration, ionic strength and pH. It was found that the adsorption of the nucleotides is highly pH dependent, primarily determined by the phosphate acid groups of the nucleic acid molecule. From this investigation, the data obtained are discussed in relation to the model for the prebiotic earth.

  15. Identification of 5 prime -adenylylimidodiphosphate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity in rabbit taste bud cells using X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asanuma, N. )

    1990-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis has been used to characterize the enzyme activity hydrolyzing the ATP analogue 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) in taste bud cells. Rabbit foliate papillae fixed with paraformaldehyde and glutaraldehyde were incubated cytochemically with AMP-PNP as the substrate and lead ion as capture agent. The reaction product which appeared on the microvilli of taste bud cells was examined using an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer connected to an analytical electron microscope. The X-ray spectrum thus obtained was compared with that obtained from the product obtained from the demonstration of ATPase activity. Comparison of the phosphorus/lead ratios in the two products showed that twice as much phosphorus was released from an AMP-PNP molecule by the activity in question compared with that released from an ATP molecule by ATPase activity. This indicates that the enzyme hydrolyzes AMP-PNP into AMP and imidodiphosphate and that the enzyme is adenylate cyclase or ATP pyrophosphohydrolase, which possesses a similar hydrolytic property, but not ATPase or alkaline phosphatase, which hydrolyzes AMP-PNP into ADP-NH2 and orthophosphate. This paper provides an example of the use of X-ray microanalysis as a tool for enzyme distinction. The method is applicable to a variety of enzymes and tissues.

  16. DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) controls the expression of the cytotoxic enterotoxin (act) gene of Aeromonas hydrophila via tRNA modifying enzyme-glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA).

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Kosykh, Valeri G; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2012-05-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is both a human and animal pathogen, and the cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) is a crucial virulence factor of this bacterium because of its associated hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities. Previously, to define the role of some regulatory genes in modulating Act production, we showed that deletion of a glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) encoding tRNA methylase reduced Act levels, while overproduction of DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) led to a concomitant increase in Act-associated biological activities of a diarrheal isolate SSU of A. hydrophila. Importantly, there are multiple GATC binding sites for Dam within an upstream sequence of the gidA gene and one such target site in the act gene upstream region. We showed the dam gene to be essential for the viability of A. hydrophila SSU, and, therefore, to better understand the interaction of the encoding genes, Dam and GidA, in act gene regulation, we constructed a gidA in-frame deletion mutant of Escherichia coli GM28 (dam(+)) and GM33 (∆dam) strains. We then tested the expressional activity of the act and gidA genes by using a promoterless pGlow-TOPO vector containing a reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our data indicated that in GidA(+) strains of E. coli, constitutive methylation of the GATC site(s) by Dam negatively regulated act and gidA gene expression as measured by GFP production. However, in the ∆gidA strains, irrespective of the presence or absence of constitutively active Dam, we did not observe any alteration in the expression of the act gene signifying the role of GidA in positively regulating Act production. To determine the exact mechanism of how Dam and GidA influence Act, a real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was performed. The analysis indicated an increase in gidA and act gene expression in the A. hydrophila Dam-overproducing strain, and these data matched with Act production in the E. coli GM28 strain. Thus, the extent of DNA methylation

  17. The rRNA and tRNA transcripts of maternally and paternally inherited mitochondrial DNAs of Mytilus galloprovincialis suggest presence of a "degradosome" in mussel mitochondria and necessitate the re-annotation of the l-rRNA/CR boundary.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Eleni; Chatzoglou, Evanthia; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2014-04-25

    Species of the genus Mytilus carry two mitochondrial genomes in obligatory coexistence; one transmitted though the eggs (the F type) and one through the sperm (the M type). We have studied the 3' and 5' ends of rRNA and tRNA transcripts using RT-PCR and RNA circularization techniques in both the F and M genomes of Mytilus galloprovincialis. We have found polyadenylated and non-adenylated transcripts for both ribosomal and transfer RNAs. In all these genes the 5' ends of the transcripts coincided with the first nucleotide of the annotated genes, but the 3' ends were heterogeneous. The l-rRNA 3' end is 47 or 48 nucleotides upstream from the one assigned by a previous annotation, which makes the adjacent first domain (variable domain one, VD1) of the main control region (CR) correspondingly longer. We have observed s-rRNA and l-rRNA transcripts with truncated 3' end and polyadenylated tRNA transcripts carrying the CCA trinucleotide. We have also detected polyadenylated RNA remnants carrying the sequences of the control region, which strongly suggests RNA degradation activity and thus presence of degradosomes in Mytilus mitochondria.

  18. Halving the dimension of a single image to be encrypted optically to avoid data expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jiawang; Tan, Guanzheng

    2016-06-01

    When directly applying optical transforms, such as fractional Fourier transform (FrFT), to a single image or real image (input image), the resulting image will become complex-valued, which leads to the doubling of data volume. This data expansion problem can be found in many existing single-image optical encryption schemes. We propose a folding technique to offset the data expansion by constructing a complex input image of half size. And we devise an optical single-image encryption scheme based on double FrFTs, in which this technique together with compressed sensing can bring about the possible maximum compression of encrypted images. Moreover, the chaos-based random circular shift for scrambling is introduced to enhance security. The chaotic random signum matrix is also tried as the measurement matrix, and it displays a good performance. Simulation results demonstrate the validity and security of the proposed scheme.

  19. A Sorrow Shared Is a Sorrow Halved: Moral Judgments of Harm to Single versus Multiple Victims

    PubMed Central

    Konis, Daffie; Haran, Uriel; Saporta, Kelly; Ayal, Shahar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a bias in moral judgment in which the mere existence of other victims reduces assessments of the harm suffered by each harmed individual. Three experiments support the seemingly paradoxical relationship between the number of harmed individuals and the perceived severity of the harming act. In Experiment 1a, participants expressed lower punitive intentions toward a perpetrator of an unethical act that hurt multiple people and assigned lower monetary compensation to each victim than did those who judged a similar act that harmed only one person. In Experiment 1b, participants displayed greater emotional involvement in the case of a single victim than when there were multiple victims, regardless of whether the victims were unrelated and unaware of each other or constituted a group. Experiment 2 measured the responses of the victims themselves. Participants received false performance feedback on a task before being informed that they had been deceived. Victims who were deceived alone reported more negative feelings and judged the deception as more immoral than did those who knew that others had been deceived as well. Taken together, these results suggest that a victim’s plight is perceived as less severe when others share it, and this bias is common to both third-party judges and victims. PMID:27531988

  20. Infants' Processing of Featural and Configural Information in the Upper and Lower Halves of the Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Paul C.; Tanaka, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Three- to 4-month-old and 6- to 7-month-old infants were administered an infant version of the Face Dimensions Test that has been used with adults (e.g., Bukach, Le Grand, Kaiser, Bub, & Tanaka, 2008). Infants were familiarized with a photograph of a woman's face and then tested with the familiar face paired with a face differing in the (a)…

  1. What Is True Halving in the Payoff Matrix of Game Theory?

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Katsumata, Yuki; Hasegawa, Eisuke; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-01-01

    In game theory, there are two social interpretations of rewards (payoffs) for decision-making strategies: (1) the interpretation based on the utility criterion derived from expected utility theory and (2) the interpretation based on the quantitative criterion (amount of gain) derived from validity in the empirical context. A dynamic decision theory has recently been developed in which dynamic utility is a conditional (state) variable that is a function of the current wealth of a decision maker. We applied dynamic utility to the equal division in dove-dove contests in the hawk-dove game. Our results indicate that under the utility criterion, the half-share of utility becomes proportional to a player's current wealth. Our results are consistent with studies of the sense of fairness in animals, which indicate that the quantitative criterion has greater validity than the utility criterion. We also find that traditional analyses of repeated games must be reevaluated.

  2. Compliance of scored tablet halves produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies with the new European Pharmacopoeia requirements.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Ghosh, Abeer Abu

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the weight uniformity of commonly divided tablets produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies and to evaluate the importance of both patient- and formulation-related variables on the splitting results. Eighty-four volunteers were enrolled in this study; their age, gender and occupation were documented in order, and the effect of these variables on the tablet splitting results was evaluated. Each volunteer was asked to divide six scored tablets of each product tested and was given clear instructions on how to conduct the splitting process. The split units were individually weighed and the RSD for each product was calculated as instructed in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur. 5.5). Only one scored tablet product passed the Ph. Eur. test of mass uniformity, while the remaining 13 products failed; this indicates that the splitting of these tablet products is not a reliable means for the provision of accurate doses to patients. Age, gender and occupation of volunteers were not found to be predictive of any variability noted in the splitting results. The only factors that were suspected to be linked to passing the splitting test, as per the European Pharmacopoeia, were the shape, friability and hardness of the tablets. As a result of this study, we believe that the practice of dividing tablets, which should provide therapeutic and economic benefits for the patient, may potentially cause significant problems, especially in drugs with low therapeutic indices. Tablets produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies should comply with the new Ph. Eur. splitting regulations to reduce this potential for complications.

  3. Big Words, Halved Brains and Small Worlds: Complex Brain Networks of Figurative Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Arzouan, Yossi; Solomon, Sorin; Faust, Miriam; Goldstein, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Language comprehension is a complex task that involves a wide network of brain regions. We used topological measures to qualify and quantify the functional connectivity of the networks used under various comprehension conditions. To that aim we developed a technique to represent functional networks based on EEG recordings, taking advantage of their excellent time resolution in order to capture the fast processes that occur during language comprehension. Networks were created by searching for a specific causal relation between areas, the negative feedback loop, which is ubiquitous in many systems. This method is a simple way to construct directed graphs using event-related activity, which can then be analyzed topologically. Brain activity was recorded while subjects read expressions of various types and indicated whether they found them meaningful. Slightly different functional networks were obtained for event-related activity evoked by each expression type. The differences reflect the special contribution of specific regions in each condition and the balance of hemispheric activity involved in comprehending different types of expressions and are consistent with the literature in the field. Our results indicate that representing event-related brain activity as a network using a simple temporal relation, such as the negative feedback loop, to indicate directional connectivity is a viable option for investigation which also derives new information about aspects not reflected in the classical methods for investigating brain activity. PMID:21556324

  4. Learning Study Guided by Variation Theory: Exemplified by Children Learning to Halve and Double Whole Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmqvist Olander, Mona; Nyberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to describe how the learning study model can be used to improve lesson design and children's learning outcomes by enabling them to perceive and define the critical aspects of the object of learning, guided by variation theory. Three lesson designs were used with three groups of children (A = 24, B = 13, C = 14) from two schools.…

  5. Integrated crop water management might sustainably halve the global food gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägermeyr, J.; Gerten, D.; Schaphoff, S.; Heinke, J.; Lucht, W.; Rockström, J.

    2016-02-01

    As planetary boundaries are rapidly being approached, humanity has little room for additional expansion and conventional intensification of agriculture, while a growing world population further spreads the food gap. Ample evidence exists that improved on-farm water management can close water-related yield gaps to a considerable degree, but its global significance remains unclear. In this modeling study we investigate systematically to what extent integrated crop water management might contribute to closing the global food gap, constrained by the assumption that pressure on water resources and land does not increase. Using a process-based bio-/agrosphere model, we simulate the yield-increasing potential of elevated irrigation water productivity (including irrigation expansion with thus saved water) and optimized use of in situ precipitation water (alleviated soil evaporation, enhanced infiltration, water harvesting for supplemental irrigation) under current and projected future climate (from 20 climate models, with and without beneficial CO2 effects). Results show that irrigation efficiency improvements can save substantial amounts of water in many river basins (globally 48% of non-productive water consumption in an ‘ambitious’ scenario), and if rerouted to irrigate neighboring rainfed systems, can boost kcal production significantly (26% global increase). Low-tech solutions for small-scale farmers on water-limited croplands show the potential to increase rainfed yields to a similar extent. In combination, the ambitious yet achievable integrated water management strategies explored in this study could increase global production by 41% and close the water-related yield gap by 62%. Unabated climate change will have adverse effects on crop yields in many regions, but improvements in water management as analyzed here can buffer such effects to a significant degree.

  6. C5-substituents of uridines and 2-thiouridines present at the wobble position of tRNA determine the formation of their keto-enol or zwitterionic forms - a factor important for accuracy of reading of guanosine at the 3'-end of the mRNA codons.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Elzbieta; Lodyga-Chruscinska, Elzbieta; Pawlak, Justyna; Cypryk, Marek; Bartos, Paulina; Ebenryter-Olbinska, Katarzyna; Leszczynska, Grazyna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2017-01-13

    Modified nucleosides present in the wobble position of the tRNA anticodons regulate protein translation through tuning the reading of mRNA codons. Among 40 of such nucleosides, there are modified uridines containing either a sulfur atom at the C2 position and/or a substituent at the C5 position of the nucleobase ring. It is already evidenced that tRNAs with 2-thiouridines at the wobble position preferentially read NNA codons, while the reading mode of the NNG codons by R5U/R5S2U-containing anticodons is still elusive. For a series of 18 modified uridines and 2-thiouridines, we determined the pKa values and demonstrated that both modifying elements alter the electron density of the uracil ring and modulate the acidity of their N3H proton. In aqueous solutions at physiological pH the 2-thiouridines containing aminoalkyl C5-substituents are ionized in ca. 50%. The results, confirmed also by theoretical calculations, indicate that the preferential binding of the modified units bearing non-ionizable 5-substituents to guanosine in the NNG codons may obey the alternative C-G-like (Watson-Crick) mode, while binding of those bearing aminoalkyl C5-substituents (protonated under physiological conditions) and especially those with a sulfur atom at the C2 position, adopt a zwitterionic form and interact with guanosine via a 'new wobble' pattern.

  7. A human and a plant intron-containing tRNATyr gene are both transcribed in a HeLa cell extract but spliced along different pathways.

    PubMed Central

    van Tol, H; Stange, N; Gross, H J; Beier, H

    1987-01-01

    tRNA splicing enzymes had been identified in mammalian and plant cells long before homologous intron-containing tRNA genes were detected. The tRNATyr gene presented here is the first intron-containing, human tRNA gene for which transcription and pre-tRNA maturation has been studied in a homologous system. This gene is disrupted by a 20-bp long intron and encodes one of the two major human tRNAsTyr which have been purified and sequenced. A tRNATyr gene recently isolated from Nicotiana also contains an intron and codes for a functional, major cytoplasmic tRNATyr. Both tRNA genes are efficiently transcribed in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Each of them produces two independent primary transcripts because of two initiation and termination sites, respectively. The maturation of the tRNATyr precursors proceeds along different pathways. The intervening sequence of the human pre-tRNATyr is excised first, followed by ligation of the tRNA halves and maturation of the flanks, as has been shown for all intron-containing tRNA genes transcribed in HeLa extract. The order of maturation steps is reversed for the plant pre-tRNATyr: processing of the flanking sequences precedes intron excision. This maturation pathway corresponds to that observed in vivo for tRNA biosynthesis in Xenopus oocytes and yeast. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3502708

  8. The Many Virtues of tRNA-derived Stress-induced RNAs (tiRNAs): Discovering Novel Mechanisms of Stress Response and Effect on Human Health*

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Mridusmita; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, mature tRNAs are cleaved by stress-activated ribonuclease angiogenin to generate 5′- and 3′-tRNA halves: a novel class of small non-coding RNAs of 30–40 nucleotides in length. The biogenesis and biological functions of tRNA halves are emerging areas of research. This review will discuss the most recent findings on: (i) the mechanism and regulation of their biogenesis, (ii) their mechanism of action (we will specifically discuss their role in the protein synthesis inhibition and the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis), and (iii) their effects on the human physiology and disease conditions. PMID:26463210

  9. Regulation of PURA gene transcription by three promoters generating distinctly spliced 5-prime leaders: a novel means of fine control over tissue specificity and viral signals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Purα is an evolutionarily conserved cellular protein participating in processes of DNA replication, transcription, and RNA transport; all involving binding to nucleic acids and altering conformation and physical positioning. The distinct but related roles of Purα suggest a need for expression regulated differently depending on intracellular and external signals. Results Here we report that human PURA (hPURA) transcription is regulated from three distinct and widely-separated transcription start sites (TSS). Each of these TSS is strongly homologous to a similar site in mouse chromosomal DNA. Transcripts from TSS I and II are characterized by the presence of large and overlapping 5'-UTR introns terminated at the same splice receptor site. Transfection of lung carcinoma cells with wild-type or mutated hPURA 5' upstream sequences identifies different regulatory elements. TSS III, located within 80 bp of the translational start codon, is upregulated by E2F1, CAAT and NF-Y binding elements. Transcription at TSS II is downregulated through the presence of adjacent consensus binding elements for interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that IRF-3 protein binds hPURA promoter sequences at TSS II in vivo. By co-transfecting hPURA reporter plasmids with expression plasmids for IRF proteins we demonstrate that several IRFs, including IRF-3, down-regulate PURA transcription. Infection of NIH 3T3 cells with mouse cytomegalovirus results in a rapid decrease in levels of mPURA mRNA and Purα protein. The viral infection alters the degree of splicing of the 5'-UTR introns of TSS II transcripts. Conclusions Results provide evidence for a novel mechanism of transcriptional control by multiple promoters used differently in various tissues and cells. Viral infection alters not only the use of PURA promoters but also the generation of different non-coding RNAs from 5'-UTRs of the resulting transcripts. PMID:21062477

  10. Plasma membrane associated phospholipase C from human platelets: Synergistic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by thrombin and guanosine 5 prime -O-(3-thiotriphosphate)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, J.J.; Henderson, P.A.; Fisher, G.J. )

    1989-01-10

    The effects of thrombin and GTP{gamma}S on the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides by membrane-associated phospholipase C (PLC) from human platelets were examined with endogenous ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes or with lipid vesicles containing either ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol or ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) or thrombin (1 unit/mL) did not stimulate release of inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), inositol bisphosphate (IP{sub 2}), or inositol phosphate (IP) from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes. IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes were, however, stimulated 3-fold by GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). A higher concentration of GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) alone also stimulated IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, release. In the presence of 1 mM calcium, release of IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3} was increased 6-fold over basal levels; however, formation of IP was not observed. At submicromolar calcium concentration, hydrolysis of exogenous phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) by platelet membrane associated PLC was also markedly enhanced by GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). Under identical conditions, exogenous phosphatidylinositol (PI) was not hydrolyzed. The same substrate specificity was observed when the membrane-associated PLC was activated with 1 mM calcium. Thrombin-induced hydrolysis of PIP{sub 2} was inhibited by treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin or pretreatment of intact platelets with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) prior to preparation of membranes. Pertussis toxin did not inhibit GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or calcium (1 mM) dependent PIP{sub 2} breakdown, while TPA inhibited GTP{gamma}S-dependent but not calcium-dependent phospholipase C activity.

  11. Effects of static magnetic field on specific adenosine-5{prime}-triphosphatase activities and bioelectrical and biomechanical properties in the rat diaphragm muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Itegin, M.; Guenay, I.; Logoglu, G.; Isbir, T.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, the authors aimed to clarify the effects of chronically applied static magnetic field (200 Gauss) on specific ATPase activities and bioelectrical and biomechanical responses in the isolated rat diaphragm muscle. The mean activities of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase and Ca{sup 2+} ATPase determined from the diaphragm homogenates were significantly higher in the magnetic field exposed group (n = 20), but that of Mg{sup 2+} ATPase was nonsignificantly lower compared to the control group (n = 13). Resting membrane potential, amplitude of muscle action potential, and overshoot values (mean {+-} SE) in the control group were found to be {minus}76.5 {+-} 0.6, 100 {+-} 0.8, and 23.5 {+-} 0.6 mV, respectively; these values were determined to be {minus}72.8 {+-} 0.4, 90.3 {+-} 0.5, and 17.2 {+-} 0.4 mV in the magnetic field-exposed group, respectively. The latency was determined to increase in the experimental group, and all the above-mentioned bioelectrical differences between the groups were significant statistically. Force of muscle twitch was found to decrease significantly in the magnetic field-exposed group, and this finding was attributed to the augmenting effect of magnetic field on Ca{sup 2+} ATPase activity. These results suggest that magnetic field exposure changes specific ATPase activities and, thence, bioelectrical and biomechanical properties in the rat diaphragm muscle.

  12. Correct splicing despite mutation of the invariant first nucleotide of a 5[prime] splice site: A possible basis for disparate clinical phenotypes in siblings with adenosine deaminase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Arredondo-Vega, F.X.; Santisteban, I.; Kelly, S.; Hershfield, M.S. ); Umetsu, D.T. ); Schlossman, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency usually causes severe combined immune deficiency in infancy. Milder phenotypes also occur and are associated with less severely impaired deoxyadenosine (dAdo) catabolism. The authors have characterized the mutations responsible for ADA deficiency in siblings with disparity in clinical phenotype. Erythrocyte dAdo nucleotide pool size, which reflects total residual ADA activity, was lower in the older, more mildly affected sib (RG) than in her younger, more severely affected sister (EG). Cultured T cells, fibroblasts, and B lymphoblasts of RG had detectable residual ADA activity, while cells of EG did not. ADA mRNA was undetectable by northern analysis in cells of both patients. Both sibs were found to be compound heterozygotes for the following novel splicing defects: (1) a G[sup +1][yields]A substitution at the 5' splice site of IVS 2 and (2) a complex 17-bp rearrangement of the 3' splice site of IVS 8, which inserted a run of seven purines into the polypyrimidine tract and altered the reading frame of exon 9. PCR-amplified ADA cDNA clones with premature translation stop codons arising from aberrant pre-mRNA splicing were identified, which were consistent with these mutations. However, some cDNA clones from T cells of both patients and from fibroblasts and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells of RG, were normally spliced at both the exon 2/3 and exon 8/9 junctions. A normal coding sequence was documented for clones from both sibs. The normal cDNA clones did not appear to arise from either contamination or PCR artifact, and mosaicism seems unlikely to have been involved. These findings suggest (1) that a low level of normal pre-mRNA splicing may occur despite mutation of the invariant first nucleotide of the 5' splice sequence and (2) that differences in efficiency of such splicing may account for the difference in residual ADA activity, immune dysfunction, and clinical severity in these siblings. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. More deletions in the 5{prime} region than in the central region of the dystrophin gene were identified among Filipino Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This report describes mutations in the dystrophin gene and the frequency of these mutations in Filipino pedigrees with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The findings suggest the presence of genetic variability among DMD/BMD patients in different populations. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Immunity, safety and protection of an Adenovirus 5 prime--Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara boost subunit vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in calves.

    PubMed

    Bull, Tim J; Vrettou, Christina; Linedale, Richard; McGuinnes, Catherine; Strain, Sam; McNair, Jim; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hope, Jayne C

    2014-10-29

    Vaccination is the most cost effective control measure for Johne's disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) but currently available whole cell killed formulations have limited efficacy and are incompatible with the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis by tuberculin skin test. We have evaluated the utility of a viral delivery regimen of non-replicative human Adenovirus 5 and Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara recombinant for early entry MAP specific antigens (HAV) to show protection against challenge in a calf model and extensively screened for differential immunological markers associated with protection. We have shown that HAV vaccination was well tolerated, could be detected using a differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) test, showed no cross-reactivity with tuberculin and provided a degree of protection against challenge evidenced by a lack of faecal shedding in vaccinated animals that persisted throughout the 7 month infection period. Calves given HAV vaccination had significant priming and boosting of MAP derived antigen (PPD-J) specific CD4+, CD8+ IFN-γ producing T-cell populations and, upon challenge, developed early specific Th17 related immune responses, enhanced IFN-γ responses and retained a high MAP killing capacity in blood. During later phases post MAP challenge, PPD-J antigen specific IFN-γ and Th17 responses in HAV vaccinated animals corresponded with improvements in peripheral bacteraemia. By contrast a lack of IFN-γ, induction of FoxP3+ T cells and increased IL-1β and IL-10 secretion were indicative of progressive infection in Sham vaccinated animals. We conclude that HAV vaccination shows excellent promise as a new tool for improving control of MAP infection in cattle.

  15. The influence of time of maternal exposure to 2,4,5,2 prime ,4 prime ,5 prime -hexachlorobiphenyl on its accumulation in their nursing offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Gallenberg, L.A.; Ring, B.J.; Vodicnik, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    2,4,5,2',4',5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (6-CB) is mobilized from rodent tissues during the lipid depletion associated with food restriction or lactation, the latter condition resulting in the substantial elimination of the maternal body burden of the chemical to nursing offspring. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the rate and/or magnitude of accumulation of 6-CB in nursing offspring differed with time following PCB administration to the maternal animal. Female ICR mice were administered two doses of 6-CB. Group I animals received (14C)-6-CB as weanlings (15-20 g) followed by unlabeled 6-CB 5 weeks later, after mating, on Day 1 of gestation. Group II received unlabeled 6-CB as weanlings and (14C)-6-CB on Day 1 of gestation. Thus, 14C identified the mobilization and elimination of either the first or the second dose of 6-CB in the treatment groups (I = (14C)-6-CB, 6-CB; II = 6-CB, (14C)-6-CB). Both groups of animals retained approximately 80% of the administered radiolabeled dose. The tissue distribution of (14C)-6-CB in group II as a percentage of the body burden was not different from that in group I as determined from maternal tissue concentrations on Day 14 of gestation. The percentage of the maternal body burden of (14C)-6-CB accumulated in suckling offspring of group II mothers was significantly greater than that in group I offspring on Day 1 (I, 2.2 +/- 0.5%; II, 3.5 +/- 0.4%), Day 3 (I, 14.8 +/- 1.9%; II, 24.6 +/- 2.7%), Day 5 (I, 16.8 +/- 1.4%; II, 24.8 +/- 0.8%), and Day 12 (I, 32.3 +/- 0.5%; II, 45.5 +/- 1.7%) postpartum. This differential elimination was reflected in the t1/2 of elimination of the radiolabeled dose from parametrial fat during lactation, which was significantly longer in group I (14 days) than group II maternal animals (9 days).

  16. Structure-Based Design of Trna-Guanine Transglycosylase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    Taking the development of inhibitors for the tRNA-modifying enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) as an example, the scope of a structure-based drug development project will be demonstrated, performed via several cycles of iterative design. The described example is based on studies, performed at ETH-Zurich and University of Marburg in joint collaboration. As these studies have been executed in an academic environment, different tools of structure-based design have been applied and several issues of more fundamental interest to the methodological background of the project could be addressed.

  17. A game of two halves? Incentive incompatibility, starting point bias and the bidding game contingent valuation method.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Paul; Ternent, Laura; Gbangou, Adjima; Newlands, David

    2010-01-01

    The bidding game (BG) method of contingent valuation is one way to increase the precision of willingness to pay (WTP) estimates relative to the single dichotomous choice approach. However, there is evidence that the method may lead to incentive incompatible responses and be associated with starting point bias. While previous studies in health using BGs test for starting point bias, none have also investigated incentive incompatibility. Using a sample of respondents resident in Burkina Faso, West Africa, this paper examines whether the BG method is associated with both incentive incompatibility and starting point bias. We find evidence for both effects. However, average WTP values remained largely unaffected after accounting for both factors in multivariate analyses. The results suggest that the BG method is an acceptable technique in settings where prices for goods are flexible.

  18. Exploring Differences in National and International Poverty Estimates: Is Uganda on Track to Halve Poverty by 2015?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores causes of differences in estimates of poverty incidence in Uganda since the early 1990s as measured by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics and the World Bank. While both sets of estimates from the two organisations show a declining trend in poverty incidence there are important differences in the levels of poverty, the speed of the…

  19. The Economic Benefits from Halving the Dropout Rate: A Boom to Businesses in the Nation's Largest Metropolitan Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Few people realize the impact that high school dropouts have on a community's economic, social, and civic health. Business owners and residents--in particular, those without school-aged children--may not be aware that they have much at stake in the success of their local high schools. Indeed, everyone--from car dealers and realtors to bank…

  20. Architecture and Folding Mechanism of the Azoarcus Group I Pre-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan,P.; Masquida, B.; Westhof, E.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Self-splicing RNAs must evolve to function in their specific exon context. The conformation of a group I pre-tRNA{sup ile} from the bacterium Azoarcus wa