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Sample records for 5s rrna structure

  1. An unusual 5S rRNA, from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and its implications for a general 5S rRNA structure.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, D A; Luehrsen, K R; Woese, C R; Pace, N R

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was determined. The high degree of evident secondary structure in the molecule has implications for the common higher order structure of other 5S rRNAs, both bacterial and eukaryotic. Images PMID:6273825

  2. The 5S rRNA-histone repeat in the crustacean Artemia: structure, polymorphism and variation of the 5S rRNA segment in different populations.

    PubMed Central

    Cruces, J; Díaz-Guerra, M; Gil, I; Renart, J

    1989-01-01

    5S rRNA genes are linked to the histone genes in the 13 populations of the crustacean Artemia that we have studied. In all cases, two types of repeat units are found. Southern blot analysis of all populations shows that they can be grouped into three classes: a) American bisexuals; b) Eurasian bisexuals, and c) parthenogenetic organisms (all from Eurasia). Restriction analysis of a bisexual population from San Francisco Bay shows that the two repeat units are of 9.0 and 8.5 kb (with minor heterogeneities of restriction sites). In parthenogenetic organisms, the two repeat units are of approximately 12 kb. Sequencing data from the region of the 5S rRNA from the San Francisco Bay population, shows that in both types of units, the single 5S rRNA gene (315 bp in length), is located 430 bp downstream the 3' regulatory sequences of the H2A gene, the last gene in the histone cluster. We have isolated three clones that contain 5S rRNA sequences. Two of them (one from an American bisexual and the other from a parthenogenetic population) contain histone and 5S rRNA genes, both with the same transcriptional polarity. The third clone, lacking histone genes, is likely to be an orphon derived from the parthenogenetic population. Images PMID:2570403

  3. Role of Histone H1 as an Architectural Determinant of Chromatin Structure and as a Specific Repressor of Transcription on Xenopus Oocyte 5S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sera, Takashi; Wolffe, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    We explore the role of histone H1 as a DNA sequence-dependent architectural determinant of chromatin structure and of transcriptional activity in chromatin. The Xenopus laevis oocyte- and somatic-type 5S rRNA genes are differentially transcribed in embryonic chromosomes in vivo depending on the incorporation of somatic histone H1 into chromatin. We establish that this effect can be reconstructed at the level of a single nucleosome. H1 selectively represses oocyte-type 5S rRNA genes by directing the stable positioning of a nucleosome such that transcription factors cannot bind to the gene. This effect does not occur on the somatic-type genes. Histone H1 binds to the 5′ end of the nucleosome core on the somatic 5S rRNA gene, leaving key regulatory elements in the promoter accessible, while histone H1 binds to the 3′ end of the nucleosome core on the oocyte 5S rRNA genes, specifically blocking access to a key promoter element (the C box). TFIIIA can bind to the somatic 5S rRNA gene assembled into a nucleosome in the presence of H1. Because H1 binds with equivalent affinities to nucleosomes containing either gene, we establish that it is the sequence-selective assembly of a specific repressive chromatin structure on the oocyte 5S rRNA genes that accounts for differential transcriptional repression. Thus, general components of chromatin can determine the assembly of specific regulatory nucleoprotein complexes. PMID:9632749

  4. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes.

  5. Compilation of 5S rRNA and 5S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Thomas; Wolters, Jörn; Erdmann, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    The BERLIN RNA DATABANK as of Dezember 31, 1989, contains a total of 667 sequences of 5S rRNAs or their genes, which is an increase of 114 new sequence entries over the last compilation (1). It covers sequences from 44 archaebacteria, 267 eubacteria, 20 plastids, 6 mitochondria, 319 eukaryotes and 11 eukaryotic pseudogenes. The hardcopy shows only the list (Table 1) of those organisms whose sequences have been determined. The BERLIN RNA DATABANK uses the format of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Data Library complemented by a Sequence Alignment (SA) field including secondary structure information. PMID:1692116

  6. An Archaea 5S rRNA analog is stably expressed in Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Mini-genes for 5S-like rRNA were constructed. These genes had a sequence which largely resembles that of the naturally occurring 5S rRNA of a bacterium, Halococcus morrhuae, which phylogenetically belongs to the Archaea. Plasmids carrying the mini-genes were transformed into Escherichia coli (Ec). Ribosomal incorporation was not a prerequisite for stable accumulation of the RNA product. However, only those constructs with a well-base-paired helix I accumulated RNA product. This result strongly implies that this aspect of the structure is likely to be an important condition for stabilizing 5S rRNA-like products. The results are consistent with our current understanding of 5S rRNA processing in Ec. When used in conjunction with rRNA probe technology, the resulting chimeric RNA may be useful as a monitoring tool for genetically engineered microorganisms or naturally occurring organisms that are released into the environment.

  7. The 5S rRNA and the rRNA intergenic spacer of the two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Fan, M; Chen, L C; Ragan, M A; Gutell, R R; Warner, J R; Currie, B P; Casadevall, A

    1995-01-01

    The intergenic spacers (IGS) separating the 23S-like and 16S-like rDNAs of the two varieties of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The C. neoformans var. neoformans IGS was 2421 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1228-1345 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. The C. neoformans var. gattii IGS was 2480 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1268-1385 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. For both varieties the 5S rDNA genes were in the same orientation as the 16S-5.8-23S genes and encode a 118 nt molecule of identical sequence. Phylogenetic comparison of C. neoformans 5S rDNA with that of other fungi placed this fungus in close relationship with other basidiomycetes including Tremella mesenterica, Bullera alba, and Cryptococcus laurentii. A secondary structure model for the deduced 5S rRNA was constructed by comparative sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified IGS of 12 C. neoformans var. neoformans strains revealed extensive size variation ranging from 100 to 300 nt. Size variation between strains in the length of the IGS may be useful for distinguishing strains. Structurally, the IGS were characterized by the presence of occasional short direct GC-rich 19-nt repeats. Overall IGS sequence identity between the C. neoformans varieties was only 78.5%, in sharp contrast to the identical or nearly identical sequences for the rDNA genes, and suggests rapid evolution for IGS sequences.

  8. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  9. Insights into the phylogenetic positions of photosynthetic bacteria obtained from 5S rRNA and 16S rRNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of complete 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences established that the secondary structure of these molecules is highly conserved. Earlier work with 5S rRNA secondary structure revealed that when structural conservation exists the alignment of sequences is straightforward. The constancy of structure implies minimal functional change. Under these conditions a uniform evolutionary rate can be expected so that conditions are favorable for phylogenetic tree construction.

  10. How Mg(2+) ion and water network affect the stability and structure of non-Watson-Crick base pairs in E. coli loop E of 5S rRNA: a molecular dynamics and reference interaction site model (RISM) study.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Sudhanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2016-08-02

    The non-Watson-Crick (non-WC) base pairs of Escherichia coli loop E of 5S rRNA are stabilized by Mg(2+) ions through water-mediated interaction. It is important to know the synergic role of Mg(2+) and the water network surrounding Mg(2+) in stabilizing the non-WC base pairs of RNA. For this purpose, free energy change of the system is calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation as Mg(2+) is pulled from RNA, which causes disturbance of the water network. It was found that Mg(2+) remains hexahydrated unless it is close to or far from RNA. In the pentahydrated form, Mg(2+) interacts directly with RNA. Water network has been identified by two complimentary methods; MD followed by a density-based clustering algorithm and three-dimensional-reference interaction site model. These two methods gave similar results. Identification of water network around Mg(2+) and non-WC base pairs gives a clue to the strong effect of water network on the stability of this RNA. Based on sequence analysis of all Eubacteria 5s rRNA, we propose that hexahydrated Mg(2+) is an integral part of this RNA and geometry of base pairs surrounding it adjust to accommodate the [Formula: see text]. Overall the findings from this work can help in understanding the basis of the complex structure and stability of RNA with non-WC base pairs.

  11. Characteristics of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) rRNA genes of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera): structure, organization, and retrotransposable elements

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J J; Johnston, J S; Cannone, J J; Gutell, R R

    2006-01-01

    As an accompanying manuscript to the release of the honey bee genome, we report the entire sequence of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences (rDNA) and related internally and externally transcribed spacer regions of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Apocrita). Additionally, we predict secondary structures for the mature rRNA molecules based on comparative sequence analyses with other arthropod taxa and reference to recently published crystal structures of the ribosome. In general, the structures of honey bee rRNAs are in agreement with previously predicted rRNA models from other arthropods in core regions of the rRNA, with little additional expansion in non-conserved regions. Our multiple sequence alignments are made available on several public databases and provide a preliminary establishment of a global structural model of all rRNAs from the insects. Additionally, we provide conserved stretches of sequences flanking the rDNA cistrons that comprise the externally transcribed spacer regions (ETS) and part of the intergenic spacer region (IGS), including several repetitive motifs. Finally, we report the occurrence of retrotransposition in the nuclear large subunit rDNA, as R2 elements are present in the usual insertion points found in other arthropods. Interestingly, functional R1 elements usually present in the genomes of insects were not detected in the honey bee rRNA genes. The reverse transcriptase products of the R2 elements are deduced from their putative open reading frames and structurally aligned with those from another hymenopteran insect, the jewel wasp Nasonia (Pteromalidae). Stretches of conserved amino acids shared between Apis and Nasonia are illustrated and serve as potential sites for primer design, as target amplicons within these R2 elements may serve as novel phylogenetic markers for Hymenoptera. Given the impending completion of the sequencing of the Nasonia genome

  12. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  13. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  14. Crystallization of engineered Thermus flavus 5S rRNA under earth and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, S; Perbandt, M; Lippmann, C; Moore, K; DeLucas, L J; Betzel, C; Erdmann, V A

    2000-04-01

    Thermus flavus 5S rRNA with a molecular weight of about 40 kDa was modified at the 5' and 3' ends. Crystals were obtained under earth and microgravity conditions. The best crystals were obtained during NASA space mission STS 94. For the first time, it was possible to collect a complete data set from 5S rRNA crystals to 7.8 A resolution and to assign the space group as R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.3, c = 387.6 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees.

  15. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  16. Gene arrangement and sequence of the 5S rRNA in Filobasidiella neoformans (Cryptococcus neoformans) as a phylogenetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Chang, Y C

    1994-04-01

    We cloned the 5S rRNA gene and determined its organization in the four genes encoding rRNAs in a ribosomal DNA repeat unit of Filobasidiella neoformans, the teleomorph of Cryptococcus neoformans. The 5S rRNA gene contained 118 nucleotides and was located 1 kb upstream from the 18S rRNA gene within the 8.6-kb fragment of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. The sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from F. neoformans was more similar to the sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from Tremella mesenterica than to the sequences of the 5S rRNA genes from Filobasidium species. The arrangement of the rRNA genes in F. neoformans closely resembles the arrangement of the rRNA genes in mushrooms such as Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Coprinus cinereus in that the 5S rRNA-coding region not only is located within the repeat unit that encodes the other rRNAs but also is transcribed in the same direction as the other rRNA genes. This is the first description of the arrangement of rRNA genes in a species belonging to the Heterobasidiomycetes.

  17. In vivo analyses of the internal control region in the 5S rRNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Erkine, A M; Van Ryk, D I; Nazar, R N

    1995-02-25

    The internal control region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 5S rRNA gene has been characterized in vivo by genomic DNase I footprinting and by mutational analyses using base substitutions, deletions or insertions. A high copy shuttle vector was used to efficiently express mutant 5S rRNA genes in vivo and isotope labelling kinetics were used to distinguish impeded gene expression from nascent RNA degradation. In contrast to mutational studies in reconstituted systems, the analyses describe promoter elements which closely resemble the three distinct sequence elements that have been observed in Xenopus laevis 5S rRNA. The results indicate a more highly conserved structure than previously reported with reconstituted systems and suggest that the saturated conditions which are used in reconstitution studies mask sequence dependence which may be physiologically significant. Footprint analyses support the extended region of protein interaction which has recently been observed in some reconstituted systems, but mutational analyses indicate that these interactions are not sequence specific. Periodicity in the footprint provides further detail regarding the in vivo topology of the interacting protein.

  18. Evidence of birth-and-death evolution of 5S rRNA gene in Channa species (Teleostei, Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Barman, Anindya Sundar; Singh, Mamta; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Lal, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, minor rDNA family codes for 5S rRNA that is arranged in tandem arrays and comprises of a highly conserved 120 bp long coding sequence with a variable non-transcribed spacer (NTS). Initially the 5S rDNA repeats are considered to be evolved by the process of concerted evolution. But some recent reports, including teleost fishes suggested that evolution of 5S rDNA repeat does not fit into the concerted evolution model and evolution of 5S rDNA family may be explained by a birth-and-death evolution model. In order to study the mode of evolution of 5S rDNA repeats in Perciformes fish species, nucleotide sequence and molecular organization of five species of genus Channa were analyzed in the present study. Molecular analyses revealed several variants of 5S rDNA repeats (four types of NTS) and networks created by a neighbor net algorithm for each type of sequences (I, II, III and IV) did not show a clear clustering in species specific manner. The stable secondary structure is predicted and upstream and downstream conserved regulatory elements were characterized. Sequence analyses also shown the presence of two putative pseudogenes in Channa marulius. Present study supported that 5S rDNA repeats in genus Channa were evolved under the process of birth-and-death.

  19. Identification of the gene encoding the 5S ribosomal RNA maturase in Bacillus subtilis: mature 5S rRNA is dispensable for ribosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Brechemier-Baey, D; Beltchev, B; Grunberg-Manago, M; Putzer, H

    2001-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, Pace and coworkers described an activity called RNase M5 in Bacillus subtilis cell extracts responsible for 5S ribosomal RNA maturation (Sogin & Pace, Nature, 1974, 252:598-600). Here we show that RNase M5 is encoded by a gene of previously unknown function that is highly conserved among the low G + C gram-positive bacteria. We propose that the gene be named rnmV. The rnmV gene is nonessential. B. subtilis strains lacking RNase M5 do not make mature 5S rRNA, indicating that this process is not necessary for ribosome function. 5S rRNA precursors can, however, be found in both free and translating ribosomes. In contrast to RNase E, which cleaves the Escherichia coli 5S precursor in a single-stranded region, which is then trimmed to yield mature 5S RNA, RNase M5 cleaves the B. subtilis equivalent in a double-stranded region to yield mature 5S rRNA in one step. For the most part, eubacteria contain one or the other system for 5S rRNA production, with an imperfect division along gram-negative and gram-positive lines. A potential correlation between the presence of RNase E or RNase M5 and the single- or double-stranded nature of the predicted cleavage sites is explored. PMID:11233981

  20. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  1. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  2. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroshi; Lim, Byung-Lak; Osawa, Syozo

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other. PMID:16593540

  3. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Johanna F.B.; Ensink, Wim A.; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P.; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J.; Dekker, Rob J.

    2017-01-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. PMID:28003516

  4. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) variety discrimination and hybridization analysis based on the 5S rRNA region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Kang, Ho-Min; Kim, Young-Sik; Baek, Jun-Pill; Zheng, Shi-Lin; Xiang, Jin-Jun; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2014-05-04

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major vegetable crop worldwide. To satisfy popular demand, more than 500 tomato varieties have been bred. However, a clear variety identification has not been found. Thorough understanding of the phylogenetic relationship and hybridization information of tomato varieties is very important for further variety breeding. Thus, in this study, we collected 26 tomato varieties and attempted to distinguish them based on the 5S rRNA region, which is widely used in the determination of phylogenetic relations. Sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA region suggested that a large number of nucleotide variations exist among tomato varieties. These variable nucleotide sites were also informative regarding hybridization. Chromas sequencing of Yellow Mountain View and Seuwiteuking varieties indicated three and one variable nucleotide sites in the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rRNA region showing hybridization, respectively. Based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the 5S rRNA sequences, we observed that 16 tomato varieties were divided into three groups at 95% similarity. Rubiking and Sseommeoking, Lang Selection Procedure and Seuwiteuking, and Acorn Gold and Yellow Mountain View exhibited very high identity with their partners. This work will aid variety authentication and provides a basis for further tomato variety breeding.

  5. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-mediated Repression of the Xenopus Oocyte 5 S rRNA Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mariam Q.; Bertke, Michelle M.; Huber, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    The 5 S rRNA gene-specific transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) interacts with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase PIAS2b and with one of its targets, the transcriptional corepressor, XCtBP. PIAS2b is restricted to the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes but relocates to the nucleus immediately after fertilization. Following the midblastula transition, PIAS2b and XCtBP are present on oocyte-type, but not somatic-type, 5 S rRNA genes up through the neurula stage, as is a limiting amount of TFIIIA. Histone H3 methylation, coincident with the binding of XCtBP, also occurs exclusively on the oocyte-type genes. Immunohistochemical staining of embryos confirms the occupancy of a subset of the oocyte-type genes by TFIIIA that become positioned at the nuclear periphery shortly after the midblastula transition. Inhibition of SUMOylation activity relieves repression of oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes and is correlated with a decrease in methylation of H3K9 and H3K27 and disruption of subnuclear localization. These results reveal a novel function for TFIIIA as a negative regulator that recruits histone modification activity through the CtBP repressor complex exclusively to the oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes, leading to their terminal repression. PMID:25368327

  6. Functional variants of 5S rRNA in the ribosomes of common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Dimarco, Eufrosina; Cascone, Eleonora; Bellavia, Daniele; Caradonna, Fabio

    2012-10-15

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus; this study, performed at DNA level only, lends itself as starting point to verify that these clusters could contain transcribed genes, then, to demonstrate the presence of heterogeneity at functional RNA level, also. In the present work we report in P. lividus ribosomes the existence of several transcribed variants of the 5S rRNA and we associate all transcribed variants to the cluster to which belong. Our finding is the first demonstration of the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA molecules in animal ribosomes, a feature that had been considered a peculiarity of some plants.

  7. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-06-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period.

  8. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  9. Authentication of Saussurea lappa, an endangered medicinal material, by ITS DNA and 5S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Chan, Ho-Yin Edwin; Wong, Ka-Lok; Wang, Jun; Yu, Man-Tang; But, Paul Pui-Hay; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2008-06-01

    Wild SAUSSUREA LAPPA in the family Asteraceae is a highly endangered plant. On the other hand, the dried root of cultivated S. LAPPA (Radix Aucklandia, Muxiang) is a popular medicinal material for treating various gastrointestinal diseases. In the market, several medicinal plants including VLADIMIRIA BERARDIOIDEA, V. SOULIEI, V. SOULIEI var. MIRABILIS, INULA HELENIUM and I. RACEMOSA in the family Asteraceae and ARISTOLOCHIA DEBILIS in the family Aristolochiaceae have the trade name of Muxiang. To manage the concerned medicinal material, we investigated if the ITS and 5S rRNA intergenic spacers are effective for discriminating S. LAPPA from its substitutes and adulterants. Sequencing results showed that the similarities of ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5S rRNA intergenic spacers among S. LAPPA and related species were 56.3 - 97.8 %, 58.5 - 97.0 %, and 26.4 - 77.9 %, respectively. The intraspecific variation was much lower. There are also several unique changes in the S. LAPPA sequences that may be used as differentiation markers.

  10. 5S rRNA and accompanying proteins in gonads: powerful markers to identify sex and reproductive endocrine disruption in fish.

    PubMed

    Diaz de Cerio, Oihane; Rojo-Bartolomé, Iratxe; Bizarro, Cristina; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren; Cancio, Ibon

    2012-07-17

    In anuran ovaries, 5S rDNA is regulated transcriptionally by transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), which upon transcription, binds 5S rRNA, forming 7S RNP. 5S rRNA can be stockpiled also in the form of 42S RNP bound to 42sp43. The aim of the present study was to assess the differential transcriptional regulation of 5S rRNA and associated proteins in thicklip gray mullet (Chelon labrosus) gonads. Up to 75% of the total RNA from mullet ovaries was 5S rRNA. qPCR quantification of 5S rRNA expression, in gonads of histologically sexed individuals from different geographical areas, successfully sexed animals. All males had expression levels that were orders of magnitude below expression levels in females, throughout an annual reproductive cycle, with the exception of two individuals: one in November and one in December. Moreover, intersex mullets from a polluted harbor had expression levels between both sexes. TFIIIA and 42sp43 were also very active transcriptionally in gonads of female and intersex mullets, in comparison to males. Nucleocytoplasmatic transport is important in this context and we also analyzed transcriptional levels of importins-α1, -α2, and -β2 and different exportins. Importin-αs behaved similarly to 5S rRNA. Thus, 5S rRNA and associated proteins constitute very powerful molecular markers of sex and effects of xenosterogens in fish gonads, with potential technological applications in the analysis of fish stock dynamics and reproduction as well as in environmental health assessment.

  11. Natural Microbial Community Compositions Compared by a Back-Propagating Neural Network and Cluster Analysis of 5S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Noble, P. A.; Bidle, K. D.; Fletcher, M.

    1997-01-01

    The community compositions of free-living and particle-associated bacteria in the Chesapeake Bay estuary were analyzed by comparing banding patterns of stable low-molecular-weight RNA (SLMW RNA) which include 5S rRNA and tRNA molecules. By analyzing images of autoradiographs of SLMW RNAs on polyacrylamide gels, band intensities of 5S rRNA were converted to binary format for transmission to a back-propagating neural network (NN). The NN was trained to relate binary input to sample stations, collection times, positions in the water column, and sample types (e.g., particle-associated versus free-living communities). Dendrograms produced by using Euclidean distance and average and Ward's linkage methods on data of three independently trained NNs yielded the following results. (i) Community compositions of Chesapeake Bay water samples varied both seasonally and spatially. (ii) Although there was no difference in the compositions of free-living and particle-associated bacteria in the summer, these community types differed significantly in the winter. (iii) In the summer, most bay samples had a common 121-nucleotide 5S rRNA molecule. Although this band occurred in the top water of midbay samples, it did not occur in particle-associated communities of bottom-water samples. (iv) Regardless of the season, midbay samples had the greatest variety of 5S rRNA sizes. The utility of NNs for interpreting complex banding patterns in electrophoresis gels was demonstrated. PMID:16535593

  12. Cytogenetic characterization by in situ hybridization techniques and molecular analysis of 5S rRNA genes of the European hazelnut (Corylus avellana).

    PubMed

    Falistocco, E; Marconi, G

    2013-03-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is widespread in Europe, where it has been cultivated for centuries. Despite progress in genetics, most of the cytogenetic aspects of this species have been overlooked. The aim of this study was to fill in this gap and obtain basic information on the chromosome structure of this species. Karyomorphological analysis confirmed the chromosome number 2n = 22 and showed that, despite their apparent uniformity, the chromosomes could be separated into three groups of different size: large (L), medium (M), and small (S). As a first step towards the physical mapping of the hazelnut chromosomes, we applied FISH to localize the position of rRNA genes (rDNA). The sites of 45S and 5S rDNA enabled us to identify two chromosome pairs belonging, respectively, to the L and S groups. The self-GISH procedure revealed that repetitive DNA is concentrated in the pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes, as with other species with rather small genomes. The analysis of 5S rDNA repeats offered additional information on the hazelnut genome by obtaining the whole sequence of the transcribed region so far unpublished. The overall results constitute a substantial advance in hazelnut cytogenetics. Further investigation of other species of Corylus could be an effective approach to understanding the phylogenesis of the genus and resolving taxonomic problems.

  13. The primary structure of oocyte and somatic 5S rRNAs from the loach Misgurnus fossilis.

    PubMed Central

    Mashkova, T D; Serenkova, T I; Mazo, A M; Avdonina, T A; Timofeyeva MYa; Kisselev, L L

    1981-01-01

    Somatic and oocyte 5S rRNAs from the liver and unfertilized eggs of the loach (Misgurnus fossilis have been sequenced and found to differ in six nucleotides. All the substitutions are confined to the 5'-half of the molecules; 4 of them are pyrimidine-pyrimidine substitutions, and 2 are purine-pyrimidine ones. Considerable differences, both in the position and the character of substitutions, have been established when these 5S rRNAs were compared with somatic and oocyte 5S rRNAs from Xenopus borealis and Xenopus laevis. Among the known primary structures, somatic 5S rRNA of M. fossilis is most similar to trout 5S rRNA. Images PMID:7197777

  14. Higher-order structure of rRNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative search for phylogenetically covarying basepair replacements within potential helices has been the only reliable method to determine the correct secondary structure of the 3 rRNAs, 5S, 16S, and 23S. The analysis of 16S from a wide phylogenetic spectrum, that includes various branches of the eubacteria, archaebacteria, eucaryotes, in addition to the mitochondria and chloroplast, is beginning to reveal the constraints on the secondary structures of these rRNAs. Based on the success of this analysis, and the assumption that higher order structure will also be phylogenetically conserved, a comparative search was initiated for positions that show co-variation not involved in secondary structure helices. From a list of potential higher order interactions within 16S rRNA, two higher-order interactions are presented. The first of these interactions involves positions 570 and 866. Based on the extent of phylogenetic covariation between these positions while maintaining Watson-Crick pairing, this higher-order interaction is considered proven. The other interaction involves a minimum of six positions between the 1400 and 1500 regions of the 16S rRNA. Although these patterns of covariation are not as striking as the 570/866 interaction, the fact that they all exist in an anti-parallel fashion and that experimental methods previously implicated these two regions of the molecule in tRNA function suggests that these interactions be given serious consideration.

  15. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  16. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  17. Structure and organization of rRNA operons in the region of the replication origin of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, N; Moriya, S; Yoshikawa, H

    1983-01-01

    Structure and organization of two complete ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sets, rrnO and rrnA, were determined for the first time in Bacillus subtilis. They are located at the region of the replication origin of the chromosome. Each set constitutes a single operon of: two tandem promoters - leader sequence - 16S rRNA gene - Ile-tRNA gene - Ala-tRNA gene - 23S rRNA gene - 5S rRNA gene - termination signal. The first promoter (P1) of rrnO differs from that of rrnA in sequence and function. P1 of rrnO was used very little for transcription either in vivo or in vitro while P1 was predominantly used in rrnA. A putative transcript of the entire operon was determined and constructed into a secondary structure. Analysis of in vivo transcripts by S1 mapping revealed primary processing sites at the loop and stem structure of 16S rRNA in rrnO and rrnA. A unique sequence in the leader region of rrnO can be formed into a highly complexed secondary structure and affects processing of mature 16S rRNA. The sequences of the two spacer tRNA genes are highly conserved between B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. Images PMID:6312418

  18. An assessment of the phylogenetic relationship among sugarcane and related taxa based on the nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y B; Burner, D M; Legendre, B L

    2000-01-01

    5S rRNA intergenic spacers were amplified from two elite sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids) cultivars and their related taxa by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 5S rDNA consensus primers. Resulting PCR products were uniform in length from each accession but exhibited some degree of length variation among the sugarcane accessions and related taxa. These PCR products did not always cross hybridize in Southern blot hybridization experiments. These PCR products were cloned into a commercial plasmid vector PCR 2.1 and sequenced. Direct sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed spacer length of 231-237 bp for S. officinarum, 233-237 for sugarcane cultivars, 228-238 bp for S. spontaneum, 239-252 bp for S. giganteum, 385-410 bp for Erianthus spp., 226-230 bp for Miscanthus sinensis Zebra, 206-207 bp for M. sinensis IMP 3057, 207-209 bp for Sorghum bicolor, and 247-249 bp for Zea mays. Nucleotide sequence polymorphism were found at both the segment and single nucleotide level. A consensus sequence for each taxon was obtained by Align X. Multiple sequences were aligned and phylogenetic trees constructed using Align X. CLUSTAL and DNAMAN programs. In general, accessions of the following taxa tended to group together to form distinct clusters: S. giganteum, Erianthus spp., M. sinensis, S. bicolor, and Z. mays. However, the two S. officinarum clones and two sugarcane cultivars did not form distinct clusters but interrelated within the S. spontaneum cluster. The disclosure of these 5S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences will facilitate marker-assisted breeding in sugarcane.

  19. FISH and AgNor mapping of the 45S and 5S rRNA genes in wild and cultivated species of Capsicum (Solananceae).

    PubMed

    Scaldaferro, Marisel A; da Cruz, M Victoria Romero; Cecchini, Nicolás M; Moscone, Eduardo A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosome number and position of rDNA were studied in 12 wild and cultivated species of the genus Capsicum with chromosome numbers x = 12 and x = 13 (22 samples). For the first time in these species, the 5S and 45S rRNA loci were localized and physically mapped using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and AgNOR banding. We focused on the comparison of the results obtained with both methods with the aim of accurately revealing the real functional rRNA genes. The analyzes were based on a previous work that reported that the 18S-5.8S-25S loci mostly coincide with GC-rich heterochromatic regions and likely have given rise to satellite DNAs, which are not active genes. These data show the variability of rDNA within karyotypes of the genus Capsicum, providing anchor points for (comparative) genetic maps. In addition, the obtained information might be useful for studies on evolution of repetitive DNA.

  20. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  1. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  2. Chromosomal mapping of H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes in eight species of Astyanax (Pisces, Characiformes) with different diploid numbers: syntenic conservation of repetitive genes.

    PubMed

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia Pasquali

    2016-03-01

    The genus Astyanax is widely distributed from the southern United States to northern Patagonia, Argentina. While cytogenetic studies have been performed for this genus, little is known about the histone gene families. The aim of this study was to examine the chromosomal relationships among the different species of Astyanax. The chromosomal locations of the 5S rRNA and H3 histone genes were determined in A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, A. mexicanus (all 2n = 50), A. fasciatus (2n = 46), and A. schubarti (2n = 36). All eight species exhibited H3 histone clusters on two chromosome pairs. In six species (A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, and A. fasciatus), syntenic clusters of H3 histone and 5S rDNA were observed on metacentric (m) or submetacentric (sm) chromosomes. In seven species, clusters of 5S rDNA sequences were located on one or two chromosome pairs. In A. mexicanus, 5S rDNA clusters were located on four chromosome pairs. This study demonstrates that H3 histone clusters are conserved on two chromosome pairs in the genus Astyanax, and specific chromosomal features may contribute to the genomic organization of the H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes.

  3. Characterization of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 rRNA gene clusters and cloning of rrnA.

    PubMed Central

    La Farina, M; Stira, S; Mancuso, R; Grisanti, C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 harbors seven rRNA gene clusters which can be distinguished by BglII digestion. The three rRNA genes present in each set are closely linked with the general structure 16S-23S-5S. We cloned rrnA and sequenced the 16S-23S spacer region and the region downstream of the 5S rRNA gene. No tRNA gene was found in these regions. PMID:8631730

  4. Is wheat mitochondrial 5S ribosomal RNA prokaryotic in nature?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M W; Spencer, D F

    1981-01-01

    Küntzel et al. (1981) (Nucleic Acids Res. 9, 1451-1461) recently concluded that the sequence of wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA is significantly more related to prokaryotic than to eukaryotic 5S rRNA sequences, and displays an especially high affinity to that of the thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium, Thermus aquaticus. However, the sequence on which this conclusion was based, although attributed to us, differs in several places from the one determined by us. We show here that the correct sequence (Spencer, D.F., Bonen, L. and Gray, M.W. (1981) Biochemistry, in press) does not support the conclusions of Küntzel et al. about potential secondary structure in wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA and its phylogenetic significance. We further show that when the wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA sequence is matched against published alignments for E. coli, T. aquaticus, and wheat cytosol 5S rRNAs, the mitochondrial sequence shows no greater homology to the T. aquaticus sequence than to the E. coli sequence, and only slightly more homology to these two sequences than to wheat cytosol 5S rRNA. This analysis confirms our original view (Biochemistry, in press) that wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA is neither obviously prokaryotic nor eukaryotic in nature, but shows characteristics of both classes of 5S rRNA, as well as some unique features. PMID:7024917

  5. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  6. 500-MHz proton NMR evidence for two solution structures of the common arm base-paired segment of wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The base-pair protons of the common arm duplex fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been identified and assigned by means of 500-MHz proton NMR spectroscopy. The two previously reported extra base pairs within the fragment are now explained by the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and its corresponding base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA). The present conclusions are supported by one- and two-dimensional proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements in H{sub 2}O and by temperature variation and Mg{sup 2+} titration of the downfield {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. The difference between the two conformers is most likely due to difference in helical tightness. Some additional amino proton resonances have also been assigned.

  7. Comparative analysis of mt LSU rRNA secondary structures of Odonates: structural variability and phylogenetic signal.

    PubMed

    Misof, B; Fleck, G

    2003-12-01

    Secondary structures of the most conserved part of the mt 16S rRNA gene, domains IV and V, have been recently analysed in a comparative study. However, full secondary structures of the mt LSU rRNA molecule are published for only a few insect species. The present study presents full secondary structures of domains I, II, IV and V of Odonates and one representative of mayflies, Ephemera sp. The reconstructions are based on a comparative approach and minimal consensus structures derived from sequence alignments. The inferred structures exhibit remarkable similarities to the published Drosophila melanogaster model, which increases confidence in these structures. Structural variance within Odonates is homoplastic, and neighbour-joining trees based on tree edit distances do not correspond to any of the phylogenetically expected patterns. However, despite homoplastic quantitative structural variation, many similarities between Odonates and Ephemera sp. suggest promising character sets for higher order insect systematics that merit further investigations.

  8. Sequence characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA from eight gram positive procaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Pribula, C. D.; Fox, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences are presented for 5S rRNA from Bacillus subtilis, B. firmus, B. pasteurii, B. brevis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Streptococcus faecalis, and 5S rRNA oligonucleotide catalogs and partial sequence data are given for B. cereus and Sporosarcina ureae. These data demonstrate a striking consistency of 5S rRNA primary and secondary structure within a given bacterial grouping. An exception is B. brevis, in which the 5S rRNA sequence varies significantly from that of other bacilli in the tuned helix and the procaryotic loop. The localization of these variations suggests that B. brevis occupies an ecological niche that selects such changes. It is noted that this organism produces antibiotics which affect ribosome function.

  9. The 5S ribosomal RNAs of Paracoccus denitrificans and Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. M.; Salgado, D.; Bonen, L.; Doolittle, W. F.; Stackebrandt, E.

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 5S rRNAs of Paracoccus denitrificans and Prochloron sp. are presented, along with the demonstrated phylogenetic relationships of P. denitrificans with purple nonsulfur bacteria, and of Prochloron with cyanobacteria. Structural findings include the following: (1) helix II in both models is much shorter than in other eubacteria, (2) a base-pair has been deleted from helix IV of P. denitrificans 5S, and (3) Prochloron 5S has the potential to form four base-pairs between residues. Also covered are the differences between pairs of sequences in P. denitrificans, Prochloron, wheat mitochondion, spinach chloroplast, and nine diverse eubacteria. Findings include the observation that Prochloron 5S rRNA is much more similar to the 5S of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans (25 percent difference) than either are to any of the other nine eubacterial 5S rRNAs.

  10. Organization, Structure, and Variability of the rRNA Operon of the Whipple's Disease Bacterium (Tropheryma whippelii)

    PubMed Central

    Maiwald, Matthias; von Herbay, Axel; Lepp, Paul W.; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic disorder associated with a cultivation-resistant, poorly characterized actinomycete, Tropheryma whippelii. We determined a nearly complete rRNA operon sequence of T. whippelii from specimens from 3 patients with Whipple's disease, as well as partial operon sequences from 43 patients. Variability was observed in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer sequences, leading to the description of five distinct sequence types. One specimen contained two spacer sequence types, raising the possibility of a double infection. Secondary structure models for the primary rRNA transcript and mature rRNAs revealed rare or unique features. PMID:10809715

  11. Low-temperature crystal structures of stibnite implying orbital overlap of Sb 5s2 inert pair electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyono, A.; Kimata, M.; Matsuhisa, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Okamoto, K.

    The crystal structure of stibnite [Sb2S3, Pnma, a=11.314(2), b=3.837(2), c=11.234(3) Å, V= 487.7(3) Å3 at 293 K] was refined in situ at 230, 173, and 128 K. It is a major characteristic of the structure that the Sb-S secondary bonds enclosing Sb 5s2 inert lone-pair electrons at 293 K are significantly shorter than the corresponding sum of the Sb and S van der Waals radii. Concerning the temperature dependence, although both the polyhedral volume and the cation eccentricity of the two SbS7 polyhedra exhibit continuous contractions with decreasing temperature, the sphericity values remain constant, indicating isotropic shrinkage. Consequently, the geometries of Sb 5s2 inert lone-pair electrons and ligand atoms remain unchanged at low temperatures. This is because the crystal structure of stibnite at low temperature induces contraction with attractive interactions, which is called the orbital overlap between Sb 5s2 inert lone-pair electrons and ligand orbitals to maintain the coordination environment. In this case, Sb 5s2 lone-pair electrons are not inert, but active. Such orbital overlaps of inert lone-electron pairs can provide a reasonable explanation for shorter secondary bonds and lower band gap energy of the binary compounds containing heavy elements such as Sb, Te, Pb, and Bi, which are key factors in tracing the origins of color, luster, and semiconductivity of their minerals or compounds.

  12. Different chromatin structures along the spacers flanking active and inactive Xenopus rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, R; Sogo, J M

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin to psoralen was assayed to compare the chromatin structure of the rRNA coding and spacer regions of the two related frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. Isolated nuclei from tissue culture cells were photoreacted with psoralen, and the extent of cross-linking in the different rDNA regions was analyzed by using a gel retardation assay. In both species, restriction fragments from the coding regions showed two distinct extents of cross-linking, indicating the presence of two types of chromatin, one that contains nucleosomes and represents the inactive gene copies, and the other one which is more cross-linked and corresponds to the transcribed genes. A similar cross-linking pattern was obtained with restriction fragments from the enhancer region. Analysis of fragments including these sequences and the upstream portions of the genes suggests that active genes are preceded by nonnucleosomal enhancer regions. The spacer regions flanking the 3' end of the genes gave different results in the two frog species. In X. borealis, all these sequences are packaged in nucleosomes, whereas in X. laevis a distinct fraction, presumably those flanking the active genes, show a heterogeneous chromatin structure. This disturbed nucleosomal organization correlates with the presence of a weaker terminator at the 3' end of the X. laevis genes compared with those of X. borealis, which allows polymerases to transcribe into the downstream spacer. Images PMID:1406621

  13. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Turon, Xavier; Hopcroft, Russell R; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Loya, Yossi; Huchon, Dorothée; Douzery, Emmanuel JP; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1) Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2) Appendicularia, and 3) Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models suggest a sister

  14. Random mutagenesis of yeast 25S rRNA identify bases critical for 60S subunit structural integrity and function

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Kitabatake, Makoto; Shin, Byung-shik; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Wang, Suzhi; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Brown, Susan J.; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Asano, Katsura

    2013-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During translation initiation, the 60S subunit joins the 40S initiation complex, producing the 80S initiation complex. During elongation, the 60S subunit binds the CCA-ends of aminoacyl- and peptidyl-tRNAs at the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, transferring the peptide onto the α-amino group of the aminoacyl-tRNA. To study the role of 25S rRNA in translation in vivo, we randomly mutated 25S rRNA and isolated and characterized seven point mutations that affected yeast cell growth and polysome profiles. Four of these mutations, G651A, A1435U, A1446G and A1587G, change a base involved in base triples crucial for structural integrity. Three other mutations change bases near the ribosomal surface: C2879U and U2408C alter the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, and G1735A maps near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. By polysome profiling in mmslΔ mutants defective in nonfunctional 25S rRNA decay, we show that some of these mutations are defective in both the initiation and elongation phases of translation. Of the mutants characterized, C2879U displays the strongest defect in translation initiation. The ribosome transit-time assay directly shows that this mutation is also defective in peptide elongation/termination. Thus, our genetic analysis not only identifies bases critical for structural integrity of the 60S subunit, but also suggests a role for bases near the peptidyl transferase center in translation initiation. PMID:26824023

  15. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  16. Structure and organization of the rrnD operon of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum': analysis of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Amador, E; Castro, J M; Correia, A; Martín, J F

    1999-04-01

    Five rRNA operons (rrn) were found by hybridization in the genome of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum' ATCC 13869 and Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. 'B. lactofermentum' DSM 20412 differed from the other corynebacteria tested in showing six hybridizing BamHI bands. Two of the rrn operons (rrnD and rrnE) were located in a single cosmid. Sequencing of the rrnD operon showed that it contains a complete 16S rRNA-23S RNA-5S rRNA gene cluster. Phylogenetic studies using the complete 16S rRNA sequence showed that 'B. lactofermentum' is closely related to several species of the genus Corynebacterium but only distantly related to the type species Brevibacterium linens and the authors suggest that it should be reclassified as Corynebacterium lactofermentum. The 5' end of mature 16S rRNA was identified by primer extension. Sequence elements similar to those of mycobacteria implicated in transcription antitermination (Boxes A, B, C) and in processing of the pre-rRNA to 16S rRNA were identified. An open reading frame encoding an rpoD-like sigma factor (named SigC) different from the previously reported SigA and SigB proteins was found upstream of rrnD in the opposite orientation. Both rpoD and sigC seem to be expressed from a bidirectional promoter region.

  17. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  18. Electronic structure of NaxCu1-xIn5S8 compounds: X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study and band structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Harel, Sylvie; Mokrani, Arezki; Lafond, Alain; Barreau, Nicolas; Fernandez, Vincent; Kessler, John

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to complete a preliminary study concerning the electronic band structure investigations of NaxCu1-xIn5S8 compounds with 0≤x≤1 , which are expected to be formed at the Cu(In,Ga)Se2/In2S3 interface. The band structure calculations demonstrate that for the compounds containing both Na and Cu, as the Cu content increases the band gap tends to decrease, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that this variation is mainly due to valence-band-maximum shift along the solid solution. The band gap strongly depends on the nature of the monovalent cation, and the band structure calculations demonstrate that the d electrons of copper are responsible for the shift of the valence band. In addition, it is worth noting that the Cu-containing compounds have indirect gaps.

  19. Superconductivity versus structural phase transition in the closely related Bi2Rh3.5S2 and Bi2Rh3S2

    DOE PAGES

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Xie, Weiwei; Lin, Qisheng; ...

    2015-05-19

    Single crystals of Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 were synthesized by solution growth, and the crystal structures and thermodynamic and transport properties of both compounds were studied. In the case of Bi2Rh3S2, a structural first-order transition at around 165 K is identified by single-crystal diffraction experiments, with clear signatures visible in resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat data. No superconducting transition for Bi2Rh3S2 was observed down to 0.5 K. In contrast, no structural phase transition at high temperature was observed for Bi2Rh3.5S2; however, bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc ≈ 1.7 K, was observed. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperaturemore » (ΘD) were found to be 9.41 mJ mol–1K–2 and 209 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3S2, and 22 mJ mol–1K–2 and 196 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3.5S2. As a result, the study of the specific heat in the superconducting state of Bi2Rh3.5S2 suggests that Bi2Rh3.5S2 is a weakly coupled, BCS superconductor.« less

  20. The crystal structure of Mtr4 reveals a novel arch domain required for rRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.N.; Robinson, H.; Klauer, A. A.; Hintze, B. J.; van Hoof, A.; Johnson, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    The essential RNA helicase, Mtr4, performs a critical role in RNA processing and degradation as an activator of the nuclear exosome. The molecular basis for this vital function is not understood and detailed analysis is significantly limited by the lack of structural data. In this study, we present the crystal structure of Mtr4. The structure reveals a new arch-like domain that is specific to Mtr4 and Ski2 (the cytosolic homologue of Mtr4). In vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that the Mtr4 arch domain is required for proper 5.8S rRNA processing, and suggest that the arch functions independently of canonical helicase activity. In addition, extensive conservation along the face of the putative RNA exit site highlights a potential interface with the exosome. These studies provide a molecular framework for understanding fundamental aspects of helicase function in exosome activation, and more broadly define the molecular architecture of Ski2-like helicases.

  1. Systematic analysis and evolution of 5S ribosomal DNA in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Vierna, J; Wehner, S; Höner zu Siederdissen, C; Martínez-Lage, A; Marz, M

    2013-01-01

    Several studies on 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) have been focused on a subset of the following features in mostly one organism: number of copies, pseudogenes, secondary structure, promoter and terminator characteristics, genomic arrangements, types of non-transcribed spacers and evolution. In this work, we systematically analyzed 5S rDNA sequence diversity in available metazoan genomes, and showed organism-specific and evolutionary-conserved features. Putatively functional sequences (12 766) from 97 organisms allowed us to identify general features of this multigene family in animals. Interestingly, we show that each mammal species has a highly conserved (housekeeping) 5S rRNA type and many variable ones. The genomic organization of 5S rDNA is still under debate. Here, we report the occurrence of several paralog 5S rRNA sequences in 58 of the examined species, and a flexible genome organization of 5S rDNA in animals. We found heterogeneous 5S rDNA clusters in several species, supporting the hypothesis of an exchange of 5S rDNA from one locus to another. A rather high degree of variation of upstream, internal and downstream putative regulatory regions appears to characterize metazoan 5S rDNA. We systematically studied the internal promoters and described three different types of termination signals, as well as variable distances between the coding region and the typical termination signal. Finally, we present a statistical method for detection of linkage among noncoding RNA (ncRNA) gene families. This method showed no evolutionary-conserved linkage among 5S rDNAs and any other ncRNA genes within Metazoa, even though we found 5S rDNA to be linked to various ncRNAs in several clades. PMID:23838690

  2. 5S rRNA-recognition module of CTC family proteins and its evolution.

    PubMed

    Korobeinikova, A V; Gongadze, G M; Korepanov, A P; Eliseev, B D; Bazhenova, M V; Garber, M B

    2008-02-01

    The effects of amino acid replacements in the RNA-binding sites of homologous ribosomal proteins TL5 and L25 (members of the CTC family) on ability of these proteins to form stable complexes with ribosomal 5S RNA were studied. It was shown that even three simultaneous replacements of non-conserved amino acid residues by alanine in the RNA-binding site of TL5 did not result in noticeable decrease in stability of the TL5-5S rRNA complex. However, any replacement among five conserved residues in the RNA-binding site of TL5, as well as of L25 resulted in serious destabilization or complete impossibility of complex formation. These five residues form an RNA-recognition module in TL5 and L25. These residues are strictly conserved in proteins of the CTC family. However, there are several cases of natural replacements of these residues in TL5 and L25 homologs in Bacilli and Cyanobacteria, which are accompanied by certain changes in the CTC-binding site of 5S rRNAs of the corresponding organisms. CTC proteins and specific fragments of 5S rRNA of Enterococcus faecalis and Nostoc sp. were isolated, and their ability to form specific complexes was tested. It was found that these proteins formed specific complexes only with 5S rRNA of the same organism. This is an example of coevolution of the structures of two interacting macromolecules.

  3. Phylogeny of Intestinal Ciliates, Including Charonina ventriculi, and Comparison of Microscopy and 18S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing for Rumen Ciliate Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devente, Savannah R.; Kirk, Michelle R.; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. PMID:25616800

  4. Structural Insights into the Methylation of C1402 in 16S rRNA by Methyltransferase RsmI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangfeng; Wang, Li; Wang, Jian; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Zhang, Linbo; Gong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    RsmI and RsmH are conserved S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) that are responsible for the 2′-O-methylation and N4-methylation of C1402 in bacterial 16S rRNA, respectively. Methylation of m4Cm1402 plays a role in fine-tuning the shape and functions of the P-site to increase the decoding fidelity, and was recently found to contribute to the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus in host animals. Here we report the 2.20-Å crystal structure of homodimeric RsmI from Escherichia coli in complex with the cofactor AdoMet. RsmI consists of an N-terminal putative RNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain (CTD) with a Rossmann-like fold, and belongs to the class III MTase family. AdoMet is specifically bound into a negatively charged deep pocket formed by both domains by making extensive contacts. Structure-based mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays revealed Asp100 and Ala124 are vital for AdoMet-binding. Although the overall fold of RsmI shows remarkable similarities to the characterized MTases involved in vitamin B12 biosynthesis, it exhibits a distinct charge distribution especially around the AdoMet-binding pocket because of different substrate specificity. The docking model of RsmI-AdoMet-RNA ternary complex suggested a possible base-flipping mechanism of the substrate RNA that has been observed in several known RNA MTases. Our structural and biochemical studies provide novel insights into the catalytic mechanism of C1402 methylation in 16S rRNA. PMID:27711192

  5. Molecular phylogenetics in 2D: ITS2 rRNA evolution and sequence-structure barcode from Veneridae to Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Mariottini, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the nuclear ITS2 rRNA primary sequence and secondary structure in Veneridae and comparatively with 20 Bivalvia taxa to test the phylogenetic resolution of this marker and its suitability for molecular diagnosis at different taxonomic levels. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees based on primary sequences were congruent with (profile-) neighbor-joining trees based on a combined model of sequence-structure evolution. ITS2 showed higher resolution below the subfamily level, providing a phylogenetic signal comparable to (mitochondrial/nuclear) gene fragments 2-5 times longer. Structural elements of the ITS2 folding, such as specific mismatch pairing and compensatory base changes, provided further support for the monophyly of some groups and for their phylogenetic relationships. Veneridae ITS2 folding is structured in six domains (DI-VI) and shows five striking sequence-structure features. Two of them, the Basal and Apical STEMs, are common to Bivalvia, while the presence of both the Branched STEM and the Y/R stretches occurs in five superfamilies of the two Heterodonta orders Myoida and Veneroida, thus questioning their reciprocal monophyly. Our results validated the ITS2 as a suitable marker for venerids phylogenetics and taxonomy, and underlined the significance of including secondary structure information for both applications at several systematic levels within bivalves.

  6. Structural, electronic and optical properties of the Zn0.5V0.5S in three phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhu-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2016-10-01

    The structural, electronic and optical properties of the Zn0.5V0.5SZB, Zn0.5V0.5SW and Zn0.5V0.5SRS are studied by the spin-polarized first-principles calculation. The Zn0.5V0.5SZB and Zn0.5V0.5SRS are metals in tetragonal structures, while the Zn0.5V0.5SW in trigonal structure is half-metal with 100% spin polarization. The Zn0.5V0.5SRS has the biggest static dielectric constant 𝜀1(0) and static refractive index n(0), which may be ascribed to the highest crystal symmetry. The maximum absorption peaks of the Zn0.5V0.5SZB, Zn0.5V0.5SW and Zn0.5V0.5SRS are located about 44 eV in the ultraviolet region, indicating these materials have good prospect for optoelectronic materials in the ultraviolet range.

  7. The macular degeneration-linked C1QTNF5 (S163) mutation causes higher-order structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    The C1q-tumor necrosis factor 5 (C1QTNF5) protein plays a significant role in retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cellular adhesion. The C1QTNF5 gene is co-transcribed with the frizzled-related protein (MFRP) gene. A Ser-to-Arg mutation at site 163 (S163R) in C1QTNF5 is known to cause late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD). Here we also found that C1QTNF5 monomers can multimerize into a bouquet-like octadecamer. We found that a novel intermolecular hydrogen-bond network of S163 that glues adjacent globular heads of C1QTNF5 together was weakened or abolished by the R163 pathogenic mutation. These findings could underlie the structural basis of this protein's adhesive function and relate to the pathogenesis of its S163R mutation. Additionally, the fact that C1QTNF5 immobilized to a resin selectively enriched detergent extracted membrane-bound MFRP, further confirmed their interaction, implying functions other than cellular adhesion for C1QTNF5.

  8. The macular degeneration-linked C1QTNF5 (S163) mutation causes higher-order structural rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The C1q-tumor necrosis factor 5 (C1QTNF5) protein plays a significant role in retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cellular adhesion. The C1QTNF5 gene is co-transcribed with the frizzled-related protein (MFRP) gene. A Ser-to-Arg mutation at site 163 (S163R) in C1QTNF5 is known to cause late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD). Here we also found that C1QTNF5 monomers can multimerize into a bouquet-like octadecamer. We found that a novel intermolecular hydrogen-bond network of S163 that glues adjacent globular heads of C1QTNF5 together and was weakened or abolished by the R163 pathogenic mutation. These findings could underlie the structural basis of this protein’s adhesive function and relate to the pathogenesis of its S163R mutation. Additionally, the fact that C1QTNF5 immobilized to a resin selectively enriched detergent extracted membrane-bound MFRP, further confirming their interaction and implying functions other than cellular adhesion for C1QTNF5. PMID:24531000

  9. Arabidopsis Chloroplast Mini-Ribonuclease III Participates in rRNA Maturation and Intron Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Hotto, Amber M.; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B.

    2015-01-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3′ end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3′ extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation. PMID:25724636

  10. Arabidopsis chloroplast mini-ribonuclease III participates in rRNA maturation and intron recycling.

    PubMed

    Hotto, Amber M; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B

    2015-03-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3' extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation.

  11. Abundant 5S rRNA-Like Transcripts Encoded by the Mitochondrial Genome in Amoebozoa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bullerwell, Charles E.; Burger, Gertraud; Gott, Jonatha M.; Kourennaia, Olga; Schnare, Murray N.; Gray, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    5S rRNAs are ubiquitous components of prokaryotic, chloroplast, and eukaryotic cytosolic ribosomes but are apparently absent from mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) of many eukaryotic groups including animals and fungi. Nevertheless, a clearly identifiable, mitochondrion-encoded 5S rRNA is present in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a member of Amoebozoa. During a search for additional mitochondrial 5S rRNAs, we detected small abundant RNAs in other members of Amoebozoa, namely, in the lobose amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis and in the myxomycete slime mold Physarum polycephalum. These RNAs are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cosediment with mitoribosomes in glycerol gradients, and can be folded into a secondary structure similar to that of bona fide 5S rRNAs. Further, in the mtDNA of another slime mold, Didymium nigripes, we identified a region that in sequence, potential secondary structure, and genomic location is similar to the corresponding region encoding the Physarum small RNA. A mtDNA-encoded small RNA previously identified in Dictyostelium discoideum is here shown to share several characteristics with known 5S rRNAs. Again, we detected genes encoding potential homologs of this RNA in the mtDNA of three other species of the genus Dictyostelium as well as in a related genus, Polysphondylium. Taken together, our results indicate a widespread occurrence of small, abundant, mtDNA-encoded RNAs with 5S rRNA-like structures that are associated with the mitoribosome in various amoebozoan taxa. Our working hypothesis is that these novel small abundant RNAs represent radically divergent mitochondrial 5S rRNA homologs. We posit that currently unrecognized 5S-like RNAs may exist in other mitochondrial systems in which a conventional 5S rRNA cannot be identified. PMID:20304999

  12. Exceptionally high and diverse mutation rates in insects small rRNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y X; Krupp, G; Gross, J H

    1985-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from the posterior silk gland of the silk worm Philosamia cynthia ricini has been determined. The comparison with other insect 5S rRNAs revealed an exceptionally conserved secondary structure, in spite of an extremely high mutation rate: Thirteen nucleotides are different in Philosamia and Drosophila 5S rRNA, but all substitutions are either compensatory or occur in loops or introduce G:U base pairs. The rates of base substitution per site per year of several insect species (diptera and lepidoptera) 5S and 5.8S rRNAs are compared with those occurring in vertebrate rRNAs. In the latter cases the rates are remarkably constant, whereas their value is not only about twofold higher in insect rRNAs, but is found to be extremely large in the 5S rRNA of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic conclusions derived from small rRNA sequence comparisons are only of limited value.

  13. Structural Rearrangements in the Active Site of the Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA Methyltransferase KsgA in a Binary Complex with 5'-Methylthioadenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Belardinelli, R; Seri, E; Gregory, S; Gualerzi, C; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2009-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) occurs in all kingdoms of life. The S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase KsgA introduces the most highly conserved rRNA modification, the dimethylation of A1518 and A1519 of 16S rRNA. Loss of this dimethylation confers resistance to the antibiotic kasugamycin. Here, we report biochemical studies and high-resolution crystal structures of KsgA from Thermus thermophilus. Methylation of 30S ribosomal subunits by T. thermophilus KsgA is more efficient at low concentrations of magnesium ions, suggesting that partially unfolded RNA is the preferred substrate. The overall structure is similar to that of other methyltransferases but contains an additional ?-helix in a novel N-terminal extension. Comparison of the apoenzyme with complex structures with 5?-methylthioadenosine or adenosine bound in the cofactor-binding site reveals novel features when compared with related enzymes. Several mobile loop regions that restrict access to the cofactor-binding site are observed. In addition, the orientation of residues in the substrate-binding site indicates that conformational changes are required for binding two adjacent residues of the substrate rRNA.

  14. The RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L11 recognizes an rRNA tertiary structure stabilized by both thiostrepton and magnesium ion

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, Lawrence B.; Risen, Lisa M.; Griffey, Richard H.; Draper, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Antibiotics that inhibit ribosomal function may do so by one of several mechanisms, including the induction of incorrect RNA folding or prevention of protein and/or RNA conformational transitions. Thiostrepton, which binds to the ‘GTPase center’ of the large subunit, has been postulated to prevent conformational changes in either the L11 protein or rRNA to which it binds. Scintillation proximity assays designed to look at the binding of the L11 C-terminal RNA-binding domain to a 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) fragment, as well as the ability of thiostrepton to induce that binding, were used to demonstrate the role of Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton in the formation and maintenance of the rRNA fragment tertiary structure. Experiments using these assays with both an Escherichia coli rRNA fragment and a thermostable variant of that RNA show that Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton all induce the RNA to fold to an essentially identical tertiary structure. PMID:10734197

  15. Conservation of the primary structure at the 3' end of 18S rRNA from eucaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagenbüchle, O; Santer, M; Steitz, J A; Mans, R J

    1978-03-01

    DNA sequencing methods have been used to determine a sequence of about 20 nucleotides at the 3' termini of various 18S (small ribosomal subunit) RNA molecules. Polyadenylated rRNA was first synthesized using the enzyme ATP:polynucleotidyl transferase from mainze. Then in the presence of an oligonucleotide primer uniquely complementary to the end of each adenylated rRNA, a cDNA copy was produced using AMV reverse transcriptase. In every case, the cDNA transcript was of finite size, which we ascribe to the appearance of an oligonucleotide containing m62A near the 3' end of the 18S rRNAs. Sequences at the 3' termini of 18S rRNA molecules from the four eucaryotic species examined here (mouse, silk worm, wheat embryo and slime mold) are highly conserved. They also exhibit strong homology to the 3' end of E. coli 16S rRNA. Two important differences, however, are apparent. First, the 16S sequence CCUCC, implicated in mRNA binding by E. coli ribosomes, is absent from each eucaryotic rRNA sequence. Second, a purine-rich region which exhibits extensive complementarity to the 5' noncoding regions of many eucaryotic mRNAs appears consistently.

  16. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution.

  17. Structural and functional exchangeability of 5 S RNA species from the eubacterium E.coli and the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Teixidò, J; Altamura, S; Londei, P; Amils, R

    1989-01-01

    The role of 5 S RNA within the large ribosomal subunit of the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus has been analysed by means of in vitro reconstitution procedures. It is shown that Sulfolobus 50 S subunits reconstituted in the absence of 5 S RNA are inactive in protein synthesis and lack 2-3 ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, it has been determined that in the course of the in vitro assembly process Sulfolobus 5 S RNA can be replaced by the correspondent RNA species of E.coli; Sulfolobus reconstituted particles containing the eubacterial 5 S molecule are stable and active in polypeptide synthesis at high temperatures. Images PMID:2493632

  18. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  19. Widespread occurrence of organelle genome-encoded 5S rRNAs including permuted molecules

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Burger, Gertraud; Gray, Michael W.; Lang, B. Franz

    2014-01-01

    5S Ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) is a universal component of ribosomes, and the corresponding gene is easily identified in archaeal, bacterial and nuclear genome sequences. However, organelle gene homologs (rrn5) appear to be absent from most mitochondrial and several chloroplast genomes. Here, we re-examine the distribution of organelle rrn5 by building mitochondrion- and plastid-specific covariance models (CMs) with which we screened organelle genome sequences. We not only recover all organelle rrn5 genes annotated in GenBank records, but also identify more than 50 previously unrecognized homologs in mitochondrial genomes of various stramenopiles, red algae, cryptomonads, malawimonads and apusozoans, and surprisingly, in the apicoplast (highly derived plastid) genomes of the coccidian pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria tenella. Comparative modeling of RNA secondary structure reveals that mitochondrial 5S rRNAs from brown algae adopt a permuted triskelion shape that has not been seen elsewhere. Expression of the newly predicted rrn5 genes is confirmed experimentally in 10 instances, based on our own and published RNA-Seq data. This study establishes that particularly mitochondrial 5S rRNA has a much broader taxonomic distribution and a much larger structural variability than previously thought. The newly developed CMs will be made available via the Rfam database and the MFannot organelle genome annotator. PMID:25429974

  20. WN4 longitudinal structure in the O (5S - 3P) and O+ (2P - 2D) ionospheric emissions as simulated by the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Oleg; Ward, William E.; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Namgaladze, Alexander; Fomichev, Victor; McConnell, John; Semeniuk, Kirill; Beagley, Stephen

    A newly developed Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) is introduced. It is being developed on the basis of two existing first principle models: the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and the ionospheric part of the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The model extends from the surface to the inner magnetosphere and hence, is able to describe in a self-consistent way how lower atmosphere dynamical variability propagates into and affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The C-IAM was applied to model the spatial structure of two different ionospheric emissions: the nighttime 135.6 nm O ( (5) S - (3) P) and daytime 732 nm O (+) ( (2) P - (2) D) emissions. The IMAGE satellite observations showed a wave number 4 (WN4) longitudinal structure in the 135.6 nm ionospheric emission emanating from the equatorial ionization anomaly at 350-400 km near 20:00 local time at each longitude. C-IAM simulations are in a good agreement with the observations. Model result analysis reveals that the main mechanism for generating the WN4 structure in the 135.6 nm emission is a modification of the ionospheric dynamo field caused by longitudinal variation of the zonal wind due to waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. It was also shown, that during geomagnetic storms and substorms the high-latitudinal electric field fully suppresses the dynamo, so that the emission intensity dramatically decreases and the WN4 structure does not appear. The 732 nm emission simulated with the C-IAM also reveals the WN4 structure. Similar to the 135.6 nm emission, this structure is caused by waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. However, the mechanism of excitation is quite different. The 732 nm emission is produced by the instant local ionization and excitation, and, hence, its variation is caused by the neutral density variability in the F2 region (above 200 km) without any involvement of the electric field effects. Correspondingly, latitudinal distribution of this

  1. Molecular phylogenetics and systematics of the bivalve family Ostreidae based on rRNA sequence-structure models and multilocus species tree.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Macali, Armando; Mariottini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The bivalve family Ostreidae has a worldwide distribution and includes species of high economic importance. Phylogenetics and systematic of oysters based on morphology have proved difficult because of their high phenotypic plasticity. In this study we explore the phylogenetic information of the DNA sequence and secondary structure of the nuclear, fast-evolving, ITS2 rRNA and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes from the Ostreidae and we implemented a multi-locus framework based on four loci for oyster phylogenetics and systematics. Sequence-structure rRNA models aid sequence alignment and improved accuracy and nodal support of phylogenetic trees. In agreement with previous molecular studies, our phylogenetic results indicate that none of the currently recognized subfamilies, Crassostreinae, Ostreinae, and Lophinae, is monophyletic. Single gene trees based on Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian (BA) methods and on sequence-structure ML were congruent with multilocus trees based on a concatenated (ML and BA) and coalescent based (BA) approaches and consistently supported three main clades: (i) Crassostrea, (ii) Saccostrea, and (iii) an Ostreinae-Lophinae lineage. Therefore, the subfamily Crassostreinae (including Crassostrea), Saccostreinae subfam. nov. (including Saccostrea and tentatively Striostrea) and Ostreinae (including Ostreinae and Lophinae taxa) are recognized [corrected]. Based on phylogenetic and biogeographical evidence the Asian species of Crassostrea from the Pacific Ocean are assigned to Magallana gen. nov., whereas an integrative taxonomic revision is required for the genera Ostrea and Dendostrea. This study pointed out the suitability of the ITS2 marker for DNA barcoding of oyster and the relevance of using sequence-structure rRNA models and features of the ITS2 folding in molecular phylogenetics and taxonomy. The multilocus approach allowed inferring a robust phylogeny of Ostreidae providing a broad molecular perspective on their systematics.

  2. Molecular Phylogenetics and Systematics of the Bivalve Family Ostreidae Based on rRNA Sequence-Structure Models and Multilocus Species Tree

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Daniele; Macali, Armando; Mariottini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The bivalve family Ostreidae has a worldwide distribution and includes species of high economic importance. Phylogenetics and systematic of oysters based on morphology have proved difficult because of their high phenotypic plasticity. In this study we explore the phylogenetic information of the DNA sequence and secondary structure of the nuclear, fast-evolving, ITS2 rRNA and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes from the Ostreidae and we implemented a multi-locus framework based on four loci for oyster phylogenetics and systematics. Sequence-structure rRNA models aid sequence alignment and improved accuracy and nodal support of phylogenetic trees. In agreement with previous molecular studies, our phylogenetic results indicate that none of the currently recognized subfamilies, Crassostreinae, Ostreinae, and Lophinae, is monophyletic. Single gene trees based on Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian (BA) methods and on sequence-structure ML were congruent with multilocus trees based on a concatenated (ML and BA) and coalescent based (BA) approaches and consistently supported three main clades: (i) Crassostrea, (ii) Saccostrea, and (iii) an Ostreinae-Lophinae lineage. Therefore, the subfamily Crassotreinae (including Crassostrea), Saccostreinae subfam. nov. (including Saccostrea and tentatively Striostrea) and Ostreinae (including Ostreinae and Lophinae taxa) are recognized. Based on phylogenetic and biogeographical evidence the Asian species of Crassostrea from the Pacific Ocean are assigned to Magallana gen. nov., whereas an integrative taxonomic revision is required for the genera Ostrea and Dendostrea. This study pointed out the suitability of the ITS2 marker for DNA barcoding of oyster and the relevance of using sequence-structure rRNA models and features of the ITS2 folding in molecular phylogenetics and taxonomy. The multilocus approach allowed inferring a robust phylogeny of Ostreidae providing a broad molecular perspective on their systematics. PMID:25250663

  3. What an rRNA Secondary Structure Tells about Phylogeny of Fungi in Ascomycota with Emphasis on Evolution of Major Types of Ascus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Liu, Chao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA secondary structure is highly conserved throughout evolution. The higher order structure is fundamental in establishing important structure-function relationships. Nucleotide sequences from ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes have made a great contribution to our understanding of Ascomycota phylogeny. However, filling the gaps between molecular phylogeny and morphological assumptions based on ascus dehiscence modes and type of fruitbodies at the higher level classification of the phylum remains an unfulfilled task faced by mycologists. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected some major groups of Ascomycota to view their phylogenetic relationships based on analyses of rRNA secondary structure. Using rRNA secondary structural information, here, we converted nucleotide sequences into the structure ones over a 20-symbol code. Our structural analyses together with ancestral character state reconstruction produced reasonable phylogenetic position for the class Geoglossomycetes as opposed to the classic nucleotide analyses. Judging from the secondary structure analyses with consideration of mode of ascus dehiscence and the ability of forming fruitbodies, we draw a clear picture of a possible evolutionary route for fungal asci and some major groups of fungi in Ascomycota. The secondary structure trees show a more reasonable phylogenetic position for the class Geoglossomycetes. Conclusions Our results illustrate that asci lacking of any dehiscence mechanism represent the most primitive type. Passing through the operculate and Orbilia-type asci, bitunicate asci occurred. The evolution came to the most advanced inoperculate type. The ascus-producing fungi might be derived from groups lacking of the capacity to form fruitbodies, and then evolved multiple times. The apothecial type of fruitbodies represents the ancestral state, and the ostiolar type is advanced. The class Geoglossomycetes is closely related to Leotiomycetes and Sordariomycetes having a similar ascus

  4. Exploration of RNA structure spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    In order to understand the structure of real structure spaces, we are studying the 5S rRNA structure space experimentally. A plasmid containing a synthetic 5S rRNA gene, two rRNA promoters, and transcription terminators has been assembled. Assays are conducted to determine if the foreign 5S rRNA is expressed, and to see whether or not it is incorporated into ribosomes. Evolutionary competition is used to determine the relative fitness of strains containing the foreign 5S rRNA and a control 5S rRNA. By using site directed mutagenesis, a number of mutants can be made in order to study the boundaries of the structure space and how sharply defined they are. By making similar studies in the vicinity of structure space, it will be possible to determine how homogeneous the 5S rRNA structure space is. Useable experimental protocols have been developed, and a number of mutants have already been studied. Initial results suggest an explanation of why single stranded regions of the RNA are less subject to mutation than double stranded regions.

  5. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  6. Biogeography in a continental island: population structure of the relict endemic centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus (Chilopoda, Craterostigmomorpha) in Tasmania using 16S rRNA and COI.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Sebastián; Mesibov, Robert; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    We used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence data to investigate the population structure in the centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus Pocock, 1902 (Chilopoda: Craterostigmomorpha: Craterostigmidae) and to look for possible barriers to gene flow on the island of Tasmania, where C. tasmanianus is a widespread endemic. We first confirmed a molecular diagnostic character in 28S rRNA separating Tasmanian Craterostigmus from its sister species Craterostigmus crabilli (Edgecombe and Giribet 2008) in New Zealand and found no shared polymorphism in this marker for the 2 species. In Tasmania, analysis of molecular variance analysis showed little variation at the 16S rRNA and COI loci within populations (6% and 13%, respectively), but substantial variation (56% and 48%, respectively) among populations divided geographically into groups. We found no clear evidence of isolation by distance using a Mantel test. Bayesian clustering and gene network analysis both group the C. tasmanianus populations in patterns which are broadly concordant with previously known biogeographical divisions within Tasmania, but we did not find that genetic distance varied in a simple way across cluster boundaries. The coarse-scale geographical sampling on which this study was based should be followed in the future by sampling at a finer spatial scale and to investigate genetic structure within clusters and across cluster boundaries.

  7. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Thermus thermophilus 16 S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC in Complex with Cofactor and Substrate Guanosine

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Gregory, S; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2008-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification is a ubiquitous feature of ribosomal RNA in all kingdoms of life. Modified nucleotides are generally clustered in functionally important regions of the ribosome, but the functional contribution to protein synthesis is not well understood. Here we describe high resolution crystal structures for the N{sup 2}-guanine methyltransferase RsmC that modifies residue G1207 in 16 S rRNA near the decoding site of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. RsmC is a class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase composed of two methyltransferase domains. However, only one S-adenosyl-l-methionine molecule and one substrate molecule, guanosine, bind in the ternary complex. The N-terminal domain does not bind any cofactor. Two structures with bound S-adenosyl-l-methionine and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine confirm that the cofactor binding mode is highly similar to other class I methyltransferases. Secondary structure elements of the N-terminal domain contribute to cofactor-binding interactions and restrict access to the cofactor-binding site. The orientation of guanosine in the active site reveals that G1207 has to disengage from its Watson-Crick base pairing interaction with C1051 in the 16 S rRNA and flip out into the active site prior to its modification. Inspection of the 30 S crystal structure indicates that access to G1207 by RsmC is incompatible with the native subunit structure, consistent with previous suggestions that this enzyme recognizes a subunit assembly intermediate.

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic activity over Cd0.5Zn0.5S with stacking fault structure combined with Cu2+ modified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Beini; Lu, Yonghong; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Zhu, Yajie; Dang, Zhi; Zhu, Nengwu; Lu, Guining; Huang, Junyi

    2016-03-01

    For enhanced photocatalytic performance of visible light responsive CdZnS, a series of Cd0.5Zn0.5S solid solutions were fabricated by different methods. It was found that the semiconductor obtained through the precipitation-hydrothermal method (CZS-PH) exhibited the highest photocatalytic hydrogen production rate of 2154 μmol h-1 g-1. The enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production of CZS-PH was probably due to stacking fault formation as well as narrow bandgap, a large surface area and a small crystallite size. Based on this, carbon nanotubes modified with Cu2+ (CNTs (Cu)) were used as a cocatalyst for CZS-PH. The addition of CNTs (Cu) enhanced notably the absorption of the composites for visible light. The highest photocatalytic hydrogen production rate of the Cd0.5Zn0.5S-CNTs (Cu) composite was 2995 μmol h-1 g-1 with 1.0 wt.% of CNTs (Cu). The improvement of the photocatalytic activity by loading of CNTs (Cu) was not due to alteration of bandgap energy or surface area, and was probably attributed to suppression of the electron-hole recombination by the CNTs, with Cu2+ anchored in the interface optimizing the photogenerated electron transfer pathway between the semiconductor and CNTs. We report here the successful combination of homojunction and heterojunction in CdZnS semiconductor, which resulted in promotion of charge separation and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

  10. Electronic structure of Na{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x}In{sub 5}S{sub 8} compounds: X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study and band structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Harel, Sylvie; Mokrani, Arezki; Lafond, Alain; Barreau, Nicolas; Fernandez, Vincent; Kessler, John

    2008-12-15

    The aim of the present work is to complete a preliminary study concerning the electronic band structure investigations of Na{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x}In{sub 5}S{sub 8} compounds with 0{<=}x{<=}1, which are expected to be formed at the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3} interface. The band structure calculations demonstrate that for the compounds containing both Na and Cu, as the Cu content increases the band gap tends to decrease, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that this variation is mainly due to valence-band-maximum shift along the solid solution. The band gap strongly depends on the nature of the monovalent cation, and the band structure calculations demonstrate that the d electrons of copper are responsible for the shift of the valence band. In addition, it is worth noting that the Cu-containing compounds have indirect gaps.

  11. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio I.; Hleap, Jose S.; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS. PMID:26488198

  12. Evolution of mitochondrial SSU-rDNA variable domain sequences and rRNA secondary structures, and phylogeny of the Agrocybe aegerita multispecies complex.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Labarère, Jacques

    2007-04-01

    Mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) rDNA variable (V1, V2, V4, V6, V8 and V9) domain sequences and rRNA secondary structures evidenced eight molecular groups within 32 strains of the Agrocybe aegerita multispecies complex from different continents. mtSSU-rRNA secondary structure evolution occurred mainly by insertion/deletion of sequences from 8 to 57nt long. Preferential insertion/deletion sites correlated with loops of the mtSSU-rRNA secondary structures, and suggested that these events occurred in regions without interactions in the ribosomal-protein assembly. Indels modified the stem length (V1 and V4 domains) or the size and loop number (V6 and V9 domains). Three indels inserted in the V1 and V4 domains had 76.5% to 94.7% identity with short sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase gene; this fact and the presence of inverted repeated motifs within indel sequences suggested a mechanism of evolution based on insertion/deletion of sequences from another region of the mitochondrial genome. Phylogenetic relationships inferred using both ribosomal DNA sequences and rRNA secondary structures were congruent and evidenced three clades within the A. aegerita complex: European, Argentinean, and a more distant Asian-American clade including A. aegerita and A. chaxingu strains. These results suggested that numerous genetic exchanges occurred between Asian-American strains after isolation of the European clade. V4-V6-V9 concatenated sequences of European and Argentinean clades had 86.1% identity, similar to the value calculated between two Agrocybe closely related species, suggesting that these clades could represent different species. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence test for rapid characterization of strains was developed.

  13. Structural and functional studies of Bud23-Trm112 reveal 18S rRNA N7-G1575 methylation occurs on late 40S precursor ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; Huvelle, Emmeline; Wacheul, Ludivine; Bourgeois, Gabrielle; Zorbas, Christiane; Graille, Marc; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2014-12-23

    The eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit carries only four ribosomal (r) RNA methylated bases, all close to important functional sites. N(7)-methylguanosine (m(7)G) introduced at position 1575 on 18S rRNA by Bud23-Trm112 is at a ridge forming a steric block between P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we report atomic resolution structures of Bud23-Trm112 in the apo and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-bound forms. Bud23 and Trm112 interact through formation of a β-zipper involving main-chain atoms, burying an important hydrophobic surface and stabilizing the complex. The structures revealed that the coactivator Trm112 undergoes an induced fit to accommodate its methyltransferase (MTase) partner. We report important structural similarity between the active sites of Bud23 and Coffea canephora xanthosine MTase, leading us to propose and validate experimentally a model for G1575 coordination. We identify Bud23 residues important for Bud23-Trm112 complex formation and recruitment to pre-ribosomes. We report that though Bud23-Trm112 binds precursor ribosomes at an early nucleolar stage, m(7)G methylation occurs at a late step of small subunit biogenesis, implying specifically delayed catalytic activation. Finally, we show that Bud23-Trm112 interacts directly with the box C/D snoRNA U3-associated DEAH RNA helicase Dhr1 supposedly involved in central pseudoknot formation; this suggests that Bud23-Trm112 might also contribute to controlling formation of this irreversible and dramatic structural reorganization essential to overall folding of small subunit rRNA. Our study contributes important new elements to our understanding of key molecular aspects of human ribosomopathy syndromes associated with WBSCR22 (human Bud23) malfunction.

  14. Analysis of the structure of Tetrahymena nuclear RNAs in vivo: telomerase RNA, the self-splicing rRNA intron, and U2 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zaug, A J; Cech, T R

    1995-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfate modification of RNA in living Tetrahymena thermophila allowed assessment of RNA secondary structure and protein association. The self-splicing rRNA intron had the same methylation pattern in vivo as in vitro, indicating that the structures are equivalent and suggesting that this RNA is not stably associated with protein in the nucleolus. Methylation was consistent with the current secondary structure model. Much of telomerase RNA was protected from methylation in vivo, but the A's and C's in the template region were very reactive. Thus, most telomerase is not base paired to telomeres in vivo. Protein-free telomerase RNA adopts a structure different from that in vivo, especially in the template and pseudoknot regions. The U2 snRNA showed methylation protection at the Sm protein-binding sequence and the mRNA branch site recognition sequence. For both telomerase RNA and U2 snRNA, the in vivo methylation pattern corresponded much better to the structure determined by comparative sequence analysis than did the in vitro methylation pattern. Thus, as expected, comparative analysis gives the structure of the RNA in vivo. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:7493315

  15. Role of Escherichia coli YbeY, a highly conserved protein, in rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Köhrer, Caroline; Jacob, Asha I.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Aleman, Lourdes M.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    The UPF0054 protein family is highly conserved with homologs present in nearly every sequenced bacterium. In some bacteria, the respective gene is essential, while in others its loss results in a highly pleiotropic phenotype. Despite detailed structural studies, a cellular role for this protein family has remained unknown. We report here that deletion of the Escherichia coli homolog, YbeY, causes striking defects that affect ribosome activity, translational fidelity and ribosome assembly. Mapping of 16S, 23S and 5S rRNA termini reveals that YbeY influences the maturation of all three rRNAs, with a particularly strong effect on maturation at both the 5′- and 3′-ends of 16S rRNA as well as maturation of the 5′-termini of 23S and 5S rRNAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate strong genetic interactions between ybeY and rnc (encoding RNase III), ybeY and rnr (encoding RNase R), and ybeY and pnp (encoding PNPase), further suggesting a role for YbeY in rRNA maturation. Mutation of highly conserved amino acids in YbeY, allowed the identification of two residues (H114, R59) that were found to have a significant effect in vivo. We discuss the implications of these findings for rRNA maturation and ribosome assembly in bacteria. PMID:20807199

  16. Cytogenetic evidence for de novo synthesis of rRNA and involvement of nucleolar material in the organization of cell structures during spermiogenesis of Chariesterus armatus (Heteroptera, Coreidae).

    PubMed

    Arakaki, R L M; Souza, H V; Castanhole, M M U; Bicudo, H E M C; Itoyama, M M

    2010-09-21

    The nucleolar material of Chariesterus armatus was analyzed during spermiogenesis in cell preparations impregnated with silver nitrate. Nucleolar corpuscles were observed in spermatids at the beginning of the process, showing that this organoid is also maintained after meiosis. In addition, nucleoli were seen in the round spermatids connected to the X-chromosome (bearer of the nucleolar organizer in C. armatus), indicating de novo synthesis of nucleolar material. This differs from the reorganization of ribosomal granules, transported from meiotic spermatocytes to round spermatids, where they would support protein synthesis, which is reported for other species. We also observed connections of nucleolar corpuscles to the nuclear membrane regions where the tail and the acrosome will be formed, suggesting close involvement of the nucleolar material in the formation of these structures. In addition to the nucleolar bodies, we detected silver-positive structures, which will require new approaches to clarify their role. One of these structures, observed in the cytoplasm, appears to correspond to the chromatoid body, which has been found in several organisms, but is still poorly understood; another is a complex structure to which the tail appears to be connected. We conclude that C. armatus is an appropriate model for understanding not only the synthesis of rRNA in the spermiogenesis, but also the functional meaning of the close relationship of nucleolar material with other structures during this process.

  17. Restless 5S: the re-arrangement(s) and evolution of the nuclear ribosomal DNA in land plants.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Susann; Costa, Andrea; Muñoz, Jesùs; Quandt, Dietmar

    2011-11-01

    Among eukaryotes two types of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) organization have been observed. Either all components, i.e. the small ribosomal subunit, 5.8S, large ribosomal subunit, and 5S occur tandemly arranged or the 5S rDNA forms a separate cluster of its own. Generalizations based on data derived from just a few model organisms have led to a superimposition of structural and evolutionary traits to the entire plant kingdom asserting that plants generally possess separate arrays. This study reveals that plant nrDNA organization into separate arrays is not a distinctive feature, but rather assignable almost solely to seed plants. We show that early diverging land plants and presumably streptophyte algae share a co-localization of all rRNA genes within one repeat unit. This raises the possibility that the state of rDNA gene co-localization had occurred in their common ancestor. Separate rDNA arrays were identified for all basal seed plants and water ferns, implying at least two independent 5S rDNA transposition events during land plant evolution. Screening for 5S derived Cassandra transposable elements which might have played a role during the transposition events, indicated that this retrotransposon is absent in early diverging vascular plants including early fern lineages. Thus, Cassandra can be rejected as a primary mechanism for 5S rDNA transposition in water ferns. However, the evolution of Cassandra and other eukaryotic 5S derived elements might have been a side effect of the 5S rDNA cluster formation. Structural analysis of the intergenic spacers of the ribosomal clusters revealed that transposition events partially affect spacer regions and suggests a slightly different transcription regulation of 5S rDNA in early land plants. 5S rDNA upstream regulatory elements are highly divergent or absent from the LSU-5S spacers of most early divergent land plant lineages. Several putative scenarios and mechanisms involved in the concerted relocation of hundreds of 5S

  18. Diversity and Structure of the Methanogenic Community in Anoxic Rice Paddy Soil Microcosms as Examined by Cultivation and Direct 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Regine; Janssen, Peter H.; Liesack, Werner

    1998-01-01

    A dual approach consisting of cultivation and molecular retrieval of partial archaeal 16S rRNA genes was carried out to characterize the diversity and structure of the methanogenic community inhabiting the anoxic bulk soil of flooded rice microcosms. The molecular approach identified four groups of known methanogens. Three environmental sequences clustered with Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanobacterium formicicum, six were closely related but not identical to those of strains of Methanosaeta concilii, two grouped with members of the genus Methanosarcina, and two were related to the methanogenic endosymbiont of Plagiopyla nasuta. The cultivation approach via most-probable-number counts with a subsample of the same soil as an inoculum yielded cell numbers of up to 107 per g of dry soil for the H2-CO2-utilizing methanogens and of up to 106 for the acetate-utilizing methanogens. Strain VeH52, isolated from the terminal positive dilution on H2-CO2, grouped within the phylogenetic radiation characterized by M. bryantii and M. formicicum and the environmental sequences of the Methanobacterium-like group. A consortium of two distinct methanogens grew in the terminal positive culture on acetate. These two organisms showed absolute 16S rRNA gene identities with environmental sequences of the novel Methanosaeta-like group and the Methanobacterium-like group. Methanosarcina spp. were identified only in the less-dilute levels of the same dilution series on acetate. These data correlate well with acetate concentrations of about 11 μM in the pore water of this rice paddy soil. These concentrations are too low for the growth of known Methanosarcina spp. but are at the acetate utilization threshold of Methanosaeta spp. Thus, our data indicated Methanosaeta spp. and Methanobacterium spp. to be the dominant methanogenic groups in the anoxic rice soil, whereas Methanosarcina spp. appeared to be less abundant. PMID:9501436

  19. The binding site for ribosomal protein S8 in 16S rRNA and spc mRNA from Escherichia coli: minimum structural requirements and the effects of single bulged bases on S8-RNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Jiang, L; Zimmermann, R A

    1994-01-01

    Through specific interactions with rRNA and mRNA, ribosomal protein S8 of Escherichia coli plays a central role in both assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit and translational regulation of spc operon expression. To better understand S8-RNA association, we have measured the affinity of S8 for a number of variants of its rRNA and mRNA binding sites prepared by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis. With the aid of site-directed deletions, we demonstrate that an imperfect, 33-nucleotide helical stem encompassing nucleotides 588-603 and 635-651 possesses all of the structural information necessary for specific binding of S8 to the 16S rRNA. This segment consists of two short duplexes that enclose a conserved, asymmetric internal loop which contains features crucial for protein recognition. The S8 binding site in spc operon mRNA is very similar in both primary and secondary structure to that in 16S rRNA except for the presence of two single bulged bases in one of the duplex segments. In addition, the apparent association constant for the S8-mRNA interaction is approximately fivefold less than that for the S8-rRNA interaction. We show that the difference in affinity can be attributed to the effects of the bulged bases. Deletion of the bulged bases from the mRNA site increases its affinity for S8 to a level similar to that of the rRNA, whereas insertion of single-base bulges at equivalent positions within the rRNA site reduces its affinity for S8 to a value typical of the mRNA. Single-base bulges in the proximity of essential recognition features are therefore capable of modulating the strength of protein-RNA interactions. PMID:7515489

  20. The rRNA evolution and procaryotic phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of ribosomal RNA primary structure allow reconstruction of phylogenetic trees for prokaryotic organisms. Such studies reveal major dichotomy among the bacteria that separates them into eubacteria and archaebacteria. Both groupings are further segmented into several major divisions. The results obtained from 5S rRNA sequences are essentially the same as those obtained with the 16S rRNA data. In the case of Gram negative bacteria the ribosomal RNA sequencing results can also be directly compared with hybridization studies and cytochrome c sequencing studies. There is again excellent agreement among the several methods. It seems likely then that the overall picture of microbial phylogeny that is emerging from the RNA sequence studies is a good approximation of the true history of these organisms. The RNA data allow examination of the evolutionary process in a semi-quantitative way. The secondary structures of these RNAs are largely established. As a result it is possible to recognize examples of local structural evolution. Evolutionary pathways accounting for these events can be proposed and their probability can be assessed.

  1. Crystal structure of (4R,5S)-4-methyl-3-methyl­sulfinyl-5-phenyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Gustavo Pozza; da Silva, Vinicius Flores; Oliver, Allen G.

    2014-01-01

    The absolute structure of the chiral asymmetric indole precursor title compound, C11H13NO3S, was confirmed by refinement of the Flack and Hooft parameters and is that expected based on the starting materials for the synthesis. The phenyl group subtends a dihedral angle of 56.40 (5)° with the mean plane of the oxazolidinone ring, which adopts an envelope conformation, with the C atom bearing the methyl group as the flap. In the crystal, no significant directional inter­actions beyond van der Waals contacts are observed. PMID:25553031

  2. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Purta, Elzbieta; Hansen, Lykke H.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Vester, Birte; Long, Katherine S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl tranferase center of bacterial ribosomes by catalyzing methylation of the C-8 position of 23S rRNA nucleotide A2503. The same nucleotide is targeted by the housekeeping methyltransferase RlmN that methylates the C-2 position. Database searches with the Cfr sequence have revealed a large group of closely related sequences from all domains of life that contain the conserved CX3CX2C motif characteristic of radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis of the Cfr/RlmN family suggests that the RlmN subfamily is likely the ancestral form, whereas the Cfr subfamily arose via duplication and horizontal gene transfer. A structural model of Cfr has been calculated and used as a guide for alanine mutagenesis studies that corroborate the model-based predictions of a 4Fe–4S cluster, a SAM molecule coordinated to the iron–sulfur cluster (SAM1) and a SAM molecule that is the putative methyl group donor (SAM2). All mutations at predicted functional sites affect Cfr activity significantly as assayed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and primer extension analysis. The investigation has identified essential amino acids and Cfr variants with altered reaction mechanisms and represents a first step towards understanding the structural basis of Cfr activity. PMID:20007606

  3. Size Matters: Assessing Optimum Soil Sample Size for Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure Analyses Using High Throughput Sequencing of rRNA Gene Amplicons

    DOE PAGES

    Penton, C. Ryan; Gupta, Vadakattu V. S. R.; Yu, Julian; ...

    2016-06-02

    We examined the effect of different soil sample sizes obtained from an agricultural field, under a single cropping system uniform in soil properties and aboveground crop responses, on bacterial and fungal community structure and microbial diversity indices. DNA extracted from soil sample sizes of 0.25, 1, 5, and 10 g using MoBIO kits and from 10 and 100 g sizes using a bead-beating method (SARDI) were used as templates for high-throughput sequencing of 16S and 28S rRNA gene amplicons for bacteria and fungi, respectively, on the Illumina MiSeq and Roche 454 platforms. Sample size significantly affected overall bacterial and fungalmore » community structure, replicate dispersion and the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) retrieved. Richness, evenness and diversity were also significantly affected. The largest diversity estimates were always associated with the 10 g MoBIO extractions with a corresponding reduction in replicate dispersion. For the fungal data, smaller MoBIO extractions identified more unclassified Eukaryota incertae sedis and unclassified glomeromycota while the SARDI method retrieved more abundant OTUs containing unclassified Pleosporales and the fungal genera Alternaria and Cercophora. Overall, these findings indicate that a 10 g soil DNA extraction is most suitable for both soil bacterial and fungal communities for retrieving optimal diversity while still capturing rarer taxa in concert with decreasing replicate variation.« less

  4. Size Matters: Assessing Optimum Soil Sample Size for Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure Analyses Using High Throughput Sequencing of rRNA Gene Amplicons

    SciTech Connect

    Penton, C. Ryan; Gupta, Vadakattu V. S. R.; Yu, Julian; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-06-02

    We examined the effect of different soil sample sizes obtained from an agricultural field, under a single cropping system uniform in soil properties and aboveground crop responses, on bacterial and fungal community structure and microbial diversity indices. DNA extracted from soil sample sizes of 0.25, 1, 5, and 10 g using MoBIO kits and from 10 and 100 g sizes using a bead-beating method (SARDI) were used as templates for high-throughput sequencing of 16S and 28S rRNA gene amplicons for bacteria and fungi, respectively, on the Illumina MiSeq and Roche 454 platforms. Sample size significantly affected overall bacterial and fungal community structure, replicate dispersion and the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) retrieved. Richness, evenness and diversity were also significantly affected. The largest diversity estimates were always associated with the 10 g MoBIO extractions with a corresponding reduction in replicate dispersion. For the fungal data, smaller MoBIO extractions identified more unclassified Eukaryota incertae sedis and unclassified glomeromycota while the SARDI method retrieved more abundant OTUs containing unclassified Pleosporales and the fungal genera Alternaria and Cercophora. Overall, these findings indicate that a 10 g soil DNA extraction is most suitable for both soil bacterial and fungal communities for retrieving optimal diversity while still capturing rarer taxa in concert with decreasing replicate variation.

  5. Structure of a human pre-40S particle points to a role for RACK1 in the final steps of 18S rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Larburu, Natacha; Montellese, Christian; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Plisson-Chastang, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex and tightly regulated process that has been mostly characterized in yeast. The discovery of a growing number of diseases linked to defects in ribosome biogenesis calls for a deeper understanding of these mechanisms and of the specificities of human ribosome maturation. We present the 19 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of a cytoplasmic precursor to the human small ribosomal subunit, purified by using the tagged ribosome biogenesis factor LTV1 as bait. Compared to yeast pre-40S particles, this first three-dimensional structure of a human 40S subunit precursor shows noticeable differences with respect to the position of ribosome biogenesis factors and uncovers the early deposition of the ribosomal protein RACK1 during subunit maturation. Consistently, RACK1 is required for efficient processing of the 18S rRNA 3′-end, which might be related to its role in translation initiation. This first structural analysis of a human pre-ribosomal particle sets the grounds for high-resolution studies of conformational transitions accompanying ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:27530427

  6. Sequence homologies between eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA and the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNa: evidences for a common evolutionary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, B

    1981-01-01

    The question of the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA was re-examined after the recent publication of the E. coli 23S rRNA sequence (26,40). A region of the 23S RNA located at its 5' end was found to be approximately 50% homologous to four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs. A computer comparison analysis indicates that no other region of the E. coli ribosomal transcription unit (greater than 5 000 nucleotides in length) shares a comparable homology with 5.8S rRNA. Homology between the 5' end of e. coli 23S and four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs falls within the same range as that between E. coli 5S RNA from the same four eukaryotic species. All these data strongly suggest that the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNA and eukaryotic 5.8S RNA have a common evolutionary origin. Secondary structure models are proposed for the 5' region of E. coli 23S RNA. Images PMID:7024907

  7. The structure of bacterial communities in the western Arctic Ocean as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kirchman, David L; Cottrell, Matthew T; Lovejoy, Connie

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial communities in the surface layer of the oceans consist of a few abundant phylotypes and many rare ones, most with unknown ecological functions and unclear roles in biogeochemical processes. To test hypotheses about relationships between abundant and rare phylotypes, we examined bacterial communities in the western Arctic Ocean using pyrosequence data of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Samples were collected from various locations in the Chukchi Sea, the Beaufort Sea and Franklin Bay in summer and winter. We found that bacterial communities differed between summer and winter at a few locations, but overall there was no significant difference between the two seasons in spite of large differences in biogeochemical properties. The sequence data suggested that abundant phylotypes remained abundant while rare phylotypes remained rare between the two seasons and among the Arctic regions examined here, arguing against the 'seed bank' hypothesis. Phylotype richness was calculated for various bacterial groups defined by sequence similarity or by phylogeny (phyla and proteobacterial classes). Abundant bacterial groups had higher within-group diversity than rare groups, suggesting that the ecological success of a bacterial lineage depends on diversity rather than on the dominance of a few phylotypes. In these Arctic waters, in spite of dramatic variation in several biogeochemical properties, bacterial community structure was remarkably stable over time and among regions, and any variation was due to the abundant phylotypes rather than rare ones.

  8. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  9. Shifts of microbial community structure in soils of a photovoltaic plant observed using tag-encoded pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shijin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Penghua; Zhong, Li; Qiu, Lequan; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-04-01

    The environmental risk of fluoride and chloride pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to solar photovoltaic sites. The elevated levels of fluoride and chloride in these soils have had significant impacts on the population size and overall biological activity of the soil microbial communities. The microbial community also plays an essential role in remediation of these soils. Questions remain as to how the fluoride and chloride contamination and subsequent remediation at these sites have impacted the population structure of the soil microbial communities. We analyzed the microbial communities in soils collected from close to a solar photovoltaic enterprise by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA tag. In addition, we used multivariate statistics to identity the relationships shared between sequence diversity and heterogeneity in the soil environment. The overall microbial communities were surprisingly diverse, harboring a wide variety of taxa and sharing significant correlations with different degrees of fluoride and chloride contamination. The contaminated soils harbored abundant bacteria that were probably resistant to the high acidity, high fluoride and chloride concentration, and high osmotic pressure environment. The dominant genera were Sphingomonas, Subgroup_6_norank, Clostridium sensu stricto, Nitrospira, Rhizomicrobium, and Acidithiobacillus. The results of this study provide new information regarding a previously uncharacterized ecosystem and show the value of high-throughput sequencing in the study of complex ecosystems.

  10. 5S RRNA GENE DELETIONS CAUSE AN UNEXPECTEDLY HIGH FITNESS LOSS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI. (R825354)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  12. The Structure of Free L11 and Functional Dynamics of L11 in Free, L11-rRNA(58nt) Binary and L11-rRNA(58nt)-thiostrepton Ternary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghan; Walsh, Joseph D.; Yu, Ping; Markus, Michelle A.; Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Schwieters, Charles D.; Krueger, Susan; Draper, David E.; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2007-01-01

    Summary The L11 binding site is one of the most important functional sites in the ribosome. The N-terminal domain of L11 has been implicated as a “reversible switch” in facilitating the coordinated movements associated with EF-G–driven GTP hydrolysis. The “reversible switch” mechanism has been hypothesized to require conformational flexibility involving re-orientation and re-positioning of the two L11 domains, and warrants a close examination of the structure and dynamics of L11. Here we report the solution structure of free L11, and relaxation studies of free L11, L11complexed to its 58 nt RNA recognition site, and L11 in a ternary complex with the RNA and thiostrepton antibiotic. The binding site of thiostrepton on L11 was also defined by analysis of structural and dynamics data and chemical shift mapping. The conclusions of this work are as follows: First, the binding of L11 to RNA leads to sizable conformation changes in the regions flanking the linker and in the hinge area that links a β-sheets and a 310-helix-turn-helix element in the N-terminus. Concurrently, the change in the relative orientation may lead to re-positioning of the N-terminus, as implied by a decrease of radius of gyration from 18.5 Å to 16.2 Å. Second, the regions, which undergo large conformation changes, exhibit motions on ms-μs or ns-ps time scales. Third, binding of thiostrepton results in more rigid conformations near the linker (Thr71) and near its putative binding site (Leu12). Lastly, conformational changes in the putative thiostrepton binding site are implicated by the re-emergence of cross-correlation peaks in the spectrum of the ternary complex, which were missing in that of the binary complex. Our combined analysis of both the chemical shift perturbation and dynamics data clearly indicates that thiostrepton binds to a pocket involving residues in the 310-helix in L11. PMID:17292917

  13. Community Structure and Diversity of Biofilms from a Beer Bottling Plant as Revealed Using 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries†

    PubMed Central

    Timke, Markus; Wang-Lieu, Ngoc Quynh; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2005-01-01

    The microbial composition of biofilms from a beer bottling plant was analyzed by a cultivation independent analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were differentiated by amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and representative clones from each group were sequenced. The diversity of the clone libraries was comparable with the diversity found for environmental samples. No evidences for the presence of strictly anaerobic taxa or important beer spoilers were found, indicating that biofilms developed for more than 6 months at the plant formed no appropriate habitat for those microorganisms. The genus Methylobacterium was one of the dominating groups of the clone libraries. The size of this population was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and fatty acid analysis. In addition, considerable numbers of clones were assigned to uncultivated organisms. PMID:16204578

  14. Spryite, {{Ag}}8({{{As}}_{0.5}^{3 +} {{As}}_{0.5}^{5 +}}){{S}}6: structure determination and inferred absence of superionic conduction of the first As3+-bearing argyrodite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Luca; Keutsch, Frank N.; Morana, Marta; Zaccarini, Federica

    2017-01-01

    We report data on the composition and crystal structure of the first As3+-bearing natural argyrodite, spryite. Spryite has the formula ({{{Ag}}_{7.98} {{Cu}}_{0.05}})_{Σ = 8.03} ({{{As}}_{0.31}^{5 +} {{Ge}}_{0.36} {{As}}_{0.31}^{3 +} {{Fe}}_{0.02}^{3 +}})_{Σ = 1.00} {{S}}_{5.97}, ideally {{Ag}}8 ({{{As}}_{0.5}^{3 +} {{As}}_{0.5}^{5 +}}){{S}}6. The crystal studied was found in a sample from the Uchucchacua polymetallic deposit, Oyon district, Cajatambo, Lima Department, Peru. The structure was refined in the space group Pna21 up to R = 0.0782 using 2099 observed reflections [2 σ( I) level]. Spryite is intimately twinned with six twin domains. The structure solution showed that As3+ and As5+ coexist in the new mineral, which represents the first case ever discovered in either a mineral or a synthetic compound belonging to a sulfide/sulfosalt group. High-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction experiments indicated that no phase transitions occur in the temperature range investigated and that the mineral does not show any evidence of fast ionic conduction.

  15. The 5S rDNA gene family in mollusks: characterization of transcriptional regulatory regions, prediction of secondary structures, and long-term evolution, with special attention to Mytilidae mussels.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Vierna, Joaquín; González-Tizón, Ana M; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Several reports on the characterization of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) in various animal groups have been published to date, but there is a lack of studies analyzing this gene family in a much broader context. Here, we have studied 5S rDNA variation in several molluskan species, including bivalves, gastropods, and cephalopods. The degree of conservation of transcriptional regulatory regions was analyzed in these lineages, revealing a conserved TATA-like box in the upstream region. The evolution of the 120 bp coding region (5S) was also studied, suggesting the occurrence of paralogue groups in razor clams, clams, and cockles. In addition, 5S rDNA sequences from 11 species and 7 genus of Mytilidae Rafinesque, 1815 mussels were sampled and studied in detail. Four different 5S rDNA types, based on the nontranscribed spacer region were identified. The phylogenetic analyses performed within each type showed a between-species gene clustering pattern, suggesting ancestral polymorphism. Moreover, some putative pseudogenized 5S copies were also identified. Our report, together with previous studies that found high degree of intragenomic divergence in bivalve species, suggests that birth-and-death evolution may be the main force driving the evolution of 5S rDNA in these animals, even at the genus level.

  16. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin A.; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  17. Mineral Type and Solution Chemistry Affect the Structure and Composition of Actively Growing Bacterial Communities as Revealed by Bromodeoxyuridine Immunocapture and 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kelly, L C; Colin, Y; Turpault, M-P; Uroz, S

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how minerals affect bacterial communities and their in situ activities in relation to environmental conditions are central issues in soil microbial ecology, as minerals represent essential reservoirs of inorganic nutrients for the biosphere. To determine the impact of mineral type and solution chemistry on soil bacterial communities, we compared the diversity, composition, and functional abilities of a soil bacterial community incubated in presence/absence of different mineral types (apatite, biotite, obsidian). Microcosms were prepared containing different liquid culture media devoid of particular essential nutrients, the nutrients provided only in the introduced minerals and therefore only available to the microbial community through mineral dissolution by biotic and/or abiotic processes. By combining functional screening of bacterial isolates and community analysis by bromodeoxyuridine DNA immunocapture and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, we demonstrated that bacterial communities were mainly impacted by the solution chemistry at the taxonomic level and by the mineral type at the functional level. Metabolically active bacterial communities varied with solution chemistry and mineral type. Burkholderia were significantly enriched in the obsidian treatment compared to the biotite treatment and were the most effective isolates at solubilizing phosphorous or mobilizing iron, in all the treatments. A detailed analysis revealed that the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the OTUs or isolated strains assigned as Burkholderia in our study showed high homology with effective mineral-weathering bacteria previously recovered from the same experimental site.

  18. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in the Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In flowering plants and animals the most common ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) organisation is that in which 35S (encoding 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA) and 5S genes are physically separated occupying different chromosomal loci. However, recent observations established that both genes have been unified to a single 35S-5S unit in the genus Artemisia (Asteraceae), a genomic arrangement typical of primitive eukaryotes such as yeast, among others. Here we aim to reveal the origin, distribution and mechanisms leading to the linked organisation of rDNA in the Asteraceae by analysing unit structure (PCR, Southern blot, sequencing), gene copy number (quantitative PCR) and chromosomal position (FISH) of 5S and 35S rRNA genes in ~200 species representing the family diversity and other closely related groups. Results Dominant linked rDNA genotype was found within three large groups in subfamily Asteroideae: tribe Anthemideae (93% of the studied cases), tribe Gnaphalieae (100%) and in the "Heliantheae alliance" (23%). The remaining five tribes of the Asteroideae displayed canonical non linked arrangement of rDNA, as did the other groups in the Asteraceae. Nevertheless, low copy linked genes were identified among several species that amplified unlinked units. The conserved position of functional 5S insertions downstream from the 26S gene suggests a unique, perhaps retrotransposon-mediated integration event at the base of subfamily Asteroideae. Further evolution likely involved divergence of 26S-5S intergenic spacers, amplification and homogenisation of units across the chromosomes and concomitant elimination of unlinked arrays. However, the opposite trend, from linked towards unlinked arrangement was also surmised in few species indicating possible reversibility of these processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that nearly 25% of Asteraceae species may have evolved unusual linked arrangement of rRNA genes. Thus, in plants, fundamental changes in intrinsic structure of rDNA units

  19. A backward view from 16S rRNA to archaea to the universal tree of life to progenotes: reminiscences of Carl Woese.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    I first became aware of Carl Woese in the mid-1970s when he and George Fox criticized a few of the 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences emerging from Strasbourg in the 10-12 y RNA sequencing project of the first 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli, some of which we were using for assembling RNA binding sites of ribosomal proteins. When I realized that they were attempting to sequence 16S rRNAs from a range of bacteria to classify them phylogenetically, I seriously questioned their sanity. Not because of the goal, which was admirable, but because of the sheer technical difficulty, and slowness, of sequencing large RNA molecules using the original Sanger RNA sequencing method, not to mention the health hazards of regularly preparing rRNA using 20-30 mCi [ (32)P]. My view changed radically, however, with their subsequent prediction of 5S rRNA secondary structures using a phylogenetic approach. Previously, the molecular biology community had been competing to generate the maximum numbers of base pairs in the model RNA molecule E. coli 5S RNA when Fox and Woese introduced the concept of compensatory base changes based on phylogeny for defining secondary structure and applied it to 5S RNA, they found evidence for only about 50% base pairing. This approach had previously been used for tRNA secondary structure predictions but its more general significance had never been acknowledged. Carl subsequently persuaded Harry Noller to apply the same method to predicting secondary structures of the large rRNAs.

  20. Structural Basis for the Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA by Aminoglycoside Resistance Methyltransferase Sgm from an Antibiotic Producer: a Diversity of Active Sites in m7G Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, N.; Tkaczuk, K; Tulsidas, S; Kaminska, K; Cubrilo, S; Maravic -Vlahovicek, G; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Sgm (Sisomicin-gentamicin methyltransferase) from antibiotic-producing bacterium Micromonospora zionensis is an enzyme that confers resistance to aminoglycosides like gentamicin and sisomicin by specifically methylating G1405 in bacterial 16S rRNA. Sgm belongs to the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase (Arm) family of enzymes that have been recently found to spread by horizontal gene transfer among disease-causing bacteria. Structural characterization of Arm enzymes is the key to understand their mechanism of action and to develop inhibitors that would block their activity. Here we report the structure of Sgm in complex with cofactors S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.0 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, and results of mutagenesis and rRNA footprinting, and protein-substrate docking. We propose the mechanism of methylation of G1405 by Sgm and compare it with other m{sup 7}G methyltransferases, revealing a surprising diversity of active sites and binding modes for the same basic reaction of RNA modification. This analysis can serve as a stepping stone towards developing drugs that would specifically block the activity of Arm methyltransferases and thereby re-sensitize pathogenic bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  1. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  2. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  3. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of rRNA gene clusters in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among multigene families, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the most frequently studied and have been explored as cytogenetic markers to study the evolutionary history of karyotypes among animals and plants. In this report, we applied cytogenetic and genomic methods to investigate the organization of rRNA genes among cichlid fishes. Cichlids are a group of fishes that are of increasing scientific interest due to their rapid and convergent adaptive radiation, which has led to extensive ecological diversity. Results The present paper reports the cytogenetic mapping of the 5S rRNA genes from 18 South American, 22 African and one Asian species and the 18S rRNA genes from 3 African species. The data obtained were comparatively analyzed with previously published information related to the mapping of rRNA genes in cichlids. The number of 5S rRNA clusters per diploid genome ranged from 2 to 15, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 chromosomes bearing a 5S rDNA cluster. Regarding 18S rDNA mapping, the number of sites ranged from 2 to 6, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 sites per diploid genome. Furthermore, searching the Oreochromis niloticus genome database led to the identification of a total of 59 copies of 5S rRNA and 38 copies of 18S rRNA genes that were distributed in several genomic scaffolds. The rRNA genes were frequently flanked by transposable elements (TEs) and spread throughout the genome, complementing the FISH analysis that detect only clustered copies of rRNA genes. Conclusions The organization of rRNA gene clusters seems to reflect their intense and particular evolutionary pathway and not the evolutionary history of the associated taxa. The possible role of TEs as one source of rRNA gene movement, that could generates the spreading of ribosomal clusters/copies, is discussed. The present paper reinforces the notion that the integration of cytogenetic data and genomic analysis provides a more complete picture for

  5. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  6. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of RluD, the only rRNA pseudouridine synthase required for normal growth of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    DEL CAMPO, MARK; OFENGAND, JAMES; MALHOTRA, ARUN

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase RluD makes pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the loop of helix 69 in 23S RNA. These are the most highly conserved ribosomal pseudouridines known. Of 11 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli, only cells lacking RluD have severe growth defects and abnormal ribosomes. We have determined the 2.0 Å structure of the catalytic domain of RluD (residues 77–326), the first structure of an RluA family member. The catalytic domain folds into a mainly antiparallel β-sheet flanked by several loops and helices. A positively charged cleft that presumably binds RNA leads to the conserved Asp 139. The RluD N-terminal S4 domain, connected by a flexible linker, is disordered in our structure. RluD is very similar in both catalytic domain structure and active site arrangement to the pseudouridine synthases RsuA, TruB, and TruA. We identify five sequence motifs, two of which are novel, in the RluA, RsuA, TruB, and TruA families, uniting them as one superfamily. These results strongly suggest that four of the five families of pseudouridine synthases arose by divergent evolution. The RluD structure also provides insight into its multisite specificity. PMID:14730022

  7. Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (nu ITS2 rRNA) Sequence-Structure Phylogenetics: Towards an Automated Reconstruction of the Green Algal Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Mark A.; Keller, Alexander; Koetschan, Christian; Förster, Frank; Merget, Benjamin; Wolf, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background Chloroplast-encoded genes (matK and rbcL) have been formally proposed for use in DNA barcoding efforts targeting embryophytes. Extending such a protocol to chlorophytan green algae, though, is fraught with problems including non homology (matK) and heterogeneity that prevents the creation of a universal PCR toolkit (rbcL). Some have advocated the use of the nuclear-encoded, internal transcribed spacer two (ITS2) as an alternative to the traditional chloroplast markers. However, the ITS2 is broadly perceived to be insufficiently conserved or to be confounded by introgression or biparental inheritance patterns, precluding its broad use in phylogenetic reconstruction or as a DNA barcode. A growing body of evidence has shown that simultaneous analysis of nucleotide data with secondary structure information can overcome at least some of the limitations of ITS2. The goal of this investigation was to assess the feasibility of an automated, sequence-structure approach for analysis of IT2 data from a large sampling of phylum Chlorophyta. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences and secondary structures from 591 chlorophycean, 741 trebouxiophycean and 938 ulvophycean algae, all obtained from the ITS2 Database, were aligned using a sequence structure-specific scoring matrix. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed by Profile Neighbor-Joining coupled with a sequence structure-specific, general time reversible substitution model. Results from analyses of the ITS2 data were robust at multiple nodes and showed considerable congruence with results from published phylogenetic analyses. Conclusions/Significance Our observations on the power of automated, sequence-structure analyses of ITS2 to reconstruct phylum-level phylogenies of the green algae validate this approach to assessing diversity for large sets of chlorophytan taxa. Moreover, our results indicate that objections to the use of ITS2 for DNA barcoding should be weighed against the utility of an automated

  8. Long-term evolution of 5S ribosomal DNA seems to be driven by birth-and-death processes and selection in Ensis razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Vierna, Joaquín; González-Tizón, Ana M; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2009-10-01

    A study of nucleotide sequence variation of 5S ribosomal DNA from six Ensis species revealed that several 5S ribosomal DNA variants, based on differences in their nontranscribed spacers (NTS), occur in Ensis genomes. The 5S rRNA gene was not very polymorphic, compared with the NTS region. The phylogenetic analyses performed showed a between-species clustering of 5S ribosomal DNA variants. Sequence divergence levels between variants were very large, revealing a lack of sequence homogenization. These results strongly suggest that the long-term evolution of Ensis 5S ribosomal DNA is driven by birth-and-death processes and selection.

  9. Coordinate regulation of ribosomal component synthesis in Acanthamoeba castellanii: 5S RNA transcription is down regulated during encystment by alteration of TFIIIA activity.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, J L; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of large rRNA precursor and 5S RNA were examined during encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii. Both transcription units are down regulated almost coordinately during this process, though 5S RNA transcription is not as completely shut down as rRNA transcription. The protein components necessary for transcription of 5S RNA and tRNA were determined, and fractions containing transcription factors comparable to TFIIIA, TFIIIB, and TFIIIC, as well as RNA polymerase III and a 3'-end processing activity, were identified. Regulation of 5S RNA transcription could be recapitulated in vitro, and the activities of the required components were compared. In contrast to regulation of precursor rRNA, there is no apparent change during encystment in the activity of the polymerase dedicated to 5S RNA expression. Similarly, the transcriptional and promoter-binding activities of TFIIIC are not altered in parallel with 5S RNA regulation. TFIIIB transcriptional activity is unaltered in encysting cells. In contrast, both the transcriptional and DNA-binding activities of TFIIIA are strongly reduced in nuclear extracts from transcriptionally inactive cells. These results were analyzed in terms of mechanisms for coordinate regulation of rRNA and 5S RNA expression. PMID:7760828

  10. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards).

    PubMed

    Edger, Patrick P; Tang, Michelle; Bird, Kevin A; Mayfield, Dustin R; Conant, Gavin; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Koch, Marcus A; Pires, J Chris

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1.) Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2.) Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3.) Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species), and 4.) The assumption (and/or treatment) that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships.

  11. Intraindividual and interspecies variation in the 5S rDNA of coregonid fish.

    PubMed

    Sajdak, S L; Reed, K M; Phillips, R B

    1998-06-01

    This study was designed to characterize further the nontranscribed intergenic spacers (NTSs) of the 5S rRNA genes of fish and evaluate this marker as a tool for comparative studies. Two members of the closely related North American Great Lakes cisco species complex (Coregonus artedi and C. zenithicus) were chosen for comparison. Fluorescence in situ hybridization found the ciscoes to have a single multicopy 5S locus located in a C band-positive region of the largest submetacentric chromosome. The entire NTS was amplified from the two species by polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers anchored in the conserved 5S coding region. Complete sequences were determined for 25 clones from four individuals representing two discrete NTS length variants. Sequence analysis found the length variants to result from presence of a 130-bp direct repeat. No two sequences from a single fish were identical. Examination of sequence from the coding region revealed two types of 5S genes in addition to pseudogenes. This suggests the presence of both somatic and germline (oocyte) forms of the 5S gene in the genome of Coregonus. The amount of variation present among NTS sequences indicates that accumulation of variation (mutation) is greater in this multicopy gene than is gene conversion (homogenization). The high level of sequence variation makes the 5S NTS an inappropriate DNA sequence for comparisons of closely related taxa.

  12. Metschnikowia Species Share a Pool of Diverse rRNA Genes Differing in Regions That Determine Hairpin-Loop Structures and Evolve by Reticulation

    PubMed Central

    Sipiczki, Matthias; Pfliegler, Walter P.; Holb, Imre J.

    2013-01-01

    Modern taxonomy of yeasts is mainly based on phylogenetic analysis of conserved DNA and protein sequences. By far the most frequently used sequences are those of the repeats of the chromosomal rDNA array. It is generally accepted that the rDNA repeats of a genome have identical sequences due to the phenomenon of sequence homogenisation and can thus be used for identification and barcoding of species. Here we show that the rDNA arrays of the type strains of Metschnikowia andauensis and M. fructicola are not homogenised. Both have arrays consisting of diverse repeats that differ from each other in the D1/D2 domains by up to 18 and 25 substitutions. The variable sites are concentrated in two regions that correspond to back-folding stretches of hairpin loops in the predicted secondary structure of the RNA molecules. The substitutions do not alter significantly the overall hairpin-loop structure due to wobble base pairing at sites of C-T transitions and compensatory mutations in the complementary strand of the hairpin stem. The phylogenetic and network analyses of the cloned sequences revealed that the repeats had not evolved in a vertical tree-like way but reticulation might have shaped the rDNA arrays of both strains. The neighbour-net analysis of all cloned sequences of the type strains and the database sequences of different strains further showed that these species share a continuous pool of diverse repeats that appear to evolve by reticulate evolution. PMID:23805311

  13. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R.; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon–anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  14. The 5S rDNA family evolves through concerted and birth-and-death evolution in fish genomes: an example from freshwater stingrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ribosomal 5S genes are well known for the critical role they play in ribosome folding and functionality. These genes are thought to evolve in a concerted fashion, with high rates of homogenization of gene copies. However, the majority of previous analyses regarding the evolutionary process of rDNA repeats were conducted in invertebrates and plants. Studies have also been conducted on vertebrates, but these analyses were usually restricted to the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. The recent identification of divergent 5S rRNA gene paralogs in the genomes of elasmobranches and teleost fishes indicate that the eukaryotic 5S rRNA gene family has a more complex genomic organization than previously thought. The availability of new sequence data from lower vertebrates such as teleosts and elasmobranches enables an enhanced evolutionary characterization of 5S rDNA among vertebrates. Results We identified two variant classes of 5S rDNA sequences in the genomes of Potamotrygonidae stingrays, similar to the genomes of other vertebrates. One class of 5S rRNA genes was shared only by elasmobranches. A broad comparative survey among 100 vertebrate species suggests that the 5S rRNA gene variants in fishes originated from rounds of genome duplication. These variants were then maintained or eliminated by birth-and-death mechanisms, under intense purifying selection. Clustered multiple copies of 5S rDNA variants could have arisen due to unequal crossing over mechanisms. Simultaneously, the distinct genome clusters were independently homogenized, resulting in the maintenance of clusters of highly similar repeats through concerted evolution. Conclusions We believe that 5S rDNA molecular evolution in fish genomes is driven by a mixed mechanism that integrates birth-and-death and concerted evolution. PMID:21627815

  15. Bacterial community structure in simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and organic matter removal process treating saline mustard tuber wastewater as revealed by 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiale; Gong, Benzhou; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yingmu; Zhou, Jian

    2017-03-01

    A simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and organic matter removal (SNDOR) process in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) was established to treat saline mustard tuber wastewater (MTWW) in this study. An average COD removal efficiency of 86.48% and total nitrogen removal efficiency of 86.48% were achieved at 30gNaClL(-1) during 100days' operation. The underlying mechanisms were investigated by PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing (V1-V9) to analyze the microbial community structures and its variation from low salinity at 10gNaClL(-1) to high salinity at 30gNaClL(-1). Results showed elevated salinity did not affect biological performance but reduced microbial diversity in SBBR, and halophilic bacteria gradually predominated by succession. Despite of high C/N, autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) Nitrosomonas and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) Candidatus Nitrososphaera both contributed to ammonium oxidation. As salinity increasing, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were significantly inhibited, partial nitrification and denitrification (PND) process gradually contributed to nitrogen removal.

  16. Effects of rumen fluid collection site on microbial population structure during in vitro fermentation of the different substrates quantified by 16S rRNA hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Muetzel, S; Krishnamoorthy, U; Becker, K

    2001-01-01

    Rumen fluid samples from a cow were withdrawn manually from the feed mat (solid phase) or the liquid phase below this mat and incubated in vitro with wheat straw, sorghum hay and a concentrate mixture. From the inoculum and several samples collected during in vitro incubation RNA was extracted to assess microbial population size and structure. RNA content recovered from the solid phase rumen fluid was significantly higher than from the liquid phase. The composition of the microbial population in the solid phase material was characterised by a high proportion of Ruminococci. Neither the proportion of other cell wall degrading organisms (Fibrobacter and Chytridiomycetes) nor the Eukarya and Archaea populations differed between the two sampling sites. Gas production was higher when substrates were incubated with solid phase than with liquid phase rumen fluid regardless of sampling time. However, the higher level of gas production was not accompanied by a corresponding increase in true digestibility. The RNA probes showed that during in vitro incubation with liquid phase rumen fluid, the eukaryotic population was inactive no matter which substrate was used and the activity of methanogens (Archaea) was lower than with solid phase rumen fluid. The population pattern of the cell wall degrading organisms was influenced mainly by the substrate fermented, and to a smaller extent by the inoculum used for in vitro fermentation.

  17. Identification and assignment of base pairs in four helical segments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA and its ribonuclease T1 cleavage fragments by means of 500-MHz proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.H.; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-01-23

    Three different fragments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA have been produced by enzymatic cleavage with ribonuclease T1. Fragment A consists of helices II and III, fragment B contains helix IV, and fragment C contains helix I of the universal 5S rRNA secondary structure. All (eight) imino proton resonances in the downfield region (9-15 ppm) of the 500-MHz proton FT NMR spectrum of fragment B have been identified and assigned as G{sub 80}{center dot}C{sub 92}{center dot}G{sub 81}{center dot}C{sub 91}-G{sub 82}{center dot}C{sub 90}-A{sub 83}{center dot}U{sub 89}-C{sub 84}{center dot}G{sub 88} and three unpaired U's in helix IV by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities. The secondary structure in helix IV of the prokaryotic loop is completely demonstrated spectroscopically for the first time in any native or enzyme-cleaved 5S rRNA. In addition, G{sub 21}{center dot}C{sub 58}-A{sub 20}{center dot}U{sub 59}-G{sub 19}{center dot}C{sub 60}-A{sub 18}{center dot}U{sub 61} in helix II, U{sub 32}{center dot}A{sub 46}-G{sub 31}{center dot}C{sub 47}-C{sub 30}{center dot}G{sub 48}-C{sub 29}{center dot}G{sub 49} in helix III, and G{sub 4}{center dot}C{sub 112}-G{sub 5}{center dot}C{sub 111}-U{sub 6}{center dot}G{sub 110} in the terminal stem (helix I) have been assigned by means of NOE experiments on intact 5S rRNA and its fragments A and C. Base pairs in helices I-IV of the universal secondary structure of B. megaterium 5S RNA are described.

  18. Crustal Seismicity and 3-D Velocity Structure in the Principal Cordillera of Central Chile (33- 34.5 S, 69.5-71 W): Implications on Andean Geodynamic and Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, M.; Monfret, T.; Vera, E.; Yañez, G.; Eisenberg, A.

    2007-12-01

    Based on data from a dense local temporary seismological network, crustal seismicity is characterized, and a 3- D body wave velocity structure is obtained by tomographic inversion down to the subducted slab. In the framework of Fondecyt 1050758, GeoAzur-IRD and ACT-18 projects, 35 broadband and short period instruments, were deployed in the studied zone for 135 days recording in continuous mode. At this zone the Andean active volcanism reappears after a gap of volcanic activity since late Miocene occurring north of 33 S due to the Central Chile flat slab subduction zone. Crustal seismicity in the depth range 0-30 km is well correlated with known geological faults that become now important in the assessment of the regional seismic hazard. This seismicity also clusters around the giant porphyry cooper deposits in the region (Rio Blanco, El Teniente), and are neither related to mine-blasts nor induced by mining activity. Moreover, the local 3-D velocity structure shows that the zone surrounding each deposit is characterized by high Vp/Vs greater than 1.8, which may indicate fluid phases located in the weakest and more fractured zone of the crust. The body wave velocity pattern shown at depth by the local tomography indicates channels of high Vp/Vs connecting the subducted slab with the surface at places where active volcanism is present, suggesting upward migration of hydrous or melted rocks. This pattern agrees with the one observed with a previous regional tomography that includes this zone, while this Vp/Vs pattern tends to be horizontal at the flat slab zone. At depths of 20-25 km, a layer of high Vp/Vs is observed beneath the Andes Cordillera that could be associated to changes in the rheological properties between the upper and lower crust, or to accumulation of magma. The average stress tensor, derived from focal mechanisms, indicate that the Andean zone is under compression in the plate convergence direction.

  19. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status.

  20. Nearly complete rRNA genes assembled from across the metazoan animals: effects of more taxa, a structure-based alignment, and paired-sites evolutionary models on phylogeny reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2010-04-01

    This study (1) uses nearly complete rRNA-gene sequences from across Metazoa (197 taxa) to reconstruct animal phylogeny; (2) presents a highly annotated, manual alignment of these sequences with special reference to rRNA features including paired sites (http://purl.oclc.org/NET/rRNA/Metazoan_alignment) and (3) tests, after eliminating as few disruptive, rogue sequences as possible, if a likelihood framework can recover the main metazoan clades. We found that systematic elimination of approximately 6% of the sequences, including the divergent or unstably placed sequences of cephalopods, arrowworm, symphylan and pauropod myriapods, and of myzostomid and nemertodermatid worms, led to a tree that supported Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa, Protostomia, and Bilateria. Deuterostomia, however, was never recovered, because the rRNA of urochordates goes (nonsignificantly) near the base of the Bilateria. Counterintuitively, when we modeled the evolution of the paired sites, phylogenetic resolution was not increased over traditional tree-building models that assume all sites in rRNA evolve independently. The rRNA genes of non-bilaterians contain a higher % AT than do those of most bilaterians. The rRNA genes of Acoela and Myzostomida were found to be secondarily shortened, AT-enriched, and highly modified, throwing some doubt on the location of these worms at the base of Bilateria in the rRNA tree--especially myzostomids, which other evidence suggests are annelids instead. Other findings are marsupial-with-placental mammals, arrowworms in Ecdysozoa (well supported here but contradicted by morphology), and Placozoa as sister to Cnidaria. Finally, despite the difficulties, the rRNA-gene trees are in strong concordance with trees derived from multiple protein-coding genes in supporting the new animal phylogeny.

  1. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  2. Ultraviolet damage and nucleosome folding of the 5S ribosomal RNA gene.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Mann, David B.; Suquet, C; Springer, David L. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2000-01-25

    The Xenopus borealis somatic 5S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the mutual effects of nucleosome folding and formation of ultraviolet (UV) photoproducts (primarily cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, or CPDs) in chromatin. We analyzed the preferred rotational and translational settings of 5S rDNA on the histone octamer surface after induction of up to 0.8 CPD/nucleosome core (2.5 kJ/m(2) UV dose). DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprints indicate that UV damage at these levels does not affect the average rotational setting of the 5S rDNA molecules. Moreover, a combination of nuclease trimming and restriction enzyme digestion indicates the preferred translational positions of the histone octamer are not affected by this level of UV damage. We also did not observe differences in the UV damage patterns of irradiated 5S rDNA before or after nucleosome formation, indicating there is little difference in the inhibition of nucleosome folding by specific CPD sites in the 5S rRNA gene. Conversely, nucleosome folding significantly restricts CPD formation at all sites in the three helical turns of the nontranscribed strand located in the dyad axis region of the nucleosome, where DNA is bound exclusively by the histone H3-H4 tetramer. Finally, modulation of the CPD distribution in a 14 nt long pyrimidine tract correlates with its rotational setting on the histone surface, when the strong sequence bias for CPD formation in this tract is minimized by normalization. These results help establish the mutual roles of histone binding and UV photoproducts on their formation in chromatin.

  3. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  4. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  5. Chromatin endogenous cleavage and psoralen crosslinking assays to analyze rRNA gene chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griesenbeck, Joachim; Wittner, Manuel; Charton, Romain; Conconi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes co-exist in two different chromatin states: actively transcribed (nucleosome depleted) chromatin, and nontranscribed (nucleosomal) chromatin. The presence of two rRNA gene populations compromises the interpretation of analyses obtained by the standard biochemical methods that are used to study chromatin structure (e.g., nuclease digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation). Here, we provide a protocol to investigate the specific association of proteins with the two rRNA gene chromatin populations in vivo, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote.

  6. Trans-splicing and RNA editing of LSU rRNA in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Kiethega, Georgette N.; Burger, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) often display reduced size and deviant secondary structure, and sometimes are fragmented, as are their corresponding genes. Here we report a mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt-LSU rRNA) with unprecedented features. In the protist Diplonema, the rnl gene is split into two pieces (modules 1 and 2, 534- and 352-nt long) that are encoded by distinct mitochondrial chromosomes, yet the rRNA is continuous. To reconstruct the post-transcriptional maturation pathway of this rRNA, we have catalogued transcript intermediates by deep RNA sequencing and RT-PCR. Gene modules are transcribed separately. Subsequently, transcripts are end-processed, the module-1 transcript is polyuridylated and the module-2 transcript is polyadenylated. The two modules are joined via trans-splicing that retains at the junction ∼26 uridines, resulting in an extent of insertion RNA editing not observed before in any system. The A-tail of trans-spliced molecules is shorter than that of mono-module 2, and completely absent from mitoribosome-associated mt-LSU rRNA. We also characterize putative antisense transcripts. Antisense-mono-modules corroborate bi-directional transcription of chromosomes. Antisense-mt-LSU rRNA, if functional, has the potential of guiding concomitantly trans-splicing and editing of this rRNA. Together, these findings open a window on the investigation of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate multiple and biochemically diverse post-transcriptional events. PMID:24259427

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of the 23S rRNA gene of the Cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S E; Doolittle, W F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Anacystis nidulans 23S rRNA gene, including the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions has been determined. The gene is 2876 nucleotides long and shows higher primary sequence homology to the 23S rRNAs of plastids (84.5%) than to that of E. coli (79%). The predicted rRNA transcript also shares many secondary structural features with those of plastids, reinforcing the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of these organelles. PMID:6326060

  8. [Comparative study of single strand conformation polymorphism of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Gong, L; Zhang, L; Li, S; Zhu, S

    1994-04-01

    A recently developed technique, non-isotopic single strand conformation polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP), was applied to study the conserved feature of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria. The 4.5S RNA gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, using the template DNA extracted respectively from five strains of Escherichia coli and three strains of different genera in Enterobacteriaceae, i.e. Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter aerogenes. The PCR products were then carried out SSCP analysis. The experimental results showed that there seemed to be no detectable differences in the size and single strand conformation of 4.5S RNA genes from above strains, except the negative strand conformation of Enterobacter aerogenes. Thus it can be seen that the secondary structures of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria are quite conservative.

  9. Human-Driven Microbiological Contamination of Benthic and Hyporheic Sediments of an Intermittent Peri-Urban River Assessed from MST and 16S rRNA Genetic Structure Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Romain; Ribun, Sébastien; Aubin, Jean-Baptiste; Colinon, Céline; Petit, Stéphanie; Marjolet, Laurence; Gourmelon, Michèle; Schmitt, Laurent; Breil, Pascal; Cottet, Marylise; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Rivers are often challenged by fecal contaminations. The barrier effect of sediments against fecal bacteria was investigated through the use of a microbial source tracking (MST) toolbox, and by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of V5-V6 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequences. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of V5-V6 16S rRNA gene sequences differentiated bacteriomes according to their compartment of origin i.e., surface water against benthic and hyporheic sediments. Classification of these reads showed the most prevalent operating taxonomic units (OTU) to be allocated to Flavobacterium and Aquabacterium. Relative numbers of Gaiella, Haliangium, and Thermoleophilum OTU matched the observed differentiation of bacteriomes according to river compartments. OTU patterns were found impacted by combined sewer overflows (CSO) through an observed increase in diversity from the sewer to the hyporheic sediments. These changes appeared driven by direct transfers of bacterial contaminants from wastewaters but also by organic inputs favoring previously undetectable bacterial groups among sediments. These NGS datasets appeared more sensitive at tracking community changes than MST markers. The human-specific MST marker HF183 was strictly detected among CSO-impacted surface waters and not river bed sediments. The ruminant-specific DNA marker was more broadly distributed but intense bovine pollution was required to detect transfers from surface water to benthic and hyporheic sediments. Some OTU showed distribution patterns in line with these MST datasets such as those allocated to the Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas. Fecal indicators (Escherichia coli and total thermotolerant coliforms) were detected all over the river course but their concentrations were not correlated with MST ones. Overall, MST and NGS datasets suggested a poor colonization of river sediments by bovine and sewer bacterial contaminants. No environmental outbreak of these bacterial contaminants was

  10. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Carbon-Sulfur Chains: II. C_5S and SC_5S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwirth, Sven; Salomon, Thomas; Dudek, John B.

    2016-06-01

    Unbiased high-resolution infrared survey scans of the ablation products from carbon-sulfur targets in the 2100 to 2150 cm-1 regime reveal two bands previously not observed in the gas phase. On the basis of comparison against laboratory matrix-isolation work and new high-level quantum-chemical calculations these bands are attributed to the linear C_5S and SC_5S clusters. While polar C_5S was studied earlier using Fourier-transform microwave techniques, the present work marks the first gas-phase spectroscopic detection of SC_5S. H. Wang, J. Szczepanski, P. Brucat, and M. Vala 2005, Int. J. Quant. Chem. 102, 795 Y. Kasai, K. Obi, Y. Ohshima, Y. Hirahara, Y. Endo, K. Kawaguchi, and A. Murakami 1993, ApJ 410, L45 V. D. Gordon, M. C. McCarthy, A. J. Apponi, and P. Thaddeus 2001, ApJS 134, 311

  11. Enterococcus faecium PBP5-S/R, the Missing Link between PBP5-S and PBP5-R

    PubMed Central

    Pietta, Ester; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2014-01-01

    During a study to investigate the evolution of ampicillin resistance in Enterococcus faecium, we observed that a number of E. faecium strains, mainly from the recently described subclade A2, showed PBP5 sequences in between PBP5-S and PBP5-R. These hybrid PBP5-S/R patterns reveal a progression of amino acid changes from the S form to the R form of this protein; however, these changes do not strictly correlate with changes in ampicillin MICs. PMID:25182648

  12. Enterococcus faecium PBP5-S/R, the missing link between PBP5-S and PBP5-R.

    PubMed

    Pietta, Ester; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Murray, Barbara E

    2014-11-01

    During a study to investigate the evolution of ampicillin resistance in Enterococcus faecium, we observed that a number of E. faecium strains, mainly from the recently described subclade A2, showed PBP5 sequences in between PBP5-S and PBP5-R. These hybrid PBP5-S/R patterns reveal a progression of amino acid changes from the S form to the R form of this protein; however, these changes do not strictly correlate with changes in ampicillin MICs.

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  14. Origins of the plant chloroplasts and mitochondria based on comparisons of 5S ribosomal RNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delihas, N.; Fox, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, we provide macromolecular comparisons utilizing the 5S ribosomal RNA structure to suggest extant bacteria that are the likely descendants of chloroplast and mitochondria endosymbionts. The genetic stability and near universality of the 5S ribosomal gene allows for a useful means to study ancient evolutionary changes by macromolecular comparisons. The value in current and future ribosomal RNA comparisons is in fine tuning the assignment of ancestors to the organelles and in establishing extant species likely to be descendants of bacteria involved in presumed multiple endosymbiotic events.

  15. Analyzing Digital Library Initiatives: 5S Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isah, Abdulmumin; Mutshewa, Athulang; Serema, Batlang; Kenosi, Lekoko

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the historical development of Digital Libraries (DLs), examines some DL initiatives in developed and developing countries and uses 5S Theory as a lens for analyzing the focused DLs. The analysis shows that present-day systems, in both developed and developing nations, are essentially content and user centric, with low level…

  16. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-07

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  17. Wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA common arm fragment conformations observed by sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The nonexchangeable protons of the common arm fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been observed by means of high-resolution 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in D{sub 2}O solution. Although NMR studies on the exchangeable protons support the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and of the same base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA), only a single conformation is manifested in the {sup 1}H NMR behavior of all of the H6 and H5 pyrimidine and most of the H8/H2 purine protons under the same salt conditions. The nonexchangeable protons near the base-paired helix have been assigned by a sequential strategy. Conformational features such as the presence of a cytidine-uridine (C{center dot}U) pair at the loop-helix junction and base stacking into the hairpin loop are evaluated from nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) data. Double-quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY) experiments show that most of the 26 riboses are in the C3{prime}-endo conformation. Finally, backbone conformational changes induced by Mg{sup 2+} and heating have been monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the common arm RNA segment can assume two conformations which produce distinguishably different NMR environments at the base-pair hydrogen-bond imino protons but not at nonexchangeable base or ribose proton or backbone phosphate sites.

  18. Control of 5S RNA transcription in Xenopus somatic cell chromatin: activation with an oocyte extract.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W F; Bloomer, L S; Gottesfeld, J M

    1983-01-01

    A chromatin fraction enriched for Xenopus 5S RNA genes has been isolated by restriction endonuclease digestion and sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Soluble chromatin sedimenting at 70-80S contains approximately 50% of the oocyte-expressed 5S RNA genes and only 1.5-3% of total chromatin DNA; this represents a 15- to 30-fold purification of the 5S genes. Such chromatin isolated from somatic cells (blood and cultured kidney cells) retains the transcriptionally-inactive state of the oocyte-expressed 5S genes. Soluble chromatin from somatic cells prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion also retains the inactive state of the oocyte-type 5S genes. It is likely that the level of chromatin structure responsible for inactivity of the oocyte genes in somatic cells is the nucleosome or short chains of nucleosomes and not supranucleosomal structures. The oocyte-type genes can be rendered transcriptionally active in somatic cell chromatin either by salt extraction of some chromosomal proteins or by treatment with the ion exchange resin Dowex A50W-X2. Alternatively, activation of these genes can be achieved by incubating somatic cell chromatin or nuclei with an extract prepared from Xenopus oocytes. This effect is not specific for 5S RNA genes as the transcription of other small RNAs (including pre-tRNA) is stimulated by the oocyte extract. The activating factor(s) is resistant to micrococcal nuclease, nondialyzable, heat labile and sensitive to trypsin; thus it is highly likely to be a protein or a group of proteins. Partial purification of the activating factor(s) has been achieved by ion exchange chromatography. Images PMID:6866764

  19. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  20. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  1. Evaluation of the suitability of free-energy minimization using nearest-neighbor energy parameters for RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Kishore J; Cannone, Jamie J; Cobaugh, Christian W; Gutell, Robin R

    2004-01-01

    Background A detailed understanding of an RNA's correct secondary and tertiary structure is crucial to understanding its function and mechanism in the cell. Free energy minimization with energy parameters based on the nearest-neighbor model and comparative analysis are the primary methods for predicting an RNA's secondary structure from its sequence. Version 3.1 of Mfold has been available since 1999. This version contains an expanded sequence dependence of energy parameters and the ability to incorporate coaxial stacking into free energy calculations. We test Mfold 3.1 by performing the largest and most phylogenetically diverse comparison of rRNA and tRNA structures predicted by comparative analysis and Mfold, and we use the results of our tests on 16S and 23S rRNA sequences to assess the improvement between Mfold 2.3 and Mfold 3.1. Results The average prediction accuracy for a 16S or 23S rRNA sequence with Mfold 3.1 is 41%, while the prediction accuracies for the majority of 16S and 23S rRNA structures tested are between 20% and 60%, with some having less than 20% prediction accuracy. The average prediction accuracy was 71% for 5S rRNA and 69% for tRNA. The majority of the 5S rRNA and tRNA sequences have prediction accuracies greater than 60%. The prediction accuracy of 16S rRNA base-pairs decreases exponentially as the number of nucleotides intervening between the 5' and 3' halves of the base-pair increases. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the current set of nearest-neighbor energy parameters in conjunction with the Mfold folding algorithm are unable to consistently and reliably predict an RNA's correct secondary structure. For 16S or 23S rRNA structure prediction, Mfold 3.1 offers little improvement over Mfold 2.3. However, the nearest-neighbor energy parameters do work well for shorter RNA sequences such as tRNA or 5S rRNA, or for larger rRNAs when the contact distance between the base-pairs is less than 100 nucleotides. PMID:15296519

  2. Characterization of the L4-L5-S1 motion segment using the stepwise reduction method.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Héctor Enrique; Puttlitz, Christian M; McGilvray, Kirk; García, José J

    2016-05-03

    The two aims of this study were to generate data for a more accurate calibration of finite element models including the L5-S1 segment, and to find mechanical differences between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments. Then, the range of motion (ROM) and facet forces for the L4-S1 segment were measured using the stepwise reduction method. This consists of sequentially testing and reducing each segment in nine stages by cutting the ligaments, facet capsules, and removing the nucleus. Five L4-S1 human segments (median: 65 years, range: 53-84 years, SD=11.0 years) were loaded under a maximum pure moment of 8Nm. The ROM was measured using stereo-photogrammetry via tracking of three markers and the facet contact forces (CF) were measured using a Tekscan system. The ROM for the L4-L5 segment and all stages showed good agreement with published data. The major differences in ROM between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments were found for lateral bending and all stages, for which the L4-L5 ROM was about 1.5-3 times higher than that of the L5-S1 segment, consistent with L5-S1 facet CF about 1.3 to 4 times higher than those measured for the L4-L5 segment. For the other movements and few stages, the L4-L5 ROM was significantly lower that of the L5-S1 segment. ROM and CF provide important baseline data for more accurate calibration of FE models and to understand the role that their structures play in lower lumbar spine mechanics.

  3. Complete rRNA sequence, arrangement of tandem repeated units and phylogeny of Nosema fumiferanae from spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens).

    PubMed

    Kyei-Poku, George; Gauthier, Debbie; van-Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2012-01-01

    We provide molecular systematics of a microporidian species, Nosema fumiferanae, one of the most common natural enemies of spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana. The uncharacterized flanking region upstream of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA and the complete rRNA cistron of N. fumiferanae was 4,769 bp long. The organization of the rRNA gene was 5'-LSU rRNA-ITS-SSU rRNA-IGS-5S-3' and corresponded primarily to most insect (i.e. lepidopteran) Nosema species identified and classified to date. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete rRNA cistron indicated that N. fumiferanae is closely related to Nosema plutellae and is correctly assigned to the "true" Nosema group. Suggestions were provided on a criterion to delineate the "true" Nosema from other microsporidian species.

  4. The identification of rRNA maturation sites in the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi argues against the full excision of presumed ITS1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Peyretaillade, E; Peyret, P; Metenier, G; Vivares, C P; Prensier, G

    2001-01-01

    In Encephalitozoon cuniculi like in other microsporidia, the primary transcript for SSU and LSU rRNAs includes only one internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) which separates SSU rRNA from the 5.8S region associated with LSU rRNA. The extraction of total RNA from E. cuniculi-infected MRC5 cells using a hot phenol/chloroform procedure enabled us to perform primer extension and S1 nuclease protection experiments in the aim of identifying rRNA maturation sites. Our data support a simple processing (four cleavage sites) with elimination of only nine nucleotides between SSU and LSU rRNA regions. Most of the presumed ITS1 sequence characterized by strain-dependent polymorphism therefore remains linked to SSU rRNA 3' end. A new secondary structure for the sixth domain of E. cuniculi LSU rRNA is proposed following the identification of its 3' terminus.

  5. Revised bond valence parameters for the P+5/S-2 ion pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidey, V.; Shteyfan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The physically reasonable bond valence parameters, r0=2.125 Å and b=0.37 Å, have been derived for the P+5/S-2 ion pair from a representative set of accurately determined low-symmetry thiophosphate structures. These parameters can be recommended for bond valence analysis of thiophosphates as a replacement for the (r0; b) sets previously reported for the same ions.

  6. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  7. Photodissociation dynamics of superexcited O2: Dissociation channels O(5S) vs. O(3S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yiyong; Meng, Qingnan; Mo, Yuxiang

    2014-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of O2, O2 + hυ → O(3P) + O(2p3(4S)3s, 3S/5S), has been studied by combining the XUV laser pump / UV laser probe and velocity map imaging methods in the photon energy range 14.64-15.20 eV. The fragment yield spectra of O(3S) and O(5S) and their velocity map images have been recorded using the state-selective (1+1) REMPI method to detect the fragments. The fragment yield spectra show resolved fine structure that arises from the predissociated Rydberg states I, I' and I″ (3ΠΩ = 0,1,2). The branching ratios between the two decay channels have been measured by one-photon ionization of the fragments O(3S) and O(5S) simultaneously. It is surprising to find that the dissociation cross sections for the production of O(5S) are larger than, or comparable to, those of O(3S) for the I and I' states, while the cross sections for the production of O(5S) are smaller than those of O(3S) for the I″ state. All fragments O(5S) arise from perpendicular transitions, which provides direct experimental evidence about the symmetry assignments of the states I, I' and I″ excited in this energy region. Although most of the fragments O(3S) arise from perpendicular transitions, some of them are from parallel transitions. Based on the calculated ab initio potential energy curves, we propose that the neutral dissociation into O(3P) + O(3S) occurs mainly via the interaction of the Rydberg states I, I', and I″ with the vibrational continuum of the diabatic 83Πu state (1π _u^{ - 1} (a^4 {Π}_u {)3}sσ _g ,^3 Π_u), while the neutral dissociation into O(3P) + O(5S) occurs mainly via the interaction of Rydberg states I, I', and I″ with the diabatic 73Πu (1π _g^{ - 1} (X^2 {Π}_g {)3}p{σ }_u ,^3 Π_u).

  8. The structure of Rpf2–Rrs1 explains its role in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kharde, Satyavati; Calviño, Fabiola R.; Gumiero, Andrea; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is a hierarchical process involving about 200 biogenesis factors and a series of remodeling steps. The 5S RNP consisting of the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and RpL11 is recruited at an early stage, but has to rearrange during maturation of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit. Rpf2 and Rrs1 have been implicated in 5S RNP biogenesis, but their precise role was unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex from Aspergillus nidulans at 1.5 Å resolution and describe it as Brix domain of Rpf2 completed by Rrs1 to form two anticodon-binding domains with functionally important tails. Fitting the X-ray structure into the cryo-EM density of a previously described pre-60S particle correlates with biochemical data. The heterodimer forms specific contacts with the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and the biogenesis factor Rsa4. The flexible protein tails of Rpf2–Rrs1 localize to the central protuberance. Two helices in the Rrs1 C-terminal tail occupy a strategic position to block the rotation of 25S rRNA and the 5S RNP. Our data provide a structural model for 5S RNP recruitment to the pre-60S particle and explain why removal of Rpf2–Rrs1 is necessary for rearrangements to drive 60S maturation. PMID:26117542

  9. rRNA operons and genome size of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', a bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Wulff, N A; Eveillard, S; Foissac, X; Ayres, A J; Bové, J-M

    2009-08-01

    Huanglongbing is one of the most severe diseases of citrus worldwide and is associated with 'Candidatus (Ca.) Liberibacter africanus' in Africa, 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' in Asia and the Americas (Brazil, USA and Cuba) and 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus' (Lam) in Brazil. In the absence of axenic cultures, genetic information on liberibacters is scarce. The sequences of the entire 23S rRNA and 5S rRNA genes from Lam have now been obtained, using a consensus primer designed on known tRNAMet sequences of rhizobia. The size of the Lam genome was determined by PFGE, using Lam-infected periwinkle plants for bacterial enrichment, and was found to be close to 1.31 Mbp. In order to determine the number of ribosomal operons on the Lam genome, probes designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene and the 3' end of the 23S rRNA gene were developed and used for Southern hybridization with I-CeuI-treated genomic DNA. Our results suggest that there are three ribosomal operons in a circular genome. Lam is the first liberibacter species for which such data are available.

  10. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  11. Essential role of conserved DUF177A protein in plastid 23S rRNA accumulation and plant embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiani; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    DUF177 proteins are nearly universally conserved in bacteria and plants except the Chlorophyceae algae. Thus far, duf177 mutants in bacteria have not established a function. In contrast, duf177a mutants have embryo lethal phenotypes in maize and Arabidopsis. In maize inbred W22, duf177a mutant embryos arrest at an early transition stage, whereas the block is suppressed in the B73 inbred background, conditioning an albino seedling phenotype. Background-dependent embryo lethal phenotypes are characteristic of maize plastid gene expression mutants. Consistent with the plastid gene expression hypothesis, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant reduction of 23S rRNA in an Escherichia coli duf177 knockout. Plastid 23S rRNA contents of duf177a mutant tissues were also markedly reduced compared with the wild-type, whereas plastid 16S, 5S, and 4.5S rRNA contents were less affected, indicating that DUF177 is specifically required for accumulation of prokaryote-type 23S rRNA. An AtDUF177A–green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene controlled by the native AtDUF177A promoter fully complemented the Arabidopsis atduf177a mutant. Transient expression of AtDUF177A–GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the protein was localized in chloroplasts. The essential role of DUF177A in chloroplast–ribosome formation is reminiscent of IOJAP, another highly conserved ribosome-associated protein, suggesting that key mechanisms controlling ribosome formation in plastids evolved from non-essential pathways for regulation of the prokaryotic ribosome. PMID:27574185

  12. Phylogenetic origins of the plant mitochondrion based on a comparative analysis of 5S ribosomal RNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, E.; Delihas, N.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.; Gibson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of 5S ribosomal RNAs from Rhodocyclus gelatinosa, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Pseudomonas cepacia were determined. Comparisons of these 5S RNA sequences show that rather than being phylogenetically related to one another, the two photosynthetic bacterial 5S RNAs share more sequence and signature homology with the RNAs of two nonphotosynthetic strains. Rhodobacter sphaeroides is specifically related to Paracoccus denitrificans and Rc. gelatinosa is related to Ps. cepacia. These results support earlier 16S ribosomal RNA studies and add two important groups to the 5S RNA data base. Unique 5S RNA structural features previously found in P. denitrificans are present also in the 5S RNA of Rb. sphaeroides; these provide the basis for subdivisional signatures. The immediate consequence of obtaining these new sequences is that it is possible to clarify the phylogenetic origins of the plant mitochondrion. In particular, a close phylogenetic relationship is found between the plant mitochondria and members of the alpha subdivision of the purple photosynthetic bacteria, namely, Rb. sphaeroides, P. denitrificans, and Rhodospirillum rubrum.

  13. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Valdivia, P.; ...

    2014-09-26

    We report neutron scattering and transport measurements on semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, a compound isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-studied A0.8FeySe2(A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K) superconducting systems. Both resistivity and DC susceptibility measurements reveal a magnetic phase transition at T = 275 K. Neutron diffraction studies show that the 275 K transition originates from a phase with rhombic iron vacancy order which exhibits an in-plane stripe antiferromagnetic ordering below 275 K. In addition, the stripe antiferromagnetic phase interdigitates mesoscopically with an ubiquitous phase with √5 x√5 iron vacancy order. This phase has a magnetic transition at TN = 425 K andmore » an iron vacancy order-disorder transition at TS = 600 K. These two different structural phases are closely similar to those observed in the isomorphous Se materials. Based on the close similarities of the in-plane antiferromagnetic structures, moments sizes, and ordering temperatures in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2 and K0.81Fe1.58Se2, we argue that the in-plane antiferromagnetic order arises from strong coupling between local moments. Superconductivity, previously observed in the A0.8FeySe2₋ zSz system, is absent in A0.8Fe1.5S2, which has a semiconducting ground state. We discuss the implied relationship between stripe and block antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in these materials as well as a strategy for further investigation.« less

  14. Complete modification maps for the cytosolic small and large subunit rRNAs of Euglena gracilis: functional and evolutionary implications of contrasting patterns between the two rRNA components.

    PubMed

    Schnare, Murray N; Gray, Michael W

    2011-10-14

    In the protist Euglena gracilis, the cytosolic small subunit (SSU) rRNA is a single, covalently continuous species typical of most eukaryotes; in contrast, the large subunit (LSU) rRNA is naturally fragmented, comprising 14 separate RNA molecules instead of the bipartite (28S+5.8S) eukaryotic LSU rRNA typically seen. We present extensively revised secondary structure models of the E. gracilis SSU and LSU rRNAs and have mapped the positions of all of the modified nucleosides in these rRNAs (88 in SSU rRNA and 262 in LSU rRNA, with only 3 LSU rRNA modifications incompletely characterized). The relative proportions of ribose-methylated nucleosides and pseudouridine (∼60% and ∼35%, respectively) are closely similar in the two rRNAs; however, whereas the Euglena SSU rRNA has about the same absolute number of modifications as its human counterpart, the Euglena LSU rRNA has twice as many modifications as the corresponding human LSU rRNA. The increased levels of rRNA fragmentation and modification in E. gracilis LSU rRNA are correlated with a 3-fold increase in the level of mispairing in helical regions compared to the human LSU rRNA. In contrast, no comparable increase in mispairing is seen in helical regions of the SSU rRNA compared to its homologs in other eukaryotes. In view of the reported effects of both ribose-methylated nucleoside and pseudouridine residues on RNA structure, these correlations lead us to suggest that increased modification in the LSU rRNA may play a role in stabilizing a 'looser' structure promoted by elevated helical mispairing and a high degree of fragmentation.

  15. An update of the structure and 16S rRNA gene sequence-based definition of higher ranks of the class Actinobacteria, with the proposal of two new suborders and four new families and emended descriptions of the existing higher taxa.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Wen-Jun; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2009-03-01

    The higher ranks of the class Actinobacteria were proposed and described in 1997. At each rank, the taxa were delineated from each other solely on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogenetic clustering and taxon-specific 16S rRNA signature nucleotides. In the past 10 years, many novel members have been assigned to this class while, at the same time, some members have been reclassified. The new 16S rRNA gene sequence information and the changes in phylogenetic positions of some taxa influence decisions about which 16S rRNA nucleotides to define as taxon-specific. As a consequence, the phylogenetic relationships of Actinobacteria at higher levels may need to be reconstructed. Here, we present new 16S rRNA signature nucleotide patterns of taxa above the family level and indicate the affiliation of genera to families. These sets replace the signatures published in 1997. In addition, Actinopolysporineae subord. nov. and Actinopolysporaceae fam. nov. are proposed to accommodate the genus Actinopolyspora, Kineosporiineae subord. nov. and Kineosporiaceae fam. nov. are proposed to accommodate the genera Kineococcus, Kineosporia and Quadrisphaera, Beutenbergiaceae fam. nov. is proposed to accommodate the genera Beutenbergia, Georgenia and Salana and Cryptosporangiaceae fam. nov. is proposed to accommodate the genus Cryptosporangium. The families Nocardiaceae and Gordoniaceae are proposed to be combined in an emended family Nocardiaceae. Emended descriptions are also proposed for most of the other higher taxa.

  16. Chromosomal localization of 5S and 18S-5.8S-25S ribosomal DNA sites in five Asian pines using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-L; Zhang, D; Hong, D-Y; Wang, X-R

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on mitotic metaphase chromosome preparations of five Asian Pinus species: Pinus tabuliformis, Pinus yunnanensis, Pinus densata, Pinus massoniana and Pinus merkusii, using simultaneously DNA probes of the 18S rRNA gene and the 5S rRNA gene including the non-transcribed spacer sequences. The number and location of 18S rDNA sites varied markedly (5-10 pairs of strong signals) among the five pines. A maximum of 20 major 18S rDNA sites was observed in the diploid genome (2n = 24) of P. massoniana. The 5S rDNA FISH pattern was less variable, with one major site and one minor site commonly observed in each species. The differentiation of rDNA sites on chromosomes among the five pines correlates well with their phylogenic positions in Pinus as reconstructed from other molecular data. P. densata, a species of hybrid origin, resembles its parents ( P. tabuliformis and P. yunnanensis), including some components characteristic of each parent in its pattern. However, the species is unique, showing new features resulting possibly from recombination and genome reorganization.

  17. rRNA Binding Sites and the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Tetracyclines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics are known to be effective in the treatment of both infectious and noninfectious disease conditions. The 16S rRNA binding mechanism currently held for the antibacterial action of the tetracyclines does not explain their activity against viruses, protozoa that lack mitochondria, and noninfectious conditions. Also, the mechanism by which the tetracyclines selectively inhibit microbial protein synthesis against host eukaryotic protein synthesis despite conservation of ribosome structure and functions is still questionable. Many studies have investigated the binding of the tetracyclines to the 16S rRNA using the small ribosomal subunit of different bacterial species, but there seems to be no agreement between various reports on the exact binding site on the 16S rRNA. The wide range of activity of the tetracyclines against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens, viruses, protozoa, and helminths, as well as noninfectious conditions, indicates a more generalized effect on RNA. In the light of recent evidence that the tetracyclines bind to various synthetic double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) of random base sequences, suggesting that the double-stranded structures may play a more important role in the binding of the tetracyclines to RNA than the specific base pairs, as earlier speculated, it is imperative to consider possible alternative binding modes or sites that could help explain the mechanisms of action of the tetracyclines against various pathogens and disease conditions. PMID:27246781

  18. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  19. Control of rRNA transcription in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1995-01-01

    The control of rRNA synthesis in response to both extra- and intracellular signals has been a subject of interest to microbial physiologists for nearly four decades, beginning with the observations that Salmonella typhimurium cells grown on rich medium are larger and contain more RNA than those grown on poor medium. This was followed shortly by the discovery of the stringent response in Escherichia coli, which has continued to be the organism of choice for the study of rRNA synthesis. In this review, we summarize four general areas of E. coli rRNA transcription control: stringent control, growth rate regulation, upstream activation, and anti-termination. We also cite similar mechanisms in other bacteria and eukaryotes. The separation of growth rate-dependent control of rRNA synthesis from stringent control continues to be a subject of controversy. One model holds that the nucleotide ppGpp is the key effector for both mechanisms, while another school holds that it is unlikely that ppGpp or any other single effector is solely responsible for growth rate-dependent control. Recent studies on activation of rRNA synthesis by cis-acting upstream sequences has led to the discovery of a new class of promoters that make contact with RNA polymerase at a third position, called the UP element, in addition to the well-known -10 and -35 regions. Lastly, clues as to the role of antitermination in rRNA operons have begun to appear. Transcription complexes modified at the antiterminator site appear to elongate faster and are resistant to the inhibitory effects of ppGpp during the stringent response. PMID:8531889

  20. Superconducting H5S2 phase in sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Shimizu, Katsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, hydrogen sulfide was experimentally found to show the high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) under high-pressure. The superconducting Tc shows 30–70 K in pressure range of 100–170 GPa (low-Tc phase) and increases to 203 K, which sets a record for the highest Tc in all materials, for the samples annealed by heating it to room temperature at pressures above 150 GPa (high-Tc phase). Here we present a solid H5S2 phase predicted as the low-Tc phase by the application of the genetic algorithm technique for crystal structure searching and first-principles calculations to sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure. The H5S2 phase is thermodynamically stabilized at 110 GPa, in which asymmetric hydrogen bonds are formed between H2S and H3S molecules. Calculated Tc values show 50–70 K in pressure range of 100–150 GPa within the harmonic approximation, which can reproduce the experimentally observed low-Tc phase. These findings give a new aspect of the excellent superconductivity in compressed sulfur-hydrogen system. PMID:26983593

  1. Superconducting H5S2 phase in sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Shimizu, Katsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2016-03-01

    Recently, hydrogen sulfide was experimentally found to show the high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) under high-pressure. The superconducting Tc shows 30–70 K in pressure range of 100–170 GPa (low-Tc phase) and increases to 203 K, which sets a record for the highest Tc in all materials, for the samples annealed by heating it to room temperature at pressures above 150 GPa (high-Tc phase). Here we present a solid H5S2 phase predicted as the low-Tc phase by the application of the genetic algorithm technique for crystal structure searching and first-principles calculations to sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure. The H5S2 phase is thermodynamically stabilized at 110 GPa, in which asymmetric hydrogen bonds are formed between H2S and H3S molecules. Calculated Tc values show 50–70 K in pressure range of 100–150 GPa within the harmonic approximation, which can reproduce the experimentally observed low-Tc phase. These findings give a new aspect of the excellent superconductivity in compressed sulfur-hydrogen system.

  2. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  3. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  4. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  5. GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Sun, Liang; Zong, Ling; Wu, Xuan; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Chang; Cao, Hui; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sudden deafness. However, the specific genes involved are largely unknown. We sought to explore the frequency of GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in patients with sudden deafness. Between September 2011 and May 2012, 62 consecutive patients with sudden deafness were seen. In 50 of these, no etiological factors for sudden deafness were found. We detected GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants by direct sequencing in these 50 patients and in 53-aged matched controls with normal hearing. In addition, we undertook functional analyses of the mitochondrial mutations which we detected, applying structural and phylogenetic analysis. GJB2 sequencing identified six mutations, including three pathogenic mutations (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, c.109G>A) and three polymorphisms, in the study participants, giving an allele frequency of 15.0 %. A homozygous c.109G>A mutation was detected in two participants. A total of 16 variants in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene were identified in the participants. No significant differences were found in GJB2 heterozygosity or in mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants between patients with sudden deafness and in controls. Our results suggest that the homozygous GJB2 c.109G>A mutation may be a cause of sudden deafness involving both ears. This finding should increase awareness of the likely role of genetic factors in the etiology of sudden deafness in general.

  6. Crystal structures of di­iodido­bis­[(1S,5S)-4-mesityl-1,2,8,8-tetra­methyl-2,4-di­aza­bicyclo­[3.2.1]octan-3-yl­idene-κC 3]palladium(IV) and di­chlorido­[(1S,5S)-4-mesityl-1,2,8,8-tetra­methyl-2,4-di­aza­bicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-yl­idene-κC 3](tri­phenyl­phosphane-κP)palladium(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Eduard; Flörke, Ulrich; Wilhelm, René

    2015-01-01

    The mol­ecular structures of the chiral title compounds, [Pd(C19H28N2)2I2], (I), and [Pd(C19H28N2)Cl2(C18H15P)], (II), show a distorted square-planar coordination around the PdII atoms with two halogenide (Hal) ligands each and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands in (I) or one NHC and one tri­phenyl­phosphane ligand in (II). The deviations of the PdII atoms from the L 2Hal2 best plane (L = NHC or tri­phenyl­phosphane ligand) are 0.206 (1) Å for (I) and 0.052 (1) Å for (II). The crystal packings exhibit inter­molecular C—H⋯Hal hydrogen bonds. PMID:26396755

  7. Sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of 5-S-cysteinyldopamine, 5-S-cysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 5-S-cysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Fornstedt-Wallin, B; Bergh, I

    1995-01-06

    A new HPLC method for the determination of 5-S-cysteinylcatechols has been developed. The alumina adsorbed fraction of the supernatant of brain homogenate was injected onto a reversed-phase column and a citrate-phosphate buffer containing 1-nonyl sulphate was used as mobile phase (pH 2.1). Two dual-series working electrodes of a thin-layer cell were operating together, joined by a special coupler. The assay allows determination of the 5-S-cysteinylcatechols in the striatum, limbic system and mesencephalon of one guinea pig. Recoveries of the three 5-S-cysteinylcatechols were 59-76%, whereas the limit of quantitation was 0.04-0.10 pmol. The coefficient of variation was less than 0.76-1.10% and linearity was found up to a concentration of 500 pmol. By adding ascorbic acid to the samples, artifacts resulting in HPLC peaks were either reduced in size or deleted.

  8. An Escherichia coli strain with all chromosomal rRNA operons inactivated: complete exchange of rRNA genes between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Zaporojets, D; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1999-03-02

    Current global phylogenies are built predominantly on rRNA sequences. However, an experimental system for studying the evolution of rRNA is not readily available, mainly because the rRNA genes are highly repeated in most experimental organisms. We have constructed an Escherichia coli strain in which all seven chromosomal rRNA operons are inactivated by deletions spanning the 16S and 23S coding regions. A single E. coli rRNA operon carried by a multicopy plasmid supplies 16S and 23S rRNA to the cell. By using this strain we have succeeded in creating microorganisms that contain only a foreign rRNA operon derived from either Salmonella typhimurium or Proteus vulgaris, microorganisms that have diverged from E. coli about 120-350 million years ago. We also were able to replace the E. coli rRNA operon with an E. coli/yeast hybrid one in which the GTPase center of E. coli 23S rRNA had been substituted by the corresponding domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that, contrary to common belief, coevolution of rRNA with many other components in the translational machinery may not completely preclude the horizontal transfer of rRNA genes.

  9. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kharrat-Souissi, Amina; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Pustahija, Fatima; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae) is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x) with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA) for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S), displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level). For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes. PMID:24260668

  10. R4, a non-LTR retrotransposon specific to the large subunit rRNA genes of nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, W D; Müller, F; Eickbush, T H

    1995-01-01

    A 4.7 kb sequence-specific insertion in the 26S ribosomal RNA gene of Ascaris lumbricoides, named R4, is shown to be a non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposable element. The R4 element inserts at a site in the large subunit rRNA gene which is midway between two other sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposable elements, R1 and R2, found in most insect species. Based on the structure of its open reading frame and the sequence of its reverse transcriptase domain, R4 elements do not appear to be a family of R1 or R2 elements that have changed their insertion site. R4 is most similar in structure and in sequence to the element Dong, which is not specialized for insertion into rRNA units. Thus R4 represents a separate non-LTR retrotransposable element that has become specialized for insertion in the rRNA genes of its host. Using oligonucleotide primers directed to a conserved region of the reverse transcriptase encoding domain, insertions in the R4 site were also amplified from Parascaris equorum and Haemonchus contortus. Why several non-LTR retrotransposable elements have become specialized for insertion into a short (87 bp) region of the large subunit rRNA gene is discussed. PMID:8524653

  11. 5-S-GAD, a novel radical scavenging compound, prevents lens opacity development.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Umeda, Izumi O; Sogo, Shunji; Nishigori, Hideo; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Natori, Shunji

    2009-02-15

    The ability of N-beta-alanyl-5-S-glutathionyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (5-S-GAD)-a novel catechol derivative isolated from an insect as an antibacterial substance-to scavenge free radicals and prevent cataract progression was examined. 5-S-GAD scavenged 1,1-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anions (O(2)(*)(-)), and inhibited lipid peroxidation. It also significantly inhibited the onset of glucocorticoid-induced lens opacification in chick embryos. These effects of 5-S-GAD were stronger than those of N-acetylcarnosine and TEMPOL, which are reported to be effective radical scavengers in the prevention of cataract progression. 5-S-GAD clearly delayed the maturation of cataracts induced by diamide in cultured lenses of rats. Daily instillation of 5-S-GAD retarded the development of lens opacity in galactose-fed rats. Biochemical analysis of the lenses revealed that 20-kDa proteins, presumably consisting of alpha-crystallin, were the most susceptible to oxidative stress, which leads to the carbonylation of the side chains of these proteins. alpha-Crystallin carbonylation induced by diamide or galactose was notably inhibited by 5-S-GAD in a dose-dependent manner. Our results show that 5-S-GAD prevents acute lens opacification in these short-term experimental models, possibly in part by virtue of its antioxidative property, and 5-S-GAD is expected to have long-term pharmaceutical effects.

  12. 8 CFR 1236.4 - Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants... OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Detention of Aliens Prior to Order of Removal § 1236.4 Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants. (a) Condition of classification. As a condition of classification and...

  13. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  14. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K. Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  15. The 5S lean method as a tool of industrial management performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, F. C.; Marascu-Klein, V.

    2015-11-01

    Implementing the 5S (seiri, seiton, seiso, seiketsu, and shitsuke) method is carried out through a significant study whose purpose to analyse and deployment the management performance in order to emphasize the problems and working mistakes, reducing waste (stationary and waiting times), flow transparency, storage areas by properly marking and labelling, establishing standards work (everyone knows exactly where are the necessary things), safety and ergonomic working places (the health of all employees). The study describes the impact of the 5S lean method implemented to storing, cleaning, developing and sustaining a production working place from an industrial company. In order to check and sustain the 5S process, it is needed to use an internal audit, called “5S audit”. Implementing the 5S methodology requires organization and safety of the working process, properly marking and labelling of the working place, and audits to establish the work in progress and to maintain the improved activities.

  16. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  17. The specific isolation of complete 5S rDNA units from chromosome 1A of hexaploid, tetraploid, and diploid wheat species using PCR with head-to-head oriented primers.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, S; Stappen, J V; Volckaert, G

    2001-08-01

    The presence of 5S rDNA units on chromosome 1A of Triticum aestivum was shown by the development of a specific PCR test, using head-to-head oriented primers. This primer set allowed the amplification of complete 5S DNA units and was used to isolate SS-Rrna-A1 sequences from polyploid and diploid wheat species. Multiple-alignment and parsimony analyses of the 132 sequences divided the sequences into four types. The isolates from T. aestivum and the tetraploid species (T. dicoccoides, T. dicoccum, T durum, T. araraticum, and T timopheevi) were all of one type, which was shown to be closely related to the type mainly characteristic for T. urartu. The other two types were isolated exclusively from the diploid species T. monococcum, T aegilopoides, T. thaoudar, and T. sinskajae and the hexaploid species T. zhukovski. Triticum monococcum was the only species for which representatives of each of the four sequence types were found to be present. Further, we discuss the possible multicluster arrangement of the 5S-Rrna-A1 array.

  18. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  19. Mouse nucleolin binds to 4.5S RNAH, a small noncoding RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Yutaka Harada, Fumio

    2008-01-04

    4.5S RNAH is a rodent-specific small noncoding RNA that exhibits extensive homology to the B1 short interspersed element. Although 4.5S RNAH is known to associate with cellular poly(A)-terminated RNAs and retroviral genomic RNAs, its function remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed 4.5S RNAH-binding proteins in mouse nuclear extracts using gel mobility shift and RNA-protein UV cross-linking assays. We found that at least nine distinct polypeptides (p170, p110, p93, p70, p48, p40, p34, p20, and p16.5) specifically interacted with 4.5S RNAHin vitro. Using anti-La antibody, p48 was identified as mouse La protein. To identify the other 4.5S RNAH-binding proteins, we performed expression cloning from a mouse cDNA library and obtained cDNA clones derived from nucleolin mRNA. We identified p110 as nucleolin using nucleolin-specific antibodies. UV cross-linking analysis using various deletion mutants of nucleolin indicated that the third of four tandem RNA recognition motifs is a major determinant for 4.5S RNAH recognition. Immunoprecipitation of nucleolin from the subcellular fractions of mouse cell extracts revealed that a portion of the endogenous 4.5S RNAH was associated with nucleolin and that this complex was located in both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus.

  20. Low-molecular-weight (4.5S) ribonucleic acid in higher-plant chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfeld, P R; Leaver, C J; Bottomley, W; Atchison, B

    1978-01-01

    A species of RNA that migrates on 10% (w/v) polyacrylamide gels between 5S and 4S RNA was detected in spinach chloroplasts. This RNA (referred to as 4.5 S RNA) was present in amounts equimolar to the 5S RNA and its molecular weight was estimated to be approx. 33 000. Fractionation of the chloroplast components showed that the 4.5S RNA was associated with the 50 S ribosomal subunit and that it could be removed by washing the ribosomes with a buffer containing 0.01 M-EDTA and 0.5 M-KCl. It did not appear to be a cleavage product of the labile 23 S RNA of spinach chloroplast ribosomes. When 125I-labelled 4.5 S RNA was hybridized to fragments of spinach chloroplast DNA produced by SmaI restriction endonuclease, a single fragment (mol.wt. 1.15 times 10(6)) became labelled. The same DNA fragment also hybridized to chloroplast 5 S RNA and part of the 23 S RNA. It was concluded that the coding sequence for 4.5 S RNA was part of, or immediately adjacent to, the rRNA-gene region in chloroplast DNA . A comparable RNA species was observed in chloroplasts of tobacco and pea leaves. Images Fig. 8. PMID:743229

  1. Survival Rates and Risk Factors for Cephalad and L5-S1 Adjacent Segment Degeneration after L5 Floating Lumbar Fusion : A Minimum 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Seung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the L5-S1 has distinct structural features in comparison with other lumbar spine segments, not much is known about adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at the L5-S1 segment. The aim of study was to compare the incidence and character of ASD of the cephalad and L5-S1 segments after L5 floating lumbar fusion. Methods From 2005 to 2010, 115 patients who underwent L5 floating lumber fusion were investigated. The mean follow-up period was 46.1 months. The incidence of radiological and clinical ASD of the cephalad and the L5-S1 segments was compared using survival analysis. Risk factors affecting ASD were analyzed using a log rank test and the Cox proportional hazard model. Results Radiological ASD of the L5-S1 segment had a statistically significant higher survival rate than that of the cephalad segment (p=0.001). However, clinical ASD of the L5-S1 segment was significantly lower survival rates than that of the cephalad segment (p=0.038). Risk factor analysis showed that disc degeneration of the cephalad segment and preoperative spinal stenosis of the L5-S1 segment were risk factors. Conclusion In L5 floating fusion, radiological ASD was more common in the cephalad segment and clinical ASD was more common in the L5-S1 segment. At the L5-S1 segment, the degree of spinal stenosis appears to be the most influential risk factor in ASD incidences, unlike the cephalad segment. PMID:25733991

  2. Physical mapping of 5S and 45S rDNA loci in pufferfishes (Tetraodontiformes).

    PubMed

    Noleto, Rafael Bueno; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Cipriano, Roger Raupp; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2007-06-01

    Chromosomal features, location and variation of the major and minor rDNA genes cluster were studied in three pufferfish species: Sphoeroides greeleyi and Sphoeroides testudineus (Tetraodontidae) and Cyclichthys spinosus (Diodontidae). The location of the major rDNA was revealed with an 18S probe in two loci for all species. The minor rDNA loci (5S rDNA) was found in one chromosome pair in tetraodontid fishes and four sites located on two distinct chromosomal pairs in C. spinosus. A syntenical organization was not observed among the ribosomal genes. Signal homogeneity for GC/AT-DNA specific fluorochromes was observed in diodontid fish except in the NORs regions, which were CMA3-positive. Giemsa karyotypes of tetraodontid species presents 2n=46, having the same diploid value of other Sphoeroides species that have been investigated. On the other hand, the karyotype of C. spinosus, described for the first time, shows 2n=50 chromosomes (4m+18sm+12st+16a). The foreknowledge of the karyotypic structure of this group and also the physical mapping of certain genes could be very helpful for further DNA sequence analysis.

  3. Mutational Evidence for a Functional Connection between Two Domains of 23S rRNA in Translation Termination

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, Alexey L.; Hedenstierna, Klas O. F.; Murgola, Emanuel J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide 1093 in domain II of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA is part of a highly conserved structure historically referred to as the GTPase center. The mutation G1093A was previously shown to cause readthrough of nonsense codons and high temperature-conditional lethality. Defects in translation termination caused by this mutation have also been demonstrated in vitro. To identify sites in 23S rRNA that may be functionally associated with the G1093 region during termination, we selected for secondary mutations in 23S rRNA that would compensate for the temperature-conditional lethality caused by G1093A. Here we report the isolation and characterization of such a secondary mutation. The mutation is a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides from helix 73 in domain V, close to the peptidyltransferase center. The deletion results in a shortening of the CGCG sequence between positions 2045 and 2048 by two nucleotides to CG. In addition to restoring viability in the presence of G1093A, this deletion dramatically decreased readthrough of UGA nonsense mutations caused by G1093A. An analysis of the amount of mutant rRNA in polysomes revealed that this decrease cannot be explained by an inability of G1093A-containing rRNA to be incorporated into polysomes. Furthermore, the deletion was found to cause UGA readthrough on its own, thereby implicating helix 73 in termination for the first time. These results also indicate the existence of a functional connection between the G1093 region and helix 73 during translation termination. PMID:12193621

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-10-28

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels.

  5. 104. JOB NO. 1347F, SHEET 5S 1927, ASSEMBLY BUILDING; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. JOB NO. 1347-F, SHEET 5S 1927, ASSEMBLY BUILDING; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; LONGITUDINAL SECTION AND TRUSS DETAILS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Hyperfine splitting of B mesons and Bs production at the Υ(5S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Franzini, J.; Heintz, U.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Narain, M.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.

    1990-12-01

    Using the Columbia University-Stony Brook (CUSB-II) detector we have studied the inclusive photon spectrum from 2.9×104 Υ(5S) decays. We observe a strong signal due to B*-->Bγ decays. From this we obtain (i) the average B*-B mass difference, 46.7+/-0.4 MeV, (ii) the photon yield per Υ(5S) decay, <γ/Υ(5S)>=1.09+/-0.06, and (iii) the average velocity of the B*'s, <β>=0.156+/-0.010, for a mix of nonstrange (B) and strange (Bs) B* mesons from Υ(5S) decays. From the shape of the photon line, we find that both B and Bs mesons are produced with nearly equal values for the hyperfine splitting of the B and Bs meson systems.

  7. [Implementation of "5S" methodology in laboratory safety and its effect on employee satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Dogan, Yavuz; Ozkutuk, Aydan; Dogan, Ozlem

    2014-04-01

    Health institutions use the accreditation process to achieve improvement across the organization and management of the health care system. An ISO 15189 quality and efficiency standard is the recommended standard for medical laboratories qualification. The "safety and accommodation conditions" of this standard covers the requirement to improve working conditions and maintain the necessary safety precautions. The most inevitable precaution for ensuring a safe environment is the creation of a clean and orderly environment to maintain a potentially safe surroundings. In this context, the 5S application which is a superior improvement tool that has been used by the industry, includes some advantages such as encouraging employees to participate in and to help increase the productivity. The main target of this study was to implement 5S methods in a clinical laboratory of a university hospital for evaluating its effect on employees' satisfaction, and correction of non-compliance in terms of the working environment. To start with, first, 5S education was given to management and employees. Secondly, a 5S team was formed and then the main steps of 5S (Seiri: Sort, Seiton: Set in order, Seiso: Shine, Seiketsu: Standardize, and Shitsuke: Systematize) were implemented for a duration of 3 months. A five-point likert scale questionnaire was used in order to determine and assess the impact of 5S on employees' satisfaction considering the areas such as facilitating the job, the job satisfaction, setting up a safe environment, and the effect of participation in management. Questionnaire form was given to 114 employees who actively worked during the 5S implementation period, and the data obtained from 63 (52.3%) participants (16 male, 47 female) were evaluated. The reliability of the questionnaire's Cronbach's alpha value was determined as 0.858 (p< 0.001). After the implementation of 5S it was observed and determined that facilitating the job and setting up a safe environment created

  8. Absolute frequency measurement of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions.

    PubMed

    Morzyński, Piotr; Wcisło, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafał; Gawlik, Wojciech; Masłowski, Piotr; Nagórny, Bartłomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czesław; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2013-11-15

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm), insensitive to first-order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yielded more accurate transition frequencies than previously reported.

  9. 8 CFR 236.4 - Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants... of Aliens Prior to Order of Removal § 236.4 Removal of S-5, S-6, and S-7 nonimmigrants. (a) Condition... section 101(a)(15)(S) of the Act, nonimmigrants in S classification must have executed Form I-854, Part...

  10. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  11. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  12. One-stage surgery through posterior approach-for L5-S1 spondyloptosis

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Celikoglu, Erhan; Borekcı, Ali; Hıcdonmez, Tufan; Suslu, Hüsnü

    2011-01-01

    Grade 5 spondylolisthesis or spondyloptosis is a rare condition. Generally, the surgical management of spondyloptosis includes multi-staged procedures instead of one-staged procedures. One-stage treatment for spondyloptosis is very rare. A 15-year-old girl with L5-S1 spondyloptosis was admitted with severe low back pain. There was no history of trauma. The patient underwent L5 laminectomy, L5-S1 discectomy, resection of sacral dome, reduction, L3-L4-L5-S1 pedicular screw fixation, and interbody-posterolateral fusion through the posterior approach. The reduction was maintained with bilateral L5-S1 discectomy, resection of the sacral dome, and transpedicular instrumentation from L3 to S1. In this particular case, one-staged approach was adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis. One-staged surgery using the posterior approach may be adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis while avoiding the risks inherent in anterior approaches. PMID:23125496

  13. Archaea box C/D enzymes methylate two distinct substrate rRNA sequences with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Graziadei, Andrea; Masiewicz, Pawel; Lapinaite, Audrone; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    RNA modifications confer complexity to the 4-nucleotide polymer; nevertheless, their exact function is mostly unknown. rRNA 2'-O-ribose methylation concentrates to ribosome functional sites and is important for ribosome biogenesis. The methyl group is transferred to rRNA by the box C/D RNPs: The rRNA sequence to be methylated is recognized by a complementary sequence on the guide RNA, which is part of the enzyme. In contrast to their eukaryotic homologs, archaeal box C/D enzymes can be assembled in vitro and are used to study the mechanism of 2'-O-ribose methylation. In Archaea, each guide RNA directs methylation to two distinct rRNA sequences, posing the question whether this dual architecture of the enzyme has a regulatory role. Here we use methylation assays and low-resolution structural analysis with small-angle X-ray scattering to study the methylation reaction guided by the sR26 guide RNA fromPyrococcus furiosus We find that the methylation efficacy at sites D and D' differ substantially, with substrate D' turning over more efficiently than substrate D. This observation correlates well with structural data: The scattering profile of the box C/D RNP half-loaded with substrate D' is similar to that of the holo complex, which has the highest activity. Unexpectedly, the guide RNA secondary structure is not responsible for the functional difference at the D and D' sites. Instead, this difference is recapitulated by the nature of the first base pair of the guide-substrate duplex. We suggest that substrate turnover may occur through a zip mechanism that initiates at the 5'-end of the product.

  14. One-pot synthesis and visible light photocatalytic activity of monodispersed AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangqing; Wang, Lei; Wei, Dailong; Kang, Shizhao; Mu, Jin

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Monodispersed AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres were prepared in a one-pot process. ► The process is environmental friendly. ► The AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres display high photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: Monodispersed AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres were synthesized using a one-pot solution method and characterized with X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm. The results indicated that the AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres were of cubic spinel structure and the mean diameter of about 0.5 μm. In addition, the visible light photocatalytic activity of AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres was also investigated at room temperature. The AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} microspheres showed very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methyl orange with a degradation efficiency of about 98% under visible light irradiation for 20 min.

  15. Early evolutionary colocalization of the nuclear ribosomal 5S and 45S gene families in seed plants: evidence from the living fossil gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Galián, J A; Rosato, M; Rosselló, J A

    2012-01-01

    In seed plants, the colocalization of the 5S loci within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the nuclear 45S tandem units is restricted to the phylogenetically derived Asteraceae family. However, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) colocalization of both multigene families has also been observed in other unrelated seed plant lineages. Previous work has identified colocalization of 45S and 5S loci in Ginkgo biloba using FISH, but these observations have not been confirmed recently by sequencing a 1.8 kb IGS. In this work, we report the presence of the 45S–5S linkage in G. biloba, suggesting that in seed plants the molecular events leading to the restructuring of the ribosomal loci are much older than estimated previously. We obtained a 6.0 kb IGS fragment showing structural features of functional sequences, and a single copy of the 5S gene was inserted in the same direction of transcription as the ribosomal RNA genes. We also obtained a 1.8 kb IGS that was a truncate variant of the 6.0 kb IGS lacking the 5S gene. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the 1.8 kb variants are pseudogenes that are present exclusively on the satellite chromosomes bearing the 45S–5S genes. The presence of ribosomal IGS pseudogenes best reconciles contradictory results concerning the presence or absence of the 45S–5S linkage in Ginkgo. Our finding that both ribosomal gene families have been unified to a single 45S–5S unit in Ginkgo indicates that an accurate reassessment of the organization of rDNA genes in basal seed plants is necessary. PMID:22354111

  16. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  17. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  18. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  19. The "DEAD box" protein DbpA interacts specifically with the peptidyltransferase center in 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, S M; Fuller-Pace, F V

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box protein DbpA is a putative RNA helicase and established RNA-dependent ATPase and is the only member of the DEAD box protein family for which a specific RNA substrate, bacterial 23S rRNA, has been identified. We have investigated the nature of this specificity in depth and have localized by deletion mutagenesis and PCR a single region of 93 bases (bases 2496-2588) in 23S rRNA that is both necessary and sufficient for complete activation of ATPase activity of DbpA. This target region forms part of the peptidyltransferase center and includes many bases involved in interaction with the 3' terminal adenosines of both A- and P-site tRNAs. Deletion of stem loops within the 93-base segment abolished ATPase activation. Similarly, point mutations that disrupt base pairing within stem structures ablated stimulation of ATPase activity. These data are consistent with roles for DbpA either in establishing and/or maintaining the correct three-dimensional structure of the peptidyltransferase center in 23S rRNA during ribosome assembly or in the peptidyltransferase reaction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8524828

  20. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  1. Typification of virulent and low virulence Babesia bigemina clones by 18S rRNA and rap-1c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C; Baravalle, M E; Valentini, B; Mangold, A; Torioni de Echaide, S; Ruybal, P; Farber, M; Echaide, I

    2014-06-01

    The population structure of original Babesia bigemina isolates and reference strains with a defined phenotypic profile was assessed using 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes. Two reference strains, BbiS2P-c (virulent) and BbiS1A-c (low virulence), were biologically cloned in vitro. The virulence profile of the strains and clones was assessed in vivo. One fully virulent and one low-virulence clone were mixed in identical proportions to evaluate their growth efficiency in vitro. Each clone was differentiated by two microsatellites and the gene gp45. The 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes sequences from B. bigemina biological clones and their parental strains, multiplied exclusively in vivo or in vitro, were compared with strain JG-29. The virulence of clones derived from the BbiS2P-c strain was variable. Virulent clone Bbi9P1 grew more efficiently in vitro than did the low-virulence clone Bbi2A1. The haplotypes generated by the nucleotide polymorphism, localized in the V4 region of the 18S rRNA, allowed the identification of three genotypes. The rap-1c haplotypes allowed defining four genotypes. Parental and original strains were defined by multiple haplotypes identified in both genes. The rap-1c gene, analyzed by high-resolution melting (HRM), allowed discrimination between two genotypes according to their phenotype, and both were different from JG-29. B. bigemina biological clones made it possible to define the population structure of isolates and strains. The polymorphic regions of the 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes allowed the identification of different subpopulations within original B. bigemina isolates by the definition of several haplotypes and the differentiation of fully virulent from low virulence clones.

  2. Intragenomic and interspecific 5S rDNA sequence variation in five Asian pines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Daming; Wang, Xiao-Quan; Ma, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    Patterns of intragenomic and interspecific variation of 5S rDNA in Pinus (Pinaceae) were studied by cloning and sequencing multiple 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees. Five pines, from both subgenera, Pinus and Strobus, were selected. The 5S rDNA repeat in pines has a conserved 120-base pair (bp) transcribed region and an intergenic spacer region of variable length (382-608 bp). The evolutionary rate in the spacer region is three- to sevenfold higher than in the genic region. We found substantial sequence divergence between the two subgenera. Intragenomic sequence heterogeneity was high for all species, and more than 86% of the clones within each individual were unique. The 5S gene tree revealed that different 5S repeats within individuals are polyphyletic, indicating that their ancestral divergence preceded the speciation events. The degrees of interspecific and intragenomic divergence among diploxylon pines are similar. The observed sequence patterns suggest that concerted evolution has been acting after the diversification of the two subgenera but very weak after the speciation of the four diploxylon pines. Sequence patterns in P. densata are consistent with hybrid origin. It had higher intragenomic diversity and maintained polymorphic copies of the parental types in addition to new and recombinant types unique to the hybrid.

  3. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  4. Species identification through mitochondrial rRNA genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Tan, Zongqing; Wang, Daren; Xue, Ling; Guan, Min-xin; Huang, Taosheng; Li, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Inter-species and intraspecific variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were observed in a bioinformatics analysis of the mitochondrial genomic sequences of 11 animal species. Some highly conserved regions were identified in the mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of these species. To test whether these sequences are universally conserved, primers were designed to target the conserved regions of these two genes and were used to amplify DNA from 21 animal tissues, including two of unknown origin. By sequencing these PCR amplicons and aligning the sequences to a database of non-redundant nucleotide sequences, it was confirmed that these amplicons aligned specifically to mtDNA sequences from the expected species of origin. This molecular technique, when combined with bioinformatics, provides a reliable method for the taxonomic classification of animal tissues. PMID:24522485

  5. B semileptonic decays at the Υ(4S) and the Υ(5S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, C.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Narain, M.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.

    1991-05-01

    B-meson semileptonic decay spectra have been obtained at the Υ(4S) and at the Υ(5S) at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring with the Columbia University-Stony Brook detector. The branching ratio for B-->eνX at the Υ(4S) is found to be (10.0+/-0.5)%. The electron spectrum of B-->eνX at the Υ(5S) is observed for the first time and the average branching ratio of B,Bs-->eνX is consistent with that for B's from Υ(4S) decays. The shape of the electron spectrum at the Υ(5S) indicates production of B mesons which are heavier than nonstrange B's, presumably strange B's.

  6. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  7. Molecular evolution inferred from small subunit rRNA sequences: what does it tell us about phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy of the parabasalids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viscogliosi, E.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Gerbod, D.; Noel, C.; Delgado-Viscogliosi, P.; Sogin, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The Parabasala are a primitive group of protists divided into two classes: the trichomonads and the hypermastigids. Until recently, phylogeny and taxonomy of parabasalids were mainly based on the comparative analysis of morphological characters primarily linked to the development of their cytoskeleton. Recent use of molecular markers, such as small subunit (SSU) rRNA has led to now insights into the systematics of the Parabasala and other groups of prolists. An updated phylogeny based on SSU rRNA is provided and compared to that inferred from ultrastructural data. The SSU rRNA phylogeny contradicts the dogma equating simple characters with pumitive characters. Hypermastigids, possessing a hyperdeveloped cytoskeleton, exhibit the most basal emergence in the parabasalid lineage. Other observations emerge from the SSU rRNA analysis, such as the secondary loss of some cytoskeleton structures in all representatives of the Monocercomonadidae, the existence of secondarily free living taxa (reversibility of parasitism) and the evidence against the co-evolution of the endobiotic parabasalids and their animal hosts. According to phylogenies based on SSU rRNA, all the trichomonad families are not monophyletic groups, putting into question the validity of current taxonomic assignments. The precise branching order of some taxa remains unclear, but this issue can possibly be addressed by the molecular analysis of additional parabasalids. The goal of such additional analyses would be to propose, in a near future, a revision of the taxonomy of this group of protists that takes into account both molecular and morphological data.

  8. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  9. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  11. Xenopus U3 snoRNA GAC-Box A′ and Box A Sequences Play Distinct Functional Roles in rRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the 5′ portion of Xenopus U3 snoRNA were tested for function in oocytes. The results revealed a new cleavage site (A0) in the 3′ region of vertebrate external transcribed spacer sequences. In addition, U3 mutagenesis uncoupled cleavage at sites 1 and 2, flanking the 5′ and 3′ ends of 18S rRNA, and generated novel intermediates: 19S and 18.5S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, specific nucleotides in Xenopus U3 snoRNA that are required for cleavages in pre-rRNA were identified: box A is essential for site A0 cleavage, the GAC-box A′ region is necessary for site 1 cleavage, and the 3′ end of box A′ and flanking nucleotides are required for site 2 cleavage. Differences between metazoan and yeast U3 snoRNA-mediated rRNA processing are enumerated. The data support a model where metazoan U3 snoRNA acts as a bridge to draw together the 5′ and 3′ ends of the 18S rRNA coding region within pre-rRNA to coordinate their cleavage. PMID:11509664

  12. Microbial community of salt crystals processed from Mediterranean seawater based on 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Baati, Houda; Guermazi, Sonda; Gharsallah, Neji; Sghir, Abdelghani; Ammar, Emna

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was used to investigate for the first time the structure of the microbial community that inhabits salt crystals retrieved from the bottom of a solar saltern, located in the coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea (Sfax, Tunisia). This community lives in an extremely salty environment of 250-310 g/L total dissolved salt. A total of 78 bacterial 16S rRNA clone sequences making up to 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), determined by the DOTUR program to 97% sequence similarity, was analyzed. These OTUs were affiliated to Bacteroidetes (71.4% of OTUs), and gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria (equally represented by 14.2% of the OTUs observed). The archaeal community composition appeared more diverse with 68 clones, resulting in 44 OTUs, all affiliated with the Euryarchaeota phylum. Of the bacterial and archaeal clones showing <97% 16S rRNA sequence identity with sequences in public databases, 47.6% and 84.1% respectively were novel clones. Both rarefaction curves and diversity measurements (Simpson, Shannon-Weaver, Chao) showed a more diverse archaeal than bacterial community at the Tunisian solar saltern pond. The analysis of an increasing clone's number may reveal additional local diversity.

  13. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  14. The linked units of 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA of razor shells (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae).

    PubMed

    Vierna, J; Jensen, K T; Martínez-Lage, A; González-Tizón, A M

    2011-08-01

    The linkage between 5S ribosomal DNA and other multigene families has been detected in many eukaryote lineages, but whether it provides any selective advantage remains unclear. In this work, we report the occurrence of linked units of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) and U1 small nuclear DNA (U1 snDNA) in 10 razor shell species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pharidae) from four different genera. We obtained several clones containing partial or complete repeats of both multigene families in which both types of genes displayed the same orientation. We provide a comprehensive collection of razor shell 5S rDNA clones, both with linked and nonlinked organisation, and the first bivalve U1 snDNA sequences. We predicted the secondary structures and characterised the upstream and downstream conserved elements, including a region at -25 nucleotides from both 5S rDNA and U1 snDNA transcription start sites. The analysis of 5S rDNA showed that some nontranscribed spacers (NTSs) are more closely related to NTSs from other species (and genera) than to NTSs from the species they were retrieved from, suggesting birth-and-death evolution and ancestral polymorphism. Nucleotide conservation within the functional regions suggests the involvement of purifying selection, unequal crossing-overs and gene conversions. Taking into account this and other studies, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which both multigene families could have become linked in the Pharidae lineage. The reason why 5S rDNA is often found linked to other multigene families seems to be the result of stochastic processes within genomes in which its high copy number is determinant.

  15. Relationship between 5S and 20S forms of malate synthase in maturing cottonseeds

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, R.B.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) activity appears and increases during seed maturation persists during desiccation, then increases again following germination. Because different modes of synthesis and organelle import of MS may occur in maturing and germinated seeds, a comparative study was performed. A comparison of immunoprecipitations from in-vivo-labeled seeds (/sup 35/S-met) and in-vitro translations of Poly A+ RNA (wheat germ) showed no detectable differences in subunit mol wt. When MS activity first appears (42 DPA) only the cytosolic 5S form is found in rate-zonal gradients (5-25% sucrose). At 48 DPA, O d, and 48 h germinated seeds both the 5S and glyoxysomal 20S forms are present, with the 20S becoming more prevalent. Western blots of SDS-PAGE gels showed that no other form(s) of MS (inactive) are present in rate-zonal fractions. Calculations of radiospecific activity (per MS activity) of 5S and 20S forms radiolabeled in vivo (/sup 35/S-met) at various time periods provided further convincing evidence that there is a 5S precursor to 20S product relationship during both seed maturation and seedling growth.

  16. Nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNAs from four jellyfishes.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Osawa, S

    1982-11-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNAs from four jellyfishes, Spirocodon saltatrix, Nemopsis dofleini, Aurelia aurita and Chrysaora quinquecirrha have been determined. The sequences are highly similar to each other. A fairly high similarity was also found between these jellyfishes and a sea anemone, Anthopleura japonica.

  17. USE OF INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATIONS TO PREDICT HC5'S BASED ON MINIMAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dyer, S., S. Belanger, J. Chaney, D. Versteeg and F. Mayer. In press. Use of Interspecies Correlation Estimations to Predict HC5's Based on Minimal Data (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1013).

  18. 5. S U.S. HIGHWAY 34 AND EAST (ILLINOIS) APPROACH TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. S U.S. HIGHWAY 34 AND EAST (ILLINOIS) APPROACH TO BRIDGE WITH EAST BRIDGE HOUSE IN RIGHT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO WEST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  19. Limitations of metazoan 18S rRNA sequence data: implications for reconstructing a phylogeny of the animal kingdom and inferring the reality of the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Abouheif, E; Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    1998-10-01

    We document the phylogenetic behavior of the 18S rRNA molecule in 67 taxa from 28 metazoan phyla and assess the effects of among-site rate variation on reconstructing phylogenies of the animal kingdom. This empirical assessment was undertaken to clarify further the limits of resolution of the 18S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker and to address the question of whether 18S rRNA phylogenies can be used as a source of evidence to infer the reality of a Cambrian explosion. A notable degree of among-site rate variation exists between different regions of the 18S rRNA molecule, as well as within all classes of secondary structure. There is a significant negative correlation between inferred number of nucleotide substitutions and phylogenetic information, as well as with the degree of substitutional saturation within the molecule. Base compositional differences both within and between taxa exist and, in certain lineages, may be associated with long branches and phylogenetic position. Importantly, excluding sites with different degrees of nucleotide substitution significantly influences the topology and degree of resolution of maximum-parsimony phylogenies as well as neighbor-joining phylogenies (corrected and uncorrected for among-site rate variation) reconstructed at the metazoan scale. Together, these data indicate that the 18S rRNA molecule is an unsuitable candidate for reconstructing the evolutionary history of all metazoan phyla, and that the polytomies, i.e., unresolved nodes within 18S rRNA phylogenies, cannot be used as a single or reliable source of evidence to support the hypothesis of a Cambrian explosion.

  20. Evaluation of Borrelia real time PCR DNA targeting OspA, FlaB and 5S-23S IGS and Borrelia 16S rRNA RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Bertie H C G M; Maraha, Boulos; Hollemans, Leonie; Sprong, Hein; Brandenburg, Afke H; Westenend, Pieter J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi non-sensu lato (s.l.) strains occurred in the Netherlands. A multiplex OspA, FlaB, IGS real time PCR was compared to 16S rRNA/rDNA RT-qPCR with lower average Cycle threshold (Ct) and LOD on strain dilutions. Multiplexing increased sensitivity on CSF samples (n=74), distinguishing B. burgdorferi s.l. from non-s.l. strains.

  1. Polarizability of 5s25p(2P12) atomic indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guella, T. P.; Miller, Thomas M.; Bederson, B.; Stockdale, J. A. D.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1984-06-01

    We have measured the static electric dipole polarizability of ground state 115 49In5s25p(2P12) with a small (~9%) admixture of metastable 5s25p(2P32). Three different methods were used: (a) E-H gradient balance, (b) comparison of deflection in an inhomogeneous electric field with an alkalimetal-atom "standard," and (c) a deflection analysis using a computer program with no adjustable parameters except the polarizability itself. All methods agree to within 11%. Our weighted final result is (10.18+/-1.20)×10-24 cm3. This is in very close agreement to a recent computation by Liberman and Zangwill, using fully relativistic wave functions and including electron correlation.

  2. A new RNA-RNA crosslinking reagent and its application to ribosomal 5S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R; Garrett, R A

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of a new RNA specific bifunctional crosslinking reagent, 1.4-phenyl-diglyoxal, is described which reacts exclusively with guanosines. The properties of the crosslinked products enabled us to develop a straightforward method for identifying the reacted nucleotides. Results obtained with ribosomal 5S RNA of Escherichia coli demonstrate the formation of an intramolecular crosslink between guanosine-2 and guanosine-112 in the stem region. Images PMID:724507

  3. Nqrs Data for C10H9MnO5S (Subst. No. 1226)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C10H9MnO5S (Subst. No. 1226)

  4. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  5. Molecular phylogenetics of subclass Peritrichia (Ciliophora: Oligohymenophorea) based on expanded analyses of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Utz, Laura R P; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among peritrich ciliates remain unclear in spite of recent progress. To expand the analyses performed in previous studies, and to statistically test hypotheses of monophyly, we analyzed a broad sample of 18s rRNA sequences (including 15 peritrich genera), applying a conservative alignment strategy and several phylogenetic approaches. The main results are that: (i) the monophyly of Peritrichia cannot be rejected; (ii) the two main clades of Sessilida do not correspond to formally recognized taxa; (iii) the monophyly of genera Vorticella and Epistylis is significantly rejected; and (iv) morphological structures commonly used in peritrich taxonomy may be evolutionarily labile.

  6. Inhibition of viral RNA methylation in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells by 5' S-isobutyl-adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemont, B; Huppert, J

    1977-01-01

    5' S-isobutyl-adenosine (SIBA), a structural analogue of S-adenosylhomocysteine, reversibly blocks the multiplication of herpes simplex type 1 virus. In the presence of SIBA, viral protein synthesis is inhibited. After removing SIBA the synthesis of proteins starts rapidly again. The new polypeptides are mainly alpha proteins (Honess and Roizman, J. Virol. 14:8-19, 1974,), normally the first to be synthesized after infection. The rapid synthesis of proteins after release of inhibition seems to be directed by mRNA formed in the presence of SIBA as indicated by experiments using actinomycin D but which was undermethylated as shown by analysis of methyl groups on RNA. SIBA inhibits the methylation of mRNA and especially that of the 5' cap. Capping of mRNA thus seems to be essential for efficient translation. The analogue affected various methylations to different extents. Images PMID:192910

  7. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  8. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  9. rRNA promoter activity in the fast-growing bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Sarah E; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2002-03-01

    The bacterium Vibrio natriegens can double with a generation time of less than 10 min (R. G. Eagon, J. Bacteriol. 83:736-737, 1962), a growth rate that requires an extremely high rate of protein synthesis. We show here that V. natriegens' high potential for protein synthesis results from an increase in ribosome numbers with increasing growth rate, as has been found for other bacteria. We show that V. natriegens contains a large number of rRNA operons, and its rRNA promoters are extremely strong. The V. natriegens rRNA core promoters are at least as active in vitro as Escherichia coli rRNA core promoters with either E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) or V. natriegens RNAP, and they are activated by UP elements, as in E. coli. In addition, the E. coli transcription factor Fis activated V. natriegens rrn P1 promoters in vitro. We conclude that the high capacity for ribosome synthesis in V. natriegens results from a high capacity for rRNA transcription, and the high capacity for rRNA transcription results, at least in part, from the same factors that contribute most to high rates of rRNA transcription in E. coli, i.e., high gene dose and strong activation by UP elements and Fis.

  10. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  11. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  12. Sequence variation and methylation of the flax 5S RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsbrough, P B; Ellis, T H; Lomonossoff, G P

    1982-01-01

    The complete sequence of the flax 5S DNA repeat is presented. Length heterogeneity is the consequence of the presence or absence of a single direct repeat and the majority of single base changes are transition mutations. No sequence variation has been found in the coding sequence. The extent of methylation of cytosines has been measured at one location in the gene and one in the spacer. The relationship between the observed sequence heterogeneity and the level of methylation is discussed in the context of the operation of a correction mechanism. Images PMID:6290983

  13. The chromatin remodeling complex NuRD establishes the poised state of rRNA genes characterized by bivalent histone modifications and altered nucleosome positions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbing; Ling, Te; Zhou, Yonggang; Feng, Weijun; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Grummt, Ingrid; Tao, Wei

    2012-05-22

    rRNA genes (rDNA) exist in two distinct epigenetic states, active promoters being unmethylated and marked by euchromatic histone modifications, whereas silent ones are methylated and exhibit heterochromatic features. Here we show that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex establishes a specific chromatin structure at rRNA genes that are poised for transcription activation. The promoter of poised rRNA genes is unmethylated, associated with components of the preinitiation complex, marked by bivalent histone modifications and covered by a nucleosome in the "off" position, which is refractory to transcription initiation. Repression of rDNA transcription in growth-arrested and differentiated cells correlates with elevated association of NuRD and increased levels of poised rRNA genes. Reactivation of transcription requires resetting the promoter-bound nucleosome into the "on" position by the DNA-dependent ATPase CSB (Cockayne syndrome protein B). The results uncover a unique mechanism by which ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes with opposing activities establish a specific chromatin state and regulate transcription.

  14. Further involvement of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in aminoglycoside-induced deafness: A novel type of heteroplasmy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.; Prezant, T.R.; Bu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been linked recently to a predisposing mutation in the 3{prime} end of the small ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of human mitochondria (1555 A{yields}G) that makes the mitochondrial rRNA structurally more similar to its bacterial counterpart. This mutation was found in Chinese families in which the susceptibility to develop ototoxic deafness was inherited through the maternal lineage. However, the 1555 A{yields}G mutation was rarely found in sporadic patients in China, where aminoglycosides are commonly used. To further characterize the mutations predisposing to aminoglycoside ototoxicity, we analyzed the 12S rRNA gene in 35 sporadic patients without the 1555 mutation. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, heteroduplex (HD) analysis, sequencing, and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, we found that 3 of 35 sporadic patients had unique sequence changes in the 12S rRNA gene. Two of these changes were homoplasmic. One of the patients displayed a novel type of heteroplasmy, which we term multiplasmy, with one base deletion at nt 961 and different populations of mitochondrial DNA with varying numbers of inserted cytosines at that site.

  15. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks.

  16. Interaction of potassium cyanide with the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung-Wook; Korbas, Malgorzata; Klepsch, Mirjam; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali

    2007-04-06

    The Ni-Fe carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase II (CODHII(Ch)) from the anaerobic CO-utilizing hydrogenogenic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans catalyzes the oxidation of CO, presumably at the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite of the [Ni-4S-5S] cluster in the active site. The CO oxidation mechanism proposed on the basis of several CODHII(Ch) crystal structures involved the apical binding of CO at the nickel ion and the activation of water at the Fe1 ion of the cluster. To understand how CO interacts with the active site, we have studied the reactivity of the cluster with potassium cyanide and analyzed the resulting type of nickel coordination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Cyanide acts as a competitive inhibitor of reduced CODHII(Ch) with respect to the substrate CO and is therefore expected to mimic the substrate. It inhibits the enzyme reversibly, forming a nickel cyanide. In this reaction, one of the four square-planar sulfur ligands of nickel is replaced by the carbon atom of cyanide, suggesting removal of the micro(2)S from the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite. Upon reactivation of the inhibited enzyme, cyanide is released, and the square-planar coordination of nickel by 4S ligands is recovered, which includes the reformation of the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 bridge. The results are summarized in a model of the CO oxidation mechanism at the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CODHII(Ch) from C. hydrogenoformans.

  17. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus to the interval between D5S435 and MAP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, V.M.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Kleyn, P.W.; Knowles, J.A.; Palmer, D.A.; Asokan, S.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Munsat, T.L. )

    1993-02-01

    The childhood-onset SMA locus has been mapped to chromosome 5q13, in a region bounded by the proximal locus, D5S6, and the closely linked distal loci, D5S112 and MAP1B. We now describe a highly polymorphic, tightly linked microsatellite marker (D5S435) that is very likely the closet proximal marker to the SMA locus. Multipoint linkage analysis firmly establishes the following order of markers at 5q13; centromere-D5S76-D5S6-D5S435-MAP1B/D5S112-D5S39-telomere. The data indicate that SMA resides in an approximately 0.7-cM (range 01.-2.1) region between D5S435 and MAP1B. This finding reduces by approximately fourfold the genetic region that most likely harbors the SMA locus and will facilitate the physical mapping and cloning of the disease gene region. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Identification of dual false indirect exclusions on the D5S818 and FGA loci.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Kline, Margaret; Hu, Peter; Wang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present a case in which the result of a maternity test was obscured due to two false indirect exclusions that occurred in two out of 15 genetic loci through the use of the AmpFlSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification kit (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The Identifiler kit failed to amplify allele 11 of the D5S818 system on the child and failed to capture the existence of allele 13 on the FGA system on both mother and child. The situation was remedied through use of the PowerPlex 16 PCR Amplification Kit (Promega, Madison, WI) which used different primers with a different allele range than that of the Identifiler kit. Maternity was confirmed through sequencing and it was found that the failure of the Identifiler kit to amplify allele 11 on the D5S818 system was the result of an incompatibility to the primer-binding site due to a mutation that changed a guanine (G) into a thymine (T) 55 base pairs (bp) downstream of the repeat. The inability of the Identifiler kit to pick up allele 13 of the FGA system was due to the out-of-range location of the allele. Indirect exclusions can be misleading if they are not fully investigated since allele range as well as primer-binding affinity are two confounders that must be addressed to ensure accuracy of the test results.

  19. iPhone 4s and iPhone 5s Imaging of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, Maaz; Ferenczy, Sandor R.; Shields, Carol L.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the technical feasibility of a consumer-grade cellular iPhone camera as an ocular imaging device compared to existing ophthalmic imaging equipment for documentation purposes. Methods A comparison of iPhone 4s and 5s images was made with external facial images (macrophotography) using Nikon cameras, slit-lamp images (microphotography) using Zeiss photo slit-lamp camera, and fundus images (fundus photography) using RetCam II. Results In an analysis of six consecutive patients with ophthalmic conditions, both iPhones achieved documentation of external findings (macrophotography) using standard camera modality, tap to focus, and built-in flash. Both iPhones achieved documentation of anterior segment findings (microphotography) during slit-lamp examination through oculars. Both iPhones achieved fundus imaging using standard video modality with continuous iPhone illumination through an ophthalmic lens. Comparison to standard ophthalmic cameras, macrophotography and microphotography were excellent. In comparison to RetCam fundus photography, iPhone fundus photography revealed smaller field and was technically more difficult to obtain, but the quality was nearly similar to RetCam. Conclusions iPhone versions 4s and 5s can provide excellent ophthalmic macrophotography and microphotography and adequate fundus photography. We believe that iPhone imaging could be most useful in settings where expensive, complicated, and cumbersome imaging equipment is unavailable. PMID:28275604

  20. Magnetization reversal phenomena in (Cr0.70Ti0.30)5S6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yuji; Sato, Tetsuya; Anzai, Shuichiro

    2005-12-01

    Magnetization reversal phenomena (MRP) along magnetic order-order transitions have recently been reported on impurity-doped magnetic systems. Because imperfect long-range magnetic order exists in these systems, it is expected that a systematic investigation of MRP will give physical information on thermomagnetic processes of magnetic systems in the range from the micro- to nanoscales. As a typical order-order transition (a state doubly modulated by helical and canting orders to a collinear ferrimagnetic state) has been known to occur on Cr5S6 at a transition temperature Tt, we investigate the magnetizations of (Cr0.70Ti0.30)5S6 on heating and cooling runs in various magnetic fields. At 20Oe, the field-cooled magnetization just below the Curie temperature has a positive sign; the sign turns negative below the compensation temperature TCM (first step) and finally returns to positive below Tt (second step). The first-step MRP observed in this system is explained by the potential barriers resulting from anisotropy energy when the preferred direction of collinear ferrimagnetic moment reverses. The proposed mechanism for second-step MRP is the pinning effect caused by the impurity atoms (Ti) in the helical long-range-order chains. Comparing other examples of MRPs, we discuss the roles of local impurity centers in the thermomagnetic process in magnetic order-order transitions.

  1. Measurements of exclusive Bs0 decays at the Υ(5S) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutskoy, A.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Anipko, D.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bedny, I.; Bitenc, U.; Bizjak, I.; Blyth, S.; Bondar, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Dragic, J.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kulasiri, R.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; MacNaughton, J.; Majumder, G.; Matsumoto, T.; McOnie, S.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sakai, Y.; Satoyama, N.; Schietinger, T.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Singh, J. B.; Somov, A.; Soni, N.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stoeck, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2007-07-01

    Several exclusive Bs0 decays are studied using a 1.86fb-1 data sample collected at the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+e- collider. In the Bs0→Ds-π+ decay mode we find 10 Bs0 candidates and measure the corresponding branching fraction. Combining the Bs0→Ds(*)-π+, Bs0→Ds(*)-ρ+, Bs0→J/ψϕ, and Bs0→J/ψη decay modes, a significant Bs0 signal is observed. The ratio σ(e+e-→Bs*B¯s*)/σ(e+e-→Bs(*)B¯s(*))=(93-9+7±1)% is obtained at the Υ(5S) energy, indicating that Bs0 meson production proceeds predominantly through the creation of Bs*B¯s* pairs. The Bs0 and Bs* meson masses are measured to be M(Bs0)=(5370±1±3)MeV/c2 and M(Bs*)=(5418±1±3)MeV/c2. Upper limits on the Bs0→γγ, Bs0→ϕγ, Bs0→K+K-, and Bs0→Ds(*)+Ds(*)- branching fractions are also reported.

  2. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida.

  3. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  4. CLUSTOM: A Novel Method for Clustering 16S rRNA Next Generation Sequences by Overlap Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Kwon; Yu, Dong Su; Hou, Bo Kyeng; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2013-01-01

    The recent nucleic acid sequencing revolution driven by shotgun and high-throughput technologies has led to a rapid increase in the number of sequences for microbial communities. The availability of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from a multitude of natural environments now offers a unique opportunity to study microbial diversity and community structure. The large volume of sequencing data however makes it time consuming to assign individual sequences to phylotypes by searching them against public databases. Since ribosomal sequences have diverged across prokaryotic species, they can be grouped into clusters that represent operational taxonomic units. However, available clustering programs suffer from overlap of sequence spaces in adjacent clusters. In natural environments, gene sequences are homogenous within species but divergent between species. This evolutionary constraint results in an uneven distribution of genetic distances of genes in sequence space. To cluster 16S rRNA sequences more accurately, it is therefore essential to select core sequences that are located at the centers of the distributions represented by the genetic distance of sequences in taxonomic units. Based on this idea, we here describe a novel sequence clustering algorithm named CLUSTOM that minimizes the overlaps between adjacent clusters. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated in a comparative exercise with existing programs, using the reference sequences of the SILVA database as well as published pyrosequencing datasets. The test revealed that our algorithm achieves higher accuracy than ESPRIT-Tree and mothur, few of the best clustering algorithms. Results indicate that the concept of an uneven distribution of sequence distances can effectively and successfully cluster 16S rRNA gene sequences. The algorithm of CLUSTOM has been implemented both as a web and as a standalone command line application, which are available at http://clustom.kribb.re.kr. PMID:23650520

  5. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  6. Prevalence of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Min-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA is a hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Of those, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region of the 12S rRNA have been associated with hearing loss. These two mutations account for a significant number of…

  7. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply.

  8. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  9. A Census of rRNA Genes and Linked Genomic Sequences within a Soil Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Manske, Brian F.; Bintrim, Scott B.; Handelsman, Jo; Goodman, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the diversity of microbial genomes represented in a library of metagenomic DNA from soil. A total of 24,400 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were screened for 16S rRNA genes. The sequences obtained from BAC clones were compared with a collection generated by direct PCR amplification and cloning of 16S rRNA genes from the same soil. The results indicated that the BAC library had substantially lower representation of bacteria among the Bacillus, α-Proteobacteria, and CFB groups; greater representation among the β- and γ-Proteobacteria, and OP10 divisions; and no rRNA genes from the domains Eukaryota and Archaea. In addition to rRNA genes recovered from the bacterial divisions Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, Cytophagales, and OP11, we identified many rRNA genes from the BAC library affiliated with the bacterial division Acidobacterium; all of these sequences were affiliated with subdivisions that lack cultured representatives. The complete sequence of one BAC clone derived from a member of the Acidobacterium division revealed a complete rRNA operon and 20 other open reading frames, including predicted gene products involved in cell division, cell cycling, folic acid biosynthesis, substrate metabolism, amino acid uptake, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. This study is the first step in using genomics to reveal the physiology of as-yet-uncultured members of the Acidobacterium division. PMID:12732537

  10. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  11. Discovery of the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor (1R,5S)-N-[3-amino-1-(cyclobutylmethyl)-2,3-dioxopropyl]-3- [2(S)-[[[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutyl]- 6,6-dimethyl-3-azabicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2(S)-carboxamide (Sch 503034) II. Key steps in structure-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Prongay, Andrew J; Guo, Zhuyan; Yao, Nanhua; Pichardo, John; Fischmann, Thierry; Strickland, Corey; Myers, Joseph; Weber, Patricia C; Beyer, Brian M; Ingram, Richard; Hong, Zhi; Prosise, Winifred W; Ramanathan, Lata; Taremi, S Shane; Yarosh-Tomaine, Taisa; Zhang, Rumin; Senior, Mary; Yang, Rong-Sheng; Malcolm, Bruce; Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Bogen, Stephane L; Chen, Kevin; Jao, Edwin; Liu, Yi-Tsung; Lovey, Raymond G; Saksena, Anil K; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F George; Madison, Vincent

    2007-05-17

    The structures of both the native holo-HCV NS3/4A protease domain and the protease domain with a serine 139 to alanine (S139A) mutation were solved to high resolution. Subsequently, structures were determined for a series of ketoamide inhibitors in complex with the protease. The changes in the inhibitor potency were correlated with changes in the buried surface area upon binding the inhibitor to the active site. The largest contribution to the binding energy arises from the hydrophobic interactions of the P1 and P2 groups as they bind to the S1 and S2 pockets [the numbering of the subsites is as defined in Berger, A.; Schechter, I. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. B 1970, 257, 249-264]. This correlation of the changes in potency with increased buried surface area contributed directly to the design of a potent tripeptide inhibitor of the HCV NS3/4A protease that is currently in clinical trials.

  12. Electric-dipole 5s - 5p Transitions in Promethiumlike Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2008-02-29

    The 5s-5p electric-dipole resonance transitions in highly ionized promethiumlike ions have been studied applying relativistic multi-reference Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory. The transition wavelengths are determined to within 0.2 {angstrom} in the more highly charged ions, where the level degeneracies are small. For somewhat lighter ions a very large reference space was used in order to account for the many degeneracies. In order to calculate transition probabilities and lifetimes, correlation corrections have been added to the transition operator in the next order. The contributions from the higher orders of the theory, that is, frequency-dependent Breit correction, Lamb shift, and mass shifts, have been estimated. The results are used to re-assess spectroscopic data from beam-foil, electron beam ion trap, and tokamak observations.

  13. Solution-Based Processing of the Phase-Change Material KSb5S8

    SciTech Connect

    Mitzi,D.; Raoux, S.; Schrott, A.; Copel, M.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2006-01-01

    A hydrazine-based process for solution-depositing phase-change materials (PCMs) is demonstrated, using KSb{sub 5}S{sub 8} (KSS) as an example. The process involves dissolving the elemental metals and chalcogen in hydrazine at room temperature and spin-coating the solution onto a substrate, followed by a short low-temperature (T {<=} 250 C) anneal. The spin-coated KSS films, which range in thickness from 10 to 90 nm, are examined using variable temperature X-ray diffraction, medium energy ion scattering (MEIS), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The spin-coated KSS films exhibit a reversible amorphous-crystalline transition with a relatively high crystallization temperature ({approx}280 C). Selected other chalcogenide-based PCMs are also expected to be suitable for thin-film deposition using this approach.

  14. Donor-acceptor pair recombination in AgIn5S8 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.; Serpengüzel, A.; Aydinli, A.; Gürlü, O.; Yilmaz, I.

    1999-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AgIn5S8 single crystals were investigated in the 1.44-1.91 eV energy region and in the 10-170 K temperature range. The PL band was observed to be centered at 1.65 eV at 10 K and an excitation intensity of 0.97 W cm-2. The redshift of this band with increasing temperature and with decreasing excitation intensity was observed. To explain the observed PL behavior, we propose that the emission is due to radiative recombination of a donor-acceptor pair, with an electron occupying a donor level located at 0.06 eV below the conduction band, and a hole occupying an acceptor level located at 0.32 eV above the valence band.

  15. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  16. Classification of 5-S Epileptic EEG Recordings Using Distribution Entropy and Sample Entropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Karmakar, Chandan; Yan, Chang; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Liu, Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an electrophysiological disorder of the brain, the hallmark of which is recurrent and unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG) measures electrical activity of the brain that is commonly applied as a non-invasive technique for seizure detection. Although a vast number of publications have been published on intelligent algorithms to classify interictal and ictal EEG, it remains an open question whether they can be detected using short-length EEG recordings. In this study, we proposed three protocols to select 5 s EEG segment for classifying interictal and ictal EEG from normal. We used the publicly-accessible Bonn database, which consists of normal, interical, and ictal EEG signals with a length of 4097 sampling points (23.6 s) per record. In this study, we selected three segments of 868 points (5 s) length from each recordings and evaluated results for each of them separately. The well-studied irregularity measure-sample entropy (SampEn)-and a more recently proposed complexity measure-distribution entropy (DistEn)-were used as classification features. A total of 20 combinations of input parameters m and τ for the calculation of SampEn and DistEn were selected for compatibility. Results showed that SampEn was undefined for half of the used combinations of input parameters and indicated a large intra-class variance. Moreover, DistEn performed robustly for short-length EEG data indicating relative independence from input parameters and small intra-class fluctuations. In addition, it showed acceptable performance for all three classification problems (interictal EEG from normal, ictal EEG from normal, and ictal EEG from interictal) compared to SampEn, which showed better results only for distinguishing normal EEG from interictal and ictal. Both SampEn and DistEn showed good reproducibility and consistency, as evidenced by the independence of results on analysing protocol.

  17. Measuring B{sub s} width difference at the {Upsilon}(5s) using quantum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, David; Soni, Amarjit

    2010-08-01

    About 90% of B{sub s}B{sub s} pairs produced at the {Upsilon}(5s) resonance are initially B{sub s}{sup *}B{sub s}{sup *} pairs which decay radiatively to B{sub s}B{sub s}. This implies that the B{sub s}B{sub s} pair will then be in an eigenstate of charge conjugation (i.e. C=-1) and therefore in an entangled state. This allows for a determination of {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}/{Gamma}{sub s} and the CP phase using a number of possible correlations between the decays of the two B{sub s} mesons. In particular, we consider the time integrated correlation, the time ordering asymmetry, and the time ordering-charge asymmetry, which in addition to time ordering distinguishes B{sub s} from B{sub s}, for various combinations of final states. With the statistics of about O(10{sup 7}-10{sup 8}) {Upsilon}(5s) events available at B factories, we find that the time ordering asymmetry between suitably defined hadronic and flavor specific (tagging) decays offers a promising method for determining the width difference. The corresponding time ordering-charge asymmetry can also bound the mixing phase. Similar observables involving exclusive decays are also considered. At the super B factories with O(50) times greater luminosity time ordering and time ordering-charge asymmetries between inclusive and exclusive modes may also provide additional bounds on the phases in those decays.

  18. Identification of the predicted 5s-4f level crossing optical lines with applications to metrology and searches for the variation of fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    Windberger, A; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Bekker, H; Oreshkina, N S; Berengut, J C; Bock, V; Borschevsky, A; Dzuba, V A; Eliav, E; Harman, Z; Kaldor, U; Kaul, S; Safronova, U I; Flambaum, V V; Keitel, C H; Schmidt, P O; Ullrich, J; Versolato, O O

    2015-04-17

    We measure optical spectra of Nd-like W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt ions of particular interest for studies of a possibly varying fine-structure constant. Exploiting characteristic energy scalings we identify the strongest lines, confirm the predicted 5s-4f level crossing, and benchmark advanced calculations. We infer two possible values for optical M2/E3 and E1 transitions in Ir^{17+} that have the highest predicted sensitivity to a variation of the fine-structure constant among stable atomic systems. Furthermore, we determine the energies of proposed frequency standards in Hf^{12+} and W^{14+}.

  19. The RNA recognition motif of NIFK is required for rRNA maturation during cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-An; Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Wang, Shun-Chang; Hsiao, Michael; Wu, Pei-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis governs protein synthesis. NIFK is transactivated by c-Myc, the key regulator of ribosome biogenesis. The biological function of human NIFK is not well established, except that it has been shown to interact with Ki67 and NPM1. Here we report that NIFK is required for cell cycle progression and participates in the ribosome biogenesis via its RNA recognition motif (RRM). We show that silencing of NIFK inhibits cell proliferation through a reversible p53-dependent G1 arrest, possibly by induction of the RPL5/RPL11-mediated nucleolar stress. Mechanistically it is the consequence of impaired maturation of 28S and 5.8S rRNA resulting from inefficient cleavage of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, a critical step in the separation of pre-ribosome to small and large subunits. Complementation of NIFK silencing by mutants shows that RNA-binding ability of RRM is essential for the pre-rRNA processing and G1 progression. More specifically, we validate that the RRM of NIFK preferentially binds to the 5'-region of ITS2 rRNA likely in both sequence specific and secondary structure dependent manners. Our results show how NIFK is involved in cell cycle progression through RRM-dependent pre-rRNA maturation, which could enhance our understanding of the function of NIFK in cell proliferation, and potentially also cancer and ribosomopathies.

  20. RNA polymerase I transcription factors in active yeast rRNA gene promoters enhance UV damage formation and inhibit repair.

    PubMed

    Meier, Andreas; Thoma, Fritz

    2005-03-01

    UV photofootprinting and repair of pyrimidine dimers by photolyase was used to investigate chromatin structure, protein-DNA interactions, and DNA repair in the spacer and promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains about 150 copies of rRNA genes separated by nontranscribed spacers. Under exponential growth conditions about half of the genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase I (RNAP-I). Initiation of transcription requires the assembly of the upstream activating factor (UAF), the core factor (CF), TATA binding protein, and RNAP-I with Rrn3p on the upstream element and core promoter. We show that UV irradiation of wild-type cells and transcription factor mutants generates photofootprints in the promoter elements. The core footprint depends on UAF, while the UAF footprint was also detected in absence of the CFs. Fractionation of active and inactive promoters showed the core footprint mainly in the active fraction and similar UAF footprints in both fractions. DNA repair by photolyase was strongly inhibited in active promoters but efficient in inactive promoters. The data suggest that UAF is present in vivo in active and inactive promoters and that recruitment of CF and RNAP-I to active promoters generates a stable complex which inhibits repair.

  1. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  2. 5S ribosomal RNA genes in six species of Mediterranean grey mullets: genomic organization and phylogenetic inference.

    PubMed

    Gornung, Ekaterina; Colangelo, Paolo; Annesi, Flavia

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a study of the 5S ribosomal RNA genes (5S rDNA) in a group of 6 species belonging to 4 genera of Mugilidae. In these 6 species, the relatively short 5S rDNA repeat units, generated by PCR and ranging in size from 219 to 257 bp, show a high level of intragenomic homogeneity of both coding and spacer regions (NTS-I). Phylogenetic reconstructions based on this data set highlight the greater phylogenetic and genetic diversity of Mugil cephalus and Oedalechilus labeo compared with the genera Liza and Chelon. Comparative sequence analysis revealed significant conservation of the short 5S rDNA repeat units across Chelon and Liza. Moreover, a second size class of 5S rDNA repeat units, ranging from roughly 800 to 1100 bp, was produced in the Liza and Chelon samples. Only short 5S rDNA repeat units were found in M. cephalus and O. labeo. The sequences of the long 5S rDNA repeat units, obtained in Chelon labrosus and Liza ramada, differ owing to the presence of 2 large insertion/deletions (indels) in the spacers (NTS-II) and show considerable sequence identity with NTS-I spacers. Interspecific sequence variation of NTS-II spacers, excluding the indels, is low. Southern-blot hybridization patterns suggest an intermixed arrangement of short and long repeat units within a single chromosome locus.

  3. Cysteine-dependent 5-S-cysteinyldopa formation and its regulation by glutathione in normal epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Benathan, M; Labidi, F

    1996-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the melanogenesis intermediate 5-S-cysteinyldopa (5-S-CD) could display antioxidative activity. In the present study, the synthesis of 5-S-CD was examined in human epidermal melanocytes isolated from dark skin type VI (MT) and from white skin type III (GT). The MT melanocytes showed the higher melanin content and dopa oxidase activity. In addition, they produced eumelanin as shown by their ultrastructure, and the solubility and UV/visible absorption of the isolated pigment. Both MT and GT cells showed high levels of 5-S-CD (5.5-6.9 nmol/mg protein). 5-S-CD was also detected in culture supernatants from MT cells; the secretion rate was estimated to be 2.5 nmol/mg protein per 24 h. The role of cysteine and glutathione in 5-S-CD formation was investigated by exposing the melanocytes to the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). A strong reduction in glutathione levels (4-8% of the untreated controls) associated with an increase in cysteine levels (152-154%) was observed. In addition, BSO induced a moderate increase in the cellular levels of 5-S-CD (114-129%) and a decrease in dopa oxidase activity (75-83%). Our results indicate that the direct addition of cysteine to dopaquinone is the main source of 5-S-CD in human epidermal melanocytes. It is proposed that the synthesis of 5-S-CD is a mechanism regulating dopaquinone levels during pigment formation and/or a defence mechanism against oxidative stress.

  4. Regulation of gene expression via retrotransposon insertions and the noncoding RNA 4.5S RNAH.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kentaro; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Kimura, Yuko; Mito, Mari; Okada, Shunpei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2015-11-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) comprise a significant portion of mammalian genomes and regulate gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we show that Myodonta clade-specific 4.5S RNAH (4.5SH), an abundant nuclear noncoding RNA that is highly homologous to the retrotransposon SINE B1, controls the expression of reporter gene that contains the antisense insertion of SINE B1 via nuclear retention. The depletion of endogenous 4.5SH with antisense oligonucleotides neutralizes the nuclear retention and changes the subcellular distribution of the reporter transcripts containing the antisense SINE B1 insertion. Importantly, endogenous transcripts with antisense SINE B1 were increased in the cytoplasm after knockdown of 4.5SH, leading to a decrease in cellular growth. We propose a tentative hypothesis that the amplification of the 4.5SH cluster in specific rodent species might delineate their evolutionary direction via the regulation of genes containing the antisense insertion of SINE B1.

  5. Design and performance of a 1 MW-5 s high temperature superconductor magnetic energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Fabbri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of a 1 MW-5 s superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system based on state-of-the-art high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is investigated in detail. Both YBCO coated conductors and MgB2 are considered. A procedure for the electromagnetic design of the coil is introduced and the final layout is arrived at and compared for the two materials. The choice of the inductance of the coil is carried out as part of the design procedure. Both low-field (3 T) and high-field (8 T) designs are considered for the YBCO. AC losses during a complete charge/discharge cycle at full power are estimated and the cooling power needed for continuous operation is derived. The power conditioning system and control algorithms needed to carry out various operations are discussed in detail. Performances of the SMES system during voltage sag compensation, load leveling and power factor correction are investigated by means of numerical simulation.

  6. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution.

  7. Unstable Inheritance of 45S rRNA Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rabanal, Fernando A.; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Mandáková, Terezie; Novikova, Polina Yu.; Lysak, Martin A.; Mott, Richard; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs). Instead, GWAS implicated a trans-acting locus, as if rRNA gene CNV was a phenotype rather than a genotype. To explain these results, we investigated the inheritance and stability of rRNA gene copy number using the variety of genetic resources available in A. thaliana — F2 crosses, recombinant inbred lines, the multiparent advanced-generation inter-cross population, and mutation accumulation lines. Our results clearly show that rRNA gene CNV can be mapped to the NORs themselves, with both loci contributing equally to the variation. However, NOR size is unstably inherited, and dramatic copy number changes are visible already within tens of generations, which explains why it is not possible to map the NORs using GWAS. We did not find any evidence of trans-acting loci in crosses, which is also expected since changes due to such loci would take very many generations to manifest themselves. rRNA gene copy number is thus an interesting example of “missing heritability”—a trait that is heritable in pedigrees, but not in the general population. PMID:28188182

  8. Histones are required for transcription of yeast rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; French, Sarah L; Oakes, Melanie L; Vu, Loan; Schneider, David A; Beyer, Ann L; Nomura, Masayasu

    2005-07-19

    Nucleosomes and their histone components have generally been recognized to act negatively on transcription. However, purified upstream activating factor (UAF), a transcription initiation factor required for RNA polymerase (Pol) I transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains histones H3 and H4 and four nonhistone protein subunits. Other studies have shown that histones H3 and H4 are associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes. To examine their functional role in Pol I transcription, we constructed yeast strains in which synthesis of H3 is achieved from the glucose-repressible GAL10 promoter. We found that partial depletion of H3 (approximately 50% depletion) resulted in a strong inhibition (>80%) of Pol I transcription. A combination of biochemical analysis and electron microscopic (EM) analysis of Miller chromatin spreads indicated that initiation and elongation steps and rRNA processing were compromised upon histone depletion. A clear decrease in relative amounts of UAF, presumably caused by reduced stability, was also observed under the conditions of H3 depletion. Therefore, the observed inhibition of initiation can be explained, in part, by the decrease in UAF concentration. In addition, the EM results suggested that the defects in rRNA transcript elongation and processing may be a result of loss of histones from rRNA genes rather than (or in addition to) an indirect consequence of effects of histone depletion on expression of other genes. Thus, these results show functional importance of histones associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes.

  9. Deep Sequencing of Subseafloor Eukaryotic rRNA Reveals Active Fungi across Marine Subsurface Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  10. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession

    PubMed Central

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution. PMID:26565722

  11. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface.

  12. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  13. Experimental investigation of the effect of indium content on the CuIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} electrodes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gannouni, M. Assaker, I. Ben; Chtourou, R.

    2015-01-15

    This paper reports on the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to investigate the electrochemical behavior of spinel CuIn{sub 5}S{sub 8}/electrolyte interface. The CuIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} spinel films have been potentiostatically deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate. CuCl{sub 2} and InCl{sub 3} mixed solutions with different [Cu]/[In] ratios were used as cation precursor and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the anion precursor in acidic solution and at room temperature. The effect of the [Cu]/[In] ratio in the precursor solution on the structural, chemical stoichiometry, and morphological properties of prepared samples, as well as the electrochemical behavior of the CuIn{sub 5}S{sub 8}/electrolyte interface was investigated. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data have been modeled using an equivalent circuit approach. Several parameters such as, flat-band potential and free carrier concentration were determined by the change in the Mott–Schottky plots.

  14. Co-located 18S/5S rDNA arrays: an ancient and unusual chromosomal trait in Julidini species (Labridae, Perciformes)

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Karlla Danielle Jorge; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Soares, Rodrigo Xavier; de Souza, Allyson Santos; da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck Felix; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wrasses (Labridae) are extremely diversified marine fishes, whose species exhibit complex interactions with the reef environment. They are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Their species have displayed a number of karyotypic divergent processes, including chromosomal regions with complex structural organization. Current cytogenetic information for this family is phylogenetically and geographically limited and mainly based on conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, the distribution patterns of heterochromatin, GC-specific chromosome regions and Ag-NORs, and the organization of 18S and 5S rDNA sites of the Atlantic species Thalassoma noronhanum (Boulenger, 1890), Halichoeres poeyi (Steindachner, 1867), Halichoeres radiatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Halichoeres brasiliensis (Bloch, 1791) and Halichoeres penrosei Starks, 1913, belonging to the tribe Julidini were analyzed. All the species exhibited 2n=48 chromosomes with variation in the number of chromosome arms among genera. Thalassoma noronhanum has 2m+46a, while species of the genus Halichoeres Rüppell, 1835 share karyotypes with 48 acrocentric chromosomes. The Halichoeres species exhibit differences in the heterochromatin distribution patterns and in the number and distribution of 18S and 5S rDNA sites. The occurrence of 18S/5S rDNA syntenic arrangements in all the species indicates a functionally stable and adaptive genomic organization. The phylogenetic sharing of this rDNA organization highlights a marked and unusual chromosomal singularity inside the family Labridae. PMID:28123678

  15. FISH-mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in chili peppers (Capsicum-Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Patricia M; Debat, Humberto J; Scaldaferro, Marisel A; Martí, Dardo A; Grabiele, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    We present here the physical mapping of the 5S rDNA locus in six wild and five cultivated taxa of Capsicum by means of a genus-specific FISH probe. In all taxa, a single 5S locus per haploid genome that persistently mapped onto the short arm of a unique metacentric chromosome pair at intercalar position, was found. 5S FISH signals of almost the same size and brightness intensity were observed in all the analyzed taxa. This is the first cytological characterization of the 5S in wild taxa of Capsicum by using a genus-derived probe, and the most exhaustive and comprehensive in the chili peppers up to now. The information provided here will aid the cytomolecular characterization of pepper germplasm to evaluate variability and can be instrumental to integrate physical, genetic and genomic maps already generated in the genus.

  16. Infective Arthritis: Bacterial 23S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Supplementary Diagnostic Method

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Andresen, Keld; Kjerulf, Anne; Salamon, Suheil; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Consecutively collected synovial fluids were examined for presence of bacterial DNA (a 700-bp fragment of the bacterial 23S rRNA gene) followed by DNA sequencing of amplicons, and by conventional bacteriological methods. One or more microorganisms were identified in 22 of the 227 synovial fluids (9,7%) originating from 17 patients. Sixteen of the patients had clinical signs of arthritis. For 11 patients molecular and conventional bacterial examinations were in agreement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, were detected in synovial fluids from 6, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. In 3 patients only 23S rRNA analysis was positive; 2 synovial fluids contained S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and 1 S. pneumoniae). The present study indicates a significant contribution by PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene analysis in recognizing and identification of microorganisms from synovial fluids. PMID:19088916

  17. Changes in rRNA transcription influence proliferation and cell fate within a stem cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Shalaby, Nevine A; Buszczak, Michael

    2014-01-17

    Ribosome biogenesis drives cell growth and proliferation, but mechanisms that modulate this process within specific lineages remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila RNA polymerase I (Pol I) regulatory complex composed of Under-developed (Udd), TAF1B, and a TAF1C-like factor. Disruption of udd or TAF1B results in reduced ovarian germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation. Female GSCs display high levels of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and Udd becomes enriched in GSCs relative to their differentiating daughters. Increasing Pol I transcription delays differentiation, whereas reducing rRNA production induces both morphological changes that accompany multicellular cyst formation and specific decreased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway component Mad. These findings demonstrate that modulating rRNA synthesis fosters changes in the cell fate, growth, and proliferation of female Drosophila GSCs and their daughters.

  18. Sequence organization of the Acanthamoeba rRNA intergenic spacer: identification of transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The primary sequence of the entire 2330 bp intergenic spacer of the A.castellanii ribosomal RNA gene was determined. Repeated sequence elements averaging 140 bp were identified and found to bind a protein required for optimum initiation at the core promoter. These repeated elements were shown to stimulate rRNA transcription by RNA polymerase I in vitro. The repeats inhibited transcription when placed in trans, and stimulated transcription when in cis, in either orientation, but only when upstream of the core promoter. Thus, these repeated elements have characteristics similar to polymerase I enhancers found in higher eukaryotes. The number of rRNA repeats in Acanthamoeba cells was determined to be 24 per haploid genome, the lowest number so far identified in any eukaryote. However, because Acanthamoeba is polyploid, each cell contains approximately 600 rRNA genes. Images PMID:7984432

  19. Specific binding of tRNAMet to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Kintner, C; Lund, E

    1978-01-01

    tRNAMetf binds to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli, forming a complex with a melting temperature of 75 degrees (in 0.6 M NaCl). The regions within the RNAs that bind to each other have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The interacting region in tRNAMetf is 17 nucleotides long, extending from G5 in the acceptor stem to D21 (D = 5.6-dihydrouridine) in the D loop. The sequence in 23S rRNA is complementary to that sequence except for an extra Up in the middle and allowing a Gp.D base pair. We propose that association of these two sequences may play a role in initiation of protein synthesis by tRNAMetf. In addition, part of this sequence in 23S rRNA may also stabilize tRNA binding to the ribosome during elongation of nascent polypeptides. Images PMID:349554

  20. Ergometric and metabolic adaptation to a 5-s sprint training programme.

    PubMed

    Linossier, M T; Denis, C; Dormois, D; Geyssant, A; Lacour, J R

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 7 weeks of sprint training (repeated 5-s all-out sprints) on maximal power output (Wv,max) determined during a force-velocity test and a 30-s Wingate test (Wpeak) were studied in ten students [22 (SD 2) years] exercising on a cycle ergometer. Before and after training, muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis muscle at rest for the ten subjects and immediately after a training session for five of them. Sprint training induced an improvement both in peak performances by 25% (Wv,max and Wpeak) and in the 30-s total work by 16%. Before sprint training, the velocity reached with no load (v0) was related to the resting muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) stores (r = 0.87, P < 0.001). The training-induced changes in v0 were observed only when these PCr stores were lowest. This pointed to a possible limiting role of low PCr concentrations in the ability to reach a high velocity. The improvement in performances was linked to an increase in the energy production from anaerobic glycolysis. This result was suggested in muscle by the increase in lactate production measured after a training session associated with the 20% higher activity of both phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The sprint training also increased the proportion of slow twitch fibres closely related to the decrease in fast twitch b fibres. This result would appear to demonstrate an appropriate adaptive reaction following high-intensity intermittent training for the slow twitch fibres which exhibit a greater oxidative capacity.

  1. Network analysis provides insights into evolution of 5S rDNA arrays in Triticum and Aegilops.

    PubMed Central

    Allaby, R G; Brown, T A

    2001-01-01

    We have used network analysis to study gene sequences of the Triticum and Aegilops 5S rDNA arrays, as well as the spacers of the 5S-DNA-A1 and 5S-DNA-2 loci. Network analysis describes relationships between 5S rDNA sequences in a more realistic fashion than conventional tree building because it makes fewer assumptions about the direction of evolution, the extent of sexual isolation, and the pattern of ancestry and descent. The networks show that the 5S rDNA sequences of Triticum and Aegilops species are related in a reticulate manner around principal nodal sequences. The spacer networks have multiple principal nodes of considerable antiquity but the gene network has just one principal node, corresponding to the correct gene sequence. The networks enable orthologous groups of spacer sequences to be identified. When orthologs are compared it is seen that the patterns of intra- and interspecific diversity are similar for both genes and spacers. We propose that 5S rDNA arrays combine sequence conservation with a large store of mutant variations, the number of correct gene copies within an array being the result of neutral processes that act on gene and spacer regions together. PMID:11238418

  2. Conserved 5' flank homologies in dipteran 5S RNA genes that would function on 'A' form DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rubacha, A; Sumner, W; Richter, L; Beckingham, K

    1984-01-01

    We have sequenced the 480 base pair (bp) repeating unit of the 5S RNA genes of the Dipteran fly Calliphora erythrocephala and compared this sequence to the three known 5S RNA gene sequences from the Dipteran Genus Drosophila (1,2). A striking series of five perfectly conserved homologies identically positioned within the 5' flanks of all four Dipteran 5S RNA coding regions has thus been identified. The spacing (12-13 bp) between all of these homologies is typical of A form rather than B form DNA. Given that the eukaryotic 5S RNA gene specific initiation factor TFIIIA (3) is a DNA unwinding protein (4), a role for these Dipteran 5' flank homologies in initiation site selection on 5S RNA genes transiently unwound for transcription is suggested. One of the Dipteran homology blocks is highly conserved in sequence and position in all but one of the eukaryotic 5S RNA gene sequences known to date (17/18 genes). Its sequence (consensus: TATAAG) and position (average center: -26 bp) are highly reminiscent of the polymerase II gene 'TATA' box (5). PMID:6209610

  3. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  4. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  5. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M.; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities. PMID:27708630

  6. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  7. RNomics in Archaea reveals a further link between splicing of archaeal introns and rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Thean Hock; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.; d’Orval, Béatrice Clouet; Bortolin, Marie-Line; Huber, Harald; Charpentier, Bruno; Branlant, Christiane; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Brosius, Jürgen; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The bulge–helix–bulge (BHB) motif recognised by the archaeal splicing endonuclease is also found in the long processing stems of archaeal rRNA precursors in which it is cleaved to generate pre-16S and pre-23S rRNAs. We show that in two species, Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Sulfolobus solfataricus, representatives from the two major archaeal kingdoms Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, respectively, the pre-rRNA spacers cleaved at the BHB motifs surrounding pre-16S and pre-23S rRNAs subsequently become ligated. In addition, we present evidence that this is accompanied by circularisation of ribosomal pre-16S and pre-23S rRNAs in both species. These data reveal a further link between intron splicing and pre-rRNA processing in Archaea, which might reflect a common evolutionary origin of the two processes. One spliced RNA species designated 16S-D RNA, resulting from religation at the BHB motif of 16S pre-rRNA, is a highly abundant and stable RNA which folds into a three-stem structure interrupted by two single-stranded regions as assessed by chemical probing. It spans a region of the pre-rRNA 5′ external transcribed spacer exhibiting a highly conserved folding pattern in Archaea. Surprisingly, 16S-D RNA contains structural motifs found in archaeal C/D box small RNAs and binds to the L7Ae protein, a core component of archaeal C/D box RNPs. This supports the notion that it might have an important but still unknown role in pre-rRNA biogenesis or might even target RNA molecules other than rRNA. PMID:11842103

  8. Materials Data on CsCr5S8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on TlCr5S8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on K(V5S8)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sn5(S2Cl)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Cd5(S2Cl)2 (SG:72) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on AgH5S2O9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Si2Cu5S7 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Y5S7 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on TlIn5S7 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Cr5S8 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbCr5S8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on RbIn5S8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Sn5(S2Cl)2 (SG:28) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-12-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ca6Sn5S16 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-08-13

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ca4Sn5S14 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on V5S4 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on V5S8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Cr5S6 (SG:163) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ti24Ga5S48 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Sb5S3O5 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Nb2Tl5S4Cl9 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Yb5S9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-05-20

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Evidence for 5S rDNA Horizontal Transfer in the toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus (Schneider, 1801) based on the analysis of three multigene families

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Batrachoididae family is a group of marine teleosts that includes several species with more complicated physiological characteristics, such as their excretory, reproductive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Previous studies of the 5S rDNA gene family carried out in four species from the Western Atlantic showed two types of this gene in two species but only one in the other two, under processes of concerted evolution and birth-and-death evolution with purifying selection. Here we present results of the 5S rDNA and another two gene families in Halobatrachus didactylus, an Eastern Atlantic species, and draw evolutionary inferences regarding the gene families. In addition we have also mapped the genes on the chromosomes by two-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Two types of 5S rDNA were observed, named type α and type β. Molecular analysis of the 5S rDNA indicates that H. didactylus does not share the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) sequences with four other species of the family; therefore, it must have evolved in isolation. Amplification with the type β specific primers amplified a specific band in 9 specimens of H. didactylus and two of Sparus aurata. Both types showed regulatory regions and a secondary structure which mark them as functional genes. However, the U2 snRNA gene and the ITS-1 sequence showed one electrophoretic band and with one type of sequence. The U2 snRNA sequence was the most variable of the three multigene families studied. Results from two-colour FISH showed no co-localization of the gene coding from three multigene families and provided the first map of the chromosomes of the species. Conclusions A highly significant finding was observed in the analysis of the 5S rDNA, since two such distant species as H. didactylus and Sparus aurata share a 5S rDNA type. This 5S rDNA type has been detected in other species belonging to the Batrachoidiformes and Perciformes orders, but not in the Pleuronectiformes

  11. Aerodynamic and engineering design of a 1.5 s high quality microgravity drop tower facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belser, Valentin; Breuninger, Jakob; Reilly, Matthew; Laufer, René; Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Hyde, Truell; Röser, Hans-Peter; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-12-01

    Microgravity experiments are essential for research in space science, biology, fluid mechanics, combustion, and material sciences. One way to conduct microgravity experiments on Earth is by using drop tower facilities. These facilities combine a high quality of microgravity, adequate payload masses and have the advantage of virtually unlimited repeatability under same experimental conditions, at a low cost. In a collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart and Baylor University (BU) in Waco, Texas, a new drop tower is currently under development at the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER). The design parameters of the drop tower ask for at least 1.5 s in free fall duration while providing a quality of at least 10-5 g. Previously, this quality has only been achieved in vacuum drop tower facilities where the capsule experiences virtually zero aerodynamic drag during its free fall. Since this design comes at high costs, a different drop tower design concept, which does not require an evacuated drop shaft, was chosen. It features a dual-capsule system in which the experiment capsule is shielded from aerodynamic forces by surrounding it with a drag shield during the drop. As no other dual-capsule drop tower has been able to achieve a quality as good as or better than 10-5 g previous work optimized the design with an aerodynamic perspective by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine the ideal shape and size of the outer capsule and to specify the aerodynamically crucial dimensions for the overall system. Experiments later demonstrated that the required quality of microgravity can be met with the proposed design. The main focus of this paper is the mechanical realization of the capsule as well as the development and layout of the surrounding components, such as the release mechanism, the deceleration device and the drop shaft. Because the drop tower facility is a

  12. Transcription of the Drosophila melanogaster 5S RNA gene requires an upstream promoter and four intragenic sequence elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, S.J.; Garcia, A.D.

    1988-03-01

    Linker-scanning (LS) mutations were constructed spanning the length of the Drosophila melanogaster 5S RNA gene. In vitro transcription analysis of the LS 5S DNAs revealed five transcription control regions. One control region essential for the transcription initiation was identified in the 5'-flanking sequence. The major sequence determinants of this upstream promoter region were located between coordinates -39 and -26 (-30 region), but important sequences extended to the transcription start site at position 1. Since mutations in the upstream promoter did not alter the ability of 5S DNA to sequester transcription factors into a stable transcription complex, it appears that this control region involved the interaction of RNA polymerase III. Active 5S DNA transcription additionally required the four intragenic control regions (ICRs) located between coordinates 3 and 18 (ICR I), 37 and 44 (ICR II), 48 and 61 (ICR III), and 78 and 98 (ICR IV). LS mutations in each ICR decreased the ability of 5S DNA to sequester transcription factors. ICR III, ICR IV, and the spacer sequence between were similar in sequence and position to the determinant elements of the multipartite ICR of Xenopus 5S DNA. The importance of ICR III and ICR IV in transcription initiation and in sequestering transcription factors suggests the presence of an activity in D. melanogaster similar to transcription factor TFIIIA of Xenopus laevis and HeLa cells. Transcription initiation of Drosophila 5S DNA was not eliminated by LS mutations in the spacer region even though these mutations reduced the ability of the TFIIIA-like activity to bind.

  13. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  14. Molecular characterization of Argulus bengalensis and Argulus siamensis (Crustacea: Argulidae) infecting the cultured carps in West Bengal, India using 18S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Avijit; Mondal, Anjan; Banerjee, Sayani; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2016-01-01

    The present study characterized Argulus spp. infecting the cultured carps using 18S rRNA gene sequences, estimated the genetic similarity among Argulus spp. and established their phylogenetic relationship. Of the 320 fish samples screened, 34 fish (10.6%) had Argulus infection. The parasitic frequency index (PFI) was observed to be high (20%) in Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Labeo bata. The frequency of infection was high in September (PFI: 17%) and October (PFI: 12.9%). The 18S rRNA sequences of five A. bengalensis (KF583878, KF192316, KM016968, KM016969, and KM016970) and one A. siamensis (KF583879) of this study showed genetic heterogeneity and exhibited 77-99% homology among the 18S rRNA gene sequences of Argulus spp. of NCBI GenBank database. Among the Indian Argulus spp. the sequence homology was 87–100%. Evolutionary pair-wise distances between Indian Argulus spp. and other Argulus spp. ranged from 0 to 20.20%. In the phylogenetic tree, all the crustaceans were clustered together as a separate clade with two distinct lineages. The lineage-1 comprised exclusive of Branchiura (Argulus spp.). All Argulus bengalensis clustered together and A. siamensis (KF583879) was closely related to Argulus sp. JN558648. The results of the present study provided baseline data for future work on population structure analysis of Indian Argulus species. PMID:28097169

  15. Identification of a novel methyltransferase, Bmt2, responsible for the N-1-methyl-adenosine base modification of 25S rRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunny; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2013-05-01

    The 25S rRNA of yeast contains several base modifications in the functionally important regions. The enzymes responsible for most of these base modifications remained unknown. Recently, we identified Rrp8 as a methyltransferase involved in m(1)A645 modification of 25S rRNA. Here, we discovered a previously uncharacterized gene YBR141C to be responsible for second m(1)A2142 modification of helix 65 of 25S rRNA. The gene was identified by reversed phase-HPLC screening of all deletion mutants of putative RNA methyltransferase and was confirmed by gene complementation and phenotypic characterization. Because of the function of its encoded protein, YBR141C was named BMT2 (base methyltransferase of 25S RNA). Helix 65 belongs to domain IV, which accounts for most of the intersubunit surface of the large subunit. The 3D structure prediction of Bmt2 supported it to be an Ado Met methyltransferase belonging to Rossmann fold superfamily. In addition, we demonstrated that the substitution of G180R in the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-binding motif drastically reduces the catalytic function of the protein in vivo. Furthermore, we analysed the significance of m(1)A2142 modification in ribosome synthesis and translation. Intriguingly, the loss of m(1)A2142 modification confers anisomycin and peroxide sensitivity to the cells. Our results underline the importance of RNA modifications in cellular physiology.

  16. Chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes, core histone genes and telomeric sequences in Brachidontes puniceus and Brachidontes rodriguezi (Bivalvia, Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromosome rearrangements are an important part of the speciation process in many taxa. The study of chromosome evolution in bivalves is hampered by the absence of clear chromosomal banding patterns and the similarity in both chromosome size and morphology. For this reason, obtaining good chromosome markers is essential for reliable karyotypic comparisons. To begin this task, the chromosomes of the mussels Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi were studied by means of fluorochrome staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi both have 2n = 32 chromosomes but differing karyotype composition. Vertebrate-type telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. B. puniceus presents a single terminal major rRNA gene cluster on a chromosome pair while B. rodriguezi shows two. Both mussels present two 5S rDNA and two core histone gene clusters intercalary located on the long arms of two chromosome pairs. Double and triple-FISH experiments demonstrated that one of the 5S rDNA and one of the major rDNA clusters appear on the same chromosome pair in B. rodriguezi but not in B. puniceus. On the other hand, the second 5S rDNA cluster is located in one of the chromosome pairs also bearing one of the core histone gene clusters in the two mussel species. Conclusion Knowledge of the chromosomal distribution of these sequences in the two species of Brachidontes is a first step in the understanding of the role of chromosome changes on bivalve evolution. PMID:21143946

  17. Differential sensitivities of CaV1.2 IIS5-S6 mutants to 1,4-dihydropyridine analogs.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwokyin; Kwok, Trevor C Y; Kostelecki, Wojciech; Leen, Jessica; Roy, Peter John; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2009-01-14

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs), L-type calcium channel (Ca(V)1) blockers, are known to interact with Ca(V)1.2 subunits through their binding site located at IIIS5-S6 and IVS6 regions. We recently identified two domain II residues (S666 and A752) critical for nifedipine blockade (Kwok et al., 2008). In this study, we examined the blockade effects of two DHP analogues, nemadipine and nicardipine, on wildtype, M1161A (in IIIS6), S666V (in IIS5) and A752T (in IIS6) mutants of the rat alpha(1C) subunit transiently expressed with beta(2a) and alpha(2)delta in cultured tsA201 cells. We found that the IC(50) ratio of the mutants to the wildtype channel was similar in S666V and M1161A mutants for both drugs, but in A752T it was lower for nemadipine than nicardipine (P<0.05). At saturating drug concentrations, not all the current was completely blocked in the mutants. The residual current recorded in 100 microM nemadipine was approximately 10% of the total current for the A752T channel, which was significantly higher than that in 100 microM nicardipine (approximately 2%). In wildtype, S666V and M1161A, there was no significant difference in residual current between nemadipine and nicardipine, although it was greater in S666V (approximately 15%) and M1161A approximately 30%) as compared to the wildtype channel (<5%). Taken together, our findings suggest that the domain II residues alter the DHP effect in a structure-specific manner and may be involved in a pathway downstream of DHP binding.

  18. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of 28S and ITS rRNA genes reveal high intragenomic variation in Cephalenchus (Nematoda): Implications for species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago José; Baldwin, James Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Concerted evolution is often assumed to be the evolutionary force driving multi-family genes, including those from ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat, to complete homogenization within a species, although cases of non-concerted evolution have been also documented. In this study, sequence variation of 28S and ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the genus Cephalenchus is assessed at three different levels, intragenomic, intraspecific, and interspecific. The findings suggest that not all Cephalenchus species undergo concerted evolution. High levels of intraspecific polymorphism, mostly due to intragenomic variation, are found in Cephalenchus sp1 (BRA-01). Secondary structure analyses of both rRNA genes and across different species show a similar substitution pattern, including mostly compensatory (CBC) and semi-compensatory (SBC) base changes, thus suggesting the functionality of these rRNA copies despite the variation found in some species. This view is also supported by low sequence variation in the 5.8S gene in relation to the flanking ITS-1 and ITS-2 as well as by the existence of conserved motifs in the former gene. It is suggested that potential cross-fertilization in some Cephalenchus species, based on inspection of female reproductive system, might contribute to both intragenomic and intraspecific polymorphism of their rRNA genes. These results reinforce the potential implications of intragenomic and intraspecific genetic diversity on species delimitation, especially in biodiversity studies based solely on metagenetic approaches. Knowledge of sequence variation will be crucial for accurate species diversity estimation using molecular methods.

  19. Nucleolus-like bodies of fully-grown mouse oocytes contain key nucleolar proteins but are impoverished for rRNA.

    PubMed

    Shishova, Kseniya V; Lavrentyeva, Elena A; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that fully-grown mammalian oocytes, rather than typical nucleoli, contain prominent but structurally homogenous bodies called "nucleolus-like bodies" (NLBs). NLBs accumulate a vast amount of material, but their biochemical composition and functions remain uncertain. To clarify the composition of the NLB material in mouse GV oocytes, we devised an assay to detect internal oocyte proteins with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and applied the fluorescent RNA-binding dye acridine orange to examine whether NLBs contain RNA. Our results unequivocally show that, similarly to typical nucleoli, proteins and RNA are major constituents of transcriptionally active (or non-surrounded) NLBs as well as of transcriptionally silent (or surrounded) NLBs. We also show, by exposing fixed oocytes to a mild proteinase K treatment, that the NLB mass in oocytes of both types contains nucleolar proteins that are involved in all major steps of ribosome biogenesis, including rDNA transcription (UBF), early rRNA processing (fibrillarin), and late rRNA processing (NPM1/nucleophosmin/B23, nucleolin/C23), but none of the nuclear proteins tested, including SC35, NOBOX, topoisomerase II beta, HP1α, and H3. The ribosomal RPL26 protein was detected within the NLBs of NSN-type oocytes but is virtually absent from NLBs of SN-type oocytes. Taking into account that the major class of nucleolar RNA is ribosomal RNA (rRNA), we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes targeting 18S and 28S rRNAs. The results show that, in contrast to active nucleoli, NLBs of fully-grown oocytes are impoverished for the rRNAs, which is consistent with the absence of transcribed ribosomal genes in the NLB mass. Overall, the results of this study suggest that NLBs of fully-grown mammalian oocytes serve for storing major nucleolar proteins but not rRNA.

  20. CLUSTOM-CLOUD: In-Memory Data Grid-Based Software for Clustering 16S rRNA Sequence Data in the Cloud Environment.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeongsu; Choi, Chi-Hwan; Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Byung Kwon; Hwang, Kyuin; Lee, Sang-Heon; Hong, Soon Gyu; Nasir, Arshan; Cho, Wan-Sup; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing can produce hundreds of thousands of 16S rRNA sequence reads corresponding to different organisms present in the environmental samples. Typically, analysis of microbial diversity in bioinformatics starts from pre-processing followed by clustering 16S rRNA reads into relatively fewer operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The OTUs are reliable indicators of microbial diversity and greatly accelerate the downstream analysis time. However, existing hierarchical clustering algorithms that are generally more accurate than greedy heuristic algorithms struggle with large sequence datasets. To keep pace with the rapid rise in sequencing data, we present CLUSTOM-CLOUD, which is the first distributed sequence clustering program based on In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) technology-a distributed data structure to store all data in the main memory of multiple computing nodes. The IMDG technology helps CLUSTOM-CLOUD to enhance both its capability of handling larger datasets and its computational scalability better than its ancestor, CLUSTOM, while maintaining high accuracy. Clustering speed of CLUSTOM-CLOUD was evaluated on published 16S rRNA human microbiome sequence datasets using the small laboratory cluster (10 nodes) and under the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environments. Under the laboratory environment, it required only ~3 hours to process dataset of size 200 K reads regardless of the complexity of the human microbiome data. In turn, one million reads were processed in approximately 20, 14, and 11 hours when utilizing 20, 30, and 40 nodes on the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environment. The running time evaluation indicates that CLUSTOM-CLOUD can handle much larger sequence datasets than CLUSTOM and is also a scalable distributed processing system. The comparative accuracy test using 16S rRNA pyrosequences of a mock community shows that CLUSTOM-CLOUD achieves higher accuracy than DOTUR, mothur, ESPRIT-Tree, UCLUST and Swarm. CLUSTOM-CLOUD is written in JAVA

  1. Identification of YbeY-Protein Interactions Involved in 16S rRNA Maturation and Stress Regulation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Shen, Yang; Proulx, Sandra; Ghosal, Anubrata; Davies, Bryan W.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT YbeY is part of a core set of RNases in Escherichia coli and other bacteria. This highly conserved endoribonuclease has been implicated in several important processes such as 16S rRNA 3′ end maturation, 70S ribosome quality control, and regulation of mRNAs and small noncoding RNAs, thereby affecting cellular viability, stress tolerance, and pathogenic and symbiotic behavior of bacteria. Thus, YbeY likely interacts with numerous protein or RNA partners that are involved in various aspects of cellular physiology. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, we identified several proteins that interact with YbeY, including ribosomal protein S11, the ribosome-associated GTPases Era and Der, YbeZ, and SpoT. In particular, the interaction of YbeY with S11 and Era provides insight into YbeY’s involvement in the 16S rRNA maturation process. The three-way association between YbeY, S11, and Era suggests that YbeY is recruited to the ribosome where it could cleave the 17S rRNA precursor endonucleolytically at or near the 3′ end maturation site. Analysis of YbeY missense mutants shows that a highly conserved beta-sheet in YbeY—and not amino acids known to be important for YbeY’s RNase activity—functions as the interface between YbeY and S11. This protein-interacting interface of YbeY is needed for correct rRNA maturation and stress regulation, as missense mutants show significant phenotypic defects. Additionally, structure-based in silico prediction of putative interactions between YbeY and the Era-30S complex through protein docking agrees well with the in vivo results. PMID:27834201

  2. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  3. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  4. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  5. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  6. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  7. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  8. Methyltransferase Erm(37) slips on rRNA to confer atypical resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Jakobsen, Lene; Buriánková, Karolina; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2005-11-25

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex possess a resistance determinant, erm(37) (also termed ermMT), which is a truncated homologue of the erm genes found in a diverse range of drug-producing and pathogenic bacteria. All erm genes examined thus far encode N(6)-monomethyltransferases or N(6),N(6)-dimethyltransferases that show absolute specificity for nucleotide A2058 in 23 S rRNA. Monomethylation at A2058 confers resistance to a subset of the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) group of antibiotics and no resistance to the latest macrolide derivatives, the ketolides. Dimethylation at A2058 confers high resistance to all MLS(B) and ketolide drugs. The erm(37) phenotype fits into neither category. We show here by tandem mass spectrometry that Erm(37) initially adds a single methyl group to its primary target at A2058 but then proceeds to attach additional methyl groups to the neighboring nucleotides A2057 and A2059. Other methyltransferases, Erm(E) and Erm(O), maintain their specificity for A2058 on mycobacterial rRNA. Erm(E) and Erm(O) have a full-length C-terminal domain, which appears to be important for stabilizing the methyltransferases at their rRNA target, and this domain is truncated in Erm(37). The lax interaction of the M. tuberculosis Erm(37) with its rRNA produces a unique methylation pattern and confers resistance to the ketolide telithromycin.

  9. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  10. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  11. Two-dimensional combinatorial screening of a bacterial rRNA A-site-like motif library: defining privileged asymmetric internal loops that bind aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D

    2010-03-09

    RNAs have diverse structures that are important for biological function. These structures include bulges and internal loops that can form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The most commonly exploited RNA drug target for small molecule intervention is the bacterial ribosome, more specifically the rRNA aminoacyl-tRNA site (rRNA A-site) which is a major target for the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics. The bacterial A-site is composed of a 1 x 1 nucleotide all-U internal loop and a 2 x 1 nucleotide all-A internal loop separated by a single GC base pair. Therefore, we probed the molecular recognition of a small library of four aminoglycosides for binding a 16384-member bacterial rRNA A-site-like internal loop library using two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS). 2DCS is a microarray-based method that probes RNA and chemical spaces simultaneously. These studies sought to determine if aminoglycosides select their therapeutic target if given a choice of binding all possible internal loops derived from an A-site-like library. Results show that the bacterial rRNA A-site was not selected by any aminoglycoside. Analyses of selected sequences using the RNA Privileged Space Predictor (RNA-PSP) program show that each aminoglycoside preferentially binds different types of internal loops. For three of the aminoglycosides, 6''-azido-kanamycin A, 5-O-(2-azidoethyl)-neamine, and 6''-azido-tobramycin, the selected internal loops bind with approximately 10-fold higher affinity than the bacterial rRNA A-site. The internal loops selected to bind 5''-azido-neomycin B bind with an affinity similar to that of the therapeutic target. Selected internal loops that are unique for each aminoglycoside have dissociation constants ranging from 25 to 270 nM and are specific for the aminoglycoside they was selected to bind compared to the other arrayed aminoglycosides. These studies further establish a database of RNA motifs that are recognized by small molecules that

  12. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2–2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2–2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2–2, atg9–4, atg5–1, rns2–2 atg9–4, and rns2–2 atg5–1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2–2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2–2 atg5–1 double mutant but not by an rns2–2 atg9–4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole. PMID:26735434

  13. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2-2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2-2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2-2, atg9-4, atg5-1, rns2-2 atg9-4, and rns2-2 atg5-1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2-2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2-2 atg5-1 double mutant but not by an rns2-2 atg9-4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole.

  14. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  15. Radiative lifetime of the 5S2 metastable state of N/+/. [with interpretation of auroral emission spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of metastable N(+)(5S2) has been measured to be 4.2 + or - 0.6 msec, a value generally in agreement with theory, by direct monitoring of the spontaneous emission from approximately 1,000,000 ions stored in a radio-frequency ion trap. Additional measurements were made of the quenching rate coefficient (2.5 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec) and the production cross section (greater than or equal to 10 to the -18th sq cm) of N(+)(5S2) in N2. This work supports the interpretation of the 2145-A feature in the spectrum of aurorae as being due to N(+)(5S2) emission.

  16. Electron microscopic study of crystals of the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA-5S ribosomal RNA complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, R S; Ferguson, C; Kingswell, A; Winkler, F K; Leonard, K R

    1988-06-01

    A novel method has been developed to grow crystals of the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA-5S RNA complex directly on grids for examination by electron microscopy. Microcrystals were examined in negative stain and in thin sections to reveal a hexagonal lattice with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 87.1 +/- 4.4 A and c = 143.8 +/- 12.7 A. Optical diffraction patterns from micrographs were obtained about the major crystal axes extending to about 40-A resolution. A packing scheme is proposed for which there are three or six transcription factor IIIA-5S RNA complexes in the unit cell related by 3(1) symmetry along the long cell axis. This would require that the 5S RNA molecules are arranged end-to-end, with the terminal loops of adjacent molecules overlapping.

  17. D5S2500 is an ambiguously characterized STR: Identification and description of forensic microsatellites in the genomics age.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C; Parson, W; Amigo, J; King, J L; Coble, M D; Steffen, C R; Vallone, P M; Gettings, K B; Butler, J M; Budowle, B

    2016-07-01

    In the process of establishing short tandem repeat (STR) sequence variant nomenclature guidelines in anticipation of expanded forensic multiplexes for massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it was discovered that the STR D5S2500 has multiple positions and genomic characteristics reported. This ambiguity is because the marker named D5S2500 consists of two different microsatellites forming separate components in the capillary electrophoresis multiplexes of Qiagen's HDplex (Hilden, Germany) and AGCU ScienTech's non-CODIS STR 21plex (Wuxi, Jiangsu, China). This study outlines the genomic details used to identify each microsatellite and reveals the D5S2500 marker in HDplex has the correctly assigned STR name, while the D5S2500 marker in the AGCU 21plex, closely positioned a further 1643 nucleotides in the human reference sequence, is an unnamed microsatellite. The fact that the D5S2500 marker has existed as two distinct STR loci undetected for almost ten years, even with reported discordant genotypes for the standard control DNA, underlines the need for careful scrutiny of the genomic properties of forensic STRs, as they become adapted for sequence analysis with MPS systems. We make the recommendation that precise chromosome location data must be reported for any forensic marker under development but not in common use, so that the genomic characteristics of the locus are validated to the same level of accuracy as its allelic variation and forensic performance. To clearly differentiate each microsatellite, we propose the name D5S2800 be used to identify the Chromosome-5 STR in the AGCU 21plex.

  18. Impact of the Japanese 5S management method on patients’ and caretakers’ satisfaction: a quasi-experimental study in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Shogo; Castro, Marcia C.; Sow, Seydou; Matsuno, Rui; Cissokho, Alioune; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    Background The 5S method is a lean management tool for workplace organization, with 5S being an abbreviation for five Japanese words that translate to English as Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain. In Senegal, the 5S intervention program was implemented in 10 health centers in two regions between 2011 and 2014. Objective To identify the impact of the 5S intervention program on the satisfaction of clients (patients and caretakers) who visited the health centers. Design A standardized 5S intervention protocol was implemented in the health centers using a quasi-experimental separate pre-post samples design (four intervention and three control health facilities). A questionnaire with 10 five-point Likert items was used to measure client satisfaction. Linear regression analysis was conducted to identify the intervention's effect on the client satisfaction scores, represented by an equally weighted average of the 10 Likert items (Cronbach's alpha=0.83). Additional regression analyses were conducted to identify the intervention's effect on the scores of each Likert item. Results Backward stepwise linear regression (n=1,928) indicated a statistically significant effect of the 5S intervention, represented by an increase of 0.19 points in the client satisfaction scores in the intervention group, 6 to 8 months after the intervention (p=0.014). Additional regression analyses showed significant score increases of 0.44 (p=0.002), 0.14 (p=0.002), 0.06 (p=0.019), and 0.17 (p=0.044) points on four items, which, respectively were healthcare staff members’ communication, explanations about illnesses or cases, and consultation duration, and clients’ overall satisfaction. Conclusions The 5S has the potential to improve client satisfaction at resource-poor health facilities and could therefore be recommended as a strategic option for improving the quality of healthcare service in low- and middle-income countries. To explore more effective intervention modalities

  19. Features of laser-induced luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, A. G.; Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M.; Salmanova, A. A.; Gasanova, L. G.; Mahammadov, A. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. A pulsed nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with built-in second and third harmonic generators to generate 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm radiation is used as a light source. It is found that the photoluminescence spectra exhibit two emission bands due to zone-acceptor level and impurity donor-impurity acceptor transitions. It is shown that the photoconductivity in Cu3In5S9 is monopolar. The waveform of the photoconductivity consists of fast and slow components associated with two channels of recombination.

  20. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  1. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-24

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested.

  2. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested. PMID:28117413

  3. Synthesis and absolute configuration of a new 3,4-dihydro-beta-carboline-type alkaloid, 3,4-dehydro-5(S)-5-carboxystrictosidine, isolated from Peruvian Uña de Gato (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Yokoya, Masashi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Aimi, Norio

    2002-10-01

    The structure including the absolute configuration of a new glucoalkaloid, 3,4-dehydro-5(S)-5-carboxystrictosidine, isolated from Peruvian Uña de Gato (Cat's Claw, original plant: Uncaria tomentosa), was confirmed by synthesis starting from secologanin and L-tryptophan.

  4. Phylogenetic Sequence Variations in Bacterial rRNA Affect Species-Specific Susceptibility to Drugs Targeting Protein Synthesis▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Akshay, Subramanian; Bertea, Mihai; Hobbie, Sven N.; Oettinghaus, Björn; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Böttger, Erik C.; Akbergenov, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting the bacterial ribosome typically bind to highly conserved rRNA regions with only minor phylogenetic sequence variations. It is unclear whether these sequence variations affect antibiotic susceptibility or resistance development. To address this question, we have investigated the drug binding pockets of aminoglycosides and macrolides/ketolides. The binding site of aminoglycosides is located within helix 44 of the 16S rRNA (A site); macrolides/ketolides bind to domain V of the 23S rRNA (peptidyltransferase center). We have used mutagenesis of rRNA sequences in Mycobacterium smegmatis ribosomes to reconstruct the different bacterial drug binding sites and to study the effects of rRNA sequence variations on drug activity. Our results provide a rationale for differences in species-specific drug susceptibility patterns and species-specific resistance phenotypes associated with mutational alterations in the drug binding pocket. PMID:21730122

  5. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM.

    PubMed

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel; Desmolaize, Benoît; Douthwaite, Stephen; Mechulam, Yves; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium methyltransferase, as well as by the previously characterized aac(6')-Ii that encodes a 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase. Inactivation of efmM in E. faecium increases susceptibility to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and tobramycin, and, conversely, expression of a recombinant version of efmM in Escherichia coli confers resistance to these drugs. The EfmM protein shows significant sequence similarity to E. coli RsmF (previously called YebU), which is a 5-methylcytidine (m⁵C) methyltransferase modifying 16S rRNA nucleotide C1407. The target for EfmM is shown by mass spectrometry to be a neighboring 16S rRNA nucleotide at C1404. EfmM uses the methyl group donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine to catalyze formation of m⁵C1404 on the 30S ribosomal subunit, whereas naked 16S rRNA and the 70S ribosome are not substrates. Addition of the 5-methyl to C1404 sterically hinders aminoglycoside binding. Crystallographic structure determination of EfmM at 2.28 Å resolution reveals an N-terminal domain connected to a central methyltransferase domain that is linked by a flexible lysine-rich region to two C-terminal subdomains. Mutagenesis of the methyltransferase domain established that two cysteines at specific tertiary locations are required for catalysis. The tertiary structure of EfmM is highly similar to that of RsmF, consistent with m⁵C formation at adjacent sites on the 30S subunit, while distinctive structural features account for the enzymes' respective specificities for nucleotides C1404 and C1407.

  6. Charged bottomoniumlike states Z{sub b}(10610) and Z{sub b}(10650) and the {Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Dianyong; Liu Xiang; Zhu Shilin

    2011-10-01

    Inspired by the newly observed two charged bottomoniumlike states, we consider the possible contribution from the intermediate Z{sub b}(10610) and Z{sub b}(10650) states to the {Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay process, which naturally explains Belle's previous observation of the anomalous {Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} production near the peak of {Upsilon}(5S) at {radical}(s)=10.87 GeV [K. F. Chen et al. (Belle Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 112001 (2008)]. The resulting d{Gamma}({Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/dm{sub {pi}}{sup +}{sub {pi}}{sup -} and d{Gamma}({Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/dcos{theta} distributions agree with Belle's measurement after inclusion of these Z{sub b} states. This formalism also reproduces the Belle observation of the double-peak structure and its reflection in the {Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +} invariant mass spectrum of the {Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(2S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay.

  7. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  8. Phylogeny of Metschnikowia species estimated from partial rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N; Kurtzman, C P

    1993-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of species assigned to the genus Metschnikowia were estimated from the extents of divergence among partial sequences of rRNA. The data suggest that the aquatic species (Metschnikowia australis, Metschnikowia bicuspidata, Metschnikowia krissii, and Metschnikowia zobellii) and the terrestrial species (Metschnikowia hawaiiensis, Metschnikowia lunata, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Metschnikowia reukaufii) form two groups within the genus. M. lunata and M. hawaiiensis are well separated from other members of the genus, and M. hawaiiensis may be sufficiently divergent that it could be placed in a new genus. Species of the genus Metschnikowia are unique compared with other ascomycetous yeasts because they have a deletion in the large-subunit rRNA sequence that includes nucleotides 434 to 483.

  9. Improving oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes by implementation of polony microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Bent, Elizabeth; Li, Wei; Jeske, Daniel R.; Cui, Xinping; Braun, Jonathan; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) were obtained by implementing polony microarray technology. OFRG is an array-based method for analyzing microbial community composition. Polonies are discrete clusters of DNA, produced by solid-phase PCR in hydrogels, and derived from individual, spatially isolated DNA molecules. The advantages of a polony-based OFRG method include higher throughput and reductions in the PCR-induced errors and compositional skew inherent in all other PCR-based community composition methods, including high throughput sequencing of rRNA genes. Given the similarities between polony microarrays and certain aspects of sequencing methods such as the Illumina platform, we suggest that if concepts presented in this study were implemented in high throughput sequencing protocols, a reduction of PCR-induced errors and compositional skew may be realized. PMID:22640891

  10. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  11. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  12. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  13. DNA sequencing analysis of ITS and 28S rRNA of Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Mikage, Masayuki

    2007-08-01

    We determined the DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS 1 and 2), the 5.8S rRNA gene and most of the 28S rRNA gene of Poria cocos for the first time, and conducted analysis of 20 samples including cultured mycelias and crude drug materials obtained from various localities and markets. Direct sequencing of the ITS 1 and 2 regions of the samples, except for four wild samples, showed that they had identical DNA sequences for ITS 1 and 2 with nucleotide lengths of 997 bps and 460 bps, respectively. By cloning, the four wild samples were found to have combined sequences of common ITS sequences with 1 or 2-base-pair insertions. Altogether both ITS 1 and 2 sequences were substantially longer than those of other fungal crude drugs such as Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus. Thus, Poria cocos could be distinguished from these crude drugs and fakes by comparing the nucleotide length of PCR products of ITS 1 and 2. Contrary to the basic homogeneity in ITS 1 and 2, three types (Group 1, 2, 3) of the 28S rRNA gene with distinctive differences in length and sequence were found. Furthermore, Group 1 could be divided into three subgroups depending on differences at nucleotide position 690. Products with different types of 28S rRNA gene were found in crude drugs from Yunnan and Anhui Provinces as well as the Korean Peninsula, suggesting that the locality of the crude drugs does not guarantee genetic uniformity. The result of DNA typing of Poria cocos may help discrimination of the quality of the crude drug by genotype.

  14. Application of 12S rRNA gene for the identification of animal-derived drugs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Da; Han, Yumei; Dong, Xiaoping; Yang, Yong; Deng, Kejun; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. Animal-derived drugs are the major source of biological products and traditional medicine, but they are often difficult to identify, causing confusion in the clinical application. Among these medicinal animals, a number of animal species are endangered, leading to the destruction of biodiversity. The identification of animal-derived drugs and their alternatives would be a first step toward biodiversity conservation and safe medication. Until now, no effective method for identifying animal-derived drugs has been demonstrated; DNA-based species identification presents a brand-new technique. METHODS. We designed primers to amplify a 523-bp fragment of 12S rRNA and generated sequences for 13 individuals within six medicinal animal species. We examined the efficiency of species recognition based on this sequence, and we also tested the taxonomic affiliations against the GenBank database. RESULTS. All the tested drugs were identified successfully, and a visible gap was found between the inter-specific and intra-specific variation. We further demonstrated the importance of data exploration in DNA-based species identification practice by examining the sequence characteristics of relative genera in GenBank. This region of the 12S rRNA gene had a 100% success rate of species recognition within the six medicinal animal species. CONCLUSIONS. We propose that the 12S rRNA locus might be universal for identifying animal-derived drugs and their adulterants. The development of 12S rRNA for indentifying animal-derived drugs that share a common gene target would contribute significantly to the clinical application of animal-derived drugs and the conservation of medicinal animal species. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  15. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  16. gar2 is a nucleolar protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe required for 18S rRNA and 40S ribosomal subunit accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gulli, M P; Girard, J P; Zabetakis, D; Lapeyre, B; Melese, T; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1995-01-01

    Several nucleolar proteins, such as nucleolin, NOP1/fibrillarin, SSB1, NSR1 and GAR1 share a common glycine and arginine rich structural motif called the GAR domain. To identify novel nucleolar proteins from fission yeast we screened Schizosaccharomyces pombe genomic DNA libraries with a probe encompassing the GAR structural motif. Here we report the identification and characterization of a S.pombe gene coding for a novel nucleolar protein, designated gar2. The structure of the fission yeast gar2 is reminiscent of that of nucleolin from vertebrates and NSR1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, like these proteins, gar2 has a nucleolar localisation. The disruption of the gar2+ gene affects normal cell growth, leads to an accumulation of 35S pre-rRNA and a decrease of mature 18S rRNA steady state levels. Moreover, ribosomal profiles of the mutant show an increase of free 60S ribosomal subunits and an absence of free 40S ribosomal subunits. gar2 is able to rescue a S.cerevisiae mutant lacking NSR1, thus establishing gar2 as a functional homolog of NSR1. We propose that gar2 helps the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles containing 18S rRNA. Images PMID:7596817

  17. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  18. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  19. Molecular systematics of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) based on exhaustive 18S rRNA phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Misawa, Kazuharu; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomy of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) was traditionally based solely on morphological characteristics. However, because recent molecular phylogeny largely contradicts the traditional subordinal and familial classifications, no classification system has yet been established that describes the subdivision of Volvocales in a manner consistent with the phylogenetic relationships. Towards development of a natural classification system at and above the generic level, identification and sorting of hundreds of sequences based on subjective phylogenetic definitions is a significant step. We constructed an 18S rRNA gene phylogeny based on 449 volvocalean sequences collected using exhaustive BLAST searches of the GenBank database. Many chimeric sequences, which can cause fallacious phylogenetic trees, were detected and excluded during data collection. The results revealed 21 strongly supported primary clades within phylogenetically redefined Volvocales. Phylogenetic classification following PhyloCode was proposed based on the presented 18S rRNA gene phylogeny along with the results of previous combined 18S and 26S rRNA and chloroplast multigene analyses.

  20. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  1. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  2. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  3. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  4. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  5. High power system for ECRH at 140Ghz, 2MW, 0.5s on FTU tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, C.; Bozzi, R.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gandini, F.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Muzzini, V.; Nardone, A.; Simonetto, A.; Spinicchia, N.; Berardi, B.; Ciccone, G.; DiGiovenale, S.; Iannone, F.; Lupini, S.; Mantovani, S.; Pesci, E.

    1999-09-20

    The 140GHz, 2MW, 0.5s ECRH system on FTU tokamak integrates closed waveguide transmission lines ({approx_equal}30 m) with quasi optical systems at both ends for efficient coupling from the 4 gyrotrons to the 4 waveguides and from these to the plasma through a single access port. Poloidal and toroidal control of the beam's launching angles and polarization is performed without movable components close to the plasma. Most of the components of each generation and transmission system were designed to operate at a power level higher than 0.5 MW, and a possible up-grade to a full 1 MW, 0.5 s capability is discussed.

  6. A Tale of Two Lines: Searching for the 5s - 5p Resonance Lines in Pm-like Ion Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y

    2008-10-24

    Highly charged ions in the promethium sequence have been suggested to show spectral features resembling the alkali sequence ions. Guided by calculations, the 5s-5p resonance lines have been sought in a variety of experiments. In the light of the most extensive calculations of Pm-like ions yet, applying relativistic multi-reference Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory, the experimental evidence is reviewed and the line identification problem assessed.

  7. Karyotypic features including organizations of the 5S, 45S rDNA loci and telomeres of Scadoxus multiflorus (Amaryllidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Monkheang, Pansa; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Sudmoon, Runglawan; Tanee, Tawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Scadoxus multiflorus Martyn, 1795 is an ornamental plant with brilliantly colored flowers. Even though its chromosomes are rather large, there is no karyotype description reported so far. Therefore, conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 45S and 5S rDNA, and human telomere sequence (TTAGGG)n probes (Arabidopsis-type telomere probes yielded negative results) were carried out. The chromosome number is as reported previously, 2n = 18. The nine chromosome pairs include two large submetacentric, five large acrocentric, one medium acrocentric, two small metacentric and eight small submetacentric chromosomes. Hybridization sites of the 45S rDNA signals were on the short arm ends of chromosomes #1, #3 and #8, while 5S rDNA signals appeared on the long arm of chromosome 3, in one homologue as a double signal. The telomere signals were restricted to all chromosome ends. Three chromosome pairs could be newly identified, chromosome pair 3 by 5S rDNA and chromosomes #1, #3 and #8 by 45S rDNA loci. In addition to new information about rDNA locations we show that the ends of Scadoxus multiflorus chromosomes harbor human instead of Arabidopsis-type telomere sequences. Overall, the Scadoxus multiflorus karyotype presents chromosomal heteromorphy concerning size, shape and 45S and 5S rDNA positioning. As Scadoxus Rafinesque, 1838 and related species are poorly studied on chromosomal level the here presented data is important for better understanding of evolution in Amaryllidaceae. PMID:28123684

  8. Molecular hybridization of iodinated 4S, 5S, and 18S + 28S RNA to salamander chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    4S, 5S, AND 18S + 28S RNA from the newt Taricha granulosa granulosa were iodinated in vitro with carrier-free 125I and hybridized to the denatured chromosomes of Taricha granulosa and Batrachoseps weighti. Iodinated 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes to the telomeric region on the shorter arm of chromosome 2 and close to the centromere on the shorter arm of chromosome 9 from T. granulosa. On this same salamander the label produced by the 5S RNA is located close to or on the centromere of chromosome 7 and the iodinated 4S RNA labels the distal end of the longer arm of chromosome 5. On the chromosomes of B. wrighti, 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes close to the centromeric region on the longer arm of the largest chromosome. Two centromeric sites are hybridized by the iodinated 5S RNA. After hybridization with iodinated 4S RNA, label is found near the end of the shorter arm of chromosome 3. It is concluded that both ribosomal and transfer RNA genes are clustered in the genome of these two salamanders. PMID:944187

  9. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Suh; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Seong, Ji-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH), disc angle (DA), disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA), lumbar lordotic angle (LLA), and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and patient satisfaction rate (PSR) were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21) at 12 months' follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21). The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21). Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable. PMID:27433472

  10. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  11. 23S rRNA gene-based enterococci community signatures in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA, following urban runoff inputs after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Hou, Aixin

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the impacts of fecal polluted urban runoff inputs on the structure of enterococci communities in estuarine waters. This study employed a 23S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with newly designed genus-specific primers, Ent127F-Ent907R, to determine the possible impacts of Hurricane Katrina floodwaters via the 17th Street Canal discharge on the community structure of enterococci in Lake Pontchartrain. A total of 94 phylotypes were identified through the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) screening of 494 clones while only 8 phylotypes occurred among 88 cultivated isolates. Sequence analyses of representative phylotypes and their temporal and spatial distribution in the lake and the canal indicated the Katrina floodwater input introduced a large portion of Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus dispar into the lake; typical fecal groups Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus hirae, and Enterococcus mundtii were detected primarily in the floodwater-impacted waters. This study provides a global picture of enterococci in estuarine waters impacted by Hurricane Katrina-derived urban runoff. It also demonstrates the culture-independent PCR approach using 23S rRNA gene as a molecular marker could be a good alternative in ecological studies of enterococci in natural environments to overcome the limitation of conventional cultivation methods.

  12. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  13. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  14. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  15. Suspension Array Analysis of 16S rRNA from Fe- and SO42-Reducing Bacteria in Uranium-Contaminated Sediments Undergoing Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Jarrell, Ann E.; Roden, Eric R.; Golova, Julia; Chernov, Boris; Schipma, Matthew J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted tunable bead array was developed and used in a retrospective analysis of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in contaminated subsurface sediments undergoing in situ U(VI) bioremediation. Total RNA was extracted from subsurface sediments and interrogated directly, without a PCR step. Bead array validation studies with total RNA derived from 24 isolates indicated that the behavior and response of the 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes could not be predicted based on the primary nucleic acid sequence. Likewise, signal intensity (absolute or normalized) could not be used to assess the abundance of one organism (or rRNA) relative to the abundance of another organism (or rRNA). Nevertheless, the microbial community structure and dynamics through time and space and as measured by the rRNA-targeted bead array were consistent with previous data acquired at the site, where indigenous sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria and near neighbors of Desulfotomaculum were the organisms that were most responsive to a change in injected acetate concentrations. Bead array data were best interpreted by analyzing the relative changes in the probe responses for spatially and temporally related samples and by considering only the response of one probe to itself in relation to a background (reference) environmental sample. By limiting the interpretation of the data in this manner and placing it in the context of supporting geochemical and microbiological analyses, we concluded that ecologically relevant and meaningful information can be derived from direct microarray analysis of rRNA in uncharacterized environmental samples, even with the current analytical uncertainty surrounding the behavior of individual probes on tunable bead arrays. PMID:16820459

  16. Sequence diversity in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons in representatives of the Escherichia coli ECOR collection.

    PubMed

    Antón, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1998-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA multigene family in Escherichia coli comprises seven rrn operons of similar, but not identical, sequence. Four operons (rrnC, B, G, and E) contain genes in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) for tRNA(Glu-2) and three (rrnA, D, and H) contain genes for tRNA(Ile-1) and tRNA(Ala-1B). To increase our understanding of their molecular evolution, we have determined the ISR sequence of the seven operons in a set of 12 strains from the ECOR collection. Each operon was specifically amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from genes or open reading frames located upstream of the 16S rRNA genes in E. coli K12. With a single exception (ECOR 40), ISRs containing one or two tRNA genes were found at the same respective loci as those of strain K12. Intercistronic heterogeneity already found in K12 was representative of most variation among the strains studied and the location of polymorphic sites was the same. Dispersed nucleotide substitutions were very few but 21 variable sites were found grouped in a stem-loop, although the secondary structure was conserved. Some regions were found in which a stretch of nucleotides was substituted in block by one alternative, apparently unrelated, sequence (as illustrated by the known putative insertion of rsl in K12). Except for substitutions of different sizes and insertions/deletions found in the ISR, the pattern of nucleotide variation is very similar to that found for the 16S rRNA gene in E. coli. Strains K12 and ECOR 40 showed the highest intercistronic heterogeneity. Most strains showed a strong tendency to homogenization. Concerted evolution could explain the notorious conservation of this region that is supposed to have low functional restrictions.

  17. Functional Role of Methylation of G518 of the 16S rRNA 530 Loop by GidB in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sharon Y.; Javid, Babak; Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Strader, Michael Brad; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications of bacterial rRNA serve a variety of purposes, from stabilizing ribosome structure to preserving its functional integrity. Here, we investigated the functional role of one rRNA modification in particular—the methylation of guanosine at position 518 (G518) of the 16S rRNA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on previously reported evidence that G518 is located 5 Å; from proline 44 of ribosomal protein S12, which interacts directly with the mRNA wobble position of the codon:anticodon helix at the A site during translation, we speculated that methylation of G518 affects protein translation. We transformed reporter constructs designed to probe the effect of functional lesions at one of the three codon positions on translational fidelity into the wild-type strain, H37Rv, and into a ΔgidB mutant, which lacks the methyltransferase (GidB) that methylates G518. We show that mistranslation occurs less in the ΔgidB mutant only in the construct bearing a lesion in the wobble position compared to H37Rv. Thus, the methylation of G518 allows mistranslation to occur at some level in order for translation to proceed smoothly and efficiently. We also explored the role of methylation at G518 in altering the susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to streptomycin (SM). Using high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), we confirmed that G518 is not methylated in the ΔgidB mutant. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments performed on 70S ribosomes purified from wild-type and ΔgidB mutant strains showed that methylation significantly enhances SM binding. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for the low-level, SM-resistant phenotype observed in M. tuberculosis strains that contain a gidB mutation. PMID:24100503

  18. The role of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease: searching for mutations in 12S mitochondrial rRNA with high disruptive potential

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul M.; Elson, Joanna L.; Greaves, Laura C.; Wortmann, Saskia B.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA are linked to many human diseases. Despite the identification of a large number of variants in the mitochondrially encoded rRNA (mt-rRNA) genes, the evidence supporting their pathogenicity is, at best, circumstantial. Establishing the pathogenicity of these variations is of major diagnostic importance. Here, we aim to estimate the disruptive effect of mt-rRNA variations on the function of the mitochondrial ribosome. In the absence of direct biochemical methods to study the effect of mt-rRNA variations, we relied on the universal conservation of the rRNA fold to infer their disruptive potential. Our method, named heterologous inferential analysis or HIA, combines conservational information with functional and structural data obtained from heterologous ribosomal sources. Thus, HIA's predictive power is superior to the traditional reliance on simple conservation indexes. By using HIA, we have been able to evaluate the disruptive potential for a subset of uncharacterized 12S mt-rRNA variations. Our analysis revealed the existence of variations in the rRNA component of the human mitoribosome with different degrees of disruptive power. In cases where sufficient information regarding the genetic and pathological manifestation of the mitochondrial phenotype is available, HIA data can be used to predict the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations. In other cases, HIA analysis will allow the prioritization of variants for additional investigation. Eventually, HIA-inspired analysis of potentially pathogenic mt-rRNA variations, in the context of a scoring system specifically designed for these variants, could lead to a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:24092330

  19. Design and Evaluation of Illumina MiSeq-Compatible, 18S rRNA Gene-Specific Primers for Improved Characterization of Mixed Phototrophic Communities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of high-throughput sequencing technologies with the 16S rRNA gene for characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities has become routine. However, the adoption of sequencing methods for eukaryotes has been slow, despite their significance to natural and engineered systems. There are large variations among the target genes used for amplicon sequencing, and for the 18S rRNA gene, there is no consensus on which hypervariable region provides the most suitable representation of diversity. Additionally, it is unclear how much PCR/sequencing bias affects the depiction of community structure using current primers. The present study amplified the V4 and V8-V9 regions from seven microalgal mock communities as well as eukaryotic communities from freshwater, coastal, and wastewater samples to examine the effect of PCR/sequencing bias on community structure and membership. We found that degeneracies on the 3′ end of the current V4-specific primers impact read length and mean relative abundance. Furthermore, the PCR/sequencing error is markedly higher for GC-rich members than for communities with balanced GC content. Importantly, the V4 region failed to reliably capture 2 of the 12 mock community members, and the V8-V9 hypervariable region more accurately represents mean relative abundance and alpha and beta diversity. Overall, the V4 and V8-V9 regions show similar community representations over freshwater, coastal, and wastewater environments, but specific samples show markedly different communities. These results indicate that multiple primer sets may be advantageous for gaining a more complete understanding of community structure and highlight the importance of including mock communities composed of species of interest. IMPORTANCE The quantification of error associated with community representation by amplicon sequencing is a critical challenge that is often ignored. When target genes are amplified using currently available primers, differential

  20. Genetic polymorphism of 12S rRNA gene among Dermacentor reticulatus Fabricius ticks in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Exclusion Zone.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Morozov, Alexandr; Sitnicova, Natalia

    2013-02-01

    The molecular genetic variability of the 12S rRNA gene, on the basis of partial primary sequence and in silico-predicted secondary structures among Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius 1794) ticks, was studied in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Exclusion Zone. In total, 20, 20, and 25 ethanol-preserved specimens, previously collected at 3 sites with 0.76, 1.91, and 4.5 millisievert (mSv)/hr ionizing radiation background, were examined. The primary sequence analysis generated 4 haplotypes defined by 3 polymorphic sites. The most common haplotype 1 was found in all 3 locations, representing 86.2% of all sampled individuals. Haplotype 4 (10.8%) was detected at the 1.91 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites. The unique haplotypes 2 (1.5%) and 3 (1.5%) were detected only at the 1.91 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites, respectively. The haplotype diversity, nucleotide diversity, and pairwise nucleotide differences for 2 tick populations at the 1.90 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites were 0.279, 0.00085, and 0.289, and 0.397, 0.00122, 0.413, respectively. No polymorphism was detected in ticks collected at the 0.76 mSv/hr site. The primary sequences of 12S rRNA were folded into the secondary structures and the free energy of haplotypes was calculated. The free energy at 37 C (ΔG) of the nonmutant haplotype 1 and the mutant haplotypes 2, 3, and 4 were -45.79, -44.17, -39.56, and -45.79 kcal/mol, respectively. Considering the correlation between the structural profile similarity of 12S rRNA and point mutations, haplotypes 1 and 4 have similar secondary structure profiles and have received a 0.999219 similarity score in the cluster tree. The unique haplotypes 2 and 3 have differences in the secondary structure in comparison with haplotypes 1 and 4; the similarity scores were 0.914747 and 0.169431, respectively. Further studies using more genetic markers are warranted to ascertain the genetic variability and population genetic structure within D. reticulatus tick populations in the ChNPP Exclusion Zone and to

  1. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  2. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  3. Two linear regression models predicting cumulative dynamic L5/S1 joint moment during a range of lifting tasks based on static postures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Chang, Chien-Chi; Lu, Ming-Lun

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that cumulative L5/S1 joint load is a potential risk factor for low back pain. The assessment of cumulative L5/S1 joint load during a field study is challenging due to the difficulty of continuously monitoring the dynamic joint load. This study proposes two regression models predicting cumulative dynamic L5/S1 joint moment based on the static L5/S1 joint moment of a lifting task at lift-off and set-down and the lift duration. Twelve men performed lifting tasks at varying lifting ranges and asymmetric angles in a laboratory environment. The cumulative L5/S1 joint moment was calculated from continuous dynamic L5/S1 moments as the reference for comparison. The static L5/S1 joint moments at lift-off and set-down were measured for the two regression models. The prediction error of the cumulative L5/S1 joint moment was 21 ± 14 Nm × s (12% of the measured cumulative L5/S1 joint moment) and 14 ± 9 Nm × s (8%) for the first and the second models, respectively. Practitioner Summary: The proposed regression models may provide a practical approach for predicting the cumulative dynamic L5/S1 joint loading of a lifting task for field studies since it requires only the lifting duration and the static moments at the lift-off and/or set-down instants of the lift.

  4. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  5. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994). PMID:7651413

  6. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-09-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994).

  7. Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov., an alkalitolerant member of Bacillus rRNA group 6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianli; Wang, Jiewei; Song, Fei; Fang, Caiyuan; Xin, Yuhua; Zhang, Yabo

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain NH3(T), was isolated from a sediment sample from the South China Sea and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 9. Strain NH3(T) had cell-wall peptidoglycan based on meso-diaminopimelic acid and MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone. The cellular fatty acid profile included significant amounts of iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(14 : 0). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain NH3(T) was 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NH3(T) was a member of rRNA group 6 of the genus Bacillus, which includes alkalitolerant, alkaliphilic and halotolerant species. The closest phylogenetic relatives were Bacillus akibai 1139(T) (96.82 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), B. pseudofirmus DSM 8715(T) (96.76 %), B. okhensis Kh10-101(T) (96.76 %) and B. alkalidiazotrophicus MS 6(T) (96.47 %). Strain NH3(T) could be distinguished from these phylogenetically close neighbours based on a number of phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic data, we conclude that strain NH3(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10116(T)  = JCM 16507(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov. is proposed.

  8. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved.

  10. Interaction of the cotranslational Hsp70 Ssb with ribosomal proteins and rRNA depends on its lid domain

    PubMed Central

    Gumiero, Andrea; Conz, Charlotte; Gesé, Genís Valentín; Zhang, Ying; Weyer, Felix Alexander; Lapouge, Karine; Kappes, Julia; von Plehwe, Ulrike; Schermann, Géza; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Fischer, Tamás; Rospert, Sabine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    Cotranslational chaperones assist in de novo folding of nascent polypeptides in all organisms. In yeast, the heterodimeric ribosome-associated complex (RAC) forms a unique chaperone triad with the Hsp70 homologue Ssb. We report the X-ray structure of full length Ssb in the ATP-bound open conformation at 2.6 Å resolution and identify a positively charged region in the α-helical lid domain (SBDα), which is present in all members of the Ssb-subfamily of Hsp70s. Mutational analysis demonstrates that this region is strictly required for ribosome binding. Crosslinking shows that Ssb binds close to the tunnel exit via contacts with both, ribosomal proteins and rRNA, and that specific contacts can be correlated with switching between the open (ATP-bound) and closed (ADP-bound) conformation. Taken together, our data reveal how Ssb dynamics on the ribosome allows for the efficient interaction with nascent chains upon RAC-mediated activation of ATP hydrolysis. PMID:27882919

  11. Bacterial taxa abundance pattern in an industrial wastewater treatment system determined by the full rRNA cycle approach.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2007-07-01

    The description of the diversity and structure of microbial communities through quantification of the constituent populations is one of the major objectives in environmental microbiology. The implications of models for community assembly are practical as well as theoretical, because the extent of biodiversity is thought to influence the function of ecosystems. Current attempts to predict species diversity in different environments derive the numbers of individuals for each operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from the frequency of clones in 16S rDNA gene libraries, which are subjected to a number of inherent biases and artefacts. We show that diversity of the bacterial community present in a complex microbial ensemble can be estimated by fitting the data of the full-cycle rRNA approach to a model of species abundance distribution. Sequences from a 16S rDNA gene library from activated sludge were reliably assigned to OTUs at a genetic distance of 0.04. A group of 17 newly designed rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to quantify by fluorescence in situ hybridization, OTUs represented with more than three clones in the 16S rDNA clone library. Cell abundance distribution was best described by a geometric series, after the goodness of fit was evaluated by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Although a complete mechanistic understanding of all the ecological processes involved is still not feasible, describing the distribution pattern of a complex bacterial assemblage model can shed light on the way bacterial communities operate.

  12. A molecular phylogeny of the marine red algae (Rhodophyta) based on the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, M A; Bird, C J; Rice, E L; Gutell, R R; Murphy, C A; Singh, R K

    1994-01-01

    A phylogeny of marine Rhodophyta has been inferred by a number of methods from nucleotide sequences of nuclear genes encoding small subunit rRNA from 39 species in 15 orders. Sequence divergences are relatively large, especially among bangiophytes and even among congeners in this group. Subclass Bangiophycidae appears polyphyletic, encompassing at least three lineages, with Porphyridiales distributed between two of these. Subclass Florideophycidae is monophyletic, with Hildenbrandiales, Corallinales, Ahnfeltiales, and a close association of Nemaliales, Acrochaetiales, and Palmariales forming the four deepest branches. Cermiales may represent a convergence of vegetative and reproductive morphologies, as family Ceramiaceae is at best weakly related to the rest of the order, and one of its members appears to be allied to Gelidiales. Except for Gigartinales, for which more data are required, the other florideophyte orders appear distinct and taxonomically justified. A good correlation was observed with taxonomy based on pit-plug ultrastructure. Tests under maximum-likelihood and parsimony of alternative phylogenies based on structure and chemistry refuted suggestions that Acrochaetiales is the most primitive florideophyte order and that Gelidiales and Hildenbrandiales are sister groups. PMID:8041780

  13. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B.; Chae, Jong Pyo; Balolong, Marilen P.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level). Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs. PMID:25656184

  14. Interaction of the cotranslational Hsp70 Ssb with ribosomal proteins and rRNA depends on its lid domain.

    PubMed

    Gumiero, Andrea; Conz, Charlotte; Gesé, Genís Valentín; Zhang, Ying; Weyer, Felix Alexander; Lapouge, Karine; Kappes, Julia; von Plehwe, Ulrike; Schermann, Géza; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Fischer, Tamás; Rospert, Sabine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-11-24

    Cotranslational chaperones assist in de novo folding of nascent polypeptides in all organisms. In yeast, the heterodimeric ribosome-associated complex (RAC) forms a unique chaperone triad with the Hsp70 homologue Ssb. We report the X-ray structure of full length Ssb in the ATP-bound open conformation at 2.6 Å resolution and identify a positively charged region in the α-helical lid domain (SBDα), which is present in all members of the Ssb-subfamily of Hsp70s. Mutational analysis demonstrates that this region is strictly required for ribosome binding. Crosslinking shows that Ssb binds close to the tunnel exit via contacts with both, ribosomal proteins and rRNA, and that specific contacts can be correlated with switching between the open (ATP-bound) and closed (ADP-bound) conformation. Taken together, our data reveal how Ssb dynamics on the ribosome allows for the efficient interaction with nascent chains upon RAC-mediated activation of ATP hydrolysis.

  15. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  16. Networks of interactions in the secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jung C.; Gutell, Robin R.

    2007-12-01

    We construct four different structural networks for both the secondary and tertiary structures of the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in the high-resolution crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus 30S and Haloarcula marismortui 50S ribosomal subunits, and investigate topological characteristics of the rRNA structures by determining relevant measures, such as the characteristic path length, the clustering coefficient, and the helix betweenness. This study reveals that the 23S rRNA network is more compact than the 16S rRNA networks, reflecting the more globular overall structure of the 23S rRNA relative to the 16S rRNA. In particular, the large number of tertiary interactions in the 23S rRNA tends to cluster, accounting for its small-world network properties. In addition, although the rRNA networks are not the scale-free network, their helix betweenness has a power-law distribution and is correlated with the phylogenetic conservation of helices. The higher the helix betweenness, the more conserved the helix. These results suggest a potential role of the rRNA network as a new quantitative approach in rRNA research.

  17. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Kyle E.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Lucks, Julius B.

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure–function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA–RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA–RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  18. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  19. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  20. Campylobacter species identification based on polymorphism of DNA encoding rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, P; Derclaye, I; Gregoire, D; Janssen, M; Cornelis, G R

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA from five Campylobacter species was digested with a mixture of XhoI and BglII restriction endonucleases and analyzed by Southern hybridization by using a probe complementary to the DNA coding for the 16S rRNA. Each of the Campylobacter species, including C. jejuni, C. coli, C. laridis, C. fetus, and C. upsaliensis, displayed a characteristic pattern. Although some bands may be common to different species, the simplicity of the hybridization pattern enabled us to discriminate among the different species of Campylobacter. Images PMID:2570080

  1. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  2. CLUSTOM-CLOUD: In-Memory Data Grid-Based Software for Clustering 16S rRNA Sequence Data in the Cloud Environment

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Byung Kwon; Hwang, Kyuin; Lee, Sang-Heon; Hong, Soon Gyu; Nasir, Arshan; Cho, Wan-Sup; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing can produce hundreds of thousands of 16S rRNA sequence reads corresponding to different organisms present in the environmental samples. Typically, analysis of microbial diversity in bioinformatics starts from pre-processing followed by clustering 16S rRNA reads into relatively fewer operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The OTUs are reliable indicators of microbial diversity and greatly accelerate the downstream analysis time. However, existing hierarchical clustering algorithms that are generally more accurate than greedy heuristic algorithms struggle with large sequence datasets. To keep pace with the rapid rise in sequencing data, we present CLUSTOM-CLOUD, which is the first distributed sequence clustering program based on In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) technology–a distributed data structure to store all data in the main memory of multiple computing nodes. The IMDG technology helps CLUSTOM-CLOUD to enhance both its capability of handling larger datasets and its computational scalability better than its ancestor, CLUSTOM, while maintaining high accuracy. Clustering speed of CLUSTOM-CLOUD was evaluated on published 16S rRNA human microbiome sequence datasets using the small laboratory cluster (10 nodes) and under the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environments. Under the laboratory environment, it required only ~3 hours to process dataset of size 200 K reads regardless of the complexity of the human microbiome data. In turn, one million reads were processed in approximately 20, 14, and 11 hours when utilizing 20, 30, and 40 nodes on the Amazon EC2 cloud-computing environment. The running time evaluation indicates that CLUSTOM-CLOUD can handle much larger sequence datasets than CLUSTOM and is also a scalable distributed processing system. The comparative accuracy test using 16S rRNA pyrosequences of a mock community shows that CLUSTOM-CLOUD achieves higher accuracy than DOTUR, mothur, ESPRIT-Tree, UCLUST and Swarm. CLUSTOM-CLOUD is written in

  3. Seasonal Diversity of Planktonic Protists in Southwestern Alberta Rivers over a 1-Year Period as Revealed by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and 18S rRNA Gene Library Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Matthew C.; Selinger, L. Brent

    2012-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of planktonic protists in river water have received limited attention despite their ecological significance and recent studies linking phagotrophic protists to the persistence of human-pathogenic bacteria. Using molecular-based techniques targeting the 18S rRNA gene, we studied the seasonal diversity of planktonic protists in Southwestern Alberta rivers (Oldman River Basin) over a 1-year period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data revealed distinct shifts in protistan community profiles that corresponded to season rather than geographical location. Community structures were examined by using clone library analysis; HaeIII restriction profiles of 18S rRNA gene amplicons were used to remove prevalent solanaceous plant clones prior to sequencing. Sanger sequencing of the V1-to-V3 region of the 18S rRNA gene libraries from spring, summer, fall, and winter supported the T-RFLP results and showed marked seasonal differences in the protistan community structure. The spring library was dominated by Chloroplastidae (29.8%), Centrohelida (28.1%), and Alveolata (25.5%), while the summer and fall libraries contained primarily fungal clones (83.0% and 88.0%, respectively). Alveolata (35.6%), Euglenozoa (24.4%), Chloroplastida (15.6%), and Fungi (15.6%) dominated the winter library. These data demonstrate that planktonic protists, including protozoa, are abundant in river water in Southwestern Alberta and that conspicuous seasonal shifts occur in the community structure. PMID:22685143

  4. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  5. Anticancer activity of CX-3543: a direct inhibitor of rRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; O'Brien, Sean; Schwaebe, Michael; Lin, Amy; Bliesath, Josh; Ho, Caroline B; Proffitt, Chris; Trent, Katy; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G

    2009-10-01

    Hallmark deregulated signaling in cancer cells drives excessive ribosome biogenesis within the nucleolus, which elicits unbridled cell growth and proliferation. The rate-limiting step of ribosome biogenesis is synthesis of rRNA (building blocks of ribosomes) by RNA Polymerase I (Pol I). Numerous kinase pathways and products of proto-oncogenes can up-regulate Pol I, whereas tumor suppressor proteins can inhibit rRNA synthesis. In tumorigenesis, activating mutations in certain cancer-associated kinases and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors lead to deregulated signaling that stimulates Pol I transcription with resultant increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Certain anticancer therapeutics, such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, reportedly exert, at least partially, their activity through disruption of ribosome biogenesis, yet many prime targets for anticancer drugs within the ribosome synthetic machinery of the nucleolus remain largely unexploited. Herein, we describe CX-3543, a small molecule nucleolus-targeting agent that selectively disrupts nucleolin/rDNA G-quadruplex complexes in the nucleolus, thereby inhibiting Pol I transcription and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. CX-3543 is the first G-quadruplex interactive agent to enter human clinical trials, and it is currently under evaluation against carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors in a phase II clinical trial.

  6. DbpA: a DEAD box protein specifically activated by 23s rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Pace, F V; Nicol, S M; Reid, A D; Lane, D P

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein DbpA is a member of the 'DEAD box' family of putative RNA-dependent ATPases and RNA helicases, so called because they share the highly conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, together with several other conserved elements. We have investigated DbpA expression under conditions where an endogenous promoter is used. In this context, translation initiation does not occur at the previously identified AUG, but at an upstream, in-frame GUG. Mutation of the GUG initiation codon to AUG virtually abolishes DbpA expression, suggesting an unusual translation initiation mechanism. Using an inducible overexpression plasmid, we have purified milligram quantities of DbpA to homogeneity and shown that the purified protein hydrolyses ATP in an RNA-dependent manner. This ATPase activity is interesting in that, unlike that of other DEAD box proteins investigated to date, it absolutely requires a specific bacterial RNA, which we have identified as 23S rRNA. This observation is particularly significant since DbpA will bind other RNAs and DNA, but will only hydrolyse ATP in the presence of 23S rRNA. Images PMID:8253085

  7. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  8. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  9. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  10. Control of rRNA Synthesis in Escherichia coli: a Systems Biology Approach†

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Patrick P.; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The first part of this review contains an overview of the various contributions and models relating to the control of rRNA synthesis reported over the last 45 years. The second part describes a systems biology approach to identify the factors and effectors that control the interactions between RNA polymerase and rRNA (rrn) promoters of Escherichia coli bacteria during exponential growth in different media. This analysis is based on measurements of absolute rrn promoter activities as transcripts per minute per promoter in bacterial strains either deficient or proficient in the synthesis of the factor Fis and/or the effector ppGpp. These absolute promoter activities are evaluated in terms of rrn promoter strength (Vmax/Km) and free RNA polymerase concentrations. Three major conclusions emerge from this evaluation. First, the rrn promoters are not saturated with RNA polymerase. As a consequence, changes in the concentration of free RNA polymerase contribute to changes in rrn promoter activities. Second, rrn P2 promoter strength is not specifically regulated during exponential growth at different rates; its activity changes only when the concentration of free RNA polymerase changes. Third, the effector ppGpp reduces the strength of the rrn P1 promoter both directly and indirectly by reducing synthesis of the stimulating factor Fis. This control of rrn P1 promoter strength forms part of a larger feedback loop that adjusts the synthesis of ribosomes to the availability of amino acids via amino acid-dependent control of ppGpp accumulation. PMID:15590778

  11. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  12. Li(V0.5Ti0.5)S2 as a 1 V lithium intercalation electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Steve J.; Wang, Da; Armstrong, A. Robert; Bruce, Peter G.

    2016-03-01

    Graphite, the dominant anode in rechargeable lithium batteries, operates at ~0.1 V versus Li+/Li and can result in lithium plating on the graphite surface, raising safety concerns. Titanates, for example, Li4Ti5O12, intercalate lithium at~1.6 V versus Li+/Li, avoiding problematic lithium plating at the expense of reduced cell voltage. There is interest in 1 V anodes, as this voltage is sufficiently high to avoid lithium plating while not significantly reducing cell potential. The sulfides, LiVS2 and LiTiS2, have been investigated as possible 1 V intercalation electrodes but suffer from capacity fading, large 1st cycle irreversible capacity or polarization. Here we report that the 50/50 solid solution, Li1+x(V0.5Ti0.5)S2, delivers a reversible capacity to store charge of 220 mAhg-1 (at 0.9 V), 99% of theoretical, at a rate of C/2, retaining 205 mAhg-1 at C-rate (92% of theoretical). Rate capability is excellent with 200 mAhg-1 at 3C. C-rate is discharge in 1 h. Polarization is low, 100 mV at C/2. To the best of our knowledge, the properties/performances of Li(V0.5Ti0.5)S2 exceed all previous 1 V electrodes.

  13. Thickness-Dependent and Magnetic-Field-Driven Suppression of Antiferromagnetic Order in Thin V5S8 Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Will J; Yuan, Jiangtan; Guo, Hua; Zhou, Panpan; Lou, Jun; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-06-28

    With materials approaching the 2D limit yielding many exciting systems with intriguing physical properties and promising technological functionalities, understanding and engineering magnetic order in nanoscale, layered materials is generating keen interest. One such material is V5S8, a metal with an antiferromagnetic ground state below the Néel temperature TN ∼ 32 K and a prominent spin-flop signature in the magnetoresistance (MR) when H∥c ∼ 4.2 T. Here we study nanoscale-thickness single crystals of V5S8, focusing on temperatures close to TN and the evolution of material properties in response to systematic reduction in crystal thickness. Transport measurements just below TN reveal magnetic hysteresis that we ascribe to a metamagnetic transition, the first-order magnetic-field-driven breakdown of the ordered state. The reduction of crystal thickness to ∼10 nm coincides with systematic changes in the magnetic response: TN falls, implying that antiferromagnetism is suppressed; and while the spin-flop signature remains, the hysteresis disappears, implying that the metamagnetic transition becomes second order as the thickness approaches the 2D limit. This work demonstrates that single crystals of magnetic materials with nanometer thicknesses are promising systems for future studies of magnetism in reduced dimensionality and quantum phase transitions.

  14. 5S program to reduce change-over time on forming department (case study on CV Piranti Works temanggung)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiana Dewi, Septika; Setiawan, Budi; P, Susatyo Nugroho W.

    2013-06-01

    Productivity is one aspect that determines the success of a company in the competitive world of business. There are seven main types of activities that do not have value-added in manufacturing processes such as overproduction, waiting time, transportation, excess inventory, unnecessary motion and defects. The whole activity is a waste (waste) that can cause harm to the Company. Therefore, in production activities is important to pay attention so that the objectives of production productivity can be achieved. Problems experienced by CV Piranti Works is a production target is not achieved resulting in a lost sale raises the cost of which can cause harm to the Company. From the analysis conducted major known cause of the problem is the length of time required for changeover. This is supported by the high non-value added activity in the changeover activities. Lean Manufacturing is an approach to make system more efficient by reducing waste. This study refers to the book compiled by Takashi Osada (2004) and several other references. In this research used method 5S (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) for the of forming departement. The purpose of this research is to design a work environment using the 5S method (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) and make arrangement of equipment and working tool cabinet design with TRIZ methods. From these results, is expected to eliminate or reduce of non-value added activity and improved the changeover time so as to meet production targets completion of the company.

  15. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  16. Caffeic acid, tyrosol and p-coumaric acid are potent inhibitors of 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, David; Corona, Giulia; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2010-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Recent investigations have shown that conjugates such as the 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine, possess strong neurotoxicity and may contribute to the underlying progression of the disease pathology. Although the neuroprotective actions of flavonoids are well reported, that of hydroxycinnamates and other phenolic acids is less established. We show that the hydroxycinnamates caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, the hydroxyphenethyl alcohol, tyrosol, and a Champagne wine extract rich in these components protect neurons against injury induced by 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine in vitro. The protection induced by these polyphenols was equal to or greater than that observed for the flavonoids, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and quercetin. For example, p-coumaric acid evoked significantly more protection at 1muM (64.0+/-3.1%) than both (-)-epicatechin (46.0+/-4.1%, p<0.05) and (+)-catechin (13.1+/-3.0%, p<0.001) at the same concentration. These data indicate that hydroxycinnamates, phenolic acids and phenolic alcohol are also capable of inducing neuroprotective effects to a similar extent to that seen with flavonoids.

  17. Reconsideration of the phylogenetic positions of five peritrich genera, Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Zoothamnopsis, Zoothamnium, and Epicarchesium (Ciliophora, Peritrichia, Sessilida), based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifang; Song, Weibo; Warren, Alan; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Chen, Zigui; Ji, Daode; Sun, Ping

    2008-01-01

    In order to re-evaluate the systematics of sessilid peritrich ciliates, small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 species belonging to five genera: Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Epicarchesium, Zoothamnium, and Zoothamnopsis. Phylogenetic trees were deduced using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that (1) sessilids which have stalks with continuous myonemes that contract in a zig-zag fashion form a separate clade from those which have stalks that contract independently and in a spiral fashion, supporting the separation of the family Zoothamniidae from the family Vorticellidae and (2) Epicarchesium and Pseudovorticella, both of which have reticulate silverline systems, are more closely related to each other than to other vorticellids, suggesting that differences in the silverline system (i.e. transverse vs. reticulate) may be the result of genuine evolutionary divergence among sessilid peritrichs. However, the newly sequenced Zoothamnopsis sinica, which has a reticulate silverline pattern, nests within the unresolved Zoothamnium species that have transverse silverline patterns. Thus, there were at least two evolutions of the reticulate silverline pattern character state from a plesiomorphic transverse state in the peritrichid ciliates. The molecular work demonstrates the genus Zoothamnium to be paraphyletic in relation to morphological studies, and suggests that Astylozoon, Opisthonecta, and Vorticella microstoma possibly share a SSU rRNA secondary structure in the helix E10-1 region.

  18. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in the Indian Ocean as Revealed by Analyses of 16S rRNA and nasA Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles. However, research on the bacterial community structure of the Indian Ocean is scarce, particularly within the vertical dimension. In this study, we investigated the bacterial diversity of the pelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones of the southwestern Indian Ocean (50.46°E, 37.71°S). The clone libraries constructed by 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that most phylotypes retrieved from the Indian Ocean were highly divergent from those retrieved from other oceans. Vertical differences were observed based on the analysis of natural bacterial community populations derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Based on the analysis of the nasA gene sequences from GenBank database, a pair of general primers was developed and used to amplify the bacterial nitrate-assimilating populations. Environmental factors play an important role in mediating the bacterial communities in the Indian Ocean revealed by canonical correlation analysis.

  19. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Conti, Raphael; Araújo, Janete Magali; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant. PMID:22481887

  20. Design and evaluation of universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously detect DAMO microbes and anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-12-15

    To develop universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing for the simultaneous detection of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, four published primer sets (PS2-PS5) were modified. The overall coverage of the four primer pairs was evaluated in silico with the Silva SSU r119 dataset. Based on the virtual evaluation, the two best primer pairs (PS4 and PS5) were selected for further verification. Illumina MiSeq sequencing of a freshwater sediment and a culture from a DAMO-anammox reactor using these two primer pairs revealed that PS5 (341b4F-806R) was the most promising universal primer pair. This pair of primers detected both archaea and bacteria with less bias than PS4. Furthermore, an anaerobic fermentation culture and a wastewater treatment plant culture were used to verify the accuracy of PS5. More importantly, it detected DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anammox bacteria simultaneously with no false positives appeared. This universal 16S rRNA gene primer pair extends the existing molecular tools for studying the community structures and distributions of DAMO microbes and their potential interactions with anammox bacteria in different environments.

  1. Heat shock represses rRNA synthesis by inactivation of TIF-IA and lncRNA-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhongliang; Dammert, Marcel A.; Hoppe, Sven; Bierhoff, Holger; Grummt, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation of ribosome biogenesis in suboptimal growth environments is crucial for cellular homeostasis and genetic integrity. Here, we show that shutdown of rRNA synthesis in response to elevated temperature is brought about by mechanisms that target both the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery and the epigenetic signature of the rDNA promoter. Upon heat shock, the basal transcription factor TIF-IA is inactivated by inhibition of CK2-dependent phosphorylations at Ser170/172. Attenuation of pre-rRNA synthesis in response to heat stress is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is transcribed in antisense orientation to pre-rRNA. PAPAS interacts with CHD4, the adenosine triphosphatase subunit of NuRD, leading to deacetylation of histones and movement of the promoter-bound nucleosome into a position that is refractory to transcription initiation. The results exemplify how stress-induced inactivation of TIF-IA and lncRNA-dependent changes of chromatin structure ensure repression of rRNA synthesis in response to thermo-stress. PMID:27257073

  2. Mutation from guanine to adenine in 25S rRNA at the position equivalent to E. coli A2058 does not confer erythromycin sensitivity in Sacchromyces cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Bommakanti, Ananth S.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    The macrolide erythromycin binds to the large subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome near the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) and inhibits elongation of new peptide chains beyond a few amino acids. Nucleotides A2058 and A2059 (E. coli numbering) in 23S rRNA play a crucial role in the binding of erythromycin, and mutation of nucleotide A2058 confers erythromycin resistance in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. There are high levels of sequence and structural similarity in the PTC of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. However, eukaryotic ribosomes are resistant to erythromycin and the presence of a G at the position equivalent to E. coli nucleotide A2058 is believed to be the reason. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a G to A mutation at this position of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 25S rRNA and analyzed sensitivity toward erythromycin. Neither growth studies nor erythromycin binding assays on mutated yeast ribosomes indicated any erythromycin sensitivity in mutated yeast strains. These results suggest that the identity of nucleotide 2058 is not the only determinant responsible for the difference in erythromycin sensitivity between yeast and prokaryotes. PMID:18218702

  3. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  4. Expansion of the aminoglycoside-resistance 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family: expression and functional characterization of four hypothetical enzymes of diverse bacterial origin.

    PubMed

    Witek, Marta A; Conn, Graeme L

    2014-09-01

    The global dissemination, potential activity in diverse species and broad resistance spectrum conferred by the aminoglycoside-resistance ribosomal RNA methyltransferases make them a significant potential new threat to the efficacy of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the treatment of serious bacterial infections. The N1 methylation of adenosine 1408 (m(1)A1408) confers resistance to structurally diverse aminoglycosides, including kanamycin, neomycin and apramycin. The limited analyses to date of the enzymes responsible have identified common features but also potential differences in their molecular details of action. Therefore, with the goal of expanding the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family as a platform for developing a more complete mechanistic understanding, we report here the cloning, expression and functional analyses of four hypothetical aminoglycoside-resistance rRNA methyltransferases from recent genome sequences of diverse bacterial species. Each of the genes produced a soluble, folded protein with a secondary structure, as determined from circular dichroism (CD) spectra, consistent with enzymes for which high-resolution structures are available. For each enzyme, antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays revealed a resistance spectrum characteristic of the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferases and the modified nucleotide was confirmed by reverse transcription as A1408. In common with other family members, higher binding affinity for the methylation reaction by-product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) than the cosubstrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) was observed for three methyltransferases, while one unexpectedly showed no measurable affinity for SAH. Collectively, these results confirm that each hypothetical enzyme is a functional 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase but also point to further potential mechanistic variation within this enzyme family.

  5. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-01-01

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years. PMID:7937917

  6. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence.

  7. METAXA2: improved identification and taxonomic classification of small and large subunit rRNA in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Hartmann, Martin; Eriksson, Karl Martin; Pal, Chandan; Thorell, Kaisa; Larsson, Dan Göran Joakim; Nilsson, Rolf Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The ribosomal rRNA genes are widely used as genetic markers for taxonomic identification of microbes. Particularly the small subunit (SSU; 16S/18S) rRNA gene is frequently used for species- or genus-level identification, but also the large subunit (LSU; 23S/28S) rRNA gene is employed in taxonomic assignment. The METAXA software tool is a popular utility for extracting partial rRNA sequences from large sequencing data sets and assigning them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial or chloroplast origin. This study describes a comprehensive update to METAXA - METAXA2 - that extends the capabilities of the tool, introducing support for the LSU rRNA gene, a greatly improved classifier allowing classification down to genus or species level, as well as enhanced support for short-read (100 bp) and paired-end sequences, among other changes. The performance of METAXA2 was compared to other commonly used taxonomic classifiers, showing that METAXA2 often outperforms previous methods in terms of making correct predictions while maintaining a low misclassification rate. METAXA2 is freely available from http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa2/.

  8. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  9. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  10. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-10-11

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years.

  11. Conformation of yeast 18S rRNA. Direct chemical probing of the 5' domain in ribosomal subunits and in deproteinized RNA by reverse transcriptase mapping of dimethyl sulfate-accessible.

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, L; Nicoloso, M; Riehl, N; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Bachellerie, J P

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the 5' domain of yeast 18S rRNA has been probed by dimethyl sulfate (DMS), either in "native" deproteinized molecules or in the 40S ribosomal subunits. DMS-reacted RNA has been used as a template for reverse transcription and a large number of reactive sites, corresponding to all types of bases have been mapped by a primer extension procedure, taking advantage of blocks in cDNA elongation immediately upstream from bases methylated at atom positions involved in the base-pair recognition of the template. Since the same atom positions are protected from DMS in base-paired nucleotides, the secondary structure status of each nucleotide can be directly assessed in this procedure, thus allowing to evaluate the potential contribution of proteins in modulating subunit rRNA conformation. While the DMS probing of deproteinized rRNA confirms a number of helical stems predicted by phylogenetic comparisons, it is remarkable that a few additional base-pairings, while proven by the comparative analysis, appear to require the presence of the bound ribosomal subunit proteins to be stabilized. Images PMID:2417197

  12. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-15

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution.

  13. Synthesis and bioactivity profile of 5-s-lipoylhydroxytyrosol-based multidefense antioxidants with a sizeable (poly)sulfide chain.

    PubMed

    Panzella, Lucia; Verotta, Luisella; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia; Martín, María Angeles; Bravo, Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2013-02-27

    Novel polyfunctionalized antioxidants, 5-S-lipoylhydroxytyrosol (1) and its disulfide 2, trisulfide 3, and tetrasulfide 4, were prepared from tyrosol and dihydrolipoic acid in the presence, when appropriate, of sulfur. Compound 1 exhibited significant activity in the ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay (1.60 Trolox equiv), whereas polysulfides 2-4 were more efficient in the DPPH reduction assay (88-93% reduction vs 68% by Trolox). At 10 μM concentration, all compounds 1-4 proved to be efficient hydroxyl radical scavengers (56-69% inhibition) in a Fenton reaction assay. When administered to human HepG2 cells, 1-4 proved to be nontoxic and exhibited marked protective effects against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (60-84% inhibition at 1 μM concentration) and cell damage induced by 400 μM tert-butylhydroperoxide. All compounds 1-4 exhibited overall greater antioxidant activity than hydroxytyrosol.

  14. Fission properties of the 1. 5-s spontaneous fission activity produced in bombardmentof /sup 248/Cm with /sup 18/O

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Lee, D.; Ghiorso, A.; Nurmia, M.J.; Aleklett, K.; Leino, M.

    1981-08-01

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions of fragments from the spontaneous fission of a 1.5-s activity produced in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 95-MeV /sup 18/O ions. Its spontaneous fission decay exhibits a very symmetric, narrow (full width at half maximum = 12 mass units) mass distribution, a very high total kinetic energy of 234 +- 2 MeV, and increasing total kinetic energy with increasingly symmetric mass division. Based on its half-life and the similarity of its fission properties to the unique fission properties so far only observed for /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most likely assignment of this activity is to the known /sup 259/Fm. However, assignment to some as yet undiscovered neutron-rich heavy element isotope such as /sup 260/Md cannot be unequivocally excluded.

  15. Measurements of the exclusive decays of the upsilon(5S) to meson final states and improved B(s)* mass measurement.

    PubMed

    Aquines, O; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Arms, K; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Savinov, V

    2006-04-21

    Using 420 pb(-1) of data collected on the upsilon(5S) resonance with the CLEO III detector, we reconstruct B mesons in 25 exclusive decay channels to measure or set upper limits on the decay rate of upsilon(5S) into B meson final states. We measure the inclusive B cross section to be sigma(upsilon(5S) --> BB(X)) = (0.177 +/- 0.030 +/- 0.016) nb and make the first measurements of the production rates of sigma(upsilon(5S) --> B*B*) = (0.131 +/- 0.025 +/- 0.014) nb and sigma(upsilon(5S) --> BB*) = (0.043 +/- 0.016 +/- 0.006) nb, respectively. We set 90% confidence level limits of sigma(upsilon(5S) -->BB) < 0.038 nb, sigma(upsilon(5S) --> B(*)B(*)pi) < 0.055 nb and sigma(upsilon(5S) --> BBpipi) < 0.024 nb. We also extract the most precise value of the B(s)* mass to date, M(B(s)*) = (5411.7 +/- 1.6 +/- 0.6) MeV/c2.

  16. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3’-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, A.V.; Khayrullina, G.A.; Kraal, B.; Kopylov, А.М.

    2012-01-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA–protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA–protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV–induced RNA–protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA– protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA – protein cross–link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA–protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit. PMID:23346381

  17. 18S rRNA suggests that Entoprocta are protostomes, unrelated to Ectoprocta.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L Y; Winnepenninckx, B; De Wachter, R; Backeljau, T; Emschermann, P; Garey, J R

    1996-05-01

    The Ento- and Ectoprocta are sometimes placed together in the Bryozoa, which have variously been regarded as proto- or deuterostomes. However, Entoprocta have also been allied to the pseudocoelomates, while Ectoprocta are often united with the Brachiopoda and Phoronida in the (super)phylum Lophophorata. Hence, the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa are still much debated. We determined complete 18S rRNA sequences of two entoprocts, an ectoproct, an inarticulate brachiopod, a phoronid, two annelids, and a platyhelminth. Phylogenetic analyses of these data show that (1) entoprocts and lophophorates have spiralian, protostomous affinities, (2) Ento- and Ectoprocta are not sister taxa, (3) phoronids and brachiopods form a monophyletic clade, and (4) neither Ectoprocta or Annelida appear to be monophyletic. Both deuterostomous and pseudocoelomate features may have arisen at least two times in evolutionary history. These results advocate a Spiralia-Radialia-based classification rather than one based on the Protostomia-Deuterostomia concept.

  18. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded.

  19. Identification of Scopulariopsis species by partial 28S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Kosim, Kinga; Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna Barbara; Bielecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis contains over 30 species of mitosporic moulds, which although usually saprophytic may also act as opportunistic pathogens in humans. They have mainly been associated with onychomycosis, and only sporadically reported as a cause of deep tissue infections or systemic disease. Identification of Scopulariopsis species still largely relies on phenotype-based methods. There is a need for a molecular diagnostic approach, that would allow to reliably discriminate between different Scopulariopsis species. The aim of this study was to apply sequence analysis of partial 28S rRNA gene for species identification of Scopulariopsis clinical isolates. Although the method employed did reveal some genetic polymorphism among Scopulariopsis isolates tested, it was not enough for species delineation. For this to be achieved, other genetic loci, within and beyond the rDNA operon, need to be investigated.

  20. The phylogenetic status of arthropods, as inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Pfeifer, D M; Field, K G; Raff, R A

    1991-09-01

    Partial 18S rRNA sequences of five chelicerate arthropods plus a crustacean, myriapod, insect, chordate, echinoderm, annelid, and platyhelminth were compared. The sequence data were used to infer phylogeny by using a maximum-parsimony method, an evolutionary-distance method, and the evolutionary-parsimony method. The phylogenetic inferences generated by maximum-parsimony and distance methods support both monophyly of the Arthropoda and monophyly of the Chelicerata within the Arthropoda. These results are congruent with phylogenies based on rigorous cladistic analyses of morphological characters. Results support the inclusion of the Arthropoda within a spiralian or protostome coelomate clade that is the sister group of a deuterostome clade, refuting the hypothesis that the arthropods represent the "primitive" sister group of a protostome coelomate clade. Bootstrap analyses and consideration of all trees within 1% of the length of the most parsimonious tree suggest that relationships between the nonchelicerate arthropods and relationships within the chelicerate clade cannot be reliably inferred with the partial 18S rRNA sequence data. With the evolutionary-parsimony method, support for monophyly of the Arthropoda is found in the majority of the combinations analyzed if the coelomates are used as "outgroups." Monophyly of the Chelicerata is supported in most combinations assessed. Our analyses also indicate that the evolutionary-parsimony method, like distance and parsimony, may be biased by taxa with long branches. We suggest that a previous study's inference of the Arthropoda as paraphyletic may be the result of (a) having two few arthropod taxa available for analysis and (b) including long-branched taxa.

  1. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  2. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  3. Measurement of rRNA Variations in Natural Communities of Microorganisms on the Southeastern U.S. Continental Shelf †

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jonathan G.; Singleton, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a clear understanding of the physiology of marine prokaryotes is complicated by the difficulties inherent in resolving the activity of various components of natural microbial communities. Application of appropriate molecular biological techniques offers a means of overcoming some of these problems. In this regard, we have used direct probing of bulk RNA purified from selective size fractions to examine variations in the rRNA content of heterotrophic communities and Synechococcus populations on the southeastern U.S. continental shelf. Heterotrophic communities in natural seawater cultures amended with selected substrates were examined. Synechococcus populations were isolated from the water column by differential filtration. The total cellular rRNA content of the target populations was assayed by probing RNA purified from these samples with an oligonucleotide complementing a universally conserved region in the eubacterial 16S rRNA (heterotrophs) or with a 1.5-kbp fragment encoding the Synechococcus sp. strain WH 7803 16S rRNA (cyanobacteria). The analyses revealed that heterotrophic bacteria responded to the addition of glucose and trace nutrients after a 6-h lag period. However, no response was detected after amino acids were added. The cellular rRNA content increased 48-fold before dropping to a value 20 times that detected before nutrients were added. Variations in the rRNA content from Synechococcus spp. followed a distinct diel pattern imposed by the phasing of cell division within the irradiance cycle. The results indicate that careful application of these appropriate molecular biological techniques can be of great use in discerning basic physiological characteristics of selected natural populations and the mechanisms which regulate growth at the subcellular level. Images PMID:16349009

  4. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  5. Characterization of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women by 18S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N-N; Guo, X-C; Lv, W; Chen, X-X; Feng, G-F

    2013-08-01

    Pregnancy and diabetes are regarded as individual risk factors for vaginal candidiasis. The high prevalence of vaginal candidiasis in pregnant diabetic women can be explained by disruption of the balance of the vaginal normal flora. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women. In the present study, the diversity and richness of the vaginal fungal flora in healthy non-pregnant women (group HN), healthy pregnant women (group HP), women with gestational diabetes mellitus (group GDM), and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus type I (group T1DM) were investigated using an 18S rRNA gene clone library method. Our data demonstrated that the composition of the vaginal fungal flora in the four groups could be divided into two phyla (Ascomycetes, 20/26, and Basidiomycetes, 6/26). The most predominant vaginal fungal species belonged to the Candida and Saccharomyces genera, uncultured fungi, and a large number of low-abundance taxa that were unrecorded or underrepresented in previous studies using cultivation-dependent methods. Variation in operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the study cohorts was generally high in the clone libraries, as 9, 13, 17, and 20 phylotypes were identified in groups HN, HP, GDM, and T1DM, respectively. The Shannon indices of groups GDM and T1DM (with poorer glycemic control) were significantly higher compared to groups HN and HP (p < 0.05). The data presented here revealed an increased diversity and varied composition of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women and demonstrated that poor glycemic control might be associated with disturbances in the vaginal fungal flora.

  6. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  7. rRNA (rrn) Operon-Engineered Bacillus subtilis as a Feasible Test Organism for Antibiotic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Yano, Koichi; Kakugawa, Koji; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains 10 rRNA (rrn) operons. We found that rRNA operon-engineered B. subtilis strain RIK543, with only the rrnO operon, is specifically hypersensitive to RNA polymerase inhibitors such as rifamycin SV and rifampin (80-fold and 20-fold, respectively). In pilot screening experiments, we found actinomycete isolates successfully at an incidence of 1.9% (18/945) that produced antibacterials that were detectable only with RIK543 as the test organism. Strain RIK543 may be a feasible test organism for the discovery of novel RNA polymerase inhibitors. PMID:23335737

  8. Evolution of bacterial diversity during two-phase olive mill waste ("alperujo") composting by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Tortosa, Germán; Castellano-Hinojosa, Antonio; Correa-Galeote, David; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms are the main contributing factor responsible for organic matter degradation during composting. In this research, the 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to elucidate evolution of bacterial diversity during mesophilic, thermophilic and maturation composting stages of the two-phase olive mill waste ("alperujo"), the main by-product of the Spanish olive oil industry. Two similar piles were performance composting AL with sheep manure as bulking agent. Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the main phyla found in genomic libraries from each composting phase. Shannon and Chao1 biodiversity indices showed a clear difference between the mesophilic/thermophilic and maturation phases, which was mainly due to detection of new genera. PCA analysis of the relative number of sequences confirmed maturation affected bacterial population structure, and Pearson correlation coefficients between physicochemical composting parameters and relative number of genera sequences suggest that Planomicrobium and Ohtaekwangia could be considered as biomarkers for AL composting maturation.

  9. Use of 2-aminopurine as a fluorescent tool for characterizing antibiotic recognition of the bacterial rRNA A-site

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher M.; Kaul, Malvika; Pilch, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques have been employed to characterize the impact of incorporation of the fluorescent base analog 2-aminopurine into the 1492 or 1493 position of an E. coli rRNA A-site model oligonucleotide, as well as the energetics and dynamics associated with recognition of this A-site model oligomer by aminoglycoside antibiotics. The results of these studies indicate that incorporation of 2AP into either the 1492 or 1493 position does not perturb the structure or stability of the host RNA or its aminoglycoside binding affinity. In addition, the results also highlight drug-induced reduction in the mobilities of the bases at both positions 1492 and 1493 as a potentially key determinant of bactericidal potency. PMID:18431442

  10. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  11. The Era GTPase recognizes the GAUCACCUCC sequence and binds helix 45 near the 3; end of 16S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-03-26

    Era, composed of a GTPase domain and a K homology domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It is required for the maturation of 16S rRNA and assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. We showed previously that the protein recognizes nine nucleotides (1531{sup AUCACCUCC}1539) near the 3{prime} end of 16S rRNA, and that this recognition stimulates GTP-hydrolyzing activity of Era. In all three kingdoms of life, the 1530{sup GAUCA}1534 sequence and helix 45 (h45) (nucleotides 1506-1529) are highly conserved. It has been shown that the 1530{sup GA}1531 to 1530{sup AG}1531 double mutation severely affects the viability of bacteria. However, whether Era interacts with G1530 and/or h45 and whether such interactions (if any) contribute to the stimulation of Era's GTPase activity were not known. Here, we report two RNA structures that contain nucleotides 1506-1542 (RNA301), one in complex with Era and GDPNP (GNP), a nonhydrolysable GTP-analogue, and the other in complex with Era, GNP, and the KsgA methyltransferase. The structures show that Era recognizes 10 nucleotides, including G1530, and that Era also binds h45. Moreover, GTPase assay experiments show that G1530 does not stimulate Era's GTPase activity. Rather, A1531 and A1534 are most important for stimulation and h45 further contributes to the stimulation. Although G1530 does not contribute to the intrinsic GTPase activity of Era, its interaction with Era is important for binding and is essential for the protein to function, leading to the discovery of a new cold-sensitive phenotype of Era.

  12. Microbial profiles of a drinking water resource based on different 16S rRNA V regions during a heavy cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyi; Zhu, Congming; Guan, Rui; Xiong, Zhipeng; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Junzhe; Sheng, Yi; Zhu, Bingchuan; Tu, Jing; Ge, Qinyu; Chen, Ting; Lu, Zuhong

    2017-03-31

    Understanding of the bacterial community structure in drinking water resources helps to enhance the security of municipal water supplies. In this study, bacterial communities were surveyed in water and sediment during a heavy cyanobacterial bloom in a drinking water resource of Lake Taihu, China. A total of 325,317 high-quality sequences were obtained from different 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) regions (V3, V4, and V6) using the Miseq sequencing platform. A notable difference was shown between the water and sediment samples, as predominated by Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria in the water and Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Verrucomicrobia in the sediment, respectively. The LD12 family dominated the water surface and was tightly associated with related indicators of cyanobacterial propagation, indicating involvement in the massive proliferation of cyanobacterial blooms. Alternatively, the genus Nitrospira dominated the sediment samples, which indicates that nitrite oxidation was very active in the sediment. Although pathogenic bacteria were not detected in a large amount, some genera such as Mycobacterium, Acinetobacter, and Legionella were still identified but in very low abundance. In addition, the effects of different V regions on bacterial diversity survey were evaluated. Overall, V4 and V3 were proven to be more promising V regions for bacterial diversity survey in water and sediment samples during heavy water blooms in Lake Taihu, respectively. As longer, cheaper, and faster DNA sequencing technologies become more accessible, we expect that bacterial community structures based on 16S rRNA amplicons as an indicator could be used alongside with physical and chemical indicators, to conduct comprehensive assessments for drinking water resource management.

  13. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  14. Replication of the rRNA and legumin genes in synchronized root cells of pea (Pisum sativum): evidence for transient EcoR I sites in replicating rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hof, J V; Hernandez, P; Bjerknes, C A; Kraszewska, E K; Lamm, S S

    1987-03-01

    The temporal pattern of replication of the rRNA and legumin genes differs in synchronized pea root cells. The relative number of rRNA genes replicated hourly during the first five hours of S phase ranges between 5 and 10 percent. In late S phase, during hours six through nine, the number of rRNA genes replicated increases reaching a maximum of about 25 percent at the ninth hour. Unlike the rRNA genes, the legumin genes have a wave-like pattern of replication peaking in early S phase at the third hour and again in late S phase at the eighth hour.Replicating rDNA, isolated by benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-column chromatography, has EcoR I restriction sites that are absent in non-replicating rDNA sequences. The cleavage of these sites is independent of the time of rDNA replication. The transient nature of the EcoR I sites suggests that they exist in a hemimethylated state in parental DNA.The two Hind III repeat-size classes of rDNA of var. Alaska peas are replicated simultaneously as cells progress through S phase. Thus, even if the 9.0 kb and 8.6 kb repeat classes are located on different chromosomes, their temporal order of replication is the same.

  15. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  16. Molecular Cytogenetics in Digenean Parasites: Linked and Unlinked Major and 5S rDNAs, B Chromosomes and Karyotype Diversification.

    PubMed

    García-Souto, Daniel; Pasantes, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Digenetic trematodes are the largest group of internal metazoan parasites, but their chromosomes are poorly studied. Although chromosome numbers and/or karyotypes are known for about 300 of the 18,000 described species, molecular cytogenetic knowledge is mostly limited to the mapping of telomeric sequences and/or of major rDNA clusters in 9 species. In this work we mapped major and 5S rDNA clusters and telomeric sequences in chromosomes of Bucephalus minimus, B. australis, Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Bucephaloidea), Monascus filiformis (Gymnophalloidea), Parorchis acanthus (Echi