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Sample records for 5t4 oncofetal antigen

  1. Cross-Presentation of the Oncofetal Tumor Antigen 5T4 from Irradiated Prostate Cancer Cells--A Key Role for Heat-Shock Protein 70 and Receptor CD91.

    PubMed

    Salimu, Josephine; Spary, Lisa K; Al-Taei, Saly; Clayton, Aled; Mason, Malcolm D; Staffurth, John; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2015-06-01

    Immune responses contribute to the success of radiotherapy of solid tumors; however, the mechanism of triggering CD8(+) T-cell responses is poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation from tumor cells by dendritic cells (DC) is a likely dominant mechanism to achieve CD8(+) T-cell stimulation. We established a cross-presentation model in which DCs present a naturally expressed oncofetal tumor antigen (5T4) from irradiated DU145 prostate cancer cells to 5T4-specific T cells. The aim was to establish which immunogenic signals are important in radiation-induced cross-presentation. Radiation (12 Gy) caused G2-M cell-cycle arrest and cell death, increased cellular 5T4 levels, high-mobility protein group-B1 (HMGB1) release, and surface calreticulin and heat-shock protein-70 (Hsp70) expression in DU145 cells. DCs phagocytosed irradiated tumor cells efficiently, followed by upregulation of CD86 on phagocytic DCs. CD8(+) 5T4-specific T cells, stimulated with these DCs, proliferated and produced IFNγ. Inhibition of HMGB1 or the TRIF/MyD88 pathway only had a partial effect on T-cell stimulation. Unlike previous investigators, we found no evidence that DCs carrying Asp299Gly Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) single-nucleotide polymorphism had impaired ability to cross-present tumor antigen. However, pretreatment of tumor cells with Hsp70 inhibitors resulted in a highly statistically significant and robust prevention of antigen cross-presentation and CD86 upregulation on DCs cocultured with irradiated tumor cells. Blocking the Hsp70 receptor CD91 also abolished cross-presentation. Together, the results from our study demonstrate that irradiation induces immunologically relevant changes in tumor cells, which can trigger CD8(+) T-cell responses via a predominantly Hsp70-dependent antigen cross-presentation process.

  2. Glycosylation and epitope mapping of the 5T4 glycoprotein oncofoetal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, David M; Woods, Andrew M; Myers, Kevin A; Westwater, Caroline; Rahi-Saund, Veena; Davies, Michael J; Renouf, David V; Hounsell, Elizabeth F; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is a focus for development of several antibody-directed therapies on the basis of the murine monoclonal antibody against 5T4 (mAb5T4), which recognizes a conformational epitope. 5T4 molecules are highly N-glycosylated transmembrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domain contains two regions of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and associated flanking regions, separated by an intervening hydrophilic sequence. Using a series of deletion and mutated cDNA constructs as well as chimaeras with the murine homologue, we have mapped the mAb5T4 epitope to the more membrane-proximal LRR2 or its flanking region. Analysis of the glycosylation of the seven consensus Asp-Xaa-Ser/Thr sites was consistent with all of the sites being glycosylated. A combination of two high-mannose chains (predominantly octasaccharide) and five mostly sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex chains with minor quantities of core fucose were detected. The two glycosylation sites, which are the most likely to have predominantly high-mannose chains, are in the only two regions that show significant differences between the human and the 81% identical mouse sequence. A site-directed mutation, which abolished glycosylation at one of these sites (position 192), did not alter antigenicity. The other, which is nearest to the N-terminus in the human, has an Asn-Leu-Thr to Asn-Leu-Leu conversion in the mouse, so cannot be glycosylated in the latter species. The large complex glycosylation at the other sites is likely to influence the antigenicity and tertiary structure generating the 5T4 epitope. PMID:11903056

  3. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity.

  4. CD8+ T-cell clones specific for the 5T4 antigen target renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tykodi, Scott S; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H

    2012-09-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the antitumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8 T cells from HLA-A2 healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8/TET T-cell clones specific for 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors, respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417-25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4-infected HLA-A2 EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2-expressing and 5T4-expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the coinoculation of a representative 5T417-25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune-deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high-avidity CD8 CTL able to recognize the naturally processed 5T417-25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8T-cell immunity targeting 5T417-25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies.

  5. The receptor tyrosine kinase ROR1--an oncofetal antigen for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Moshfegh, Ali; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Khan, Abdul Salam; Mikaelsson, Eva; Osterborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2014-12-01

    Targeted cancer therapies have emerged as new treatment options for various cancer types. Among targets, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are among the most promising. ROR1 is a transmembrane RTK of importance during the normal embryogenesis for the central nervous system, heart, lung and skeletal systems, but is not expressed in normal adult tissues. However, ROR1 is overexpressed in several human malignancies and may act as a survival factor for tumor cells. Its unique expression by malignant cells may provide a target for novel therapeutics including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and small molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (TKI) for the treatment of cancer. Promising preclinical results have been reported in e.g. chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pancreatic carcinoma, lung and breast cancer. ROR1 might also be an interesting oncofetal antigen for active immunotherapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the ROR1 structure and functions in cancer and highlight emerging therapeutic options of interest for targeting ROR1 in tumor therapy.

  6. An oncofetal antigen, IMP-3-derived long peptides induce immune responses of both helper T cells and CTLs

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Masatoshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Senju, Satoru; Imamura, Yuya; Sayem, Mohammad Abu; Irie, Atsushi; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Fukuma, Daiki; Shinohara, Masanori; Hamada, Akinobu; Jono, Hirofumi; Yuba, Eiji; Kono, Kenji; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakayama, Hideki; Nishimura, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3), an oncofetal antigen identified using genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses, is overexpressed in several malignancies. IMP-3-derived cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have been used for peptide-based immunotherapies against various cancers. In addition to CTLs, induction of tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-specific helper T (Th) cells is crucial for establishment of effective antitumor immunity. In this study, we aimed to identify IMP-3-derived long peptides (IMP-3-LPs) carrying CTL and promiscuous Th-cell epitopes for use in cancer immunotherapy. IMP-3-derived Th-cell epitopes that bind to multiple HLA-class II molecules were predicted by in silico analysis, and their immunogenicity was determined by utilizing human T cells. We identified two highly immunogenic IMP-3-LPs presented by multiple HLA-class II molecules. One of the IMP-3-LPs encompassed two CTL epitopes that have been used for peptide-vaccine immunotherapy in ongoing clinical trials. IMP-3-LPs-specific Th cells responded to autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the recombinant IMP-3 proteins, suggesting that these s (LPs) can be naturally processed and presented. The IMP-3-LPs and specific Th cells augmented the expansion of IMP-3-specific CTLs, which was further enhanced by programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) blockade. In addition, IMP-3-LP encapsulated in liposomes was efficiently cross-presented in vitro, and this LP successfully cross-primed CTLs in HLA-A2 transgenic mice (Tgm) in vivo. Furthermore, one of the IMP-3-LPs induced IMP-3-specific Th cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of head-and-neck malignant tumor (HNMT) patients. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of IMP-3-LPs in propagating both Th cells and CTLs and may have implications for IMP-3-LPs-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27471607

  7. Oncofetal H19 RNA promotes tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Matouk, Imad J; Raveh, Eli; Abu-lail, Rasha; Mezan, Shaul; Gilon, Michal; Gershtain, Eitan; Birman, Tatiana; Gallula, Jennifer; Schneider, Tamar; Barkali, Moshe; Richler, Carmelit; Fellig, Yakov; Sorin, Vladimir; Hubert, Ayala; Hochberg, Abraham; Czerniak, Abraham

    2014-07-01

    The oncofetal H19 gene transcribes a long non-coding RNA(lncRNA) that is essential for tumor growth. Here we found that numerous established inducers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition(EMT) also induced H19/miR-675 expression. Both TGF-β and hypoxia concomitantly induced H19 and miR-675 with the induction of EMT markers. We identified the PI3K/AKT pathway mediating the inductions of Slug, H19 RNA and miR-675 in response to TGF-β treatment, while Slug induction depended on H19 RNA. In the EMT induced multidrug resistance model, H19 level was also induced. In a mouse breast cancer model, H19 expression was tightly correlated with metastatic potential. In patients, we detected high H19 expression in all common metastatic sites tested, regardless of tumor primary origin. H19 RNA suppressed the expression of E-cadherin protein. H19 up-regulated Slug expression concomitant with the suppression of E-cadherin protein through a mechanism that involved miR-675. Slug also up-regulated H19 expression and activated its promoter. Altogether, these results may support the existence of a positive feedback loop between Slug and H19/miR-675, that regulates E-cadherin expression. H19 RNA enhanced the invasive potential of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced tumor metastasis in vivo. Additionally, H19 knockdown attenuated the scattering and tumorigenic effects of HGF/SF. Our results present novel mechanistic insights into a critical role for H19 RNA in tumor progression and indicate a previously unknown link between H19/miR-675, Slug and E-cadherin in the regulation of cancer cell EMT programs.

  8. First-in-human trial of an anti-5T4 antibody-monomethylauristatin conjugate, PF-06263507, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; LoRusso, Patricia; Barton, Jeremy; Hua, Steven; Reich, Steven D; Shazer, Ronald; Taylor, Carrie T; Xuan, Dawei; Borghaei, Hossein

    2017-01-09

    Background The antibody-drug conjugate PF-06263507 targets the cell-surface, tumor-associated antigen 5T4 and consists of a humanized IgG1 conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethylauristatin-F by a non-cleavable maleimidocaproyl linker. In this first-in-human, dose-finding trial (NCT01891669), we evaluated safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of PF-06263507 in pretreated patients with advanced solid tumors, unselected for 5T4 expression. starting at 0.05 mg/kg, with 25, 56, and 95% dose increments, depending on observed dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), applying a modified continual reassessment method. Results Twenty-six patients received PF-06263507 at 0.05 to 6.5 mg/kg. The first DLT, grade 3 photophobia, occurred at 4.34 mg/kg and two additional DLTs, grade 2 keratitis and grade 1 limbal stem cell deficiency (> 2-week dosing delay), at 6.5 mg/kg. The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue (38.5%), photophobia (26.9%), and decreased appetite, dry eye, nausea, and thrombocytopenia (23.1% each). No treatment-related grade 4-5 AEs were reported. Systemic exposure of PF-06263507 increased in a dose-related manner. At the maximum tolerated dose (MTD, 4.34 mg/kg), mean terminal half-life for PF-06263507 and unconjugated payload were ~6 and 3 days, respectively. Payload serum concentrations were substantially lower compared with PF-06263507. No objective responses were observed. Conclusions The MTD and recommended phase II dose were determined to be 4.34 mg/kg. Ocular toxicities accounted for the DLTs observed, as previously reported with monomethylauristatin-F payloads. Further studies are warranted to investigate clinical activity of this agent in patients with 5T4-expressing tumors.Trial registration ID: NCT01891669.

  9. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition with O-glycosylated oncofetal fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yao; Gelfenbeyn, Kirill; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Handa, Kazuko; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been shown to play a key role in embryogenesis and cancer progression. We previously found that fibronectin (FN) carrying O-GalNAc at a specific site is selectively expressed in cancer and fetal cells/tissues, and termed oncofetal FN (onfFN). Here, we show that (i) a newly-established monoclonal antibody against FN lacking the O-GalNAc, termed normalFN (norFN), is useful for isolation of onfFN, (ii) onfFN, but not norFN, can induce EMT in human lung carcinoma cells, (iii) onfFN has a synergistic effect with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 in EMT induction. PMID:22641031

  10. Preclinical Development of an anti-5T4 Antibody-Drug Conjugate: Pharmacokinetics in Mice, Rats, and NHP and Tumor/Tissue Distribution in Mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mauricio; Wentland, JoAnn; Han, Xiaogang; Zhang, Yanhua; Rago, Brian; Duriga, Nicole; Spriggs, Franklin; Kadar, Eugene; Song, Wei; McNally, James; Shakey, Quazi; Lorello, Leslie; Lucas, Judy; Sapra, Puja

    2015-11-18

    The pharmacokinetics of an antibody (huA1)-drug (auristatin microtubule disrupting MMAF) conjugate, targeting 5T4-expressing cells, were characterized during the discovery and development phases in female nu/nu mice and cynomolgus monkeys after a single dose and in S-D rats and cynomolgus monkeys from multidose toxicity studies. Plasma/serum samples were analyzed using an ELISA-based method for antibody and conjugate (ADC) as well as for the released payload using an LC-MS/MS method. In addition, the distribution of the Ab, ADC, and released payload (cys-mcMMAF) was determined in a number of tissues (tumor, lung, liver, kidney, and heart) in two tumor mouse models (H1975 and MDA-MB-361-DYT2 models) using similar LBA and LC-MS/MS methods. Tissue distribution studies revealed preferential tumor distribution of cys-mcMMAF and its relative specificity to the 5T4 target containing tissue (tumor). Single dose studies suggests lower CL values at the higher doses in mice, although a linear relationship was seen in cynomolgus monkeys at doses from 0.3 to 10 mg/kg with no evidence of TMDD. Evaluation of DAR (drug-antibody ratio) in cynomolgus monkeys (at 3 mg/kg) indicated that at least half of the payload was still on the ADC 1 to 2 weeks after IV dosing. After multiple doses, the huA1 and conjugate data in rats and monkeys indicate that exposure (AUC) increases with increasing dose in a linear fashion. Systemic exposure (as assessed by Cmax and AUC) of the released payload increased with increasing dose, although exposure was very low and its pharmacokinetics appeared to be formation rate limited. The incidence of ADA was generally low in rats and monkeys. We will discuss cross species comparison, relationships between the Ab, ADC, and released payload exposure after multiple dosing, and insights into the distribution of this ADC with a focus on experimental design as a way to address or bypass apparent obstacles and its integration into predictive models.

  11. The product of the imprinted H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I.; Ayesh, S.; Perlman, E. J.; Pizov, G.; Tanos, V.; Schneider, T.; Erdmann, V. A.; Podeh, D.; Komitowski, D.; Quasem, A. S.; de Groot, N.; Hochberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The H19 gene is an imprinted, maternally expressed gene in humans. It is tightly linked and coregulated with the imprinted, paternally expressed gene of insulin-like growth factor 2. The H19 gene product is not translated into protein and functions as an RNA molecule. Although its role has been investigated for more than a decade, its biological function is still not understood fully. H19 is abundantly expressed in many tissues from early stages of embryogenesis through fetal life, and is down regulated postnatally. It is also expressed in certain childhood and adult tumours. This study was designed to screen the expression of H19 in human cancer and its relation to the expression of H19 in the fetus. METHODS: Using in situ hybridisation with a [35S] labelled probe, H19 mRNA was detected in paraffin wax sections of fetal tissues from the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and of a large array of human adult and childhood tumours arising from these tissues. RESULTS: The H19 gene is expressed in tumours arising from tissues which express this gene in fetal life. Its expression in the fetus and in cancer is closely linked with tissue differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these and previous data, H19 is neither a tumour suppressor gene nor an oncogene. Its product is an oncofetal RNA. The potential use of this RNA as a tumour marker should be evaluated. Images PMID:9208812

  12. Use of the 60 kd oncofetal protein for monitoring chemical hepatocarcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hanausek-Walaszek, M.; Walaszek, Z.; Webb, T.E.

    1986-03-01

    The 60 kd oncofetal protein (OFP-60) was earlier found in the blood plasma of tumor hosts and carcinogen-treated animals. OFP-60 was shown to be induced by all initiators of chemical carcinogenesis tested but neither by tumor promoters nor by liver regeneration. In the present study a hepatocarcinogen-mediated induction of OFP-60 and its release to circulation has been monitored by use of a sensitive biochemical assay. This assay measures, in a cell-free system, the energy-dependent release of nuclear mRNA sequences, catalyzed by OFP-60. A non-necrogenic dose by diethylnitrosamine (DENA) was administered to female Sprague Dawley rats 24 hours after partial hepatectomy. Half of the rats received phenobarbital in the diet beginning 7 weeks post-carcinogen treatment. Upon treatment with DENA, the relative activity of OFP-60 in the liver cytosol gradually increases up to 6 weeks and then remains constant. In the blood, the OFP-60 activity increases only up to 3 weeks, then decreases to basal level before a slow ascent is observed. Phenobarbital increases the activity in both liver and blood. The increase may be due to expansion of the cell population in the OFP-60 containing foci, while the decrease in the blood to immune clearance.

  13. Development and use of monoclonal antibodies against an oncofetal protein associated with carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runge, S W; Larroya-Runge, S N; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1991-06-01

    An oncofetal protein (OFP) studied in our laboratory associated with embryogenesis, carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis has as its known biological function the modification of RNA release from isolated nuclei. In the present study, we have developed and investigated the use of monoclonal antibodies against OFP. Six hybridoma cell lines (A-F) were isolated by screening the hybridoma culture media for anti-OFP antibodies (MOFP) with an indirect ELISA and by testing the ability of these antibodies complexed with anti-mouse IgG-agarose to bind to rat OFP and remove its associated RNA transport activity from solution (Immunobioassay). An inhibition ELISA developed to measure OFP gave a linear response up to 20 ng of plasma protein from a tumor-bearing rat. Western blot analysis using these monoclonals showed that OFP from a rat tumor (H7777) cytosol that shed to the blood consisted of two species exhibiting molecular weights of 50 and 55 kD respectively. In order to show the usefulness of our assays, a preliminary study showing the ability of the immunobioassay to detect the expression of OFP in the plasma of carcinogen treated rats in a dosage dependent manner has been presented. Since OFP is produced in the target organ of rats shortly after treatment with carcinogens and persists in the preneoplastic foci and subsequent tumors, these monoclonal antibodies will be valuable in studying its involvement in chemical carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  14. Structural flexibility in magnetocaloric RE5T4 (RE = rare-earth; T = silicon, germanium, gallium) materials: Effect of chemical substitution on structure, bonding and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sumohan

    The binary, ternary and multicomponent intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals (RE) with group 14 elements (Tt) at the RE5 Tt4 stoichiometry have been known for over 30 years, but only in the past decade have these materials become a gold mine for solid-state chemistry, materials science and condensed matter physics. It all started with the discovery of a giant magnetocaloric effect in Gd5Si 2Ge2, along with other extraordinary magnetic properties, such as a colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistance. The distinctiveness of this series is in the remarkable flexibility of the chemical bonding between well-defined, subnanometer-thick slabs and the resultant magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of these materials. This can be controlled by varying either or both RE and Tt elements, including mixed rare-earth elements on the RE sites and different group 14 (or T = group 13 or 15) elements occupying the Tt sites. In addition to chemical means, the interslab interactions are also tunable by temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Thus, this system provides a splendid "playground" to investigate the interrelationships among composition, structure, physical properties, and chemical bonding. The work presented in this dissertation involving RE5T4 materials has resulted in the successful synthesis, characterization, property measurements, and theoretical analyses of various new intermetallic compounds. The results provide significant insight into the fundamental magnetic and structural behavior of these materials and help us better understand the complex link between a compound's composition, its observed structure, and its properties.

  15. Involvement of O-glycosylation defining oncofetal fibronectin in epithelial-mesenchymal transition process

    PubMed Central

    Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Gelfenbeyn, Kirill; Ding, Yao; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Handa, Kazuko; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2011-01-01

    The process termed “epithelial–mesenchymal transition” (EMT) was originally discovered in ontogenic development, and has been shown to be one of the key steps in tumor cell progression and metastasis. Recently, we showed that the expression of some glycosphingolipids (GSLs) is down-regulated during EMT in human and mouse cell lines. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of GalNAc-type (or mucin-type) O-glycosylation in EMT process, induced with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in human prostate epithelial cell lines. We found that: (i) TGF-β treatment caused up-regulation of oncofetal fibronectin (onfFN), which is defined by mAb FDC6, and expressed in cancer or fetal cells/tissues, but not in normal adult cells/tissues. The reactivity of mAb FDC6 requires the addition of an O-glycan at a specific threonine, inside the type III homology connective segment (IIICS) domain of FN. (ii) This change is associated with typical EMT characteristics; i.e., change from epithelial to fibroblastic morphology, enhanced cell motility, decreased expression of a typical epithelial cell marker, E-cadherin, and enhanced expression of mesenchymal markers. (iii) TGF-β treatment up-regulated mRNA level of FN containing the IIICS domain and GalNAc-T activity for the IIICS domain peptide substrate containing the FDC6 onfFN epitope. (iv) Knockdown of GalNAc-T6 and T3 inhibited TGF-β–induced up-regulation of onfFN and EMT process. (v) Involvement of GSLs was not detectable with the EMT process in these cell lines. These findings indicate the important functional role of expression of onfFN, defined by site-specific O-glycosylation at IIICS domain, in the EMT process. PMID:22006308

  16. The oncofetal protein IMP3: a novel biomarker for endometrial serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenxin; Yi, Xiaofang; Fadare, Oluwole; Liang, Sharon X; Martel, Maritza; Schwartz, Peter E; Jiang, Zhong

    2008-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in fetal tissue and malignant tumors but rarely found in adult benign tissues. The aim of this study is to determine the expression of IMP3 in benign endometrium, endometrial cancer, and its precursor lesions, trying to see whether IMP3 has any diagnostic usage. Two hundred ninety-eight endometrial samples were examined for IMP3 expression by immunohistochemistry. These included benign endometrium (n=68), atypical hyperplasia or endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (n=35), endometrial glandular dysplasia (n=21), endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (n=18), endometrioid carcinoma (n=70), mucinous carcinoma (n=8), serous carcinoma (n=51), clear cell carcinoma (n=12), and other malignancies (n=15). Maturational patterns in the 68 benign endometrial samples included atrophic (n=12), proliferative (n=18), secretory (n=14), menstrual (n=8), and gestational (n=16). Most of the carcinomas were histologically pure; where mixed, the second component constituted <10% of the total tumor volume. The extent and intensity of IMP3 expression was semiquantitatively determined and scored for all samples. A renal cell carcinoma with known IMP3 expression was used as positive control for each immunohistochemistry run. Among the malignant cases, IMP3 expression was predominantly found in endometrial serous carcinoma and its putative precursor lesions, with 3 (14%) of 21 endometrial glandular dysplasia, 16 (89%) of 18 serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma, and 48 (94%) of 51 serous carcinomas (P<0.001). In contrast, the frequency of IMP3 expression was significantly lesser in nonserous malignancies with 0 (0%) of 35, 5 (7%) of 70, 0 (0%) of 8, 3 (25%) of 12, and 5 (33%) of 15 positive expression rates in atypical hyperplasia or endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell carcinomas, and other malignancies, respectively. The IMP3 staining was

  17. Developmental transcription factor NFIB is a putative target of oncofetal miRNAs and is associated with tumour aggressiveness in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Becker-Santos, Daiana D; Thu, Kelsie L; English, John C; Pikor, Larissa A; Martinez, Victor D; Zhang, May; Vucic, Emily A; Luk, Margaret Ty; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Piga, Daniela; Lhomme, Nicolas M; Tsay, Mike J; Yee, John; MacAulay, Calum E; Lam, Stephen; Lockwood, William W; Robinson, Wendy P; Jurisica, Igor; Lam, Wan L

    2016-10-01

    Genes involved in fetal lung development are thought to play crucial roles in the malignant transformation of adult lung cells. Consequently, the study of lung tumour biology in the context of lung development has the potential to reveal key developmentally relevant genes that play critical roles in lung cancer initiation/progression. Here, we describe for the first time a comprehensive characterization of miRNA expression in human fetal lung tissue, with subsequent identification of 37 miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that recapitulate their fetal expression patterns. Nuclear factor I/B (NFIB), a transcription factor essential for lung development, was identified as a potential frequent target for these 'oncofetal' miRNAs. Concordantly, analysis of NFIB expression in multiple NSCLC independent cohorts revealed its recurrent underexpression (in ∼40-70% of tumours). Interrogation of NFIB copy number, methylation, and mutation status revealed that DNA level disruption of this gene is rare, and further supports the notion that oncofetal miRNAs are likely the primary mechanism responsible for NFIB underexpression in NSCLC. Reflecting its functional role in regulating lung differentiation, low expression of NFIB was significantly associated with biologically more aggressive subtypes and, ultimately, poorer survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Suppression of hamster lymphocyte reactivity to simian virus 40 tumor surface antigens by spleen cells from pregnant hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Weppner, W.A.; Adkinson, L.R.; Coggin, J.H.Jr

    1980-09-01

    SV40-transformed tumor cells in hamsters have been found to have cell surface antigens cross-reactive with antigens temporally expressed on fetal tissues. Using a lymphocyte transformation assay, spleen cells from pregnant hamsters were found to be incapable of responding to preparations of either hamster fetal tissue or SV40-transformed cells. However, a suppressor component can be demonstrated in spleen cell populations of both primi-and multiparous hamsters during pregnancy that is capable of reducing the response of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40 tumor-associated antigens. The degree of suppression is proportional to the ratio of responder cells to spleen cells from pregnant animals. These results suggest there is a subpopulation of spleen cells involved in immunoregulation during pregnancy that has the ability to suppress the reactivity of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40-associated oncofetal antigens.

  19. Expression and structural characterization of anti-T-antigen single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and analysis of their binding to T-antigen by surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Subedi, Ganesh P; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2013-12-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr), also known as Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen), is an oncofetal antigen commonly found in cancerous tissues. Availability of anti-T-antigen human antibodies could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Four groups of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were previously isolated from a phage library (Matsumoto-Takasaki et al. (2009) Isolation and characterization of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies from a phage library. BioSci Trends 3:87-95.). Here, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Group 1-4 were expressed and produced in a Drosophila S2 cell expression system. ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses confirmed the binding activity of 1E8 scFv protein to various T-antigen presenting conjugates. NMR experiments provided evidence of the folded nature of the 1E8 scFv protein. ScFv-ligand contact was identified by STD NMR, indicating that the galactose unit of T-antigen at the non-reducing end was primarily recognized by 1E8 scFv. This thus provides direct evidence of T-antigen specificity.

  20. Repression by sustained-release. beta. -glucuronidase inhibitors of chemical carcinogen-mediated induction of a marker oncofetal protein in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Walaszek, Z.; Hanausek-Walaszek, M.; Webb, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    The degree of induction of an oncofetal protein marker in rodents by selected chemical carcinogens has been correlated with changes in carcinogenicity induced by dietary D-glucaro-1,4-lactone (GL) based anticarcinogens. These potent anticarcinogens may act to increase the clearance of carcinogens as glucuronides through the inhibition of ..beta..-glucuronidase. The sustained-release forms are particularly effective, 1.5 mmol/kg of GL maintaining serum ..beta..-glucuronidase activity at or below 50% for only 1 h, while an equivalent amount of calcium glucarate (CGT) maintained this level of inhibition for over 5 h. CGT or other sustained-release inhibitors, when fed to rodents during administration of carcinogens that undergo glucuronidation, caused a marked reduction in the induction of the marker protein. For those systems where other markers of carcinogenesis were also assessed, it was determined the inhibition of marker-protein induction was quantitatively similar to both the inhibition of binding of the carcinogen to DNA and the subsequent induction of tumors in target organs. The following carcinogens were administered intraperitoneally: benzo(a)pryene; 7,12-demethylbenz(a)anthracene; 3-methylcholanthrene; 2-acetylaminofluorene; 2-naphthylamine; N-nitroso-N,N-dibutylamine; aflatoxin B1; 1-nitropyrene.

  1. Purification and refolding of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies (scFvs) expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-02-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr) is an oncofetal antigen that is commonly expressed as a carbohydrate determinant in many adenocarcinomas. Since it is associated with tumor progression and metastasis, production of recombinant antibodies specific for T-antigen could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Previously, we isolated and characterized 11 anti-T-antigen phage clones from a phage library displaying human single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and purified one scFv protein, 1G11. More recently, we purified and characterized 1E8 scFv protein using a Drosophila S2 expression system. In the current study, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Groups 1-4 were purified from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Inclusion bodies isolated from E. coli cells were denatured in 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Solubilized His-tagged scFv proteins were purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose column chromatography in the presence of 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Purified scFv proteins were refolded according to a previously published method of step-wise dialysis. Two anti-T-antigen scFv proteins, 1E6 and 1E8 that belong to Groups 1 and 2, respectively, were produced in sufficient amounts, thus allowing further characterization of their binding activity with T-antigen. Specificity and affinity constants determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, provided evidence that both 1E8 and 1E6 scFv proteins are T-antigen specific and suggested that 1E8 scFv protein has a higher affinity for T-antigen than 1E6 scFv protein.

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Mario; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Izzi, Valerio; Masuelli, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

  3. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  4. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  5. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  6. Diagnostic Antigens of Leishmania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    braziliensis (MHOM/BR/75/M2903), L. chagasi (MJOM/BR/82/BA-2,C 1), L. donovani (MHOMiEt/67iHU3), Leishmania guyanensis (MIHOMJBR/75/M4147), L. infantum (IPT-1...comparative test to a variety of other recombinant Leishmania antigens including L. chagasi hsp70, L. braziliensis hsp83/90, L. braziliensis eIF4A, L...34 4. AD CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-92-C-2082 EC•£ 2 j 994 ’i, L TITLE: DIAGNOSTIC ANTIGENS OF LEISHMANIA L PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven G. Reed, Ph.D

  7. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  8. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  9. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  10. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  11. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  12. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  13. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  14. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  15. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  16. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  17. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  18. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  19. K99 surface antigen of Escherichia coli: antigenic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    K99 prepared by acid precipitation hemagglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes, whereas K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex did not. K99 purified by either procedure hemagglutinated horse erythrocytes. K99 prepared by acid precipitation contained a second antigen not presnet in the K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. This antigen could be detected by immunoprecipitation with some, but not all, sera prepared against K99-positive Escherichia coli strains. It was assumed that this second antigen is not K99 and is responsible for the guinea pig erythrocyte hemagglutination reaction. Furthermore, the second antigen has an isoelectric point of 4.2, which has been reported by Morris and co-workers to be the isoelectric point of K99. Images PMID:83300

  20. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  1. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  2. How does antigen retrieval work?

    PubMed

    Leong, Trishe Y-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of antigen retrieval has enabled immunohistology to become an integral component of morphologic diagnosis, routinely employed in cancer diagnosis, and for the identification of therapeutic and prognostic markers. The mechanism of antigen retrieval, however, remains speculative with the key to our understanding embedded in the actions of formaldehyde on proteins. One commonly held concept is that heat primarily breaks down protein cross-linkages that occur with aldehyde fixation, thus "unmasking" protein epitopes of interest. Enzymatic pretreatment is also thought to have a similar action whereas such "breakages" are the result of extremely rapid molecular movement induced by microwaves and ultrasound. The formation of rigid cagelike calcium complexes during formaldehyde fixation is another suggested mechanism of antigen masking requiring chelating agents for reversal. A more recent suggestion for the antigen retrieval phenomenon has evoked the Mannich reaction, which occurs with the cross-linking of some proteins. Such cross-linkages can be hydrolyzed by heat or alkalis so that the process of antigen retrieval may be the simple removal of such cross-linked proteins that are sterically interfering with the binding of antibodies to linear protein epitopes in the tissue section. We are clearly not yet in possession of all the answers to the problem.

  3. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  4. UG311, An Oncofetal Marker Lost with Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    i~iit,• S... -{ $. .. .. ,, . .. .. . . .... . .. . ... . >FIGURE THE IGF AXIS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF PROSTATE CANCER. Christopher W...19. 55. Chan, J.M., Stampfer , M.J., Giovannucci, E., Gann, P.H., et al. 1998, Science, 279, 563. 56. Wolk, A., Mantzoros, C.S., Andersson, S.O

  5. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  6. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  7. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  8. Allergy to cockroach antigens in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Romański, B; Dziedziczko, A; Pawlik-Miskiewicz, K; Wilewska-Klubo, T; Zbikowska-Gotz, M

    1981-01-01

    Cockroach allergy was investigated in a group of 56 patients with atopic bronchial asthma (37 men and 19 women with ages ranging from 16 to 65) all allergic to house dust antigen. In all patients, both intracutaneous tests and bronchial provocation tests were performed with cockroach antigen prepared from the species most common in Poland, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis. Positive skin reactions to cockroach antigen were found in 17 patients while an immediate bronchoconstrictive response was noted in 11. In the authors opinion, cockroach antigens may be partly responsible for the antigenic properties of house dust and may play a causative role in some cases of atopic asthma.

  9. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  10. Regulation of antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Rivero, Fernando D; Luján, Hugo D

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic variation, a clonal phenotypic variation developed by microorganisms, involves the permanent switching of homologous, antigenically different cell surface molecules. In pathogenic microorganisms, antigenic variation is often described as a mechanism to evade the host immune system and therefore is responsible for the generation of chronic and/or recurrent infections. However, antigenic variation has also been involved in expanding host diversity and differential courses of the diseases. The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation through the continuous exchange of approximately 200 variant-specific surface proteins. Here we review the principal issues regarding the significance of antigenic variation during Giardia infections, the particular features of the variant-specific surface proteins, and the current knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate this process, as well as the relevance of disrupting antigenic variation as a novel approach to design effective antiparasitic vaccines.

  11. Antigenic Variation of Campylobacter Flagella

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Cultures were grown at 37"C zation, the flagellum is a major antigen of the campylobacter in anaerobic jars on chocolate -blood agar plates. An atmo- cell...Protein epitopes to the serospecificity of the LIO 8 serogroup. This solubilized in sample buffer was stacked in 4.5% acrylamide thermolabile serogroup...were grown for 24 h and then streaked ELISA. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on one side of a chocolate -blood agar plate from which a was

  12. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  13. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  14. Antigenic heterogeneity of vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Page, C.; Rose, M.; Yacoub, M.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic status of vascular endothelium from different sites of the normal adult and fetal human cardiovascular system was investigated. Tissues included aorta (n = 9), pulmonary artery (n = 8), coronary artery (n = 6), ventricle/atrium (n = greater than 10), lymph node (n = 2), fetal whole heart (n = 3), and umbilical cord (n = 7). Frozen sections were studied using monoclonal antibodies recognizing endothelial markers (EN4, vWf, Pal-E, and 44G4), vascular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM, VCAM, and PECAM), the monocyte/endothelial marker (OKM5), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (class I and class II). Results demonstrate that capillary endothelium is phenotypically different from endothelial cells (EC) lining large vessels. Capillary EC strongly express MHC classes I and II, ICAM, and OKM5, which are variably weak to undetectable on large vessels. In contrast, the large vessels strongly express vWf and appear to constitutively express ELAM-1. This suggests that the capillary EC may be more efficient at antigen presentation or more susceptible to immune attack in vivo. Interestingly, normal coronary arteries, unlike all other large vessels, express MHC class II and VCAM molecules. Future studies should concentrate on comparative functional studies between capillary, coronary, and large vessel EC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519671

  15. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  16. [Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces strains (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N

    1980-01-01

    The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces strains and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces strains in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama strains and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six strains of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.

  17. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  18. Radial immunodiffusion: a simple and rapid method for detection of Marek's disease antigen(s).

    PubMed

    Marquardt, W W

    1972-05-01

    A qualitative radial immunodiffusion technique is described which detects antigen(s) in feathers from live or dead chickens infected with Marek's disease herpesvirus. Antiserum, which is incorporated into a support medium, reacts with antigen(s) in the feather tip producing a radial precipitin ring. Antigen(s) was detected in 93.3% of experimentally inoculated chickens 21 days postinoculation and in 100% of infected birds subsequently tested through 6 weeks. No antigen was detectable in the feathers of uninoculated control chickens. The technique is simple and rapid to perform. Positive tests could be detected after 1 to 2 hours of incubation. Antigen detection by the radial immunodiffusion test correlated well with other criteria of infection. This technique should have application as a laboratory research tool and as an adjunct for a rapid flock diagnosis of Marek's disease.

  19. Antigen-Presenting Cells and Antigen Presentation in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Benson, Robert A.; Bedaj, Marija; Maffia, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) form in territorialized niches of peripheral tissues characterized by the presence of antigens; however, little is known about mechanism(s) of antigen handling by ectopic lymphoid structures. In this mini review, we will discuss the role of antigen-presenting cells and mechanisms of antigen presentation in TLOs, summarizing what is currently known about this facet of the formation and function of these tissues as well as identifying questions yet to be addressed. PMID:27872626

  20. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  1. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  2. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  3. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  4. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  5. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  6. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  7. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  8. CD1 antigen presentation: how it works.

    PubMed

    Barral, Duarte C; Brenner, Michael B

    2007-12-01

    The classic concept of self-non-self discrimination by the immune system focused on the recognition of fragments from proteins presented by classical MHC molecules. However, the discovery of MHC-class-I-like CD1 antigen-presentation molecules now explains how the immune system also recognizes the abundant and diverse universe of lipid-containing antigens. The CD1 molecules bind and present amphipathic lipid antigens for recognition by T-cell receptors. Here, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of how the processes of CD1 assembly, trafficking, lipid-antigen binding and T-cell activation are achieved and the new insights into how lipid antigens differentially elicit CD1-restricted innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

  9. Antigenicity of two turkey astrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saif, Y M

    2004-12-01

    Astroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. These viruses cause gastroenteritis in humans and in a variety of animal species, including turkey poults. Only human astroviruses are well characterized antigenically. In the current study, two turkey astrovirus isolates, TAstV1987 and TAstV2001, were antigenically compared using cross-neutralization tests in turkey embryos, as well as cross-reactivity of the two isolates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antigenic relatedness values (R) were calculated using the Archetti and Horsfall formula. The R value based on the cross-neutralization tests was 0.56%, which indicates that TAstV1987 and TAstV2001 belong to different serotypes; the R value of the two viruses based on ELISA was 70.7%, which suggests these two viruses share common antigen(s).

  10. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  11. Diverse Endogenous Antigens for Mouse Natural Killer T Cells: Self-Antigens That Are Not Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T cells with an invariant antigen receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-antigens presented by the CD1d antigen-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-antigens are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. Here we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian antigens for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these antigens required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-antigen is acquired. Extracts of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) contain a self-antigen that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, recombinant CD1d molecules. The antigen(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-antigen that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-antigen for iNKT cells, that the self-antigens comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs. PMID:21191069

  12. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  13. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  14. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  16. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  17. Serum immunoglobulin levels in Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J.; Johnson, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    Ig levels were determined by radial immunodiffusion in uncomplicated cases of acute hepatitis with or without Australia antigenaemia. Initial sera from Australia antigen negative cases showed a striking elevation in IgM levels when compared to Australia antigen positive cases (6·5 versus 1·9 mg/ml). None of twenty-four Australia antigen positive cases exceeded 3 mg/ml IgM, and only 3/58 Australia antigen negative cases exhibited values below 3 mg/ml. Intial sera from Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative subjects did not differ in concentration of IgG, IgA, or IgD. Serial determinations of IgG revealed a transient fall in patients with Australia antigen positive hepatitis, and a rise in Australia antigen negative cases. Asymptomatic, Australia antigen positive, Guaymi Indian subjects were compared to matched Australia antigen negative controls from the same indigenous group and no differences in the concentration of IgG, IgM, IgA or IgD were found, although elevations of IgG and IgM were common in both groups. No evidence of abnormal proteins was found when sera were tested by cellulose acetate electrophoresis or by immunoelectrophoresis versus immunoglobulin-specific antisera. Ultracentrifugal analysis failed to detect `7S' IgM. PMID:4625396

  18. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  19. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  20. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  1. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  2. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  3. Antigen presentation by Hodgkin's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Cossman, J; Diehl, V; Volkman, D J

    1985-11-01

    The L428 tumor cell line is a long-term tissue culture of Reed-Sternberg cells which was derived from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The L428 cells express all known cell surface antigens, cytochemical staining, and cytologic features of freshly explanted Reed-Sternberg cells. In addition to the previously described HLA-DR cell surface antigens, the L428 cells are now demonstrated to express both DS and SB alloantigens. Thus, the L428 cells express all of the known subclasses of the human immune response genes that are located in the major histocompatibility complex. Furthermore, the L428 cells are capable of presenting soluble antigen to T cells in a genetically restricted fashion. T cell lines were established from normal donors previously immunized with tetanus toxoid. The T cells utilized were incapable of tetanus toxoid-induced proliferation unless antigen-presenting cells were added to the cultures. However, T cells from the two normal donors, which like the L428 cells expressed HLA-DR 5, demonstrated significant proliferative responses when cultured with tetanus toxoid and L428 cells. No proliferative response was observed when the L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells for a DR (4,-), DR (2,-) or DR (1,7) T cell line. The tetanus toxoid dose-response curve was similar regardless of whether autologous mononuclear leukocytes or L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells. The T cell proliferation induced by soluble antigen was also blocked by anti-HLA-DR antibody. Thus, functionally, Hodgkin's disease may be classified as a tumor of antigen-presenting cells.

  4. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  5. Computer aided selection of candidate vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunoinformatics is an emergent branch of informatics science that long ago pullulated from the tree of knowledge that is bioinformatics. It is a discipline which applies informatic techniques to problems of the immune system. To a great extent, immunoinformatics is typified by epitope prediction methods. It has found disappointingly limited use in the design and discovery of new vaccines, which is an area where proper computational support is generally lacking. Most extant vaccines are not based around isolated epitopes but rather correspond to chemically-treated or attenuated whole pathogens or correspond to individual proteins extract from whole pathogens or correspond to complex carbohydrate. In this chapter we attempt to review what progress there has been in an as-yet-underexplored area of immunoinformatics: the computational discovery of whole protein antigens. The effective development of antigen prediction methods would significantly reduce the laboratory resource required to identify pathogenic proteins as candidate subunit vaccines. We begin our review by placing antigen prediction firmly into context, exploring the role of reverse vaccinology in the design and discovery of vaccines. We also highlight several competing yet ultimately complementary methodological approaches: sub-cellular location prediction, identifying antigens using sequence similarity, and the use of sophisticated statistical approaches for predicting the probability of antigen characteristics. We end by exploring how a systems immunomics approach to the prediction of immunogenicity would prove helpful in the prediction of antigens. PMID:21067543

  6. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  7. Murine cell-mediated immune response recognizes an enterovirus group-specific antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Beck, M A; Tracy, S M

    1989-01-01

    Splenocytes taken from mice inoculated with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) (Nancy) developed an in vitro proliferative response against CVB3 antigen. This response could not be detected earlier than 8 days postinoculation but could be detected up to 28 days after exposure to CB3. CVB3-sensitized splenocytes responded not only to the CVB3 antigen but to other enteroviruses as well. This response was found to be enterovirus specific in that no response was detected to a non-enteroviral picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or to an unrelated influenza virus. The generation of a splenocyte population capable of responding to an enterovirus group antigen(s) was not limited to inoculation of mice with CVB3, as similar responses were generated when mice were inoculated with CVB2. Cell subset depletions revealed that the major cell type responding to the enterovirus group antigen(s) was the CD4+ T cell. Current evidence suggests that the group antigen(s) resides in the structural proteins of the virus, since spleen cells from mice inoculated with a UV-inactivated, highly purified preparation of CVB3 virions also responded in vitro against enteroviral antigens. PMID:2476566

  8. TL antigen as a transplantation antigen recognized by TL-restricted cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to broadly expressed classical class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, structurally closely related TL antigens are expressed in a highly restricted fashion. Unlike classical class I antigens, TL antigens are not known to be targets of cytotoxic T cells or to mediate graft rejection. Whereas classical class I antigens function as antigen-presenting molecules to T cell receptors (TCR), the role of TL is yet to be defined. To elucidate the function of TL, we have derived transgenic mice expressing TL in most tissues including skin by introducing a TL gene, T3b of C57BL/6 mouse origin, driven by the H-2Kb promoter. By grafting the skin of transgenic mice, we demonstrate that TL can serve as a transplantation antigen and mediate a TCR-alpha/beta+ CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. This T cell recognition of TL does not require antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. Furthermore, we show that C57BL/6 F1 mice develop CD8+ T cells that are cytotoxic for C57BL/6 TL+ leukemia cells, providing further support for the concept that aberrantly expressed nonmutated proteins such as TL can be recognized as tumor antigens. PMID:8113675

  9. Antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccines of various antigenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Monto, A S; Foster, D A

    1990-02-01

    Four inactivated influenza vaccines (containing the recommended antigens for the 1985-1986 influenza season) of various antigenic concentration levels were randomly administered to 140 study participants. The effect of the increasing antigen concentration resulted in significantly higher influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels 3 weeks after vaccination for the A/H1N1 antigen but not for the A/H3N2 or B antigens. Also, at 3 weeks after vaccination, there were significantly lower antibody titer levels associated with increasing age for the A/H1N1 and B antigens (adjusting for the prevaccination antibody titer and antigen content).

  10. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  11. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  12. The antigenic relationship between Brettanomyces-Debaryomyces strains and the Salmonella cholerae-suis O antigen.

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N; Sağanak, I; Wells, G

    1978-01-01

    The immune sera for Brettanomyces lambicus, B. claussenii, Debaryomyces hansenii and D. marama agglutinated Salmonella cholerae-suis (0:6(2), 7). The immune serum for S. cholerae-suis agglutinated B. lambicus, B. clausenni, D. hansenii and D. marama. Absorption and agglutination cross-tested demonstrated common antigen factor(s) in the tested yeasts and Salmonella 0:7 antigen.

  13. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  14. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  15. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  16. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  17. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  18. Neural antigen-specific autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lennon, Vanda A

    2012-07-01

    Neural-specific autoantibodies have been documented and their diagnostic utility validated in diseases affecting the neuraxis from cerebral cortex to the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous system and skeletal muscle. These neurological disorders occur both idiopathically and in a paraneoplastic context. Molecular identification of the antigens has expedited development of confirmatory and high-throughput tests for serum and cerebrospinal fluid, which permit early diagnosis and reveal the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms. The autoantibodies are classifiable on the basis of antigen location: intracellular (nuclear or cytoplasmic) or plasma membrane. Immunohistopathological studies of patients' biopsied and autopsied tissues suggest that effector T cells mediate the autoimmune neurological disorders for which defining autoantibodies recognize intracellular antigens. Antigens within intact cells are inaccessible to circulating antibody, and the associated neurological deficits rarely improve with antibody-depleting therapies. Tumoricidal therapies may arrest neurological progression, but symptom reversal is rare. In contrast, autoantibodies specific for plasma membrane antigens have pathogenic potential, and the associated neurological deficits are often amenable to antibody-depleting immunotherapy, such as plasma exchange and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy. These reversible neurological disorders are frequently misdiagnosed as neurodegenerative. The focus of this review is the immunobiology, pathophysiology, and clinical spectrum of autoimmune neurological disorders accompanied by neural-specific IgGs.

  19. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  20. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Immune responses to vaccines involving a combined antigen-nanoparticle mixture and nanoparticle-encapsulated antigen formulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xiaoming; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Qiu, Shaohui; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-07-01

    Many physicochemical characteristics significantly influence the adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles; one critical factor is the kinetics of antigen exposure to the immune system by particle-adjuvanted vaccines. Here, we investigated how various antigen-nanoparticle formulations impacted antigen exposure to the immune system and the resultant antigen-specific immune responses. We formulated antigen with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by encapsulating antigen within nanoparticles or by simply mixing soluble antigen with the nanoparticles. Our results indicated that the combined formulation (composed of antigen encapsulated in nanoparticles and antigen mixed with nanoparticles) induced more powerful antigen-specific immune responses than each single-component formulation. Mice immunized with the combined vaccine formulation displayed enhanced induction of antigen-specific IgG antibodies with high avidity, increased cytokine secretion by splenocytes, and improved generation of memory T cell. Enhanced immune responses elicited by the combined vaccine formulation might be attributed to the antigen-depot effect at the injection site, effective provision of both adequate initial antigen exposure and long-term antigen persistence, and efficient induction of dendritic cell (DC) activation and follicular helper T cell differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Understanding the effect of antigen-nanoparticle formulations on the resultant immune responses might have significant implications for rational vaccine design.

  2. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  3. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  4. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Maksim V; Ter Beest, Martin; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here, we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for the podosomes of dendritic cells.

  5. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  6. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits.

  7. Targeting carbohydrate antigens in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Anastas; Canziani, Gabriela; Macleod, Stewart; Plaxco, Jason; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-03-18

    Peptide mimotopes provide a strategy to augment human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) specific carbohydrate reactive immune responses. Their antigenic and immunological properties will depend on the optimization of motif clustering and multimerization. We observe that structural variants of the same mimetic motif, linear versus cyclic, can be used to tune the properties of the antibodies elicited. The expansion of the database of mimotope sequence motifs can be increased by analyzing structures that bind to HIV directed monoclonal antibody 2G12 and the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), fostering new mimotope designs. Such analysis indicates that these reagents bind to subsets of mannosyl antigens on the envelope (env) protein.

  8. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  10. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis.

  11. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies.

  12. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  13. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A P; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment. PMID:3068870

  14. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  15. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  16. Study of an Anthrax Protective Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-24

    have been studied, and the biological and chemical properties of the latter have been determined , as well. We have used a milk-peptone medium for...antigen, a significant role of the organic compounds used as the cEergy source was established. Glucose, saccharose and dextran proved to be the best

  17. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  18. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.; Gerulat, Bernard F.; Pinchuck, Paul

    1964-01-01

    A new group of synthetic random polymers of α-L-amino acids has been studied for immunogenicity. With the glutamic acid and alanine copolymers, those consisting of almost equimolar amounts of the two (G60A40 and G40A60) were effective antigens in rabbits whereas those with higher glutamic acid contents (G75A25, G90A10) were poor antigens. The substitution of alanine by valine or leucine (G75V25 and G80Leu20) produced copolymers which were poor antigens in rabbits but effective in guinea pigs. L70A30, although capable of "non-specifically" precipitating serum proteins, was shown not to be antigenic in either rabbits or guinea pigs. The introduction of alanine into glutamic acid and lysine polymers (GLA series) enhanced the immunogenicity of the terpolymers, i.e., GLA30 > GLA20 > GLA10 > GL. The mechanism by which this may be accomplished is discussed as possibly being related to the reduction of the interactions between glutamyl and lysyl residues which allows the carboxyl groups to act as strong immunogenic determinants. PMID:14176288

  19. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  20. Degenerate interfaces in antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Decanniere, K; Transue, T R; Desmyter, A; Maes, D; Muyldermans, S; Wyns, L

    2001-10-26

    In most of the work dealing with the analysis of protein-protein interfaces, a single X-ray structure is available or selected, and implicitly it is assumed that this structure corresponds to the optimal complex for this pair of proteins. However, we have found a degenerate interface in a high-affinity antibody-antigen complex: the two independent complexes of the camel variable domain antibody fragment cAb-Lys3 and its antigen hen egg white lysozyme present in the asymmetric unit of our crystals show a difference in relative orientation between antibody and antigen, leading to important differences at the protein-protein interface. A third cAb-Lys3-hen lysozyme complex in a different crystal form adopts yet another relative orientation. Our results show that protein-protein interface characteristics can vary significantly between different specimens of the same high-affinity antibody-protein antigen complex. Consideration should be given to this type of observation when trying to establish general protein-protein interface characteristics.

  1. Rational antigen modification as a strategy to upregulate or downregulate antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S I; Schlom, J

    2000-02-01

    Recent and rapid advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of antigen recognition by CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes have led to the birth of possibilities for site-directed, rational modification of cognate antigenic determinants. This immunologic concept has vast biomedical implications for regulation of host immunity against the pathogenesis of diverse disease processes. The upregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'agonistic' peptides would be most desirable in response to invasive pathogenic challenges, such as infectious and neoplastic disease, while the downregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'antagonistic' peptides would be most efficacious during inappropriate pathologic consequences, such as autoimmunity. The capacity to experimentally manipulate intrinsic properties of cognate peptide ligands to appropriately alter the nature, course and potency of cellular immune interactions has important potential in both preventive and therapeutic clinical paradigms.

  2. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  3. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  4. Comparison of Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Cercarial Antigens and Soluble Egg Antigens for Serodiagnosing Schistosome Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Mike; Aitken, Cara; Bailey, Wendi; Ji, Minjun; Dawson, Emily; Gilis, Henk; Spence, Grant; Alexander, Claire; van Gool, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni cercarial antigen preparation (cercarial transformation fluid – SmCTF) was evaluated for detection of anti-schistosome antibodies in human sera in 4 collaborating laboratories. The performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. mansoni egg antigens (SmSEA) in an indirect enzyme-immunoassay (ELISA) antigen assay, the latter being used routinely in 3 of the 4 participating laboratories to diagnose S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. In the fourth laboratory the performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. japonicum egg antigens (SjSEA) in ELISA for detection of anti-S. japonicum antibodies. In all 4 laboratories the results given by SmCTF in ELISA were very similar to those given by the antigen preparation routinely used in the respective laboratory to detect anti-schistosome antibodies in human infection sera. In so far as the ELISA results from SmCTF are thus so little different from those given by schistosome egg antigens and also cheaper to produce, the former is a potentially useful new diagnostic aid for schistosomiasis. PMID:23029577

  5. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  6. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  7. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  8. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  9. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  10. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  11. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  12. Cellular Antigens in the Structure of Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    the previously described method. 𔄁xzracts of the Dolichos biflorus L seeds (to calculate antigen A) and Cytisus sessilifolius L. seeds (to calculate...find the group antigen A and phytohemagglutinins "from seeds Cytisus sessilefolius L. in order to calculate antigen H. As h -6- "Fable 4 shows virus

  13. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  14. The effect of antigen encapsulation in chitosan particles on uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Zaharoff, David A

    2013-03-01

    Particle-based vaccine delivery systems are under exploration to enhance antigen-specific immunity against safe but poorly immunogenic polypeptide antigens. Chitosan is a promising biomaterial for antigen encapsulation and delivery due to its ability to form nano- and microparticles in mild aqueous conditions thus preserving the antigenicity of loaded polypeptides. In this study, the influence of chitosan encapsulation on antigen uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs) is explored. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model protein antigens and encapsulated in chitosan particles via precipitation-coacervation at loading efficiencies >89%. Formulation conditions were manipulated to create antigen-encapsulated chitosan particles (AgCPs) with discrete nominal sizes (300 nm, 1 μm, and 3 μm). Uptake of AgCPs by dendritic cells and macrophages was found to be dependent on particle size, antigen concentration and exposure time. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that uptake of AgCPs enhanced upregulation of surface activation markers on APCs and increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lastly, antigen-specific T cells exhibited higher proliferative responses when stimulated with APCs activated with AgCPs versus soluble antigen. These data suggest that encapsulation of antigens in chitosan particles enhances uptake, activation and presentation by APCs.

  15. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  16. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tallóczy, Zsolt; Martinez, Jose; Joset, Danielle; Ray, Yonaton; Gácser, Attila; Toussi, Sima; Mizushima, Noboru; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Nosanchuk, Josh; Goldstein, Harris; Loike, John; Sulzer, David; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-02-08

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  17. Recovery of antigenically reactive HIV-2 cores.

    PubMed

    Chrystie, I L; Almeida, J D

    1989-03-01

    Negative staining studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been hampered by the fragile nature of the particles. Although detergent treatment is capable of releasing cores from HIV-2 particles, these are unstable and do not retain morphological integrity. Addition of glutaraldehyde will stabilise these structures but, if used at too high a concentration, will destroy their antigenicity. This study shows that if both detergent and glutaraldehyde are used in correct proportions, antigenically reactive cores can be recovered from HIV-2 cell cultures. More specifically we show that a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P40 and 0.1% glutaraldehyde produces preparations of HIV-2 cores that are suitable for immune electron microscopy. These cores reacted positively, that is, formed immune complexes, with both human HIV-2 antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody that, although directed against p24 (HIV-1), reacts also with p25 (HIV-2).

  18. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  19. T Helper Cell Tolerance to Ubiquitous Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    NAKKEN, BRITT; DAVIS, KAREN E.; PAN, ZIJIAN; BACHMANN, MICHAEL; FARRIS, A. DARISE

    2007-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies. In order to understand the immunologic events leading to the development of such antibodies, knowledge of mechanisms of immune tolerance to nuclear antigens is required. By utilizing adoptive T cell transfer strategies with transgenic mouse models expressing nuclear neo-self antigens, T cell tolerance to the lupus-related nuclear antigens human La and nRNP A has been demonstrated. These findings also indicate the existence in normal animals of autoreactive B cells continuously presenting nuclear antigen, suggesting that nuclear antigens are not sequestered from the immune system. Investigations of CD4+ T cell tolerance to non-nuclear antigens have revealed a number of mechanisms that protect the host from autoreactivity, including autoreactive T cell deletion, regulatory T cell development and anergy induction. Recent studies using T cell receptor and neo-self nuclear antigen transgenic mice are revealing the importance of such mechanisms in maintaining tolerance to nuclear antigens. Mechanisms of tolerogenic antigen presentation, identification of tolerogenic antigen source(s), and the pathways leading to loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens in systemic autoimmune disease states are currently being sought. PMID:14629620

  20. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  1. Detection of functional class II-associated antigen: role of a low density endosomal compartment in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a functional assay to identify processed antigen in subcellular fractions from antigen-presenting cells; stimulatory activity in this assay may be caused by either free peptide fragments or by complexes of peptide fragments and class II molecules present on organellar membrane sheets and vesicles. In addition, we have developed a functional assay to identify proteolytic activity in subcellular fractions capable of generating antigenic peptides from intact proteins. These techniques permit the direct identification of intracellular sites of antigen processing and class II association. Using a murine B cell line stably transfected with a phosphorylcholine (PC)-specific membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig), we show that PC- conjugated antigens are rapidly internalized and efficiently degraded to generate processed antigen within an early low density compartment. Proteolytic activity capable of generating antigenic peptide fragments from intact proteins is found within low density endosomes and a dense compartment consistent with lysosomes. However, neither processed peptide nor peptide-class II complexes are detected in lysosomes from antigen-pulsed cells. Furthermore, blocking the intracellular transport of internalized antigen from the low density endosome to lysosomes does not inhibit the generation of processed antigen. Therefore, antigens internalized in association with membrane Ig on B cells can be efficiently processed in low density endosomal compartments without the contribution of proteases present within denser organelles. PMID:7722450

  2. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans.

  3. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand.

  4. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  5. From the antigen-presenting cell to the antigen-presenting vesicle: the exosomes.

    PubMed

    Schartz, Noël Emile Célestin; Chaput, Nathalie; André, Fabrice; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2002-08-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles of 30 to 100 nm in diameter, of endocytic origin, and are produced and secreted in vitro by living cells of diverse origin. In vivo and in vitro experiments suggest, from their particular proteomic composition, that exosomes are involved in the transfer of tumor antigens to antigen presenting cells, and in the stimulation of a specific immune response. In this review, we provide a molecular characterization of exosomes. The hypotheses accounting for exosome biogenesis will be outlined. Finally, we will describe their bioactivities and discuss their potential relevance and clinical implementation for cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  7. LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGEN IN TISSUE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Coons, Albert H.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Kaplan, Melvin H.

    1951-01-01

    The fate of three proteins, crystalline hen's egg albumin, crystalline bovine plasma albumin, and human plasma γ-globulin, was traced after intravenous injection into mice. This was done by preparing frozen sections of quick-frozen tissue, allowing what foreign protein might be present in the section to react with homologous antibody labelled with fluorescein, and examining the section under the fluorescence microscope. By this means, which employs the serological specificity of the protein as a natural "marker," all three of these proteins were found in the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system, the connective tissue, the vascular endothelium, the lymphocytes of spleen and lymph node, and the epithelium of the kidney tubules, the liver, and in very small amounts in the adrenal. The central nervous system was not studied. All three persisted longest in the reticulo-endothelial system and the connective tissue, and in the doses employed egg white (10 mg.) was no longer detectable after 1 day, bovine albumin (10 mg.) after 2 days, and human γ-globulin (4 mg.) after 6 days, although in a somewhat higher dose (10 mg.) human γ-globulin persisted longer than 8 days. Egg albumin differed from the others in not being detectable in the cells of the renal glomerulus. It was found that each of the three proteins was present in the nuclei of each cell type enumerated above, often in higher concentration than in the cytoplasm. Further, some of the nuclei not only contained antigen, soon after injection, but were also surrounded by a bright ring associated with the nuclear membrane. By means of photographic records under the fluorescence microscope of sections stained for antigen, and direct observation under the light microscope of the same field subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin, it could be determined that the antigen was not adsorbed to chromatin or nucleoli, but was apparently in solution in the nuclear sap. PMID:14803641

  8. Purification and characterization of the major antigen WI-1 from Blastomyces dermatitidis yeasts and immunological comparison with A antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, B S; Jones, J M

    1994-01-01

    The lack of well-defined antigens from Blastomyces dermatitidis has hampered the ability to reliably diagnose human infection and study the immunobiology of blastomycosis. We recently discovered a novel surface protein on B. dermatitidis yeasts, designated WI-1, and demonstrated it to be a key antigenic target of humoral and cellular responses during infection. In the present article, we purified and characterized WI-1 and compared it immunologically with the only Blastomyces antigen commercially available, A antigen. WI-1 was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography over a DEAE-cellulose column. It eluted from the column at a point on the salt gradient corresponding to 460 to 490 mM NaCl, reflecting its acidic pI of approximately equal to 5.2. Purified WI-1 had a molecular mass of 120 kDa and contained a large amount of cysteine (85 residues) and aromatic amino acids but undetectable carbohydrate. In contrast, A antigen had a molecular mass of 135 kDa and contained 37% carbohydrate. Immunological comparison of the two antigens showed that, when radiolabeled, WI-1 was more reactive with anti-Blastomyces antisera than A antigen but did not cross-react with anti-Histoplasma antisera. Proteinase digestion of WI-1 eliminated its recognition by anti-WI-1 and anti-Blastomyces antisera. Proteinase treatment of A antigen had no effect on its recognition by anti-Blastomyces or anti-Histoplasma antisera, but periodate treatment abolished recognition by anti-Histoplasma antisera, indicating that the cross-reactive determinant(s) of A antigen is displayed on the accompanying carbohydrate. In further studies, anti-WI-1 antiserum reacted with A antigen and, conversely, anti-A antiserum and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacted with WI-1, indicating a shared determinant on the two antigens. A recombinant 25-amino-acid repeat, recently cloned from WI-1 and found to be the major target of antibody recognition of WI-1, reacted strongly with anti-A antiserum and MAbs. In MAb

  9. Protective antibody titres and antigenic competition in multivalent Dichelobacter nodosus fimbrial vaccines using characterised rDNA antigens.

    PubMed

    Raadsma, H W; O'Meara, T J; Egerton, J R; Lehrbach, P R; Schwartzkoff, C L

    1994-03-01

    The relationship between K-agglutination antibody titres and protection against experimental challenge with Dichelobacter nodosus, the effect of increasing the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, and the importance of the nature of additional antigens in multivalent vaccines on antibody response and protection against experimental challenge with D. nodosus were examined in Merino sheep. A total of 204 Merino sheep were allocated to one of 12 groups, and vaccinated with preparations containing a variable number of rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial antigens. The most complex vaccine contained ten fimbrial antigens from all major D. nodosus serogroups, while the least complex contained a single fimbrial antigen. In addition to D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, other bacterial rDNA fimbrial antigens (Moraxella bovis Da12d and Escherichia coli K99), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used in some vaccines. Antibody titres to fimbrial antigens and BSA were measured by agglutination and ELISA tests, respectively. Antibody titres were determined on five occasions (Weeks 0, 3, 6, 8, and 11 after primary vaccination). All sheep were exposed to an experimental challenge with virulent isolates of D. nodosus from either serogroup A or B, 8 weeks after primary vaccination. For D. nodosus K-agglutinating antibody titres, a strong negative correlation between antibody titre and footrot lesion score was observed. This relationship was influenced by the virulence of the challenge strain. Increasing the number of fimbrial antigens in experimental rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial vaccines resulted in a linear decrease in K-agglutinating antibody titres to individual D. nodosus serogroups. Similarly, a linear decrease in protection to challenge with homologous serogroups was observed as the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens represented in the vaccine increased. The reduction in antibody titres in multicomponent vaccines is thought to be due to antigenic competition. The level of competition

  10. Characterization of the cellular antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast form.

    PubMed Central

    Casotto, M

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic components of the yeast extract of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Linder 2511 cultured for 3, 8, 20, 30, and 60 days were examined by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. The 3-day extract was chosen for characterization of the antigenic components because its stability did not vary with time and it contained all antigens identified by patient sera. Antibodies to cross-reacting antigens of P. brasiliensis extracts were detected in sera from patients with histoplasmosis, candidiasis, and aspergillosis. The 58-, 57-, 21-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) antigens were specific for P. brasiliensis, while the 48- and 45-kDa antigens were specific for paracoccidioidomycosis. The Western blot technique is a useful tool for the diagnosis of disease and revealed heterogeneity in the responses of patient sera. The combination of the 58-, 57-, and 45-kDa proteins confirmed a diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (87% of the cases). Images PMID:2380351

  11. Human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Fukunishi, T; Barcos, M; Tanigaki, N; Pressman, D

    1979-01-01

    Human Ia-like antigens in liver and kidney were shown by the immunofluorescence assay to be present mostly in the endothelial-mesenchymal cells of these organs. The parenchymal cells apparently contained no human Ia-like antigens. The antigens in liver and kidney were purified and shown to have the same subunit structure as human Ia-like antigens of cultured B-lymphoid cells. The human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs, not only in liver and kidney but also in testis, heart, muscle and brain, carried all the xenoantigenic characteristics of human Ia-like antigens expressed on lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:389786

  12. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects.

  13. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, W; Fung, B; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-04-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the region around the basal bodies of ciliated cat tracheal cells. Thus, we have found an antigen that is common to a variety of cell types from many different animal sources and is specifically associated with both centrioles and basal bodies. The possible role of the antigen in differentiation is discussed.

  14. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, W; Fung, B; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-01-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the region around the basal bodies of ciliated cat tracheal cells. Thus, we have found an antigen that is common to a variety of cell types from many different animal sources and is specifically associated with both centrioles and basal bodies. The possible role of the antigen in differentiation is discussed. Images PMID:6166008

  15. Antigen presentation for priming T cells in central system.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Shaoni; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2017-01-01

    Generation of myelin antigen-specific T cells is a major event in neuroimmune responses that causes demyelination. The antigen-priming of T cells and its location is important in chronic and acute inflammation. In autoimmune multiple sclerosis, the effector T cells are considered to generate in periphery. However, the reasons for chronic relapsing-remitting events are obscure. Considering mechanisms, a feasible aim of research is to investigate the role of antigen-primed T cells in lupus cerebritis. Last thirty years of investigations emphasize the relevance of microglia and infiltrated dendritic cells/macrophages as antigen presenting cells in the central nervous system. The recent approach towards circulating B-lymphocytes is an important area in the context. Here, we analyze the existing findings on antigen presentation in the central nervous system. The aim is to visualize signaling events of myelin antigen presentation to T cells and lead to the strategy of future goals on immunotherapy research.

  16. Overview of Plant-Made Vaccine Antigens against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Marina; Corigliano, Mariana G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of vaccine antigens against malaria produced in plants. Plant-based expression systems represent an interesting production platform due to their reduced manufacturing costs and high scalability. At present, different Plasmodium antigens and expression strategies have been optimized in plants. Furthermore, malaria antigens are one of the few examples of eukaryotic proteins with vaccine value expressed in plants, making plant-derived malaria antigens an interesting model to analyze. Up to now, malaria antigen expression in plants has allowed the complete synthesis of these vaccine antigens, which have been able to induce an active immune response in mice. Therefore, plant production platforms offer wonderful prospects for improving the access to malaria vaccines. PMID:22911156

  17. Predicted complementarity determining regions of the T cell antigen receptor determine antigen specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, C D; Eidelman, F J; Duncan, A; Hooshmand, F; Hedrick, S M

    1995-01-01

    The antigen receptor on T cells (TCR) has been predicted to have a structure similar to a membrane-anchored form of an immunoglobulin F(ab) fragment. Virtually all of the conserved amino acids that are important for inter- and intramolecular interactions in the VH-VL pair are also conserved in the TCR V alpha and V beta chains. A molecular model of the TCR has been constructed by homology and we have used the information from this, as well as the earlier structural predictions of others, to study the basis for specificity. Specifically, regions of a TCR cloned from an antigen-specific T cell were stitched into the corresponding framework of a second TCR. Results indicate that the substitution of amino acid sequences corresponding to the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin can convey the specificity for antigen and major histocompatibility complex molecules. These data are consistent with a role, but not an exclusive role, for CDR3 in antigen peptide recognition. Images PMID:7534228

  18. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  19. Induction of antigen-specific T suppressor cells by soluble Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Finkel, B E; Murphy, J W

    1988-01-01

    In naturally acquired paracoccidioidomycosis, patients have depressed in vivo and in vitro cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen. In addition, it has been reported that these patients have significant levels of circulating paracoccidioidal antigen in their sera. The primary purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of P. brasiliensis antigen on the CMI responses in a mouse model. On the basis of findings with other fungal agents, we predicted that circulating paracoccidioidal antigen may be inducing suppressor cells which modulate the CMI response. In this study, we show (i) that a soluble P. brasiliensis culture filtrate antigen (Pb.Ag) emulsified in complete Freund adjuvant and injected subcutaneously into mice induces reasonably high levels of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in CBA/J mice; (ii) that Pb.Ag elicits DTH reactions specific for P. brasiliensis when injected into footpads of immunized mice; and (iii) that an intravenous injection of Pb.Ag induces a population of lymph node and spleen cells which, upon adoptive transfer, suppress the afferent limb of the DTH response to paracoccidioidal antigen. The afferent suppressor cells can be detected in spleens as early as 5 days after Pb.Ag treatment, are present in significant numbers by 7 days in both spleens and lymph nodes, and are virtually absent by 14 days. In contrast, at 14 days after antigen injection, efferent suppressor cells were detected in spleens and lymph nodes. The Pb.Ag-induced afferent suppressor cells specifically inhibit the antiparacoccidioidal DTH response. They are nylon wool-nonadherent cells, and their activity is abrogated by anti-Thy-1 and complement treatment, indicating that they are T lymphocytes. The phenotype of these afferent suppressor T cells is L3T4+ Lyt-1+2- I-J+. The Pb.Ag-specific suppressor cells described in this paper are similar to the Ts1 cells in the azobenzenearsonate, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl, and

  20. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    antigens expressed on breast tumors. Towards this end we are developing peptide mimotopes of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens as they are T cell...dependent antigens. In our progress to date we have shown the 1) immunization with peptide mimotope activates a specific cellular response to a model murine...tumor cell line; 2) vaccination of mice with peptide eradicates established tumor; 3) Immunization with DNA format of the peptide suppresses tumor

  1. Controlled Release of Antigens for One Dose Immunization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    microencapsulation of antigen coated alum or by microencapsulating clusters of smaller (᝺ microns) microcapsules . Microcapsules under 10 microns in... microencapsulation were studied to determine what criteria must be satisfied to provide a protective immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen... microencapsulated in poly (DL-lactide-co- glycolide) in a form that was too large to be phagocytized and had an antigen release profile similar to that achieved with

  2. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (β-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to β-lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with β-lactamase in Freund’s adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund’s adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. PMID:16754878

  3. Antigenic relationship between influenza B viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Chakraverty, Pratima

    1971-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether antigenic groupings exist among influenza B viruses. Altogether, 22 influenza type B strains isolated during the years 1940-68 were examined by reciprocal haemagglutination-inhibition, strain-specific complement-fixation, and serum neutralization tests with sera produced in ferrets and guinea-pigs. It was found that the strain-specific complement-fixation test was superior for separating influenza B viruses into groups whereas the haemagglutination-inhibition and serum neutralization tests were better for demonstrating similarities. The results obtained with these three immunological techniques confirmed that antigenic variation exists among influenza B viruses, although it is not as clearcut as among influenza A viruses. The results were subjected to numerical taxonomic analysis. Dendrograms and minimum-spanning trees were constructed, using methods based on cluster analysis of similarity coefficients. Four main groups of influenza B viruses were established, although they were all interlinked. The results of this study do not justify the separation of influenza B viruses into subtypes similar to those of influenza A viruses. PMID:5317011

  4. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  5. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Peón, Alberto N.; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models. PMID:23484125

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  7. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and its antigens.

    PubMed

    Peón, Alberto N; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  8. Identification of Salmonella O antigens by coagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J O; Britt, L E; Harrell, W K

    1984-01-01

    This study concerns the preparation of reagents for identifying the somatic O antigens of Salmonella enteritidis. Coagglutination reagents (COAGs) with antibody fixed to killed and stabilized protein A-bearing staphylococci were prepared with antisera which were used for identifying the somatic O antigens of S. enteritidis by the slide agglutination test. The reactions of the COAGs were compared with those obtained with the grouping antisera in routine slide agglutination tests in which 41 or more serologically different Salmonella strains, representing most of the known groups, were used. One-third of the COAGs gave identical reactions to those of the slide agglutination antisera. The reactions of the other COAGs varied from the slide agglutination antisera results, some by many reactions and others by only a few. The coagglutination procedure was more reactive than the routine slide agglutination test and resulted in cross-reactions which were not observed in the original grouping antisera. More COAGs were specific when they were tested with alcohol-treated cultures than with live cultures. Coagglutination conserves antiserum, allowing about 12 times as many tests for a given volume of group-specific glycerolized antiserum as does the slide agglutination method. PMID:6203928

  9. Antigen-Presenting Cells in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2017-02-06

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin include dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages. They are highly dynamic, with the capacity to enter skin from the peripheral circulation, patrol within tissue, and migrate through lymphatics to draining lymph nodes. Skin APCs are endowed with antigen sensing, processing, and presenting machinery and play key roles in initiating, modulating, and resolving cutaneous inflammation. Skin APCs are a highly heterogeneous population with functionally specialized subsets that are developmentally imprinted and modulated by local tissue microenvironmental and inflammatory cues. This review explores recent advances that have allowed for a more accurate taxonomy of APC subsets found in both mouse and human skin. It also examines the functional specificity of individual APC subsets and their collaboration with other immune cell types that together promote adaptive T cell and regional cutaneous immune responses during homeostasis, inflammation, and disease. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017 . Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  10. Autoantibodies and their antigens in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2009-08-01

    Autoantibody detection assists in the diagnosis and allows differentiation of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 1 (AIH-1), characterized by antinuclear antibody (ANA) and/or smooth muscle antibody (SMA), and type 2 (AIH-2), distinguished by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or antibodies to liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). Detection of atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) and anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies can act as an additional pointer toward the diagnosis of AIH, particularly in the absence of the conventional autoantibodies. Routine autoantibody testing by indirect immunofluorescence has been recently complemented by molecular assays based on purified or recombinant antigens. Although the AIH-1-specific ANA and SMA targets need better definition, those of anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 in AIH-2 have been clearly identified; the fine specificity of antibody reactivity and its clinical relevance to disease pathogenesis are the focus of ongoing investigation. This article critically discusses the current knowledge of the diagnostic and clinical significance of AIH-related autoantibody reactivities, focusing on key issues that the physician needs to be aware of to be able to request the appropriate testing and to interpret correctly the laboratory results within the clinical context of the patient.

  11. Emerging Antigens Involved in Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    New allergic diseases can “emerge” because of exposure to a novel antigen, because the immune responsiveness of the subject changes, or because of a change in the behavior of the population. Novel antigens have entered the environment as new pests in the home (e.g., Asian lady beetle or stink bugs), in the diet (e.g., prebiotics or wheat isolates), or because of the spread of a biting arthropod (e.g., ticks). Over the last few years, a significant new disease has been identified, which has changed the paradigm for food allergy. Bites of the tick, Amblyomma americanum, are capable of inducing IgE antibodies to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which is associated with two novel forms of anaphylaxis. In a large area of the southeastern United States, the disease of delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat is now common. This disease challenges many previous rules about food allergy and provides a striking model of an emerging allergic disease. PMID:24095162

  12. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  13. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Koch, Raphael; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Busch, Veit; Wolters, Heiner; Kelsch, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ABO-incompatible (ABOi) renal transplantation (RTx) from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA) is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared. Patients and Methods 10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group) and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group). The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups. Results Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82), the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172). Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively), with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient. Conclusion Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future. PMID:26121389

  14. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  15. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  16. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Antigen Cross Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind tumor antigens and mediate their uptake into antigen presenting cells. HSP–antigen complexes are then directed toward either the MHC class I pathway through antigen cross presentation or the conventional class II pathway, leading to activation of T cell subsets. Uptake of HSP-chaperoned polypeptides can involve both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent routes, and mechanisms of antigen sorting between the Class I and II pathways after uptake are currently under investigation. The processes involved in internalization of HSP–antigen complexes differ somewhat from the mechanisms previously determined for (unchaperoned) particulate and free soluble antigens. A number of studies show that HSP-facilitated antigen cross presentation requires uptake of the complexes by scavenger receptors (SR) followed by processing in the proteasome, and loading onto MHC class I molecules. In this review we have examined the roles of HSPs and SR in antigen uptake, sorting, processing, cell signaling, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22566944

  17. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    PubMed

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2017-01-18

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Enhancement of Antigen-Specific Suppression by Muramyl Dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Thomas A.; Krieger, Nancy J.; Pesce, Amadeo; Michael, J. Gabriel

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the synthetic adjuvant MDP (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglu-tamine) on the generation of antigen-specific suppression was investigated. Suppression of the anti-bovine serum albumin response, which was achieved by intravenous administration of a peptic fragment of the antigen, was greatly enhanced by simultaneous administration of MDP. Induction of suppression by a combination of bovine serum albumin fragments and MDP was found to be antigen specific and appeared to occur via the generation of antigen-specific suppressor T cells. PMID:6187686

  19. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  20. T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P K; Waterfield, J D; Gascoigne, N R; Sharrock, C E; Mitchison, N A

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the helper and cytotoxic T-cell response to minor histocompatibility antigens and generated long term antigen-specific cell lines to them. Antigen-specific activity was selected for by regular restimulation with irradiated cells bearing the antigens in the presence of interleukin 2, so that alloreactivity to other cell surface antigens was gradually lost. Helper T cells cultured over several months were active in vivo and in vitro, but the culturing method eventually selected for cytotoxic T cells at the expense of helper T cells, with concomitant changes in the proportions of cells expressing the Lyt phenotypes. Individual long term cultures of cytotoxic T cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens were restricted by either H2K or D but not both. Helper T cells to minor histocompatibility antigens derived directly from primed F1 mice did not show restriction to the priming parental haplotype. This is consistent with antigen reprocessing by the F1 antigen presenting cells such that populations of helper T cells restricted by both parental H-2 haplotypes were primed. F1 cytotoxic T cells were restricted to the parental H-2 haplotype used for in vitro boosting, irrespective of which H-2 was used for in vivo priming. PMID:6214502

  1. Antigenic variation among Borrelia spp. in relapsing fever.

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, K S; Farmer, S G; Komorowski, R A; Knox, K K

    1986-01-01

    Seven antigens of Borrelia hermsii, B. parkeri, and B. turicatae with isoelectric points in the range of 4.4 to 5.0 and molecular masses of 40 to 43 kilodaltons played a role in the relapse phenomenon of relapsing fever. Based upon location of the antigens in the outer envelope, the molecular weight, and Western blot analysis, the antigens from each phase of spirochetemia appeared to be a mixture of the serotype-specific antigens of cloned B. hermsii. Images PMID:3536750

  2. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobulin determinants could not be demonstrated. However, by virtue of its adsorption to specific antigen, an antigen-combining site was shown to be present. The possible regulatory role of streptococcal antigen-specific suppressor factor in protection against dental caries is discussed. PMID:6164645

  3. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  4. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  5. Antibody-induced antigenic modulation is antigen dependent: characterization of 22 proteins on a malignant human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pesando, J.M.; Hoffman, P.; Abed, M.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of several of the surface antigens on normal and malignant hematopoietic cells is reduced or is modulated by incubation with specific antibodies. Although antigenic modulation provides a means by which cells can escape antibody-mediated immune destruction, the physiologic significance and frequency of this phenomenon are both poorly understood. To begin to address these issues, the authors identified and characterized surface antigens on the malignant B cell line Laz 221 established from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with the use of 26 hematopoietic cell populations and immune precipitation studies with the use of iodinated ALL cells indicate the 163 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) identify 22 different proteins on this cell line, including at least six previously described surface molecules. Seven of these antigens are expressed by all nucleated cells examined, whereas only the ..mu.. chain of immunoglobulin is B cell specific. Studies that made use of multiple MoAb specific for the same antigen suggest that the capacity for antigenic modulation is an intrinsic property of individual antigens. These studies also suggest that the murine immune response to shared human antigens varies from one immunizing cell population to another. Immunogenicity of individual human antigens in the mouse may be a function of their cell surface environment.

  6. A universal computational model for predicting antigenic variants of influenza A virus based on conserved antigenic structures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yousong; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Jianhong; Li, Kenli; Tan, Zhongyang; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid determination of the antigenicity of influenza A virus could help identify the antigenic variants in time. Currently, there is a lack of computational models for predicting antigenic variants of some common hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses. By means of sequence analysis, we demonstrate here that multiple HA subtypes of influenza A virus undergo similar mutation patterns of HA1 protein (the immunogenic part of HA). Further analysis on the antigenic variation of influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 showed that the amino acid residues’ contribution to antigenic variation highly differed in these subtypes, while the regional bands, defined based on their distance to the top of HA1, played conserved roles in antigenic variation of these subtypes. Moreover, the computational models for predicting antigenic variants based on regional bands performed much better in the testing HA subtype than those did based on amino acid residues. Therefore, a universal computational model, named PREDAV-FluA, was built based on the regional bands to predict the antigenic variants for all HA subtypes of influenza A viruses. The model achieved an accuracy of 0.77 when tested with avian influenza H9N2 viruses. It may help for rapid identification of antigenic variants in influenza surveillance. PMID:28165025

  7. F41 pili as protective antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produce F41, K99, or both pilus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moseley, S L; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Pigs suckling dams that have been vaccinated with pilus antigen are protected against challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that express the same pilus antigen. However, some ETEC strains express more than one pilus antigen. Pregnant swine were vaccinated either with E. coli HB101 that harbored a recombinant plasmid coding for F41 expression (F41+) or with the HB101 parent strain that carries the pHC79 vector (F41-). Suckling pigs born to vaccinated dams were challenged with ETEC that expressed either K99, F41, or both pilus antigens. Production of F41 in vivo was demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay of sections of ileum and by seroconversion against F41 antigen by pigs challenged with F41+ and K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41+ vaccine protected against challenge with an F41+ ETEC strain. In contrast, F41+ vaccination did not protect against challenge with K99+ or K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41- vaccine did not protect against challenge with any strain used. The results indicate that K99+ F41+ ETEC strains produce F41 antigen in the small intestine during disease and that F41+ vaccination can be a protective antigen if the challenge strain expresses only F41 antigen, but that F41+ vaccination may not protect against strains that produce both K99 and F41 antigens. PMID:2880807

  8. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  10. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Dixon, H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight research laboratories in Europe and the United States of America were selected on the basis of having published data on Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum antigens to participate in a study of various antigen/test combinations for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. The serum bank consisted of 395 well documented sera from four endemic areas in Brazil (2 areas), Kenya, and the Philippines. Altogether, 21 S. mansoni and four S. japonicum antigen and immunoassay combinations were evaluated. S. mansoni egg antigens yielded a higher combined sensitivity than adult worm antigens, irrespective of their purity, in active S. mansoni infections before and after specific treatment. Quantitative seroreactivity of characterized S. mansoni egg antigens showed good correlation with faecal egg counts in the 5-14 year age group. No correlation between morbidity related to S. mansoni and seroreactivity was observed in any test system. Three S. japonicum egg antigens showed high sensitivity and specificity in relation to the presence or absence of eggs in the stool. The quantitative seroreactivity of the characterized S. japonicum egg antigens correlated directly with the intensity of S. japonicum infection in all age groups. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using several different procedures, performed well with the antigens used in the study. The indium slide immunoassay (ISI), a simple qualitative visual test system using an S. mansoni egg antigen, demonstrated a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The results did not indicate the superiority of any particular immunodiagnostic method for detecting antischistosome antibodies. This collaborative study is considered a first step towards developing and standardizing antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. PMID:6983926

  11. Fine structure of A and M antigens from Brucella biovars.

    PubMed

    Meikle, P J; Perry, M B; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Bundle, D R

    1989-09-01

    Brucella A and M epitopes were found on single O-polysaccharide chains of all biotype strains of this species. Lipopolysaccharides from the type and reference strains of five of the six Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. canis, and B. neotomae, were extracted and purified. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in conjunction with silver staining and immunoblotting developed by monoclonal antibodies, showed bands characteristic of A, M, or mixed A and M antigens. The A antigen previously described as an exclusively alpha 1,2-linked homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose was shown by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to possess a fine structure consistent with the low-frequency occurrence of alpha 1, 3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose residues. This feature was previously attributed only to the M antigen, which is also a homopolymer of the same sugar. B. melitensis biotype 3 and B. suis biotype 4 lipopolysaccharides showed characteristics of mixed A and M antigens. Immunoabsorption of these O polysaccharides on a column of immobilized A-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody enriched polymer chains with A-antigen characteristics but did not eliminate M epitopes. Composite A- and M-antigen characteristics resulted from O polysaccharides in which the frequency of alpha 1,3 linkages, and hence, M-antigen characteristics, varied. All biotypes assigned as A+ M- expressed one or two alpha 1,3-linked residues per polysaccharide O chain. M antigens (M+ A-) also possessed a unique M epitope as well as a tetrasaccharide determinant common to A-antigen structures. B. canis and B. abortus 45/20, both rough strains, expressed low-molecular-weight A antigen.

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N

    2008-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycle marker protein, is well known as a DNA sliding clamp for DNA polymerase delta and as an essential component for eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication and repair. Due to its mobility inside nuclei, PCNA is dynamically presented in a soluble or chromatin-associated form. The heterogeneity and specific modifications of PCNA may reflect its multiple functions and the presence of many binding partners in the cell. The recent proteomics approaches applied to characterizing PCNA interactions revealed multiple PCNA partners with a wide spectrum of activity and unveiled the possible existence of new PCNA functions. Since more than 100 PCNA-interacting proteins and several PCNA modifications have already been reported, a proteomics point of view seems exactly suitable to better understand the role of PCNA in cellular functions.

  13. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines.

  14. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  15. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  16. Synthesis of factor VIII antigen by cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Nachman, R; Levine, R; Jaffe, E A

    1977-10-01

    Immunoprecipitates containing guinea pig Factor VIII antigen were prepared from guinea pig plasma with a cross-reacting rabbit anti-human Factor VIII. Monospecific antisera to guinea pig Factor VIII antigen were produced in rabbits by using these washed immunoprecipitates as immunogens. The resulting antisera to guinea pig Factor VIII antigen detected Factor VIII antigen in guinea pig plasma and inhibited the von Willebrand factor activity in guinea pig plasma. This antibody also detected Factor VIII antigen in a solubilized protein mixture prepared from isolated cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes. Cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes were labeled with radio-active leucine. By radioautography, 96.2% of the radio-activity was present in megakaryocytes. The radio-active Factor VIII antigen present in the solubilized cell protein mixture was isolated by immunoprecipitation and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results demonstrate that cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes synthesize Factor VIII antigen which contains the same polypeptide subunit (mol wt 200,000) present in guinea pig plasma Factor VIII antigen.

  17. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Novicki, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection. PMID:26338856

  18. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  19. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  20. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  1. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Frost, Holly M; Novicki, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection.

  2. Antigens provide immunity against Ich in channel catfish trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine effects of 1) types of Ich antigens and routes of immunization, 2) methods of inactivated trophonts, and 3) antigen doses on fish immune protection against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet (Ich). All catfish immunized with live theronts by immersion, live the...

  3. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  4. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses. PMID:28286501

  5. Production of Antigens and Antibodies for Diagnosis of Arbovirus Diseases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-20

    for Germiston, Qalyub, Sicilian, vesicular stomatitis Indiana, and Ganjam viruses . The antigens were inactivated with beta-propiolactone. Rabbits were...immunized successfully intravenously with Ross River, Germiston, and Japanese encephalitis viruses using immunogens grown in RK-13 rabbit kidney...vesicular stomatitis Indiana, and Ganjam viruses . The antigens were inactivated with beta-propiolactone. Rabbits were immunized successfully intravenously

  6. Complex of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen and 48,000-dalton host tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, D S; Carroll, R B

    1981-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T Ag) can be separated by sucrose gradient sedimentation into a rapidly sedimenting, maximally phosphorylated fraction and a slowly sedimenting, less phosphorylated fraction. The Mr 48,000 host tumor antigen (48,000 HTA, also called nonviral T Ag) is preferentially complexed with the maximally phosphorylated T Ag. Pulse-labeled T Ag sediments as a 5-6S monomer, whereas T Ag radiolabeled for progressively longer periods slowly increases in sedimentation coefficient to give a broad distribution between 5 S and greater than 28 S. Mutation in the viral A locus causes a decrease in T Ag phosphorylation and a marked decrease in 48,000 HTA binding, shifting the sedimentation coefficient of T Ag to the monomer value. The more highly phosphorylated T Ag also has the highest affinity for chromatin. Images PMID:6941238

  7. Comparison of Binax Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit with Binax RIA Urinary Antigen kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, B A; Plouffe, J F; Benson, R F; Fields, B S; Breiman, R F

    1996-01-01

    The Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit (Binax, Portland, Maine) was compared with the EQUATE RIA Legionella Urinary Antigen kit (Binax) for its ability to detect the presence of urinary antigens to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Urine specimens from patients without Legionnaires' disease (n = 33) were negative by both methods (specificity, 100%). Twenty (77%) of 26 urine specimens from patients with Legionnaires' disease positive by the radioimmunoassay kit were also positive by the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit. If the cutoff for a positive EIA result were lowered to a ration of > or = 2.5, 23 of 26 (88%) urine specimens would have been positive by EIA and the specificity would remain 100%. Use of the EIA kit is an acceptable method for detecting L. pneumophila serogroup 1 urinary antigens by laboratories that do not want to handle radioactive materials. PMID:8735125

  8. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  9. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection.

  10. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  11. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Fonville, Judith M.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Arriaga, Jose Bustos; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L.; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Russell, Colin A.; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C.; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G.; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V.; Tesh, Robert B.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P.; Holmes, Edward C.; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Smith, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to two years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogenous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  12. Genetic Basis for Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Bordetellae

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Andrew; Allen, Andrew G.; Cadisch, Joanna; Thomas, Richard; Stevens, Kim; Churcher, Carol M.; Badcock, K. L.; Parkhill, Julian; Barrell, Bart; Maskell, Duncan J.

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis express a surface polysaccharide, attached to a lipopolysaccharide, which has been called O antigen. This structure is absent from Bordetella pertussis. We report the identification of a large genetic locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis that is required for O-antigen biosynthesis. The locus is replaced by an insertion sequence in B. pertussis, explaining the lack of O-antigen biosynthesis in this species. The DNA sequence of the B. bronchiseptica locus has been determined and the presence of 21 open reading frames has been revealed. We have ascribed putative functions to many of these open reading frames based on database searches. Mutations in the locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis prevent O-antigen biosynthesis and provide tools for the study of the role of O antigen in infections caused by these bacteria. PMID:10417135

  13. Mosaic VSGs and the Scale of Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James P. J.; Wang, Huanhuan; Barry, J. David

    2013-01-01

    A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct ‘mosaic’ VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection. PMID:23853603

  14. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  15. A role for mitochondria in antigen processing and presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Cervantes-Silva, Mariana P; Ontiveros-Dotor, Elizabeth; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T-lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signalling process. However, the role of mitochondria in APCs during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing and -presentation process. Here we show that hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) -loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APC, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1–2 hr following antigen exposure, suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analysed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC–peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes, which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes, which endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48–62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taken together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APC mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC–T immune synapse. PMID:25251370

  16. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  17. Shared HLA antigens and reproductive performance among Hutterites.

    PubMed Central

    Ober, C L; Martin, A O; Simpson, J L; Hauck, W W; Amos, D B; Kostyu, D D; Fotino, M; Allen, F H

    1983-01-01

    Shared histocompatibility antigens between spouses may affect reproductive outcome adversely as a result of prenatal selection against compatible fetuses. Evidence from both animal and human studies suggest that histocompatible fetuses may not initiate a maternal immunologic response that prevents rejection of the embryo. Therefore, parents sharing HLA antigens may produce compatible fetuses and consequently experience a greater frequency of early fetal losses and show poorer reproductive outcome than couples not sharing antigens. In the Hutterites, an inbred human isolate that proscribes contraception, we tested the hypothesis that couples sharing HLA antigens have poorer reproductive outcomes than couples who do not. The Hutterites are characterized by high fertility and large family sizes. Couples that share zero (no. = 21), one (no. = 15), and more than one (no. = 10) HLA-A or HLA-B antigens were compared for reproductive performance. Median intervals between births were larger among couples that share more than one antigen in eight of 11 intervals examined. In addition, the median intervals from marriage to first, fifth, and tenth birth were consistently larger among couples that share more than one antigen. Differences among the groups appear to become larger with increasing parity, suggesting that the effect of histocompatibility on reproductive performance becomes more evident in later pregnancies. These differences in reproductive performance between couples that share zero, one, or more than one HLA-A or HLA-B antigens may have significant evolutionary consequences. However, our results demonstrate that sharing HLA antigens does not preclude normal pregnancy and caution should be exercised before concluding that shared HLA antigens are solely responsible for repeated fetal losses. PMID:6577788

  18. Carbohydrate-Mediated Targeting of Antigen to Dendritic Cells Leads to Enhanced Presentation of Antigen to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eddie W.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hacohen, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The unique therapeutic value of dendritic cells (DCs) for the treatment of allergy, autoimmunity and transplant rejection is predicated upon our ability to selectively deliver antigens, drugs or nucleic acids to DCs in vivo. Here we describe a method for delivering whole protein antigens to DCs based on carbohydrate-mediated targeting of DC-expressed lectins. A series of synthetic carbohydrates was chemically-coupled to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and each conjugate was evaluated for its ability to increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by murine DCs to OVA-specific T cells (CD4+ and CD8+). In vitro data are presented that demonstrate that carbohydrate modification of OVA leads to a 50-fold enhancement of presentation of antigenic peptide to CD4+ T cells. A tenfold enhancement is observed for CD8+ T cells; this indicates that the targeted lectin(s) can mediate cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I. Our data indicate that the observed enhancements in antigen presentation are unique to OVA that is conjugated to complex oligosaccharides, such as a high-mannose nonasaccharide, but not to monosaccharides. Taken together, our data suggest that a DC targeting strategy that is based upon carbohydrate-lectin interactions is a promising approach for enhancing antigen presentation via class I and class II molecules. PMID:18186095

  19. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  20. HCC-DETECT: a combination of nuclear, cytoplasmic, and oncofetal proteins as biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; El-Far, Mohamed; Malak, Camelia A Abdel; Omran, Mohamed M; Shiha, Gamal E; Farid, Khaled; Barakat, Lamiaa A; Albannan, Mohamed S; Attallah, Ahmed A; Abdelrazek, Mohamed A; Elbendary, Mohamed S; Sabry, Refaat; Hamoda, Gehan A; Elshemy, Mohamed M; Ragab, Abdallah A; Foda, Basma M; Abdallah, Sanaa O

    2015-09-01

    Currently, the search for suitable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers is very intensive. Besides, efficacy and cost/effectiveness of screening and surveillance of cirrhotics for the diagnosis of HCC is still debated. So, the present study is concerned with the evaluation of cytokeratin-1 (CK-1) and nuclear matrix protein-52 (NMP-52) for identifying HCC. Two-hundred and eighty individuals categorized into three groups [liver fibrosis (F1-F3), cirrhosis (F4), and HCC] constituted this study. Western blot was used for identifying CK-1 and NMP-52 in serum samples. As a result, a single immunoreactive band was shown at 67 and 52 kDa corresponding to CK-1 and NMP-52, respectively. Both CK-1 and NMP-52 bands were cut and electroeluted separately. These markers were quantified in sera using ELISA. Patients with HCC were associated with higher concentrations of CK-1 and NMP-52 than those without HCC with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). CK-1 showed an area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83 with 75 % sensitivity and 82 % specificity while NMP-52 yielded 0.72 AUC with 62 % sensitivity and 70 % specificity for identifying HCC. HCC-DETECT comprising CK-1 and NMP-52 together with AFP was then constructed yielding 0.90 AUC for identifying HCC with 80 % sensitivity and 92 % specificity. HCC-DETECT was then tested for separating HCC from F1-F3 showing 0.94 AUC with 80 % sensitivity and 93 % specificity. In conclusion, CK-1 in conjunction with NMP-52 and AFP could have a potential role for improving the detection of HCC with a high degree of accuracy.

  1. The Increasing Complexity of the Oncofetal H19 Gene Locus: Functional Dissection and Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Matouk, Imad; Raveh, Eli; Ohana, Patricia; Lail, Rasha Abu; Gershtain, Eitan; Gilon, Michal; De Groot, Nathan; Czerniak, Abraham; Hochberg, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    The field of the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is advancing rapidly. Currently, it is one of the most popular fields in the biological and medical sciences. It is becoming increasingly obvious that the majority of the human transcriptome has little or no-protein coding capacity. Historically, H19 was the first imprinted non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcript identified, and the H19/IGF2 locus has served as a paradigm for the study of genomic imprinting since its discovery. In recent years, we have extensively investigated the expression of the H19 gene in a number of human cancers and explored the role of H19 RNA in tumor development. Here, we discuss recently published data from our group and others that provide further support for a central role of H19 RNA in the process of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we focus on major transcriptional modulators of the H19 gene and discuss them in the context of the tumor-promoting activity of the H19 RNA. Based on the pivotal role of the H19 gene in human cancers, we have developed a DNA-based therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers that have upregulated levels of H19 expression. This approach uses a diphtheria toxin A (DTA) protein expressed under the regulation of the H19 promoter to treat tumors with significant expression of H19 RNA. In this review, we discuss the treatment of four cancer indications in human subjects using this approach, which is currently under development. This represents perhaps one of the very few examples of an existing DNA-based therapy centered on an lncRNA system. Apart from cancer, H19 expression has been reported also in other conditions, syndromes and diseases, where deregulated imprinting at the H19 locus was obvious in some cases and will be summarized below. Moreover, the H19 locus proved to be much more complicated than initially thought. It houses a genomic sequence that can transcribe, yielding various transcriptional outputs, both in sense and antisense directions. The major transcriptional outputs of the H19 locus are presented here. PMID:23429271

  2. Urinary oncofetal ED-A fibronectin correlates with poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shanna A; Loomans, Holli A; Ketova, Tatiana; Andl, Claudia D; Clark, Peter E; Zijlstra, Andries

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) contributes to the structural integrity of tissues as well as the adhesive and migratory functions of cells. While FN is abundantly expressed in adult tissues, the expression of several alternatively spliced FN isoforms is restricted to embryonic development, tissue remodeling and cancer. These FN isoforms, designated ED-A and ED-B, are frequently expressed by cancer cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and newly forming blood vessels. Using a highly sensitive collagen-based indirect ELISA, we evaluated the correlation of urinary ED-A and ED-B at time of cystectomy with overall survival in patients with high-grade bladder cancer (BCa). Detectable levels of total FN as well as ED-A and ED-B were found in urine from 85, 73 and 51 % of BCa patients, respectively. The presence of urinary ED-A was a significant independent predictor of 2-year overall survival (OS) after adjusting for age, tumor stage, lymph node stage, and urinary creatinine by multivariable Logistic Regression (p = 0.029, OR = 4.26, 95 % CI 1.16-15.71) and improved accuracy by 3.6 %. Furthermore, detection of ED-A in the urine was a significant discriminator of survival specifically in BCa patients with negative lymph node status (Log-Rank, p = 0.006; HR = 5.78, 95 % CI 1.39-24.13). Lastly, multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that urinary ED-A was an independent prognostic indicator of 5-year OS rate for patients with BCa (p = 0.04, HR = 2.20, 95 % CI 1.04-4.69). Together, these data suggest that cancer-derived, alternatively spliced FN isoforms can act as prognostic indicators and that additional studies are warranted to assess the clinical utility of ED-A in BCa.

  3. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  4. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  5. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lauren M; Baskerville, Edward B; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-09-05

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype-phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens.

  6. Standardization and characterization of antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Arechavala, Alicia; Carissimi, Mariana; Sorrentino, Julia Medeiros; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Daboit, Tatiane Caroline; Kammler, Luana; Negroni, Ricardo; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis. Nine strains of Aspergillus species Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , and Aspergillus niger were grown in Sabouraud and Smith broth to produce exoantigens. The antigens were tested by immunodiffusion against sera from patients with aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses. The protein fraction of the antigens was detected by SDS-PAGE; Western blot and representative bands were assessed by mass spectrometry coupled to a nano Acquity UltraPerformance LC and analyzed by the Mascot search engine. Concurrently, all sera were tested with Platelia Aspergillus EIA. The most reactive antigens to sera from patients infected by A. fumigatus were produced by A. fumigatus MG2 Sabouraud and pooled A. fumigatus Sabouraud samples, both with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100% and 97%, respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus antigens were reactive against A. niger and A. flavus sera, each one with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Two proteins, probably responsible for antigenic activity, β-glucosidase in A. fumigatus and α-amylase in A. niger were attained. The commercial kit had a specificity of 22%, sensitivity of 100%, positive predictive value of 48%, and negative predictive value of 100%. The antigens produced showed high sensitivity and specificity and can be exploited for diagnostics of aspergilloma.

  7. JL1, a novel differentiation antigen of human cortical thymocyte

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of a novel thymocyte differentiation antigen, JL1, defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against human thymocytes showed a specificity for stage II double positive (CD4+CD8+) human cortical thymocytes. This antigen was not expressed at detectable levels on medullary thymocytes, mature peripheral leukocytes, bone marrow cells or on other types of tissues elsewhere in the human body. Immunohistologic analysis revealed that JL1 had a clear pattern of distribution on cortical thymocytes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I- labeled cell lysates from human thymocytes and Molt-4 leukemic cell line with anti-JL1 mAb yielded a 120-130-kD single chain glycoprotein. When immunoprecipitation of cell lysate was done after endoglycosidase F treatment, JL1 antigen was still detected by antibody but the band showed a reduction in apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kD. This suggests that, although JL1 molecule contains carbohydrate group, this does not form a critical part of the antigenic determinant for anti-JL1 antibody. JL1 antigen appears to be the first double positive, stage-specific differentiation antigen of human thymocyte reported so far. This antigen would be a useful marker for lymphoblastic malignancy of stage II thymocyte origin and it may be involved in the thymocyte education process. PMID:8376947

  8. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  9. Molecular Mimics of the Tumour Antigen MUC1

    PubMed Central

    James, Tharappel C.; Bond, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as “self”, and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as ‘proof of principle’ we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1) from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides. PMID:23166757

  10. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  11. Rational design of protamine nanocapsules as antigen delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Presas, Elena; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Martínez-Pulgarín, Susana; Alonso, Covadonga; Escribano, José M; Alonso, María J; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2017-01-10

    Current challenges in global immunization indicate the demand for new delivery strategies, which could be applied to the development of new vaccines against emerging diseases, as well as to improve safety and efficacy of currently existing vaccine formulations. Here, we report a novel antigen nanocarrier consisting of an oily core and a protamine shell, further stabilized with pegylated surfactants. These nanocarriers, named protamine nanocapsules, were rationally designed to promote the intracellular delivery of antigens to immunocompetent cells and to trigger an efficient and long-lasting immune response. Protamine nanocapsules have nanometric size, positive zeta potential and high association capacity for H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin, a protein that was used here as a model antigen. The new formulation shows an attractive stability profile both, as an aqueous suspension or a freeze-dried powder formulation. In vitro studies showed that protamine nanocapsules were efficiently internalized by macrophages without eliciting significant toxicity. In vivo studies indicate that antigen-loaded nanocapsules trigger immune responses comparable to those achieved with alum, even when using significantly lower antigen doses, thus indicating their adjuvant properties. These promising in vivo data, alongside with their versatility for the loading of different antigens and oily immunomodulators and their excellent stability profile, make these nanocapsules a promising platform for the delivery of antigens.

  12. Changes in structural and antigenic properties of proteins by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    1995-08-01

    Radiation effect on structural and antigenic properties of proteins (0.2% in 0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4) were investigated using ovalbumin (OVA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Aggregation of OVA and BSA was induced by radiation and the molecular mass increased significantly in N 2. Significant changes in surface hydrophobicity and [ θ] 222 nm of CD were also observed by radiation showing the destruction of secondary structure of proteins. Antigenicity of irradiated OVA measured by the method of immunodiffusion was decreased by radiation, and the reactivity to anti-OVA antibody was almost diminished at 8 kGy in N 2 and 4 kGy in O 2, respectively. The reactivity of BSA was diminished at 4 kGy both in N 2 and O 2. Changes in hydrophobicity of OVA did not correspond to the decrease in antigenicity, whereas the changes in [ θ] 222 nm relatively well corresponded to the antigenicity. The SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis showed that radiation at higher doses induced the production of protein aggregates and degraded fragments with reactivity to the specific antibodies. These results suggest that the main part of conformation-dependent antigenic structure (conformational epitope) is easily lost by radiation, but some antigenicity, which is mostly due to the amino acid sequence-dependent antigenic structures (sequential epitopes), remains even at higher dose.

  13. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  14. Duality of β-glucan microparticles: antigen carrier and immunostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Baert, Kim; De Geest, Bruno G; De Greve, Henri; Cox, Eric; Devriendt, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Designing efficient recombinant mucosal vaccines against enteric diseases is still a major challenge. Mucosal delivery of recombinant vaccines requires encapsulation in potent immunostimulatory particles to induce an efficient immune response. This paper evaluates the capacity of β-glucan microparticles (GPs) as antigen vehicles and characterizes their immune-stimulatory effects. The relevant infectious antigen FedF was chosen to be loaded inside the microparticles. The incorporation of FedF inside the particles was highly efficient (roughly 85%) and occurred without antigen degradation. In addition, these GPs have immunostimulatory effects as well, demonstrated by the strong reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by porcine neutrophils upon their recognition. Although antigen-loaded GPs still induce ROS production, antigen loading decreases this production by neutrophils for reasons yet unknown. However, these antigen-loaded GPs are still able to bind their specific β-glucan receptor, demonstrated by blocking complement receptor 3, which is the major β-glucan receptor on porcine neutrophils. The dual character of these particles is confirmed by a T-cell proliferation assay. FedF-loaded particles induce a significantly higher FedF-specific T-cell proliferation than soluble FedF. Taken together, these results show that GPs are efficient antigen carriers with immune-stimulatory properties. PMID:27330289

  15. Response to self antigen imprints regulatory memory in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Gratz, Iris K.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Lee, Karen; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Abbas, Abul K.

    2012-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in tissues is achieved through a delicate balance between pathogenic T cell responses directed at tissue-specific antigens and the ability of the tissue to inhibit these responses. The mechanisms by which tissues and the immune system communicate to establish and maintain immune homeostasis are currently unknown. Clinical evidence suggests that chronic or repeated exposure to self antigen within tissues leads to an attenuation of pathologic autoimmune responses, possibly as a means to mitigate inflammatory damage and preserve function. Many human organ-specific autoimmune diseases are characterized by the initial presentation of the disease being the most severe, with subsequent flares being of lesser severity and duration1. In fact, these diseases often spontaneously resolve, despite persistent tissue autoantigen expression2. In the practice of antigen-specific immunotherapy (antigen-SIT), allergens or self antigens are repeatedly injected in the skin, with a diminution of the inflammatory response occurring after each successive exposure3. Although these findings suggest that tissues acquire the ability to attenuate autoimmune reactions upon repeated responses to antigens, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that upon expression of self antigen in a peripheral tissue, thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Treg cells) become activated, proliferate and differentiate into more potent suppressors, which mediate resolution of organ-specific autoimmunity. After resolution of the inflammatory response, activated Treg cells are maintained in the target tissue and are primed to attenuate subsequent autoimmune reactions when antigen is re-expressed. Thus, Treg cells function to confer ‘regulatory memory’ to the target tissue. These findings provide a framework for understanding how Treg cells respond when exposed to self antigen in peripheral tissues and offer mechanistic insight into how tissues regulate autoimmunity. PMID

  16. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  17. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability✩

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J.; Beeson, James G.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines. PMID:26475447

  18. Structural and antigenic analysis of meningococcal piliation.

    PubMed Central

    Olafson, R W; McCarthy, P J; Bhatti, A R; Dooley, J S; Heckels, J E; Trust, T J

    1985-01-01

    Pilin with an Mr of 16,500 was purified to homogeneity from Neisseria meningitidis SP3428. Procedures which provided useful separation during purification included high-pressure liquid chromatography with a TSK size exclusion column, Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography with SP-Sephadex, and preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid composition of this pilin was similar to that previously reported for this species. The sequence of N-terminal 51 amino acids was also determined. The protein lacked a modified phenylalanine at the amino terminus and displayed six residues which were different from Neisseria gonorrhoeae in that region of the molecule determined to be the lectin-binding domain. Monoclonal antibody raised to this pilin was employed, along with a monoclonal antibody to an epitope common to all gonococcal pilins, to analyze the intra- and interstrain heterogeneity of meningococcal piliation. The results indicate that N. meningitidis displays considerable intra- and interstrain heterogeneity with respect to both pilus subunit size and antigenicity. The Mr of subunits ranged from 13,000 to 20,000. Images PMID:2580788

  19. Pericyte Antigens in Perivascular Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Asatrian, Greg; Mravic, Marco; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Dry, Sarah M.; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear line of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from pericytes or modified perivascular cells. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor (previously termed hemangiopericytoma) was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation. Methods Here, we systematically examine pericyte immunohistochemical markers among glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, angioleiomyoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. Immunohistochemical staining and semiquantification was performed using well-defined pericyte antigens, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Results Glomus tumor and myopericytoma demonstrate diffuse staining for all pericyte markers, including immunohistochemical reactivity for αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Malignant glomus tumors all showed some degree of pericyte marker immunoreactivity, although it was significantly reduced. Angioleiomyoma shared a similar αSMA + CD146 + PDGFRβ+ immunophenotype; however, this was predominantly seen in the areas of perivascular tumor growth. Solitary fibrous tumors showed patchy PDGFRβ immunoreactivity only. Discussion In summary, pericyte marker expression is a ubiquitous finding in glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Malignant glomus tumor shows a comparative reduction in pericyte marker expression, which may represent partial loss of pericytic differentiation. Pericyte markers are essentially not seen in solitary fibrous tumor. The combination of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ immunohistochemical stainings may be of utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26085647

  20. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  1. 4-1BB chimeric antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Campana, Dario; Schwarz, Herbert; Imai, Chihaya

    2014-01-01

    In addition to T-cell receptor signals, T lymphocytes require costimulatory signals for robust activation. Among these, those mediated by 4-1BB (CD137, TNFRSF9) are critical for tumor immunity. 4-1BB is expressed in T-cell receptor-activated lymphocytes as well as natural killer cells and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. 4-1BB ligation induces a signaling cascade that results in cytokine production, expression of antiapoptotic molecules, and enhanced immune responses. In line with the described function of 4-1BB, its addition to CD3ζ chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) increases their capacity to provoke T-cell expansion and antitumor activity. The results of preclinical studies with 4-1BB CARs have been corroborated by encouraging results from clinical trials. Advantages and disadvantages of 4-1BB CARs versus CARs bearing other costimulatory components remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we discuss the properties of 4-1BB, the design of 4-1BB CARs, and the function of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells expressing them.

  2. Persistence of acanthamoeba antigen following acanthamoeba keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Matheson, M; Dart, J; Cree, I

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the hypothesis that persistent corneal and scleral inflammation following acanthamoeba keratitis is not always caused by active amoebic infection but can be due to persisting acanthamoebic antigens
METHODS—24 lamellar corneal biopsy and penetrating keratoplasty specimens were obtained from 14 consecutive patients at various stages of their disease and divided for microscopy and culture. Histological sections were immunostained and screened for the presence of Acanthamoeba cysts by light microscopy. Cultures were carried out using partly homogenised tissues on non-nutrient agar seeded with E coli. Clinical data were obtained retrospectively from the case notes of these patients.
RESULTS—Of the 24 specimens, 20 were obtained from eyes that were clinically inflamed at the time of surgery. Acanthamoeba cysts were present in 16 (80%) of these 20 specimens, while only five (25%) were culture positive. Acanthamoeba cysts were found to persist for up to 31 months after antiamoebic treatment.
CONCLUSION—These findings support the hypothesis that Acanthamoeba cysts can remain in corneal tissue for an extended period of time following acanthamoeba keratitis and may cause persistent corneal and scleral inflammation in the absence of active amoebic infection. In view of these findings, prolonged intensive antiamoebic therapy may be inappropriate when the inflammation is due to retained antigen rather than to viable organisms

 PMID:11222330

  3. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  4. Demonstration of protective antigen carried by flagella of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Minamoto, N; Tanaka, S

    1984-01-01

    The protective antigen present on the flagella of Clostridium chauvoei was studied by the mouse protection test. A partially purified flagella preparation (PPF) showed protective antigenicity after two intraperitoneal injections of 2 micrograms as protein, while the protective antigenicity of nonflagellated mutants (NFM) was 100-fold less than that of the flagellated parent strain. Although the protective effect of antisera against the whole cells and PPF, in terms of ED50 values, was mostly lost after absorption with the parent strain, that of antisera after absorption with NFMs showed no appreciable loss. These results suggest that the flagella of Cl. chauvoei play some role in inducing protective immunity in mice.

  5. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, B; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response to a soluble blood stage preparation of P. falciparum was observed in splenic cells from immune animals than in those from mice with a patent P. yoelii infection. The antigen-induced proliferative response was enhanced when animals were exposed to a secondary infection. Animals exposed to a challenge infection were treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies to deplete the corresponding subset of T cells. There was a marked diminution in P. falciparum antigen-induced proliferative response in the total splenic cell populations from CD8-depleted but not from CD4-depleted mice. In CD8-depleted and nondepleted animals, the antigen-induced proliferation in the total cell populations was markedly lower than in the T-cell-rich populations, indicating inhibitory activities of B cells and/or macrophages. There was no such difference in the stimulation between total and T-enriched cell populations from CD4-depleted animals. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the presence of an almost equal percentage of CD8+ (59.6%) and CD4+ (64%) T cells in the spleen preparations following in vivo depletion of CD4- and CD8-bearing T cells, respectively. When cultured with P. yoelii blood stage antigen, splenocytes from animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen displayed a significant proliferative response which was markedly diminished by treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement. Animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen and then challenged with P. yoelii blood stage

  6. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  7. Bacterial vectors for the delivery of tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toussaint, Bertrand; Le Gouëllec, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacterial vectors, which offer ease of production and efficiency, has become an important mechanism for the delivery of protein antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo. Proof of concept studies has been carried out utilizing different bacteria in various cancer models with some in clinical trials. Here we described the way to prepare Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccines based on a virulence-attenuated strain to test the efficacy of different fragments of a well-known tumor antigen. This protocol could be applied to efficacy studies in murine models of human cancers.

  8. Isolation and purification of antigenic components of Cryptococcus.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Levitz, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    The encapsulated fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are significant agents of life-threatening infections, particularly in persons with suppressed cell-mediated immunity. This chapter provides detailed methodology for the purification of two of the major antigen fractions of C. neoformans: glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and mannoprotein (MP). GXM is the primary component of the polysaccharide capsule, which is the major cryptococcal virulence factor. In contrast, MPs have been identified as key antigens that stimulate T-cell responses. Purification of GXM and MP should assist investigators studying the antigenic, biochemical, and virulence properties of Cryptococcus species.

  9. Genetic and antigenic diversity of the surface protective antigen proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Nagai, Shinya

    2007-07-01

    The surface protective antigen (Spa) protein of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has been shown to be highly immunogenic and is a potential candidate for a new vaccine against erysipelas. In this study, we cloned and sequenced spa genes from all E. rhusiopathiae serovar reference strains as well as from a serovar 18 strain which was not classified as any species in the genus Erysipelothrix. Sequence analysis revealed that the Spa proteins could be classified into three molecular species, including SpaA, which was previously found in serovars 1a and 2, and the newly designated SpaB and SpaC proteins. The SpaA protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, and N, the SpaB protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 4, 6, 11, 19, and 21, and the SpaC protein is produced only by serovar 18. The amino acid sequence similarity was high among members of each Spa type (96 to 99%) but low between different Spa types ( approximately 60%). The greatest diversity in Spa proteins was found in the N-terminal half of the molecule (50 to 57% similarity), which was shown to be involved in immunoprotection. Coinciding with this, immunoblot analysis revealed that rabbit antisera specific to each Spa reacted strongly with the homologous Spa protein but weakly with heterologous Spa proteins. A mouse cross-protection study showed that the three recombinant Spa (rSpa) proteins elicited complete protection against challenge with homologous strains but that the level of protection against challenge with heterologous strains varied depending on the rSpa protein used for immunization. Our study is the first to demonstrate sequence and antigenic diversity in Spa proteins and to indicate that rSpaC may be the most promising antigen for use as a vaccine component because of its broad cross-protectiveness.

  10. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  11. Characterization of New Breast Tumor-Specific Antigens Using a Novel Antigen Discovery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    The tyrosinase gene codes for an antigen recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes on HLA-A2 melanomas. JExp Med 178, no. 2:489. 2. Coulie...cold PBS, pelleted and stored at -800 C for later use. Detergent lysis buffer (1% CHAPS) and a cocktail of protease inhibitors (2 mM PMSF, 100 gM...40 REFERENCES 1. Brichard, V., Van Pel, A., Wolfel, T., Wolfel, C., De Plaen, E., Lethe, B., Coulie, P., and Boon, T. The tyrosinase gene codes for

  12. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  13. Characterization of O-antigen delivered by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) vaccine candidates against nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    De Benedetto, G; Alfini, R; Cescutti, P; Caboni, M; Lanzilao, L; Necchi, F; Saul, A; MacLennan, C A; Rondini, S; Micoli, F

    2017-01-11

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease (iNTS) is a leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa. The most common pathogens are Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The O-antigen portion of their lipopolysaccharide is a target of protective immunity and vaccines targeting O-antigen are currently in development. Here we investigate the use of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) as delivery system for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis O-antigen. Gram-negative bacteria naturally shed outer membrane in a blebbing process. By deletion of the tolR gene, the level of shedding was greatly enhanced. Further genetic modifications were introduced into the GMMA-producing strains in order to reduce reactogenicity, by detoxifying the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. We found that genetic mutations can impact on expression of O-antigen chains. All S. Enteritidis GMMA characterized had an O-antigen to protein w/w ratio higher than 0.6, while the ratio was 0.7 for S. Typhimurium ΔtolR GMMA, but decreased to less than 0.1 when further mutations for lipid A detoxification were introduced. Changes were also observed in O-antigen chain length and level and/or position of O-acetylation. When tested in mice, the GMMA induced high levels of anti-O-antigen-specific IgG functional antibodies, despite variation in density and O-antigen structural modifications. In conclusion, simplicity of manufacturing process and low costs of production, coupled with encouraging immunogenicity data, make GMMA an attractive strategy to further investigate for the development of a vaccine against iNTS.

  14. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  15. Urinary antigens as markers of papillary toxicity. I. Identification and characterization of rat kidney papillary antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, F W; Hildebrand, H; Lutte, L; Schwengberg, S; Henke, B; Greshake, D; Schmidt, B; Friederich, A; Rinke, M; Schlüter, G; Bomhard, E

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared in an attempt to develop diagnostic tools for the identification of toxic damage to the rat renal papilla. One IgG and five IgM monoclonal antibodies, reacting with antigens localized in the papilla were obtained. Three of the IgM class and the IgG class monoclonal antibodies were found to be specific for antigens localized in collecting ducts, two of them staining papillary collecting ducts more intensely than cortical collecting ducts. The IgG class antibody, termed Pap X 5C10, recognizes an antigen located at high density on the luminal side of papillary collecting duct epithelial cells and at lower density in cortical collecting duct cells. One of the IgM class monoclonal antibodies reacts with an antigen localized in epithelial cells as ascending and descending loops of Henle and of connecting tubules. Another of the IgM class monoclonal antibodies reacts with an antigen localized in the interstices of the inner medulla. All these monoclonal antibodies react with their antigens in native frozen as well as in Bouin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue slices. Molecular properties of the Pap X 5C10 antigen have been investigated by gel permeation chromatography, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and isoelectric focusing. The results indicate that the antigen in both its tissue-derived and urinary form is of large (150-200 kDa) molecular size and can be separated into two molecular species with isoelectric points of pH 7.2 and 7.3 respectively. In the urine the antigens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies form large complexes with Tamm-Horsfall protein. The antigen-containing complexes can be extracted from urine by adsorption to diatomaceous earth and elution with SDS-containing buffer. Using sandwich ELISA-type assays it is possible to determine the concentration of the antigens. In preliminary experiments we were able to show that at least three of the antigens are detected in the urine following toxic insults to the kidney. The

  16. Instability of induction cooker (electromagnetic stove) antigen retrieval in immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Zheng, Xiang-Yi

    2012-03-01

    An induction cooker is a modern electric cooker that takes electromagnetic induction principle to heat. As it has high efficiency, no open flame, and is safe and convenient, more and more laboratories use it as an antigen retrieval heating tool in immunohistochemistry. We found that there was still some instability with the induction cooker, because with certain antigens the power change influenced the results of immunohistochemistry staining, showing weaker staining intensity or decreased number of positive cells, but which were not entirely negative. For some antigens, it had no influence on results. The instability of this heating tool for antigen retrieval was caused partly by negligent operators, and which may influence the experimental results and the pathologic diagnosis.

  17. Biomarkers for Antigen Immunotherapy in Allergy and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Odegard, Jared M.; Wambre, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Allergy and type 1 diabetes are immune mediated diseases that, despite being etiologically distinct, have inappropriate activation and effector function of antigen-specific T cells in the pathogenic process. Understanding changes in frequency and phenotype of these cells is critical to improve assessment of disease diagnosis and prognosis and effectively assess immunological response to therapy. In the setting of antigen-specific therapy in allergy and type 1 diabetes, assays to monitor the immunological mechanisms of disease have been improving in recent years, and we are getting closer to an accurate understanding of how the cellular immune response is modulated during treatment. In this review, we summarize the current state of cell-based immune monitoring of antigen therapy trials. We then discuss emerging advances in antigen-specific biomarkers that are transforming our knowledge about allergy and that have the potential to dramatically impact our understanding of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:26122171

  18. Antigen-specific lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis.

    PubMed

    Vuento, R

    1983-04-01

    Lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis was studied. A micromethod using washed blood cells and Yersinia enterocolitica antigen was employed. The washed blood cells were incubated in the presence of various dilutions of heat-treated whole bacteria; these proved as antigen superior to gentamicin- or formalin-treated bacteria. Patients with recent yersiniosis had a significantly higher response against Yersinia antigen as compared to 20 healthy controls, who had either no response or a low response. No difference could be observed in responses against PPD or streptokinase-streptodornase, or in the mitogen responses between these two groups. A marked cross-reaction was observed between Yersinia and Escherichia coli antigen. The results show that patients with recent yersiniosis develop lymphocyte transformation response against Yersinia. Lymphocyte transformation test can be used in the study of host responses against infecting Yersinia in patients with different clinical pictures of yersiniosis.

  19. Ceramide Inhibits Antigen Uptake and Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sallusto, Federica; Nicolò, Chiara; De Maria, Ruggero; Corinti, Silvia; Testi, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Ceramides are intramembrane diffusible mediators involved in transducing signals originated from a variety of cell surface receptors. Different adaptive and differentiative cellular responses, including apoptotic cell death, use ceramide-mediated pathways as an essential part of the program. Here, we show that human dendritic cells respond to CD40 ligand, as well as to tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, with intracellular ceramide accumulation, as they are induced to differentiate. Dendritic cells down-modulate their capacity to take up soluble antigens in response to exogenously added or endogenously produced ceramides. This is followed by an impairment in presenting soluble antigens to specific T cell clones, while cell viability and the capacity to stimulate allogeneic responses or to present immunogenic peptides is fully preserved. Thus, ceramide-mediated pathways initiated by different cytokines can actively modulate professional antigen-presenting cell function and antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:8976196

  20. Manufacturing issues related to combining different antigens: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, J

    2001-12-15

    Despite the growing demand for combination vaccines, many challenges have been encountered in developing them. It is difficult to predict the physical compatibility and stability of antigens in combination, because these characteristics are highly dependent on vaccine excipients. Clinical evaluation of potential modifications of efficacy of antigens in combination may be alleviated by use of appropriate animal models. Manufacturing issues, such as batch-release testing, storage of intermediate products, and the shift to preservative-free products, are of particular concern because they have the potential to affect the supply chain. Managing changes in the manufacture of one antigen that is a component of several different combination vaccines is also difficult. However, most potential issues can be resolved through the simplification of regulatory processes and harmonization of requirements, such as the acceptance of comparability protocols and antigen master files. Continued collaboration between industry and authorities is necessary to develop effective means of handling all submissions pertaining to combination vaccines.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Antigenic Peptides in Complex with TAP

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Elisa; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) selectively translocates antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. Loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and proofreading of these bound epitopes are orchestrated within the macromolecular peptide-loading complex, which assembles on TAP. This heterodimeric ABC-binding cassette (ABC) transport complex is therefore a major component in the adaptive immune response against virally or malignantly transformed cells. Its pivotal role predestines TAP as a target for infectious diseases and malignant disorders. The development of therapies or drugs therefore requires a detailed comprehension of structure and function of this ABC transporter, but our knowledge about various aspects is still insufficient. This review highlights recent achievements on the structure and dynamics of antigenic peptides in complex with TAP. Understanding the binding mode of antigenic peptides in the TAP complex will crucially impact rational design of inhibitors, drug development, or vaccination strategies. PMID:28194151

  2. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  3. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    means to eradicate tumor cells would therefore be an advantage in vaccine development (manuscript #2 submitted). Choice of peptide mimotope Arrays of...peptide mimotopes of carbohydrate antigens formulated as multiple antigen peptides or as DNA vaccines can elicit carbohydrate reactive IgM serum...specific CTL. Immunity 1999; 10:51-61. 1. Kieber-Emmons T, Luo P, Qiu J, et al. Vaccination with carbohydrate peptide mimotopes promotes anti-tumor

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I.; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M.; Rodrigues, Flávia G.; DaRocha, Wanderson D.; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8+ T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases. PMID:22114198

  5. Application of paramagnetic beads for purifying Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zarzecka, A; Bartoszcze, M

    2006-10-01

    Paramagnetic beads coated with Protein G and Tosylactivated-280 dynabeads have been used to purify Bacillus anthracis protective antigen from a liquid culture. The obtained protein was used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test to detect B. anthracis protective antigen antibodies in human sera collected from immunized individuals. The purification method using paramagnetic beads is very effective. It is fast, easy and may be carried out practically in any laboratory.

  6. Expression of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Bacillus megaterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    protective antigen in Bacillus megaterium B.J. Berger, K.E. Schwandt and C.L. Radford Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Technical Memorandum DISTRIBUTION...antigen in Bacillus megaterium B. J. Berger, K. E. Schwandt, and C. L. Radford Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Technical...expressed using Bacillus megaterium and a xylose-inducible heterologous expression system. After only 3.5 hours growth post-induction in Luria

  7. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  8. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urra, Xabier; Miró, Francesc; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain proteins are detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs) carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing recovery from stroke. PMID:25309322

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-06

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  10. Can Reproductive Hormones Modulate Host Immunity to Breast Cancer Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0668 TITLE: Can Reproductive Hormones Modulate Host Immunity to Breast Cancer Antigens PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard T...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Can Reproductive Hormones Modulate Host Immunity to Breast Cancer Antigens 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-!1-0668 5c...neu-N mice can be readily applied to clinical trial development. The goal of the present work is to test the hypothesis that reproductive hormones can

  11. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  12. Serological diagnosis with recombinant N antigen for hantavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-07-17

    Hantaviruses are causative agents of two rodent-borne zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. Serological examinations to detect hantavirus antibodies have been most widely used for surveillance among humans and rodent reservoirs. Here, we will review antigenic structure of nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantaviruses and application of recombinant N protein as diagnostic antigen for screening and serotyping.

  13. Prostate Tumor Antigen Discovery: Development of a Novel Genetic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    recognizing the ovarian carcinoma antigen CA125 encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres. Cancer Immunology , Immunotherapy, 1998. 47(1): p. 13-20. 37...Morganelli, K. Wardwell and A.L. Howell, Increased potency of Fc-receptor-targeted antigens. Cancer Immunology , Immunotherapy, 1997. 45(3-4): p. 146...Urology, 1999. I61(35: p. 984-9. 72. Curnow, R.T., Clinical experience with CD64-dirccred immunotherapy. An overview. Cancer Immunology , Immunotherapy

  14. Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-2-0058 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...mally integrated copy of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen gene protects mice against an anthrax spore challenge. Infect Im- mun 2003;71(7):3831...multiplying the empirically determined aerosol exposure concentration (CFU/liter air) in the chamber by the amount of air that was estimated to have been

  15. Junk DNA-Encoded Antigens in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0359 TITLE: Junk DNA -Encoded Antigens in Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kathleen H. Burns, M.D., Ph.D...SUBTITLE Junk DNA -Encoded Antigens in Ovarian Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...that comprises unique, protein-coding exons. These exclude studies of highly repetitive DNA sequences despite the fact that this dimension of our

  16. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  17. Regulator T cells: specific for antigen and/or antigen receptors?

    PubMed

    Rubin, B; de Durana, Y Diaz; Li, N; Sercarz, E E

    2003-05-01

    Adaptive immune responses are regulated by many different molecular and cellular effectors. Regulator T cells are coming to their rights again, and these T cells seem to have ordinary alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs) and to develop in the thymus. Autoimmune responses are tightly regulated by such regulatory T cells, a phenomenon which is beneficial to the host in autoimmune situations. However, the regulation of autoimmune responses to tumour cells is harmful to the host, as this regulation delays the defence against the outgrowth of neoplastic cells. In the present review, we discuss whether regulatory T cells are specific for antigen and/or for antigen receptors. Our interest in these phenomena comes from the findings that T cells produce many more TCR-alpha and TCR-beta chains than are necessary for surface membrane expression of TCR-alphabeta heterodimers with CD3 complexes. Excess TCR chains are degraded by the proteasomes, and TCR peptides thus become available to the assembly pathway of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Consequently, do T cells express two different identification markers on the cell membrane, the TCR-alphabeta clonotype for recognition by B-cell receptors and clonotypic TCR-alphabeta peptides for recognition by T cells?

  18. Airborne birch pollen antigens in different particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Rantio-Lehtimäki, A; Viander, M; Koivikko, A

    1994-01-01

    Two particle samplers for ambient air, situated together: a static size-selective bio-aerosol sampler (SSBAS) and a Burkard pollen and spore trap were compared in sampling intact birch pollen grains through one flowering period of Betula (a total of 44 days). The SSBAS trapped pollen grains three times more efficiently than the Burkard trap, but the variations in pollen counts were significantly correlated. In contrast, birch pollen antigenic activity and the pollen count in the Burkard samples were not closely correlated. The antigenic concentration was occasionally high both before and after the pollination period. There was a high birch pollen antigenic activity in particle size classes where intact pollen grains were absent, even on days when the pollen count was very low. Correspondingly, on days with high birch pollen counts in the air, pollen antigenic activity was on several occasions low, indicating that pollen grains were empty of antigenic material. The small particle size classes are especially important to allergic patients because they are able to penetrate immediately into the alveoli and provoke asthmatic reactions. Therefore, aerobiological information systems based on pollen and spore counts should be supplemented with information concerning antigenic activities in the air.

  19. Cancer testis antigen expression in testicular germ cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter K; Thielken, Andrea; Brandt, Simone; Barghorn, André; Lohe, Bernd; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Cancer testis antigens are encoded by germ line-associated genes that are present in normal germ cells of testis and ovary but not in differentiated tissues. Their expression in various human cancer types has been interpreted as 're-expression' or as intratumoral progenitor cell signature. Cancer testis antigen expression patterns have not yet been studied in germ cell tumorigenesis with specific emphasis on intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified as a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to study MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, GAGE1 and CTAG1B expression in 325 primary testicular germ cell tumors, including 94 mixed germ cell tumors. Seminomatous and non-seminomatous components were separately arranged and evaluated on tissue microarrays. Spermatogonia in the normal testis were positive, whereas intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified was negative for all five CT antigens. Cancer testis antigen expression was only found in 3% (CTAG1B), 10% (GAGE1, MAGEA4), 33% (MAGEA3) and 40% (MAGEC1) of classic seminoma but not in non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors. In contrast, all spermatocytic seminomas were positive for cancer testis antigens. These data are consistent with a different cell origin in spermatocytic seminoma compared with classic seminoma and support a progression model with loss of cancer testis antigens in early tumorigenesis of testicular germ cell tumors and later re-expression in a subset of seminomas.

  20. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  1. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens: prime candidates for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-06-30

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer/testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival.

  2. Kinetics of Antigen Expression and Epitope Presentation during Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Nathan P.; Smith, Stewart A.; Wong, Yik Chun; Tan, Chor Teck; Dudek, Nadine L.; Flesch, Inge E. A.; Lin, Leon C. W.; Tscharke, David C.; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about the dynamics of antigen presentation to T cells during viral infection is very poor despite being of fundamental importance to our understanding of anti-viral immunity. Here we use an advanced mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify the presentation of eight vaccinia virus peptide-MHC complexes (epitopes) on infected cells and the amounts of their source antigens at multiple times after infection. The results show a startling 1000-fold range in abundance as well as strikingly different kinetics across the epitopes monitored. The tight correlation between onset of protein expression and epitope display for most antigens provides the strongest support to date that antigen presentation is largely linked to translation and not later degradation of antigens. Finally, we show a complete disconnect between the epitope abundance and immunodominance hierarchy of these eight epitopes. This study highlights the complexity of viral antigen presentation by the host and demonstrates the weakness of simple models that assume total protein levels are directly linked to epitope presentation and immunogenicity. PMID:23382674

  3. A Novel Malaria Vaccine Candidate Antigen Expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleni-Muus, Janna; Aldag, Ingo; Samuel, Kay; Creasey, Alison M.; Hartmann, Marcus W. W.; Cavanagh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective malaria vaccines is hampered by the problem of producing correctly folded Plasmodium proteins for use as vaccine components. We have investigated the use of a novel ciliate expression system, Tetrahymena thermophila, as a P. falciparum vaccine antigen platform. A synthetic vaccine antigen composed of N-terminal and C-terminal regions of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) was expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila. The recombinant antigen was secreted into the culture medium and purified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity chromatography. The vaccine was immunogenic in MF1 mice, eliciting high antibody titers against both N- and C-terminal components. Sera from immunized animals reacted strongly with P. falciparum parasites from three antigenically different strains by immunofluorescence assays, confirming that the antibodies produced are able to recognize parasite antigens in their native form. Epitope mapping of serum reactivity with a peptide library derived from all three MSP-1 Block 2 serotypes confirmed that the MSP-1 Block 2 hybrid component of the vaccine had effectively targeted all three serotypes of this polymorphic region of MSP-1. This study has successfully demonstrated the use of Tetrahymena thermophila as a recombinant protein expression platform for the production of malaria vaccine antigens. PMID:24489871

  4. Antigenic analysis of immune complexes formed in normal human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M

    1985-01-01

    Immune complexes, isolated from pregnancy sera by absorption to immobilized protein A, were dissociated and the antigen components separated from the IgG antibodies, which possessed immune reactivity directed against the plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. Gel filtration studies demonstrated that five separate antigens could be identified and were of placental origin, as observed by their reactivity in an ELISA with affinity purified anti-trophoblast antibodies isolated from maternal sera. The five antigens of apparent mol. wt 2 X 10(6), 400,000, 150,000, 13,000 and less than 10,000 daltons were designated maternally recognised trophoblast antigens (MRTA), numbers V-IX; the relative proportions of these antigens in the sera were 14%, 68%, 16%, 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Immune complexes were also identified in nulliparous non-pregnant female sera and consisted of the 150,000 and the less than 10,000 daltons antigen components. The relationship between the MRTA present in the immune complexes and the MRTA (numbers I-IV) previously identified as components of the trophoblast plasma membrane is discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:4042429

  5. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  6. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen.

  7. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-02-24

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer.

  8. Immunomodulatory roles of the carcinoembryonic antigen family of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Allez, Matthieu; Park, Mee-Sook; Mayer, Lloyd

    2006-08-01

    One of the most remarkable aspects of the immune system is its ability to fashion an immune response most appropriate to the activating stimulus. Although the immune system possesses a number of adaptations to accomplish this, an important theme is local immune regulation by site-specific expression of receptors and ligands. One family of molecules that is gaining attention as modulators of the immune system is the carcinoembryonic antigen cell-adhesion molecule family (CEACAM). Functionally, the carcinoembryonic antigen family can mediate cell-cell contact, host-pathogen interactions, and immune regulation. For example, biliary glycoprotein (CEACAM1) can have direct activity on T cells, leading to the inhibition of helper or cytotoxic T cell function. The expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEACAM5) on intestinal epithelial cells is involved in the activation of populations of regulatory CD8(+) T cells, while a distinct subset of regulatory CD8+ T cells is activated by nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (CEACAM6) on placental trophoblasts. Interestingly, the function and phenotype of these cells depend upon the specific member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family expressed, as well as the antigen-presenting molecule with which it associates. Thus, these glycoproteins comprise a family of molecules whose functions can depend on their nature and context.

  9. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-01-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens. PMID:7642292

  10. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  11. Inhibitory effects of thymus-independent type 2 antigens on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation: comparative analysis of carbohydrate structures and the antigen presenting cell.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, M; Carrasco-Marín, E; Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Outschoorn, I M; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1997-02-25

    The role of thymus-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens (polysaccharides) on the MHC-II-restricted processing of protein antigens was studied in vitro. In general, antigen presentation is inhibited when both peritoneal and splenic macrophages (M phi) as well as Küpffer cells (KC) are preincubated with acidic polysaccharides or branched dextrans. However, the inhibitory effect of neutral polysaccharides was minimal when KC were used as antigen presenting cells (APC). Morphological evaluation of the uptake of fluoresceinated polysaccharides clearly correlates with this selective and differential interference. Polysaccharides do not block MHC-I-restricted antigen presentation. Some chemical characteristics shared by different saccharides seem to be specially related to their potential inhibitory abilities: (i) those where two anomeric carbon atoms of two interlinked sugars and (ii) those containing several sulfate groups per disaccharide repeating unit. No polysaccharide being inhibitory in M phi abrogated antigen processing in other APC: lipopolysaccharide-activated B cells, B lymphoma cells, or dendritic cells (DC). Using radiolabeled polysaccharides it was observed that DC and B cells incorporated less radioactivity as a function of time than M phi. Morphological evaluation of these different APC incubated for extended periods of time with inhibitory concentrations of polysaccharides revealed intense cytoplasmic vacuolization in M phi but not in B cells or DC. The large majority of M phi lysosomes containing polysaccharides fail to fuse with incoming endocytic vesicles and delivery of fluid-phase tracers was reduced, suggesting that indigestible carbohydrates reduced the fusion of these loaded lysosomes with endosomes containing recently internalized tracers. It is suggested that the main causes of this antigen presentation blockade are (i) the chemical characteristics of certain carbohydrates and whether the specific enzymatic machinery for their intracellular

  12. M. tuberculosis T Cell Epitope Analysis Reveals Paucity of Antigenic Variation and Identifies Rare Variable TB Antigens.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Copin, Richard; Sutherland, Jayne; Gehre, Florian; de Jong, Bouke; Owolabi, Olumuiya; Mbayo, Georgetta; Giardina, Federica; Ernst, Joel D; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-11-11

    Pathogens that evade adaptive immunity typically exhibit antigenic variation. By contrast, it appears that although the chronic human tuberculosis (TB)-causing pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis needs to counter host T cell responses, its T cell epitopes are hyperconserved. Here we present an extensive analysis of the T cell epitopes of M. tuberculosis. We combined population genomics with experimental immunology to determine the number and identity of T cell epitope sequence variants in 216 phylogenetically diverse strains of M. tuberculosis. Antigen conservation is indeed a hallmark of M. tuberculosis. However, our analysis revealed a set of seven variable antigens that were immunogenic in subjects with active TB. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis uses mechanisms other than antigenic variation to evade T cells. T cell epitopes that exhibit sequence variation may not be subject to the same evasion mechanisms, and hence vaccines that include such variable epitopes may be more efficacious.

  13. Peptide-MHC-I from Endogenous Antigen Outnumber Those from Exogenous Antigen, Irrespective of APC Phenotype or Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Haskett, Scott; Kaminsky, Lauren W.; Lin, Eugene; Truckenmiller, Mary E.; Bellone, Clifford J.; Buller, R. Mark; Norbury, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Naïve anti-viral CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) are activated by the presence of peptide-MHC Class I complexes (pMHC-I) on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC). Increasing the number of pMHC-I in vivo can increase the number of responding TCD8+. Antigen can be presented directly or indirectly (cross presentation) from virus-infected and uninfected cells, respectively. Here we determined the relative importance of these two antigen presenting pathways in mousepox, a natural disease of the mouse caused by the poxvirus, ectromelia (ECTV). We demonstrated that ECTV infected several pAPC types (macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC), including DC subsets), which directly presented pMHC-I to naïve TCD8+ with similar efficiencies in vitro. We also provided evidence that these same cell-types presented antigen in vivo, as they form contacts with antigen-specific TCD8+. Importantly, the number of pMHC-I on infected pAPC (direct presentation) vastly outnumbered those on uninfected cells (cross presentation), where presentation only occurred in a specialized subset of DC. In addition, prior maturation of DC failed to enhance antigen presentation, but markedly inhibited ECTV infection of DC. These results suggest that direct antigen presentation is the dominant pathway in mice during mousepox. In a broader context, these findings indicate that if a virus infects a pAPC then the presentation by that cell is likely to dominate over cross presentation as the most effective mode of generating large quantities of pMHC-I is on the surface of pAPC that endogenously express antigens. Recent trends in vaccine design have focused upon the introduction of exogenous antigens into the MHC Class I processing pathway (cross presentation) in specific pAPC populations. However, use of a pantropic viral vector that targets pAPC to express antigen endogenously likely represents a more effective vaccine strategy than the targeting of exogenous antigen to a limiting p

  14. In vitro antigen-induced antibody responses to hepatitis B surface antigen in man. Kinetic and cellular requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Cupps, T R; Gerin, J L; Purcell, R H; Goldsmith, P K; Fauci, A S

    1984-01-01

    In this report we define the parameters of the human immune response after immunization with hepatitis B vaccine. 2 wk after booster immunization, there is significant spontaneous secretion of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs IgG), which is not further augmented by stimulation with antigen or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). By 4 wk there is little spontaneous secretion of specific antibody, and low doses of antigen or PWM produce significant increases in the amount of anti-HBs IgG produced. By 8 wk the peripheral blood mononuclear cells are refractory to stimulation by antigen, but anti-HBs IgG is produced in response to PWM. 0.5 yr or more after the last immunization, some individuals will manifest an antigen-induced specific antibody response. This induction of anti-HBs IgG by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is monocyte- and T cell-dependent. Note that there is a dichotomy in the T cell response to HBsAg. The specific antibody response is clearly T cell dependent, but no in vitro T cell proliferative response to HBsAG could be demonstrated in the immunized individuals. Although the precise reason for the absent proliferative response to HBsAg despite well-established humoral immunity has not been determined, there was no evidence to suggest nonspecific suppression by HBsAg or the presence of an adherent suppressor cell population. The ability to evaluate antigen-induced, antigen-specific responses to HBsAg will be useful in defining the unique interaction between the human immune response and this clinically important viral agent. PMID:6332826

  15. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  16. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  17. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  18. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  19. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  20. Molecular cloning of Taenia taeniaeformis oncosphere antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Cougle, W G; Lightowlers, M W; Bogh, H O; Rickard, M D; Johnson, K S

    1991-03-01

    Infection of mice with the cestode Taenia taeniaeformis exhibits several important features common to other cestode infections, including the ability to vaccinate with crude antigen mixtures. Partial purification of the protective oncosphere antigens has been reported with a cutout from deoxycholate (DOC) acrylamide gels; this cutout was called fraction II (FII), and comprises approximately 10% of total DOC-soluble oncosphere antigen. Western blots of DOC gels probed with anti-FII antisera revealed a series of 3-5 discrete bands within the FII region. Further fractionation of the FII antigens on DOC gels was impractical due to limitations in supply of oncospheres, so a cDNA library was constructed from 150 ng of oncosphere mRNA and screened with alpha-FII antisera. Two distinct clone families were identified, oncA and oncB. Antibodies affinity-purified on either of two representative members, oncA1 and oncB1, recognised all the FII bands. Individual FII bands excised from a DOC gel resolved into an overlapping series of molecules when re-run on SDS-PAGE, indicating that each FII band consisted of several polypeptides of differing molecular weight. Immunoprecipitates resolved on SDS-PAGE revealed that alpha-FII recognised 3 major oncosphere antigens, of 62, 34 and 25 kDa; antisera against oncB precipitated both the 34- and 25-kDa antigens, whereas alpha-oncA antisera precipitated the 62-kDa antigen. We conclude that oncA and oncB encode the major antigens in the FII complex. The 62-kDa antigen encoded by oncA1 was the only common antigen precipitated by anti-FII and two other antisera raised against different protective extracts, suggesting that it may be a protective component in all three. Southern blot results indicate that oncA and oncB are distinct genes present at low copy number in the genome. Evidence is also presented suggesting that some cestode mRNAs, including oncA, may use variant polyadenylation signals.

  1. Immunization of rabbits with nematode Ascaris lumbricoides antigens induces antibodies cross-reactive to house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae antigens.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Khan, Al Fazal; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Takai, Toshiro; Zaman, Khalequz; Yunus, Md; Takeuchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the relationship between helminthic infection and allergic diseases. Although IgE cross-reactivity between nematode Ascaris antigens and house dust-mite allergens in allergic patients have been reported, whether Ascaris or the mite is the primary sensitizer remains unknown. Here we found that immunization of naïve animals with Ascaris lumbricoides (Al) antigens induced production of antibodies cross-reactive to mite antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Sera from Bangladeshi children showed IgE reactivity to Ascaris and mite extracts. IgG from rabbits immunized with Al extract exhibited reactivity to Df antigens. Treatment of the anti-Al antibody with Df antigen-coupled beads eliminated the reactivity to Df antigens. In immunoblot analysis, an approximately 100-kDa Df band was the most reactive to anti-Al IgG. The present study is the first step towards the establishment of animal models to study the relationship between Ascaris infection and mite-induced allergic diseases.

  2. Polymer blend particles with defined compositions for targeting antigen to both class I and II antigen presentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kenny K; Zhan, Xi; Shen, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Defense against many persistent and difficult-to-treat diseases requires a combination of humoral, CD4(+) , and CD8(+) T-cell responses, which necessitates targeting antigens to both class I and II antigen presentation pathways. In this study, polymer blend particles are developed by mixing two functionally unique polymers, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and a pH-responsive polymer, poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-propylacrylic acid-co-butyl methacrylate) (DMAEMA-co-PAA-co-BMA). Polymer blend particles are shown to enable the delivery of antigens into both class I and II antigen presentation pathways in vitro. Increasing the ratio of the pH-responsive polymer in blend particles increases the degree of class I antigen presentation, while maintaining high levels of class II antigen presentation. In a mouse model, it is demonstrated that a significantly higher and sustained level of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, and comparable antibody responses, are elicited with polymer blend particles than PLGA particles and a conventional vaccine, Alum. The polymer blend particles offer a potential vaccine delivery platform to generate a combination of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses that insure robust and long-lasting immunity against many infectious diseases and cancers.

  3. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; D'Aliberti, Deborah; Venza, Mario; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Biondo, Carmelo; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Tramontano, Anna; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  4. Special antigens on sperm from autoimmune infertile men.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Chao, L; Goust, J M; Milroy, G T; Woodley-Miller, C; Caldwell, J Z; Daru, J; Williamson, H O

    1988-05-01

    Sera from three fertile men and four infertile men without sperm antibodies, 17 infertile men with sperm antibodies in serum and seminal plasma (S.P.), and 25 infertile men with sperm antibodies in S.P. were tested by Western Blot analysis against sperm membrane extracts and S.P. from fertile nonautoimmune men and infertile autoimmune men. Sera from fertile men reacted against common antigens with molecular weights (MW) of 28, 38, 48, 60, and 68 kD present on sperm from autoimmune and nonautoimmune men and special antigen of MW 76 kD on the sperm of fertile men. Sera from 15 of 17 (88%) autoimmune infertile men with sperm antibodies in serum and S.P. detected special antigens with MW of 58 kD (sera reactivity in 47% of these men), 43kD (in 29%), 30 kD (in 24%), 35 kD (in 18%), 52 kD (in 12%), 41 kD (in 6%), and 71 kD (in 6%) on the sperm of autoimmune men in addition to the common antigens. Sera from 15 of 25 (60%) men with sperm antibodies in their S.P. showed reactivity to special antigens with MW 52 kD (in 20%), 35 kD (in 16%), 41 kD (in 16%), 58 kD (in 8%), 70/71 kD (in 8%), 30 kD (in 8%), and 56 kD (in 4%). Sera from 18 of 42 (43%) infertile men with sperm antibodies also detected special antigens of MW 26, 46, and 76 kD present only in fertile men's sperm. Sera from only 15 of 42 (36%) autoimmune infertile men reacted against special antigens with MW 17, 20, 23, 30, 43, and 58 kD in the seminal plasma of autoimmune infertile men.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. O-Antigen Modulates Infection-Induced Pain States

    PubMed Central

    Yaggie, Ryan E.; Pavlov, Vladimir I.; Done, Joseph; Heckman, Charles J.; Whitfield, Christopher; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Klumpp, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular initiators of infection-associated pain are not understood. We recently found that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) elicited acute pelvic pain in murine urinary tract infection (UTI). UTI pain was due to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its receptor, TLR4, but pain was not correlated with inflammation. LPS is known to drive inflammation by interactions between the acylated lipid A component and TLR4, but the function of the O-antigen polysaccharide in host responses is unknown. Here, we examined the role of O-antigen in pain using cutaneous hypersensitivity (allodynia) to quantify pelvic pain behavior and using sacral spinal cord excitability to quantify central nervous system manifestations in murine UTI. A UPEC mutant defective for O-antigen biosynthesis induced chronic allodynia that persisted long after clearance of transient infections, but wild type UPEC evoked only acute pain. E. coli strains lacking O-antigen gene clusters had a chronic pain phenotype, and expressing cloned O-antigen gene clusters altered the pain phenotype in a predictable manner. Chronic allodynia was abrogated in TLR4-deficient mice, but inflammatory responses in wild type mice were similar among E. coli strains spanning a wide range of pain phenotypes, suggesting that O-antigen modulates pain independent of inflammation. Spinal cords of mice with chronic allodynia exhibited increased spontaneous firing and compromised short-term depression, consistent with centralized pain. Taken together, these findings suggest that O-antigen functions as a rheostat to modulate LPS-associated pain. These observations have implications for an infectious etiology of chronic pain and evolutionary modification of pathogens to alter host behaviors. PMID:22899994

  6. Genetics of O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocchetta, H. L.; Burrows, L. L.; Lam, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce an elaborate assortment of extracellular and cell-associated bacterial products that enable colonization and establishment of infection within a host. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules are cell surface factors that are typically known for their protective role against serum-mediated lysis and their endotoxic properties. The most heterogeneous portion of LPS is the O antigen or O polysaccharide, and it is this region which confers serum resistance to the organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of concomitantly synthesizing two types of LPS referred to as A band and B band. The A-band LPS contains a conserved O polysaccharide region composed of d-rhamnose (homopolymer), while the B-band O-antigen (heteropolymer) structure varies among the 20 O serotypes of P. aeruginosa. The genes coding for the enzymes that direct the synthesis of these two O antigens are organized into two separate clusters situated at different chromosomal locations. In this review, we summarize the organization of these two gene clusters to discuss how A-band and B-band O antigens are synthesized and assembled by dedicated enzymes. Examples of unique proteins required for both A-band and B-band O-antigen synthesis and for the synthesis of both LPS and alginate are discussed. The recent identification of additional genes within the P. aeruginosa genome that are homologous to those in the A-band and B-band gene clusters are intriguing since some are able to influence O-antigen synthesis. These studies demonstrate that P. aeruginosa represents a unique model system, allowing studies of heteropolymeric and homopolymeric O-antigen synthesis, as well as permitting an examination of the interrelationship of the synthesis of LPS molecules and other virulence determinants. PMID:10477307

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to guinea pig Ia antigens. II. Effect on alloantigen-, antigen-, and mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Four xenographic monoclonal antibodies to guinea pig Ia antigens were tested for their inhibitory effects on antigen-, alloantigen-, and mitogen-induced T cell proliferation. All four monoclonal antibodies reacted with strain 2 Ia antigens, and all four were capable of inhibiting the strain 13 against strain 2 mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) by 50-70%; the two monoclonals that reacted with strain 13 Ia antigens were also capable of inhibiting the strain 2 against strain 13 MLR. In contrast, an analysis of the effects of a single monoclonal antibody on the responses to several antigens demonstrated a selective monoclonal pattern of inhibition in that the responses to some, but not all, antigens were inhibited. These results suggest that monoclonal antibodies react with different parts of Ia molecules that may have different functional roles and that certain parts of an Ia molecule participate in the presentation of certain antigens, whereas other regions of the same molecule present different antigens. PMID:6158543

  8. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  9. Sharing the burden: antigen transport and firebreaks in immune responses.

    PubMed

    Handel, Andreas; Yates, Andrew; Pilyugin, Sergei S; Antia, Rustom

    2009-05-06

    Communication between cells is crucial for immune responses. An important means of communication during viral infections is the presentation of viral antigen on the surface of an infected cell. Recently, it has been shown that antigen can be shared between infected and uninfected cells through gap junctions, connexin-based channels, that allow the transport of small molecules. The uninfected cell receiving antigen can present it on its surface. Cells presenting viral antigen are detected and killed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The killing of uninfected cells can lead to increased immunopathology. However, the immune response might also profit from killing those uninfected bystander cells. One benefit might be the removal of future 'virus factories'. Another benefit might be through the creation of 'firebreaks', areas void of target cells, which increase the diffusion time of free virions, making their clearance more likely. Here, we use theoretical models and simulations to explore how the mechanism of gap junction-mediated antigen transport (GMAT) affects the dynamics of the virus and immune response. We show that under the assumption of a well-mixed system, GMAT leads to increased immunopathology, which always outweighs the benefit of reduced virus production due to the removal of future virus factories. By contrast, a spatially explicit model leads to quite different results. Here we find that the firebreak mechanism reduces both viral load and immunopathology. Our study thus shows the potential benefits of GMAT and illustrates how spatial effects may be crucial for the quantitative understanding of infection dynamics and immune responses.

  10. Semiquantitative measure of immune responses against erythropoietic stem cell antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A semiquantitative assay was developed and used to measure the effects of immune responses against 16 independent non-H-2 antigenic loci on erythropoietic stem cells. The assay compares repopulation in genetically anemic WBB6F1-W/Wv recipients that have normal immune responses, and in lethally irradiated WBB6F1 +/+ mice whose immune responses are suppressed by the irradiation. The differences in repopulating ability between these two types of recipients measure how immune responses affect erythropoietic stem cells. Stem cell repopulating abilities for the cells with antigens specified by the Thy-1, H-1, H-24, Ly-1, H-37, and H-17 loci were affected slightly, if at all. Repopulating abilities were moderately reduced by responses against antigens specified by H-15, 16, Ea-2, and Ly-2, 3 loci, and against the differences between the B6 and B10 genotypes, although marrow of these types cured W/Wv recipients. A surprising result occurred for the antigen specified by the H-8 locus, in which immune responses strongly reduced repopulating abilities, although this type of marrow cell cured W/Wv recipients. A comparison of these results with skin graft survival times suggests that the antigens specified by the H-17 and H-24 loci are strongly immunogenic on skin but not on marrow stem cells, while those specified by the H-12 and H-8 loci are strongly immunogenic on marrow stem cells but not on skin.

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  12. Selection of antigenically advanced variants of seasonal influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Makoto; Taft, Andrew S.; Das, Subash C.; Hanson, Anthony P.; Song, Jiasheng; Imai, Masaki; Wilker, Peter R.; Watanabe, Tokiko; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Russell, Colin A.; James, Sarah L.; Skepner, Eugene; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kelso, Anne; McCauley, John; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Xu, Xiyan; Wentworth, David E.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Smith, Derek J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses mutate frequently, necessitating constant updates of vaccine viruses. To establish experimental approaches that may complement the current vaccine strain selection process, we selected antigenic variants from human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza virus libraries possessing random mutations in the globular head of the haemagglutinin protein (which includes the antigenic sites) by incubating them with human and/or ferret convalescent sera to human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Further, we selected antigenic escape variants from human viruses treated with convalescent sera and from mice that had been previously immunized against human influenza viruses. Our pilot studies with past influenza viruses identified escape mutants that were antigenically similar to variants that emerged in nature, establishing the feasibility of our approach. Our studies with contemporary human influenza viruses identified escape mutants before they caused an epidemic in 2014–2015. This approach may aid in the prediction of potential antigenic escape variants and the selection of future vaccine candidates before they become widespread in nature. PMID:27572841

  13. HLA class II antigen presentation by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Younger, A R; Amria, S; Jeffrey, W A; Mahdy, A E M; Goldstein, O G; Norris, J S; Haque, A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Recent evidence suggests that reduced expression of target protein antigens and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is the predominant immune escape mechanism of malignant prostate tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prospect of antigen specific immunotherapy against prostate cancer via the HLA class II pathway of immune recognition. Here, we show for the first time that prostate cancer cells express HLA class II proteins that are recognized by CD4+ T cells. Prostate tumor cells transduced with class II molecules efficiently presented tumor-associated antigens/peptides to CD4+ T cells. This data suggests that malignant prostate tumors can be targeted via the HLA class II pathway, and that class II-positive tumors could be employed for direct antigen presentation, and CD4+ T-cell mediated tumor immunotherapy.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2008) 11, 334-341; doi:10.1038/sj.pcan.4501021; published online 16 October 2007.

  14. STUDIES ON THE ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF SOME MAMMALIAN SPERMATOZOA

    PubMed Central

    Henle, Werner; Henle, Gertrude; Chambers, Leslie A.

    1938-01-01

    1. A method has been described for separation of heads and tails of mammalian spermatozoa. 2. By means of absorption technique applied to homologous spermatozoal sera, head-specific and tail-specific antigens could be demonstrated. Both are heat-labile. 3. A heat-stable antigen was found to be common to both heads and tails. This substance is species-specific. 4. Antibodies against the head- and tail-specific antigens led to two different types of agglutination as shown by the slide method. 5. Using heterologous antisera against spermatozoa three different cross-reacting antigens could be observed, two in the heads, one in the tails. 6. One of the head-antigens is not active in the native cell; it comes to action only after breaking the cell. Antibodies against this substance were not found in antisera against native bull spermatozoa but were formed when vibrated spermatozoa or heads were injected into rabbits. 7. The cross-reactions can be removed from an antiserum leaving the head- as well as the tail-specific reaction intact. PMID:19870792

  15. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  16. Allogeneic Antigen Composition for Preparing Universal Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that tumors induce specific changes to the surface of human endothelial cells thereby providing the basis for designing endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target antigens expressed by the tumor endothelium. The present report extends these studies in vitro by investigating the efficacy of allogeneic antigens with regard to their ability to target immune responses against the tumor vasculature since alloantigens simplify vaccine development and implementation in clinical practice. We demonstrated that allogeneic SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer), which presents a specifically prepared composition of cell surface antigens from tumor-stimulated endothelial cells, allows targeting of the tumor vasculature with efficacy of 17, where efficacy represents the killing rate of target cells before normal cells are adversely affected, and efficacy of 60, where efficacy represents the fold decrease in the number of target cells and directly relates to tumor growth arrest. These data suggest that allogeneic SANTAVAC may be considered an antigenic composition that following administration in the presence of respective adjuvants may be clinically tested as a therapeutic or prophylactic universal cancer vaccine without adverse side effects to the normal vasculature. PMID:27781211

  17. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  18. The CD1 size problem: lipid antigens, ligands, and scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Dalam

    2014-01-01

    Whereas research on CD1d has emphasized a few glycosyl ceramides, the broader family of four human CD1 antigen-presenting molecules binds hundreds of distinct self-lipids. Individual lipid types bind within CD1 grooves in different ways, such that they partially fill the groove, match the groove volume, or protrude substantially from the groove. These differing modes of binding can now be connected to differing immunological functions, as individual lipids can act as stimulatory antigens, inhibitory ligands, or space-filling scaffolds. Because each type of CD1 protein folds to produce antigen-binding grooves with differing sizes and shapes, CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, CD1d, and CD1e have distinct mechanisms of capturing self-lipids and exchanging them for foreign lipids. The size discrepancy between endogeneous lipids and groove volume is most pronounced for CD1b. Recent studies show that the large CD1b cavity can simultaneously bind two self-lipids, the antigen, and its scaffold lipid, which can be exchanged for one large bacterial lipid. In this review, we will highlight recent studies showing how cells regulate lipid antigen loading and the roles CD1 groove structures have in control of the presentation of chemically diverse lipids to T cells. PMID:24658584

  19. Antigenic competition in a multivalent foot rot vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J D; Jackson, D C; Brown, L E; Wood, P R; Stewart, D J

    1994-04-01

    The antigenic competition that occurs when pilus antigens of different serogroups are combined in multivalent vaccines for foot rot has been investigated using recombinant pilus antigens. Our prototype vaccine contains pili from nine serogroups of Dichelobacter nodosus which are expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sheep inoculated with this multivalent vaccine were not as well protected against foot rot as those given the monovalent vaccine. Levels of agglutinating and total antibody specific for any particular pili serogroup were found to be significantly reduced in sheep vaccinated with six or more closely related pili. This effect was more pronounced for agglutinating antibody, which is thought to mediate protection, but was also observed with total antibody levels measured by ELISA. The antigenic competition was not associated with the total antigen load as a tenfold higher dose of monovalent pili induced high titres of antibody. Furthermore, distributing the vaccine to four sites, each draining to a different lymph node, failed to overcome the competition. Experiments with mixtures of monospecific sera indicate that the phenomenon is unlikely to be due to blocking of serogroup-specific protective antibodies by an excess of cross-reactive non-protective antibody elicited by heterologous pili.

  20. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation.

  1. Identification of immunodominant antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using proteome microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Douglas M.; Pal, Sukumar; Kayala, Mathew A.; Teng, Andy; Kim, Paul J.; Baldi, Pierre; Felgner, Philip L.; Liang, Xiaowu; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted pathogen in the world. In order to control this infection, there is an urgent need to formulate a vaccine. Identification of protective antigens is required to implement a subunit vaccine. To identify potential antigen vaccine candidates, three strains of mice, BALB/c, C3H/HeN and C57BL/6, were inoculated with live and inactivated C. trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) by different routes of immunization. Using a protein microarray, serum samples collected after immunization were tested for the presence of antibodies against specific chlamydial antigens. A total of 225 open reading frames (ORF) of the C. trachomatis genome were cloned, expressed, and printed in the microarray. Using this protein microarray, a total of seven C. trachomatis dominant antigens were identified (TC0052, TC0189, TC0582, TC0660, TC0726, TC0816 and, TC0828) as recognized by IgG antibodies from all three strains of animals after immunization. In addition, the microarray was probed to determine if the antibody response exhibited a Th1 or Th2 bias. Animals immunized with live organisms mounted a predominant Th1 response against most of the chlamydial antigens while mice immunized with inactivated Chlamydia mounted a Th2-biased response. In conclusion, using a high throughput protein microarray we have identified a set of novel proteins that can be tested for their ability to protect against a chlamydial infection. PMID:20044059

  2. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Trimerization Completes Monomer Folding and Antigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Magadán, Javier G.; Khurana, Surender; Das, Suman R.; Frank, Gregory M.; Stevens, James; Golding, Hana; Bennink, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) remains an important human pathogen largely because of antigenic drift, the rapid emergence of antibody escape mutants that precludes durable vaccination. The most potent neutralizing antibodies interact with cognate epitopes in the globular “head” domain of hemagglutinin (HA), a homotrimeric glycoprotein. The H1 HA possesses five distinct regions defined by a large number of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), i.e., Ca1, Ca2, Cb, Sa, and Sb. Ca1-Ca2 sites require HA trimerization to attain full antigenicity, consistent with their locations on opposite sides of the trimer interface. Here, we show that full antigenicity of Cb and Sa sites also requires HA trimerization, as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy of IAV-infected cells and biochemically by pulse-chase radiolabeling experiments. Surprisingly, epitope antigenicity acquired by HA trimerization persists following acid triggering of the globular domains dissociation and even after proteolytic release of monomeric heads from acid-treated HA. Thus, the requirement for HA trimerization by trimer-specific MAbs mapping to the Ca, Cb, and Sa sites is not dependent upon the bridging of adjacent monomers in the native HA trimer. Rather, complete antigenicity of HA (and, by inference, immunogenicity) requires a final folding step that accompanies its trimerization. Once this conformational change occurs, HA trimers themselves would not necessarily be required to induce a highly diverse neutralizing response to epitopes in the globular domain. PMID:23824811

  3. Antigen processing and immune regulation in the response to tumours.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Emma; James, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The MHC class I and II antigen processing and presentation pathways display peptides to circulating CD8(+) cytotoxic and CD4(+) helper T cells respectively to enable pathogens and transformed cells to be identified. Once detected, T cells become activated and either directly kill the infected / transformed cells (CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes) or orchestrate the activation of the adaptive immune response (CD4(+) T cells). The immune surveillance of transformed/tumour cells drives alteration of the antigen processing and presentation pathways to evade detection and hence the immune response. Evasion of the immune response is a significant event tumour development and considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. To avoid immune recognition, tumours employ a multitude of strategies with most resulting in a down-regulation of the MHC class I expression at the cell surface, significantly impairing the ability of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes to recognize the tumour. Alteration of the expression of key players in antigen processing not only affects MHC class I expression but also significantly alters the repertoire of peptides being presented. These modified peptide repertoires may serve to further reduce the presentation of tumour-specific/associated antigenic epitopes to aid immune evasion and tumour progression. Here we review the modifications to the antigen processing and presentation pathway in tumours and how it affects the anti-tumour immune response, considering the role of tumour-infiltrating cell populations and highlighting possible future therapeutic targets.

  4. Pericyte antigens in angiomyolipoma and PEComa family tumors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Asatrian, Greg; Barnhill, Raymond; Lugassy, Claire; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2015-08-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are an uncommon family of soft tissue tumors with dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. Although PEComa family tumors commonly demonstrate a perivascular growth pattern, pericyte antigen expression has not yet been examined among this unique tumor group. Previously, we demonstrated that a subset of perivascular soft tissue tumors exhibit a striking pericytic immunophenotype, with diffuse expression of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Here, we describe the presence of pericyte antigens across a diverse group of PEComa family tumors (n = 19 specimens). Results showed that pericyte antigens differed extensively by histological appearance. Typical angiomyolipoma (AML) specimens showed variable expression of pericyte antigens among both perivascular and myoid-appearing cells. In contrast, AML specimens with a predominant spindled morphology showed diffuse expression of pericyte markers, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. AML samples with predominant epithelioid morphology showed a marked reduction in or the absence of immunoreactivity for pericyte markers. Lymphangiomyoma samples showed more variable and partial pericyte marker expression. In summary, pericyte antigen expression is variable among PEComa family tumors and largely varies by tumor morphology. Pericytic marker expression in PEComa may represent a true pericytic cell of origin, or alternatively aberrant pericyte marker adoption. Markers of pericytic differentiation may be of future diagnostic utility for the evaluation of mesenchymal tumors, or identify actionable signaling pathways for future therapeutic intervention.

  5. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  6. Two distinct antigen systems in human B lymphocytes: identification of cell surface and intracellular antigens using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Yuasa, H; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct antigen systems (L26 and L27) specifically expressed in human B lymphocytes were identified using TB2-2B3 (2B3) and T3-5B3 (5B3) monoclonal antibodies, respectively. Whereas L26 antigen defined by 2B3 were rarely expressed on the surface of B cells but abundant in the cytoplasm, 127 antigens detected by 5B3 was clearly expressed on the cell surface. These two antigens appeared to be restricted in their expression to B cells, as they were found in most B cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, monocytes and granulocytes. Functional studies demonstrated that L27 was more easily lost from B cells after activation with pokeweed mitogen than was L26. Likewise, plasma cell myeloma, as well as normal plasma cells, was devoid of both L26 and L27, whereas immunoblastic sarcoma of B cell type expressed L26 but not L27. These two antigens co-existed in the same B cell lines including Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cell lines, B cell type acute lymphatic leukaemia (B-ALL) cell line, Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines and myeloma cell lines, but pre-B and common ALL cell lines were entirely negative for both L26 and L27. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that L26 consisted of at least two polypeptide chains with molecular weights of 30K and 33K daltons, which were clearly distinct from HLA-DR antigens. The antigen L27 is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6332692

  7. Successive Administration of Streptococcus Type 5 Group A Antigens and S. typhimurium Antigenic Complex Corrects Elevation of Serum Cytokine Concentration and Number of Bone Marrow Stromal Pluripotent Cells in CBA Mice Induced by Each Antigen Separately.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Grabko, V I; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-12-01

    Administration of bacterial antigens to CBA mice induced an increase in serum concentration of virtually all cytokines with a peak in 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens and in 7 h after administration of streptococcus antigens. In 20 h, cytokine concentrations returned to the control level or were slightly below it. In 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, GM-CSF, IL-12, and TNF-α, in comparison with injection S. typhimurium antigens alone and IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, and TNF-α in comparison with injection of streptococcus antigens alone; the concentrations of IL-2 and IFN-γ, in contrast, increased by 1.5 times in this case. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens, the number of multipotential stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and their cloning efficiency (ECF-MSC) increased by 4.8 and 4.4 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, while after administration of streptococcus antigens by 2.6 and 2.4 times, respectively. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, these parameters increased by 3.2 and 2.9 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, i.e. the observed increase in the level of MSC count and ECF-MSC is more consistent with the response of the stromal tissue to streptococcus antigens. Thus, successive administration of two bacterial antigens corrected both serum cytokine profiles and MSC response to administration of each antigen separately, which indicates changeability of the stromal tissue in response to changes in the immune response.

  8. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-05

    The liver tissues of man and certain animals (dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc.) yield, upon alcoholic extraction, various substances which may be divided by their physical and chemical properties into several groups. While many substances are present in the alcoholic extract, the ones possessing antigenic properties are comparatively few. The latter are responsible for the antigenic properties exhibited by the whole alcoholic extract. The substances extracted with alcohol were fractionated into the following four groups. (a) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Hot Alcohol.-These are chiefly proteins and salts. The proteins are probably the minute particles of larger molecules held in apparent suspension in alcohol until all other substances are removed. The water extracted from the tissues and admixed with alcohol is also an essential factor in extracting these particles in an alcoholic solution. The salts present are the usual physiological constituents of the liver, notably, sodium chloride. The quantity of these substances extracted with alcohol varies greatly with different specimens. Biologically considered, they are neither markedly hemolytic nor anticomplementary and possess no antigenic property for the Wassermann reaction. It is important, however, to note that the proteins bind complement when mixed with certain active human sera. For this reason a preparation of antigen containing this group of substances is unsuitable for use in combination with an active serum, and should, therefore, be rejected. (b) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Soluble in Hot Alcohol.-This group contains soaps, cleavage products of proteins, and small amounts of the bile salts. Soaps and bile salts are very strongly hemolytic and are absolutely unfit for use as antigen. Moreover, their antigenic properties are very slight. It is best to eliminate this group of substances from the preparation of antigen. The quantity of the substances of this group extracted from different specimens

  9. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  10. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  11. Disruption of antigenic variation is crucial for effective parasite vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Fernando D; Saura, Alicia; Prucca, Cesar G; Carranza, Pedro G; Torri, Alessandro; Lujan, Hugo D

    2010-05-01

    Giardia lamblia is a human intestinal pathogen. Like many protozoan microorganisms, Giardia undergoes antigenic variation, a mechanism assumed to allow parasites to evade the host's immune response, producing chronic and/or recurrent infections. Recently, we found that the mechanism controlling variant-specific surface protein (VSP) switching in Giardia involves components of the RNA interference machinery and that disruption of this pathway generates trophozoites simultaneously expressing many VSPs. Here we use these altered trophozoites to determine the role of antigenic variation in a gerbil model of giardiasis. Our results show that either primary infection with trophozoites simultaneously expressing many VSPs or immunization with purified VSPs from the transgenic cells protects gerbils from subsequent Giardia infections. These results constitute, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that antigenic variation is essential for parasite survival within hosts and that artificial disruption of this mechanism might be useful in generating vaccines against major pathogens that show similar behavior.

  12. Immunization against Rabies with Plant-Derived Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelska, Anna; Dietzschold, Bernard; Sleysh, N.; Fu, Zhen Fang; Steplewski, Klaudia; Hooper, D. Craig; Koprowski, Hilary; Yusibov, Vidadi

    1998-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that recombinant plant virus particles containing a chimeric peptide representing two rabies virus epitopes stimulate virus neutralizing antibody synthesis in immunized mice. We show here that mice immunized intraperitoneally or orally (by gastric intubation or by feeding on virus-infected spinach leaves) with engineered plant virus particles containing rabies antigen mount a local and systemic immune response. After the third dose of antigen, given intraperitoneally, 40% of the mice were protected against challenge infection with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Oral administration of the antigen stimulated serum IgG and IgA synthesis and ameliorated the clinical signs caused by intranasal infection with an attenuated rabies virus strain.

  13. MHC structure and function − antigen presentation. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this review deals with the molecules and processes involved in the processing and presentation of the antigenic fragments to the T-cell receptor. Though the nature of the antigens presented varies, the most significant class of antigens is proteins, processed within the cell to be then recognized in the form of peptides, a mechanism that confers an extraordinary degree of precision to this mode of immune response. The efficiency and accuracy of this system is also the result of the myriad of mechanisms involved in the processing of proteins and production of peptides, in addition to the capture and recycling of alternative sources aiming to generate further diversity in the presentation to T-cells. PMID:25807243

  14. Abnormal distribution of the histocompatibility antigens (HLA) in lousy patients.

    PubMed

    Morsy, T A; Alalfy, M S; Sabry, A H; Fikry, A A; El Sharkawy, I M

    1996-04-01

    The histocompatibility antigens have important functions in the development of the immune response, in the development of immunologic tolerance and in the resistance and susceptibility to diseases. In the present study, the frequency of the human leucocytic antigens (HLA) were studied in 31 lousy children with Pediculus h. capitis (head lice) and 14 adults with Phthirus pubis (pubic lice) to evaluate the immune response in their pathogenesis. The patients (children and adults) were parasite-free as indicated by urine, stool and blood analysis and clinical examination. A significant increase was found between HLA-A11 and, -B5 and lousy children with P. h. capitis and between HLA,-A11, -B5 and -B27 and lousy adults with P. pubis. The association between HLA antigens and parasitic infection was discussed.

  15. Garden-variety vaccines: antigens derived from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Tacket, Carol O

    2004-10-01

    The discovery of new vaccines can result from deletion of virulence determinants from a specific pathogen or from identification of target antigens that stimulate a protective immune response. Vaccine development will become less empirical as applications of genomics, proteomics and reverse vaccinology are exploited, and new protective antigens will emerge for inclusion in the vaccines of the future. However, production and purification of these new antigens for oral and parenteral use using traditional expression systems, will be expensive and unattractive to vaccine manufacturers who see the vaccine market as economically uninviting. Cost is one of the persistent barriers to deployment of new vaccines to populations that need them most urgently. This factor will inhibit the development and distribution of safe and effective new vaccines against high priority pathogens.

  16. Small Wonders—The Use of Nanoparticles for Delivering Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Aya; Smooker, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Despite the discovery of many potential antigens for subunit vaccines, universal protection is often lacking due to the limitations of conventional delivery methods. Subunit vaccines primarily induce antibody-mediated humoral responses, whereas potent antigen-specific cellular responses are required for prevention against some pathogenic infections. Nanoparticles have been utilised in nanomedicine and are promising candidates for vaccine or drug delivery. Nanoparticle vehicles have been demonstrated to be efficiently taken up by dendritic cells and induce humoral and cellular responses. This review provides an overview of nanoparticle vaccine development; in particular, the preparation of nanoparticles using a templating technique is highlighted, which would alleviate some of the disadvantages of existing nanoparticles. We will also explore the cellular fate of nanoparticle vaccines. Nanoparticle-based antigen delivery systems have the potential to develop new generation vaccines against currently unpreventable infectious diseases. PMID:26350599

  17. The CD24 surface antigen in neural development and disease.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Daniel T; Menon, Vishal; Bretz, Niko P; Pruszak, Jan

    2017-03-01

    A cell's surface molecular signature enables its reciprocal interactions with the associated microenvironments in development, tissue homeostasis and pathological processes. The CD24 surface antigen (heat-stable antigen, nectadrin; small cell lung cancer antigen cluster-4) represents a prime example of a neural surface molecule that has long been known, but whose diverse molecular functions in intercellular communication we have only begun to unravel. Here, we briefly summarize the molecular fundamentals of CD24 structure and provide a comprehensive review of CD24 expression and functional studies in mammalian neural developmental systems and disease models (rodent, human). Striving for an integrated view of the intracellular signaling processes involved, we discuss the most pertinent routes of CD24-mediated signaling pathways and functional networks in neurobiology (neural migration, neurite extension, neurogenesis) and pathology (tumorigenesis, multiple sclerosis).

  18. THE ANTIGENS AND AUTOANTIGENS OF THE SEMINAL VESICLE

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Frank; Shulman, Sidney

    1971-01-01

    Guinea pig vesicular fluid was characterized both biochemically and immunologically. Biochemical analyses showed this fluid to be homogeneous by ultracentrifugal analyses, revealing a single boundary with a sedimentation coeflicient of 1.5 S. In contrast, electrophoretic separation methods revealed six components, of which three were major components, of approximately equal proportions. They were termed I, II, and III. One of these components (II) was shown to be strongly antigenic in heteroimmunization, whereas components I and III failed to show any antigenicity, even after diverse attempts. This antigen (component II) was found to be highly tissue specific and species specific. Through procedures of isoimmunization, component II was also found to be immunogenic, giving rise (in male animals) to autoantibodies, A high proportion of injected guinea pigs showed positive skin tests and many revealed tissue lesions when the seminal vesicles were examined histologically. It is therefore concluded that experimental autoimmune disease of the seminal vesicle has been induced. PMID:4997583

  19. [Common epitopes of protein antigens in Neisseria and Moraxella].

    PubMed

    Goncharenko, A V; Filatova, T N; Padiukov, L N; Baturo, A P

    2000-01-01

    Cross reactions between N. meningitidis and M. catarrhalis proteins were studied with the use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to M. catarrhalis protein antigens. All antigenic preparations under study were shown to give cross reactions between N. meningitidis serotype porin of 39 kD (strain B125) and M. catarrhalis proteins of 40-41 kD. These M. catarrhalis proteins belonged to main proteins of class F and had the function of porins in the cell. In addition, the epitope of 41-kD antigen, detected by monoclonal antibodies 3E10, is common for both N. meningitidis porin and N. meningitidis iron-regulated proteins of 70 and 50 kD. The epitope of M. catarrhalis protein of 67 kD, detected by monoclonal antibodies 1G6, is common for N. meningitidis porin and N. meningitidis iron-regulated proteins of 50 and 55 kD.

  20. A stochastic microscopic model for the dynamics of antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Guerberoff, Gustavo; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-09-07

    We present a novel model that describes the within-host evolutionary dynamics of parasites undergoing antigenic variation. The approach uses a multi-type branching process with two types of entities defined according to their relationship with the immune system: clans of resistant parasitic cells (i.e. groups of cells sharing the same antigen not yet recognized by the immune system) that may become sensitive, and individual sensitive cells that can acquire a new resistance thus giving rise to the emergence of a new clan. The simplicity of the model allows analytical treatment to determine the subcritical and supercritical regimes in the space of parameters. By incorporating a density-dependent mechanism the model is able to capture additional relevant features observed in experimental data, such as the characteristic parasitemia waves. In summary our approach provides a new general framework to address the dynamics of antigenic variation which can be easily adapted to cope with broader and more complex situations.

  1. Autopresentation of hepatitis B virus envelope antigens by T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Pilli, M; Penna, A; Bertoletti, A; Valli, A; Cavalli, A; Pasetti, G; Fiaccadori, F

    1992-01-01

    Processing and presentation by T cells appear to be limited to antigens that can directly interact with the T-cell surface, thereby overcoming the T-cell inefficiency in antigen capture and internalization. Our study provides evidence that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins can also be efficiently processed and presented by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to other T cells in a human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted fashion. This phenomenon suggests a receptor-mediated interaction between T cells and the HBV envelope and defines a system that can, we hope, be exploited for the identification of the receptor binding site within the HBV envelope and for the characterization of the putative cellular HBV receptor. PMID:1548778

  2. Antigenic breadth: a missing ingredient in HSV-2 subunit vaccines?

    PubMed

    Halford, William P

    2014-06-01

    The successful human papillomavirus and hepatitis B virus subunit vaccines contain single viral proteins that represent 22 and 12%, respectively, of the antigens encoded by these tiny viruses. The herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genome is >20 times larger. Thus, a single protein subunit represents 1% of HSV-2's total antigenic breadth. Antigenic breadth may explain why HSV-2 glycoprotein subunit vaccines have failed in clinical trials, and why live HSV-2 vaccines that express 99% of HSV-2's proteome may be more effective. I review the mounting evidence that live HSV-2 vaccines offer a greater opportunity to stop the spread of genital herpes, and I consider the unfounded 'safety concerns' that have kept live HSV-2 vaccines out of U.S. clinical trials for 25 years.

  3. Circulating parasite antigen in patients with hydrocephalus secondary to neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, H H; Gonzalez, A E; Gilman, R H; Bernal, T; Rodriguez, S; Pretell, E J; Azcurra, O; Parkhouse, R M E; Tsang, V C W; Harrison, L J S

    2002-04-01

    End stages of neurocysticercosis include residual intraparenchymal brain calcifications and hydrocephalus. Although brain calcifications alone have a benign prognosis, hydrocephalus is frequently associated with chronic inflammation and intracranial hypertension, together with a protracted clinical evolution, and may lead to patient deaths. By using a monoclonal-based antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured the levels of circulating parasite antigen in the sera of 56 patients with neurocysticercosis: 27 with calcifications only and 29 with hydrocephalus. The assay gave positive results in 14 of 29 patients with hydrocephalus but was consistently negative in patients with calcifications. Circulating parasite antigen in hydrocephalus secondary to neurocysticercosis indicates the presence of live parasites in these patients and thus a potential benefit from antiparasitic therapy.

  4. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs processing of particulate antigen by macrophages: modification of the antigen reverses the functional defect.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Constance B; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2004-06-11

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a semiconductor used in the electronics industry, causes systemic immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's impact on macrophages to process the particulate antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC), for a T cell response in culture was examined after in vivo exposure of mice. GaAs-exposed splenic macrophages were defective in activating SRBC-primed lymph node T cells that could not be attributed to impaired phagocytosis. Modified forms of SRBC were generated to examine the compromised function of GaAs-exposed macrophages. SRBC were fixed to maintain their particulate nature and subsequently delipidated with detergent. Delipidation of intact SRBC was insufficient to restore normal antigen processing in GaAs-exposed macrophages. However, chemically exposed cells efficiently processed soluble sheep proteins. These findings suggest that the problem may lie in the release of sequestered sheep protein antigens, which then could be effectively cleaved to peptides. Furthermore, opsonization of SRBC with IgG compensated for the macrophage processing defect. The influence of signal transduction and phagocytosis via Fcgamma receptors on improved antigen processing could be dissociated. Immobilized anti-Fcgamma receptor antibody activated macrophages to secrete a chemokine, but did not enhance processing of unmodified SRBC by GaAs-exposed macrophages. Restoration of normal processing of particulate SRBC by chemically exposed macrophages involved phagocytosis through Fcgamma receptors. Hence, initial immune responses may be very sensitive to GaAs exposure, and the chemical's immunosuppression may be averted by opsonized particulate antigens.

  5. Mature IgM-expressing plasma cells sense antigen and develop competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pascal; Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; Barthly, Lucas; Jagot, Ferdinand; This, Sébastien; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Colisson, Renaud; Hobeika, Elias; Fest, Thierry; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Sicard, Antoine; Mondière, Paul; Genestier, Laurent; Nutt, Stephen L.; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogma holds that plasma cells, as opposed to B cells, cannot bind antigen because they have switched from expression of membrane-bound immunoglobulins (Ig) that constitute the B-cell receptor (BCR) to production of the secreted form of immunoglobulins. Here we compare the phenotypical and functional attributes of plasma cells generated by the T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent forms of the hapten NP. We show that the nature of the secreted Ig isotype, rather than the chemical structure of the immunizing antigen, defines two functionally distinct populations of plasma cells. Fully mature IgM-expressing plasma cells resident in the bone marrow retain expression of a functional BCR, whereas their IgG+ counterparts do not. Antigen boost modifies the gene expression profile of IgM+ plasma cells and initiates a cytokine production program, characterized by upregulation of CCL5 and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that IgM-expressing plasma cells can sense antigen and acquire competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge. PMID:27924814

  6. Continual Antigenic Diversification in China Leads to Global Antigenic Complexity of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiaodan; Zhou, Hongbo; Wu, Aiping; Dong, Libo; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Rongbao; Bo, Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Lin, Xian; Jin, Meilin; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus poses a significant potential threat to human society due to its wide spread and rapid evolution. In this study, we present a comprehensive antigenic map for HPAI H5N1 viruses including 218 newly sequenced isolates from diverse regions of mainland China, by computationally separating almost all HPAI H5N1 viruses into 15 major antigenic clusters (ACs) based on their hemagglutinin sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 12 of these 15 ACs originated in China in a divergent pattern. Further analysis of the dissemination of HPAI H5N1 virus in China identified that the virus’s geographic expansion was co-incident with a significant divergence in antigenicity. Moreover, this antigenic diversification leads to global antigenic complexity, as typified by the recent HPAI H5N1 spread, showing extensive co-circulation and local persistence. This analysis has highlighted the challenge in H5N1 prevention and control that requires different planning strategies even inside China. PMID:28262734

  7. Continual Antigenic Diversification in China Leads to Global Antigenic Complexity of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiaodan; Zhou, Hongbo; Wu, Aiping; Dong, Libo; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Rongbao; Bo, Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Lin, Xian; Jin, Meilin; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-03-06

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus poses a significant potential threat to human society due to its wide spread and rapid evolution. In this study, we present a comprehensive antigenic map for HPAI H5N1 viruses including 218 newly sequenced isolates from diverse regions of mainland China, by computationally separating almost all HPAI H5N1 viruses into 15 major antigenic clusters (ACs) based on their hemagglutinin sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 12 of these 15 ACs originated in China in a divergent pattern. Further analysis of the dissemination of HPAI H5N1 virus in China identified that the virus's geographic expansion was co-incident with a significant divergence in antigenicity. Moreover, this antigenic diversification leads to global antigenic complexity, as typified by the recent HPAI H5N1 spread, showing extensive co-circulation and local persistence. This analysis has highlighted the challenge in H5N1 prevention and control that requires different planning strategies even inside China.

  8. Antigenic relatedness of equine herpes virus types 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, D E; Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1978-01-01

    Antiserums prepared in specific pathogen free (SPF) ponies were used in direct and indirect immunofluorescence, immunodiffusion, complement fixation and serum neutralization procedures to study the interrelationships of the three types of equine herpes viruses (EHV-1, EHV-2, and EHV-3). Equine cell cultures infected with each type virus fluoresced when stained with homologous conjugated antiserum. In reciprocal tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced, but EHV-2 did not cross-fluoresce. Non-infected cell cultures did not fluoresce when stained with the 3 conjugates. EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced in reciprocal indirect fluorescent antibody tests, but no cross-fluorescence was shown with EHV-2. Antigens representing each type of equine herpes virus reacted with their homologous antiserum in the immunodiffusion test. In reciprocal tests, a common line(s) of identity formed with EHV-1 and EHV-3; however, the precipitin line(s) was not common with EHV-2. Antigen prepared from noninfected embryonic mule skin (EMS) cell cultures did not react with any of the antiserums. Specific complement-fixing antibodies were present in antiserums when tested against their homologous antigens. In reciprocal complement fixation tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 crossreacted, but no cross-reactivity was shown with EHV-2. Significant levels of neutralizing antibody were in an antiserum when tested against homologous virus, whereas cross-neutralization was not detectable in reciprocal tests. These studies indicate that each type of equine herpes virus contains specific antigenic components, and EHV-1 and EHV-3 share a common antigen(s) that is not shared with EHV-2.

  9. Transfer of antigenic macromolecules from macrophages to lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bona, C.; Anteunis, A.; Robineaux, R.; Astesano, A.

    1972-01-01

    In an in vitro autologous system, studies were carried out on the transfer of either biosynthetically-labelled [14C]Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin or [125I]Maia squinado haemocyanin from macrophages to lymphocytes. When cultured 1 hour in vitro, lymphocytes adhered to autologous macrophages, forming lymphocyte-macrophage islands (LMI). Quantitative data obtained from stained thick sections showed that 1.8 per cent of the lymphocytes had adhered to macrophages with ingested [14C]endotoxin while 0.6 per cent of the lymphocytes adhered to macrophages with ingested [125I]haemocyanin. The presence of antigen macromolecules was observed mainly within lymphocytes adhering to macrophages with ingested antigens, i.e. at the level of LMI. On the other hand, autoradiography carried out on the same thick sections, showed that 0.20 per cent of the lymphocyte population in LMI possess silver grains. High resolution autoradiographic pictures of thin sections, showed a peculiar localization of silver grains in LMI lymphocytes: about 80 per cent of the radioactivity was found within lymphocytic nuclei and the remainder either on the cellular membrane or free in the cytoplasm. The disappearance of radioactivity from the LMI-located macrophage membranes (where lymphocytes contain silver grains) as well as the regular inhibition of antigen transfer occurring after pronase treatment of the macrophage which contained ingested antigen, strongly suggest that antigen bound to macrophage membrane was transferred to lymphocytes. As pretreatment of lymphocytes with anti-Ig serum resulted in regular inhibition of antigen transfer, it appears that the Ig receptors of lymphocyte membranes play an important role in the transfer mechanism. Combined technique, i.e. autoradiography and the peroxidase method for revealing Ig bound to lymphocyte membranes, showed that silver grains occurred only within lymphocytes displaying peroxidase-positive membrane. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID

  10. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail.

  11. Novel chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuren; Zhang, Youhui

    2008-04-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in immune induction. Dendritic cells perform antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T cells only when they are matured and in the functional state. In the development of a vaccine, it is of utmost importance to consider how to make dendritic cells' functions immunologically adequate. In this paper, we report the development of a series of antitumor DNA vaccines with similar structural framework, in which a gene encoding tumor-associated antigenic peptide is ligated upstream to the gene coding secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine and downstream to the gene encoding the Fc portion of IgG (named chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine [CADV]). CCR7(+) T, B, natural killer and dendritic cells can be attracted by secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, and Fc facilitates antigen uptake via Fc receptors expressed on dendritic cells. In a series of experiments in mice vaccinated by CADV with such tumor-associated antigenic specificities as HPV-16 E7, PSA-PSM-PAP, HER-2/neu, p53 and hTERT, CADV can attract immune cells to the vaccine inoculation site, remarkably inhibit tumor growth and extend survival time in tumor-bearing mice. The antitumor effect is more efficacious than that in mice treated with SLC-Ag or Ag-Fc hybrid gene. Tumor-associated antigenic-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be induced by in vitro experiment in a human system. When combined with measures blocking the negative immune feedback circuits, the therapeutic effect of the vaccine can be further enhanced. Large-scale production of CADV is possible for clinical application.

  12. A theoretical compartment model for antigen kinetics in the skin.

    PubMed

    Römgens, Anne M; Bader, Dan L; Bouwstra, Joke A; Oomens, Cees W J

    2016-03-10

    The skin is a promising location for vaccination with its abundant population of antigen capturing and presenting cells. The development of new techniques, such as the use of microneedles, can facilitate the delivery of vaccines into the skin. In recent years, many different types of microneedle arrays have been designed. However, their geometry and arrangement within an array may be optimized to trigger sufficient antigen presenting cells. A computational model can support the rational design of microneedle arrays. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to describe the distribution and kinetics of a delivered antigen within the skin using a theoretical compartment model, which included binding of antigens to receptors and their uptake by cells, and to determine which parameters should be measured to validate the model for a specific application. Multiple simulations were performed using a high and low antigen delivery dose and a range of values for the rate constants. The results indicated that the cells were highly saturated when a high dose was applied, while for a low dose saturation was only reached in 5% of the simulations. This was caused by the difference in the ratio between the administered dose and the available binding sites and suggests the dose should be adapted to the number of cells and receptors for a specific compound. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters confirmed that the initial dose and receptor concentrations were indeed the two parameters that had the largest influence on the variance in antigen concentrations within the cells and circulation at equilibrium. Hence, these parameters are important to be measured in vivo. The presented pharmacokinetics model can be used in future computational models to predict the influence of microneedle array geometry to optimize their design.

  13. Brucella spp. lumazine synthase: a novel antigen delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Toledo, Andrea; Cruz, Carmen; Rosas, Gabriela; Meneses, Gabriela; Laplagne, Diego; Ainciart, Natalia; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Fragoso, Gladis; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2005-04-15

    Lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) was evaluated as a protein carrier to improve antigen delivery of KETc1, one of the peptides of the anti-cysticercosis vaccine. KETc1 becomes antigenic, preserved its immunogenicity and its protective capacity when expressed as a recombinant chimeric protein using Brucella spp. lumazine synthase. KETc1 and BLS-KETc1 were not MHC H-2(d), H-2(k) nor H-2(b) haplotype-restricted albeit KETc1 is preferentially presented in the H-2(b) haplotype. These findings support that BLS is a potent new delivery system for the improvement of subunit vaccines.

  14. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-02

    transcription and translation of the Bacillus megaterium protein C gene. J. Bacteriol. 158:e09-813. 9. Friedlander, A, M. 1986. Macrophages are sensitive to...of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus anthracis 6. pEaltranalO opl. AMPOA’T B*u~iA S. L. Welkos, J. R. Lowe, F. Eden-McCutchan, M. Vodkin, S. M... Bacillus anthracls and the 5’ and 3’ flanking sequences were determined. Protective antigen ie one of three proteins comprising anthrax toxin. The open

  15. Serodiagnosis of American trypanosomosis by using nonpathogenic trypanosomatid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Monteón, V M; Guzmán-Rojas, L; Negrete-García, C; Rosales-Encina, J L; Lopez, P A

    1997-01-01

    Crithidia luciliae, a nonpathogenic trypanosomatid, could provide a good alternative source of antigen for serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed 100% sensitivity and 83% specificity when 91 human serum samples from Chagas' disease patients and 127 human serum samples from people suffering from toxoplasmosis (21 samples), leishmaniasis (32 samples), systemic rheumatic diseases (33 samples), and heart diseases (41 samples) were tested simultaneously with Trypanosoma cruzi and C. luciliae crude extracts. By Western blotting, an immunodominant band (30 kDa) was recognized by chagasic sera on the C. luciliae crude extract; specificity reached 97% with respect to this protein band. The carbohydrate moieties were not antigenic. PMID:9399545

  16. Multimolecular associations of the T-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Beyers, A D; Spruyt, L L; Williams, A F

    1992-09-01

    T cells are activated when the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR) interacts with an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule on the surface of another cell. It is often assumed that T-cell activation is induced by the crosslinking of TCRs. In this article, Albertus Beyers, Louise Spruyt and Alan Williams argue that this mechanism is not generally applicable. They hypothesize that the key event in T-cell activation is the formation of multimolecular complexes consisting of the TCR and several other polypeptides, including CD4 or CD8, CD2, CD5 and the associated tyrosine kinases p59(fyn) and p56(lck).

  17. Cloning of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    of the complicated precedents of duplicate toxin genes in chro- muumm mosomall and plasmid DNA of B. thuringiensis (Schnepf and Whitely, 1981; Klier...OiL V4. 34. S-W7. SW 1v 99 CwI 0193 by MT 0 009-7483/06O-002.00/0 mU"- - 1*;)-0Cloning of the Protective Antigen Gene OCT 19 MI L Sof Bacillus ...Sumnler uncertain, it is probably caused by other Bacillus antigens, 4 t which may include LF and EF. PA produced from recom- A The - "w t of a

  18. Mechanism of O-antigen distribution in lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, R C; Hunt, F

    1990-01-01

    O-antigen units are nonuniformly distributed among lipid A-core molecules in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria, as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate; the actual distribution patterns are complex, multimodal, and strain specific. Although the basic biochemical steps involved in synthesis and polymerization of O-antigen monomers and their subsequent attachment to lipid A-core are known, the mechanism by which specific multimodal distribution patterns are attained in mature LPS has not been previously considered theoretically or experimentally. We have developed probability equations which completely describe O-antigen distribution among lipid A-core molecules in terms of the probability of finding a nascent polymer (O antigen linked to carrier lipid) of length k (Tk) and the probability that a nascent polymer of length k will be extended to k + 1 by polymerase (pk) or transferred to lipid A-core by ligase (qk). These equations were used to show that multimodal distribution patterns in mature LPS cannot be produced if all pk are equal to p and all qk are equal to q, conditions which indicate a lack of selectivity of polymerase and ligase, respectively, for nascent O-antigen chain lengths. A completely stochastic model (pk = p, qk = q) of O-antigen polymerization and transfer to lipid A-core was also inconsistent with observed effects of mutations which resulted in partial inhibition of O-antigen monomer synthesis, lipid A-core synthesis, or ligase activity. The simplest explanation compatible with experimental observations is that polymerase or ligase, or perhaps both, have specificity for certain O-antigen chain lengths during biosynthesis of LPS. Our mathematical model indicates selectively probably was associated with the polymerase reaction. Although one may argue for a multimodal distribution pattern based on a kinetic mechanism i.e., varying reaction parameters in space or in time during cell growth, such

  19. Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis antigen in women by enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Yule, A; Gellan, M C; Oriel, J D; Ackers, J P

    1987-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for the detection of Trichomonas vaginalis antigen in vaginal swabs. Four hundred and eighty two women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic were tested; 44 (9.1%) were positive by culture, 32 (6.6%) were positive by wet film examination, and 54 (11.2%) were considered to be positive for trichomonal antigen by EIA. Taking culture as the reference method, the EIA had a sensitivity of 93.2% and a specificity of 97.5%. The predictive value of a positive test was 82% and that of a negative test was 99.3%. PMID:3495554

  20. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology. PMID:24212823

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  2. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  3. Minor histocompatibility antigens--targets of graft versus leukemia responses.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stanley R; Murata, M; Bryant, S; Warren, E H

    2002-08-01

    Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells by donor T cells recognizing recipient minor H antigens contributes to the curative potential of allogeneic HCT. The importance of the allogeneic response to a successful outcome is clearly illustrated by the results of stem cell transplant for malignancy after nonmyeloablative conditioning. Remarkably little is understood about the molecular nature of minor H antigens and this has impeded efforts to determine the role of specific disparities in graft versus tumor reactions or to manipulate T cell responses to augment antitumor activity without exacerbating GVHD. The isolation of minor H antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell clones from recipients of allogeneic HCT has provided the reagents to characterize their expression on leukemic progenitors and to identify the genes encoding these antigens. Using cDNA expression cloning, genetic polymorphisms in the human IFI-75, Uty, KIAA0020, and UGT2B17 genes have been identified to encode new minor H antigens presented by HLA A3, B8, A2, and A29 respectively. Two of these genes are preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells including leukemic progenitors suggesting it may be possible to augment T cell responses to promote a selective graft versus leukemia effect. A third gene, UGT2B17 is highly expressed in liver and GI tract and may be a target for GVHD in these organs. The studies to identify the molecular nature of minor H antigens have provided insights into the complexities of the graft versus host response associated with allogeneic HCT, but the challenge for the future will be to develop strategies that can selectively induce durable graft versus tumor effects without GVHD. A critical issue in developing specific immunotherapy to augment GVL responses is to determine which minor H antigens are expressed on leukemic stem cells. Studies using transplantation of human AML into SCID mice have identified a putative leukemic stem cell which is contained in the CD34+ CD38

  4. Changes in repeat number, sequence, and reading frame in S-antigen genes of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Saint, R B; Coppel, R L; Cowman, A F; Brown, G V; Shi, P T; Barzaga, N; Kemp, D J; Anders, R F

    1987-01-01

    The S antigens from different isolates of Plasmodium falciparum exhibit extensive size, charge, and serological diversity. We show here that the S-antigen genes behave as multiple alleles of a single locus. The size heterogeneity results from different numbers, lengths, and/or sequences of tandem repeat units encoded within the S-antigen genes. Two genes studied here encode antigenically different S antigens but nevertheless have closely related tandem repeat sequences. We show that antigenic differences can arise because repeats are translated in different reading frames. Images PMID:3313007

  5. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  6. Identification of a Highly Antigenic Linear B Cell Epitope within Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Morais, Cristiane Guimarães; Mourão, Luíza Carvalho; de Ávila, Ricardo Andrez Machado; Soares, Irene Silva; Fontes, Cor Jesus; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Braga, Érika Martins

    2011-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is considered to be a major candidate antigen for a malaria vaccine. Previous immunoepidemiological studies of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) have shown a higher prevalence of specific antibodies to domain II (DII) of AMA-1. In the present study, we confirmed that specific antibody responses from naturally infected individuals were highly reactive to both full-length AMA-1 and DII. Also, we demonstrated a strong association between AMA-1 and DII IgG and IgG subclass responses. We analyzed the primary sequence of PvAMA-1 for B cell linear epitopes co-occurring with intrinsically unstructured/disordered regions (IURs). The B cell epitope comprising the amino acid sequence 290–307 of PvAMA-1 (SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK), with the highest prediction scores, was identified in domain II and further selected for chemical synthesis and immunological testing. The antigenicity of the synthetic peptide was identified by serological analysis using sera from P. vivax-infected individuals who were knowingly reactive to the PvAMA-1 ectodomain only, domain II only, or reactive to both antigens. Although the synthetic peptide was recognized by all serum samples specific to domain II, serum with reactivity only to the full-length protein presented 58.3% positivity. Moreover, IgG reactivity against PvAMA-1 and domain II after depletion of specific synthetic peptide antibodies was reduced by 18% and 33% (P = 0.0001 for both), respectively. These results suggest that the linear epitope SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK is highly antigenic during natural human infections and is an important antigenic region of the domain II of PvAMA-1, suggesting its possible future use in pre-clinical studies. PMID:21713006

  7. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    PubMed

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis.

  8. Detection of Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica common and uncommon antigens, using rabbit hyper immune serum raised against their excretory-secretory and somatic antigens.

    PubMed

    Abdolahi Khabisi, S; Sarkari, B

    2016-12-01

    Fasciolosis is an important neglected helminth disease caused by two liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The two species of Fasciola are usually different in their morphological and molecular features. They have also common and uncommon antigens in both their somatic and excretory secretory metabolites. In this study, we compared somatic and excretory-secretory (ES) antigens of F. hepatica and F. gigantica, by using rabbit hyper immune serum raised against these antigens. Adult worms were collected from bile ducts of infected animals and species of the fluke was confirmed by RFLP-PCR. ES and somatic antigens of both species were prepared. Rabbits were subcutaneously immunized with either ES or somatic antigens to produce antibodies against these antigens. SDS-PAGE pattern of F. hepatica and F. gigantica somatic antigens was similar and both of them revealed 30 protein bands, ranging from 18 to 180 kDa. In contrast, SDS-PAGE pattern of ES antigen of the two species was different. While protein bands with molecular weight of 18, 27, 29, 48, and 62 kDa were common in both species, bands of 19, 45, 55 and 58 kDa were only noticed in F. hepatica ES antigen. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies, raised against F. hepatica and F. gigantica ES antigen, reacted with main five protein bands, 25, 27, 29, 62 and 67 kDa and polyclonal antibodies raised against somatic antigens of both species reacted with three protein bands, 25, 27 and 72 kDa. Thus, the 25, 27 and 29 kDa protein bands may serve as immunodominant antigens, which might be considered for serodiagnosis of fasciolosis. Moreover, bands of 62 and 67 kDa in ES antigen and 72 kDa in somatic antigens of both species were immunodominant and might be suitable candidate for development of serological assays for diagnosis of fasciolosis.

  9. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-12-06

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered-both at the same time and in the same location-in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties.

  10. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A.; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S.; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered—both at the same time and in the same location—in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties. PMID:27929422

  11. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  12. Demonstration of heterogeneity among the antigenic proteins of Mobiluncus species.

    PubMed Central

    Schwebke, J R; Hillier, S L; Fohn, M J; Lukehart, S A

    1990-01-01

    The protein and antigenic profiles of the American Type Culture Collection type strains of Mobiluncus species and those of 114 clinical isolates were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting with homologous polyvalent antisera. The majority of isolates (82%) possessed characteristic protein profiles and could be identified to the species level by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The major protein bands were also antigenic, and some antigenic cross-reactivity was noted between the two Mobiluncus species. All of the isolates were examined for reactivity with a panel of 12 monoclonal antibodies previously prepared against the type strains. While 56 of 60 clinical isolates of Mobiluncus curtisii (93%) reacted with one or more of the monoclonal antibodies, only 23 of 54 clinical isolates which were identified as Mobiluncus mulieris by biochemical methods (48%) reacted with one or more of the monoclonal antibodies. One of the 4 M. curtisii isolates (25%) and 11 of the 31 M. mulieris isolates (35%) which did not react with the monoclonal antibodies also had atypical protein profiles. These results demonstrate a high degree of heterogeneity in the protein and antigenic profiles of Mobiluncus isolates and suggest that further taxonomic division may be appropriate. Images PMID:1691207

  13. Mimotope vaccine efficacy gets a "boost" from native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-04-01

    Tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-targeting mimotope peptides exert more prominent immunostimulatory functions than unmodified TAAs, with the caveat that some T-cell clones exhibit a relatively low affinity for TAAs. Combining mimotope-based vaccines with native TAAs in a prime-boost setting significantly improves antitumor immunity.

  14. Lewis Y Antigen as a Target for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    that peptide mimotopes of adenocarcinomac associated carbohydrate forms that include Lewis Y may function4as a breast cancer vaccine , 3.) established the...the feasibility of peptide mimotopes and design requirements for their use as potential vaccine surrogates for carbohydrate antigens in future vaccine ...understanding mechanisms associated with the utility of peptide mimotopes for vaccine efficacy, priming with mimicking peptides might establish beneficial

  15. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  1. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  2. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  3. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  4. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  5. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  6. Antigenic cross-reactivity of sperm and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1980-11-01

    Since seminal components can mediate immunosuppression in vitro, it is possible that some antigen(s) may be common to both the reproductive and immunologic systems. In a group of 70 couples with unexplained infertility, 50 "autoimmune" males and 40 "isoimmune" females had lower than normal percentages of total T cells (mean values +/- standard error of the mean 63 +/- 2% and 60 +/- 2% for immune males and females, respectively, versus 77 +/- 2% and 78 +/- 5% for 50 normal males and females, respectively; P < 0.001). Sheep red blood cell (SRBC) rosetting of lymphocytes was significantly reduced when SRBC were preincubated with sperm extracts (61 +/- 4% versus 9 +/- 2%; P < 0.001) but not when SRBC were incubated with normal serum or when lymphocytes were preincubated with sperm extracts. Antisperm antibody titers in the patients' sera (48 +/- 13) were correlated with their antithymocyte antibody titers (18 +/- 3) (P < 0.01). Moreover, antithymocyte antiserum (titer 1024) cross-reacted with sperm extract (titer 128), and vice versa. This cross-reactivity was significantly reduced by absorption of the sera with sperm cells (P < 0.001), thymocytes (P < 0.001), or white blood cells (P < 0.005). Absorption of autoimmune sperm extracts and seminal plasmas with thymocytes or sperm cells reduced the Coombs' titers, especially immunglobulin G (P < 0.01) and immunoglobulin A (P < 0.025). Similar results were obtained in passive hemagglutiation, immunofluorescence, and cytotoxicity assays. We conclude that sperm and T cells share a common antigen(s).

  7. Profiling human serum antibodies with a carbohydrate antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; McShane, Lisa M.; Dodd, Lori; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen arrays (glycan arrays) have been recently developed for the high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate macromolecule interactions. When profiling serum, information about experimental variability, inter-individual biological variability, and intra-individual temporal variability is critical. In this report, we describe the characterization of a carbohydrate antigen array and assay for profiling human serum. Through optimization of assay conditions and development of a normalization strategy, we obtain highly reproducible results with a within-experiment coefficient of variation (CV) of 10.8% and an overall CV (across multiple batches of slides and days) of 28.5%. We also report antibody profiles for 48 human subjects and evaluate for the first time the effects of age, race, sex, geographic location, and blood type on antibody profiles for a large set of carbohydrate antigens. We found significant dependence on age and blood type of antibody levels for a variety of carbohydrates. Finally, we conducted a longitudinal study with a separate group of 7 serum donors to evaluate the variation in anti-carbohydrate antibody levels within an individual over a period ranging from 3 to 13 weeks and found that, for nearly all antigens on our array, antibody levels are generally stable over this period. The results presented here provide the most comprehensive evaluation of experimental and biological variation reported to date for a glycan array and have significant implications for studies involving human serum profiling. PMID:19624168

  8. Experimental Immunization Based on Plasmodium Antigens Isolated by Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Ali N.; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines blocking malaria parasites in the blood-stage diminish mortality and morbidity caused by the disease. Here, we isolated antigens from total parasite proteins by antibody affinity chromatography to test an immunization against lethal malaria infection in a murine model. We used the sera of malaria self-resistant ICR mice to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL for purification of their IgGs which were subsequently employed to isolate blood-stage parasite antigens that were inoculated to immunize BALB/c mice. The presence of specific antibodies in vaccinated mice serum was studied by immunoblot analysis at different days after vaccination and showed an intensive immune response to a wide range of antigens with molecular weight ranging between 22 and 250 kDa. The humoral response allowed delay of the infection after the inoculation to high lethal doses of P. yoelii yoelii 17XL resulting in a partial protection against malaria disease, although final survival was managed in a low proportion of challenged mice. This approach shows the potential to prevent malaria disease with a set of antigens isolated from blood-stage parasites. PMID:26539558

  9. Rab17 mediates differential antigen sorting following efferocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Charles; Kim, Yohan; Argintaru, Dean; Heit, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages engulf and destroy pathogens (phagocytosis) and apoptotic cells (efferocytosis), and can subsequently initiate adaptive immune responses by presenting antigens derived from engulfed materials. Both phagocytosis and efferocytosis share a common degradative pathway in which the target is engulfed into a membrane-bound vesicle, respectively, termed the phagosome and efferosome, where they are degraded by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes. Despite this shared maturation pathway, macrophages are immunogenic following phagocytosis but not efferocytosis, indicating that differential processing or trafficking of antigens must occur. Mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence microscopy of efferosomes and phagosomes in macrophages demonstrated that efferosomes lacked the proteins required for antigen presentation and instead recruited the recycling regulator Rab17. As a result, degraded materials from efferosomes bypassed the MHC class II loading compartment via the recycling endosome – a process not observed in phagosomes. Combined, these results indicate that macrophages prevent presentation of apoptotic cell-derived antigens by preferentially trafficking efferocytosed, but not phagocytosed, materials away from the MHC class II loading compartment via the recycling endosome pathway. PMID:28005073

  10. Hepatitis B viral antigenic structure: signature analysis by monoclonal radioimmunoassays.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Wong, M A; Shorey, J; Brown, R D; Marciniak, R A; Isselbacher, K J

    1984-01-01

    An approach has been developed for the analysis of hepatitis B viral (HBV) antigenic structure that creates numerical "signatures" of HBV strains. This technique employs high-affinity IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBsAg) directed toward distinct and separate determinants on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Such antibodies have been used to develop sensitive and specific radioimmuno-assays for measurement of HBsAg-associated determinants in serum. In performing "signature" analysis separate binding curves for each monoclonal anti-HBsAg are generated by measuring immunoreactivity in serial dilutions of HBsAg-positive serum. Since the HBsAg concentration in serum is unknown, the binding profiles of groups of samples from the same "classic" HBV subtype are aligned by an iterative maximum likelihood procedure to give the numerical signature of that HBV subtype. By using this approach, HBsAg shows far more antigenic heterogeneity than previously recognized by polyvalent anti-HBsAg antibodies. Indeed, there are subgroups within the classic HBsAg subtypes. In addition, the a domain (common to all known subtypes or strains of HBV) has been shown to be multideterminant. Thus, these studies have demonstrated heretofore unrecognized differences in HBV subtypes. This approach also has broader significance for the study of subtle or major antigenic changes among other viral agents since it is not necessary to know the concentration of virus or viral protein in complex protein mixtures. PMID:6585796

  11. [Molecular nature of the Brucella polysaccharide antigen (poly-B)].

    PubMed

    L'vov, V L; Pluzhnikova, G N; Lapina, E B; Shashkov, A S; Askerova, S A

    1987-08-01

    Cyclic (1----2)-beta-D-glucan was isolated from killed cells of pathogenic Brucella melitensis 16M. Its structure was deduced mainly from the acid hydrolysis, methylation analysis and 13C-NMR spectroscopy data. The cycloglucan and demicellated lipopolysaccharide of B. melitensis 16M form a stable complex identical, by immunodiffusion test, to the earlier described polysaccharide B antigen.

  12. Wheeling and Dealing With Antigen Presentation in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In tuberculosis, antigens are transferred from infected to uninfected dendritic cells. Does this favor T lymphocyte response and anti-mycobacterial host defense? In a recent report published in Cell Host & Microbe, Ernst and colleagues show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have hijacked this mechanism for its own benefit.

  13. Multiple Antigen Peptide Vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    M. Vanegas, L. M. Salazar , and M. E. Patarroyo. 2000. Serine repeat antigen peptides which bind specifically to red blood cells. l’arasitol. Int...J. Immunol. 154:6022-򓭦. 58. Urquiza, M., 1 .. E. Rodriguez, J. E. Suarez , 1<’. Guzman, M. Ocampo, H. Curtidor, C. Segura, E. Trujillo, and M. E

  14. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  15. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  16. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  17. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  18. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  19. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  20. Serotype sensitivity of a lateral flow immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed

    Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Kozel, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    To meet the needs of a global community, an immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) must have high sensitivity for CrAg of all major serotypes. A new immunoassay for CrAg in lateral flow format was evaluated and found to have a high sensitivity for detection of serotypes A, B, C, and D.

  1. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  2. The antigenic repertoire of premalignant and high-risk lesions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Juan Pablo; Stanton, Sasha E; Disis, Mary L

    2015-04-01

    Prophylactic vaccines have been a major advance in preventing the development of infections after exposure to pathogens. When contemplating an effective approach to cancer prevention, vaccines offer unique advantages over other more standard approaches: First, once appropriately stimulated, antigen-specific T cells will travel to all sites of disease and eradicate cells bearing the proteins to which the T cells have been primed by vaccination. Second, successful immunization will further result in the development of immunologic memory, providing lifelong immunologic surveillance. There is evidence of an adaptive tumor immune infiltrate even at the earliest stages of breast and colon cancer development. Furthermore, there is measurable immunity to lesion-associated antigens present in patients who will eventually develop malignancy even before cancer is clinically evident. Recent studies are beginning to unmask the preinvasive antigenic repertoire for these two malignancies. Preliminary experiments in transgenic mouse models of mammary and intestinal tumors suggest that immunization against antigens expressed in preinvasive and high-risk lesions may be effective in preventing the development of invasive malignancy.

  3. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens.

    PubMed

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involving members of the TET (translocated in liposarcoma, Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1, TATA box binding protein-associated factor 15) family of RNA binding proteins and members of the E-26 (ETS) family of transcription factors. The resulting onco-fusion proteins are highly specific for EFT and downstream targets of TET-ETS represent candidate tumor specific antigens. In order to identify new EFT-associated CTA, we analyzed microarray-data sets from EFT and normal tissues from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The impact of TET-ETS on expression of CTA was analyzed using GEO data sets from transgenic mesenchymal stem cells. One CTA with high specificity for EFT is lipase I (LIPI, membrane-associated phospholipase A1-β). CTL specific for LIPI-derived peptides LDYTDAKFV and NLLKHGASL were able to lyse HLA-A2 positive EFT cells in vitro which confirms the possible role of LIPI and other CTA for EFT-immunotherapy.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens Associated with Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    syndrome (ATR-X syndrome) which effective antitumoral immunity is currently an area of includes a- thalassemia , urogenital abnormalities, and a active...major histocompatibility complex class I-re- linked mental retardation with a- thalassemia (ATR-X stricted antigen of a murine colon tumor derives from

  5. Identification of human cancers deficient in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular antigens must be processed before presentation to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Using a recombinant vaccinia virus (Vac) to transiently express the Kd molecule, we studied the antigen processing efficiency of 26 different human tumor lines. Three cell lines, all human small cell lung carcinoma, consistently failed to process endogenously synthesized proteins for presentation to Kd-restricted, Vac-specific T cells. Pulse- chase experiments showed that MHC class I molecules were not transported by these cell lines from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This finding suggested that peptides were not available for binding to nascent MHC molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. Northern blot analysis of these cells revealed low to nondetectable levels of mRNAs for MHC-encoded proteasome components LMP-7 and LMP-2, as well as the putative peptide transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2. Treatment of cells with interferon gamma enhanced expression of these mRNAs and reversed the observed functional and biochemical deficits. Our findings suggest that downregulation of antigen processing may be one of the strategies used by tumors to escape immune surveillance. Potential therapeutic applications of these findings include enhancing antigen processing at the level of the transcription of MHC-encoded proteasome and transporter genes. PMID:8426105

  6. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  7. Antigen detection assay for identification of Penicillium marneffei infection.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaroj, Sansanee C; Chawengkirttikul, Runglawan; Sirisinha, Stitaya; Watkins, Pramuan; Srinoulprasert, Yuttana

    2003-01-01

    Two recently produced monoclonal antibodies were used to develop an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei. The method was evaluated with 53 patients with culture-confirmed penicilliosis and 240 controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the ELISA were 92.45, 97.5, and 96.59%, respectively.

  8. [HL-A antigens in dust allergy in children].

    PubMed

    Seignalet, J; Levallois, C; Lapinski, H; Jean, R

    1976-12-01

    The distribution of 29 HLA antigens has been compared in 60 unrelated children presenting a dust allergy and in 300 healthy controls. We observed an increased frequency for HLA-Aw19 and HLA-B5 in patients. Yet, the differences are not very significant and there is probably no association between one HLA gene and the dust allergy.

  9. Molecular Basis for Antigenic Diversity of Genus Betanodavirus

    PubMed Central

    Panzarin, Valentina; Toffan, Anna; Abbadi, Miriam; Buratin, Alessandra; Mancin, Marzia; Braaen, Stine; Olsen, Christel Moræus; Bargelloni, Luca; Rimstad, Espen; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a devastating disease for the Mediterranean mariculture. Four different betanodavirus species are recognized, Striped jack-, Redspotted grouper-, Tiger puffer-, and Barfin flounder nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV, RGNNV, TPNNV and BFNNV), but there is little knowledge on their antigenic properties. In order to describe the serological relationships among different betanodavirus genotypes, serum neutralization assays were performed using rabbit polyclonal antisera against eight fish nodaviruses that cover a wide species-, temporal-, spatial- and genetic range. The results indicate that the SJNNV and RGNNV are antigenically distinct, constituting serotypes A and C, respectively. The TPNNV and BFNNV, the latter representing cold-water betanodaviruses, are antigenically related and cluster within serotype B. The reassortant viruses RGNNV/SJNNV and SJNNV/RGNNV group within serotypes A and C, respectively, indicating that the coat protein encoded by RNA2 acts as major immunoreactivity determinant. Immunostaining of in vitro expressed wild type and chimeric capsid proteins between the RGNNV and the SJNNV species indicated that the C-terminal part of the capsid protein retains the immunoreactive portion. The amino acid (aa) residues determining RGNNV and SJNNV antigenic diversity were mapped to aa residues 217–256 and aa 257–341, respectively. Neutralization of reverse genetics derived chimeric viruses indicated that these areas determine the neutralizing epitopes. The data obtained are crucial for the development of targeted serological tests for the diagnosis of VNN, and informative for development of cross-protective vaccines against various betanodavirus genotypes. PMID:27438093

  10. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  11. Sharing the burden: antigen transport and firebreaks in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Andreas; Yates, Andrew; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Antia, Rustom

    2008-01-01

    Communication between cells is crucial for immune responses. An important means of communication during viral infections is the presentation of viral antigen on the surface of an infected cell. Recently, it has been shown that antigen can be shared between infected and uninfected cells through gap junctions, connexin-based channels, that allow the transport of small molecules. The uninfected cell receiving antigen can present it on its surface. Cells presenting viral antigen are detected and killed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The killing of uninfected cells can lead to increased immunopathology. However, the immune response might also profit from killing those uninfected bystander cells. One benefit might be the removal of future ‘virus factories’. Another benefit might be through the creation of ‘firebreaks’, areas void of target cells, which increase the diffusion time of free virions, making their clearance more likely. Here, we use theoretical models and simulations to explore how the mechanism of gap junction-mediated antigen transport (GMAT) affects the dynamics of the virus and immune response. We show that under the assumption of a well-mixed system, GMAT leads to increased immunopathology, which always outweighs the benefit of reduced virus production due to the removal of future virus factories. By contrast, a spatially explicit model leads to quite different results. Here we find that the firebreak mechanism reduces both viral load and immunopathology. Our study thus shows the potential benefits of GMAT and illustrates how spatial effects may be crucial for the quantitative understanding of infection dynamics and immune responses. PMID:18708323

  12. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  13. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  14. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and if suppression is associated with specific targeting of T- or B-cells, three separate experiments were conducted: (1) female PPARa constitutive knockout (PPARa KO; B6.129S4-Ppar(tm1Gonz)N12) and wild-type controls (WT; C57BL/6-Tac) exposed to 0, 7.5, or 30 mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized on Day 11 with a T-cell-dependent antigen and sera then collected for measures of antigen-specific lgM titers (TDAR) 5 days later; (2) female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 0.94, 1.88, 3.75, or 7.5mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized with a T-cell-independent antigen on Day 11 and sera were then collected foranalyses of antigen-specific lgM titers (TIAR) 7 days later; and (3) splenic lymphocyte phenotypes were assessed in unimmunized female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 3.75, or 7.5 mg PFOA/kg for 10 days to investigate effects of PFOA in the absence of specific immunization. Separate groups of mice were immunized with a T-cell-dependent antigen after 11 days of exposure and splenic lymphocyte sub-populations were assessed after 13 or 15 days of exposure to assess numbers of stimulated cells. The results indicated that exposure to ≥1.88mg PFOA/kg suppressed the TIAR; exposure to 30 mg PFOA/k

  15. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  16. Existence of a squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin complex causes a deviation between squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations determined using two different immunoassays: first report of squamous cell carcinoma antigen coupling with immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eriko; Kurano, Makoto; Tobita, Akiko; Shimosaka, Hironori; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma antigen is used as a tumour marker and is routinely measured in clinical laboratories. We validated two different immunoassays and found three cases in which the squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations deviated greatly between the two immunoassays. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for these deviations. Methods The squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations were determined using the ARCHITECT SCC (CLIA method) and the ST AIA-PACK SCC (FEIA method). We performed polyethylene glycol precipitation and size exclusion chromatography to assess the molecular weight and spike recovery and absorption tests to examine the presence of an autoantibody. Results Both methods exhibited good performances for the measurement of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, although a correlation test showed large differences in the squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations measured using the two methods in three cases. The results of polyethylene glycol treatment and size exclusion chromatography indicated the existence of a large molecular weight squamous cell carcinoma antigen in these three cases. The spike recovery tests suggested the possible presence of an autoantibody against squamous cell carcinoma antigen. Moreover, the absorption test revealed that large squamous cell carcinoma antigen complexes were formed by the association of squamous cell carcinoma antigen with IgG in two cases and with both IgG and IgA in one case. Conclusions This study describes the existence of large molecular weight squamous cell carcinoma antigen that has complexed with immunoglobulin in the serum samples. The reason for the deviations between the two immunoassays might be due to differences of their reactivities against the squamous cell carcinoma antigen immune complexes with their autoantibody. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the coupling of squamous cell carcinoma antigen with IgA.

  17. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of multiple antigen peptides (MAP) containing P. vivax CS epitopes in Aotus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Herrera, S; De Plata, C; González, M; Perlaza, B L; Bettens, F; Corradin, G; Arévalo-Herrera, M

    1997-04-01

    Using linear synthetic peptides corresponding to the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the common type, we have identified several T and B-cell epitopes recognized by human individuals. Three T-cell epitopes studied (p6) from the amino, (p11) from the central and (p25) from the carboxyl regions, were widely recognized by lymphocytes of immune donors. A series of six peptides, in addition to p11, representing the central repeat domain of the CS(p11-p17) protein were used in ELISA assays to map the B-cell epitopes of this region. P11 was the peptide most frequently recognized by sera containing antibodies to the homologous CS protein as determined by IFAT. The sequences corresponding to peptides p6, p11 and P25 as well as that representing a universal T-cell epitope derived from the tetanus toxin were used to assemble eight different Multiple Antigen Peptides (MAP). The immunogenicity of these MAP was analysed in Aotus monkeys. Groups of two animals were immunized with each MAP and both antibody response, T-lymphocyte proliferation and in vitro gamma-IFN production were evaluated. Two MAPs containing the same B-cell epitope and either a promiscuous CS-protein derived T-cell epitope (p25) or the tetanus toxin epitope (p-tt30) proved to be the most immunogenic and induced high levels of anti-peptide antibodies that recognized the native protein. Except for animals immunized with MAP VII, there was no correlation between antibody levels, lymphocyte proliferation or gamma-IFN production in vitro. The broad recognition of these epitopes by individuals which had been exposed to malaria, the capacity of these MAPs to induce antibodies, recognize the cognate protein, and in vitro gamma-IFN production encourages further analyses of the potential of these proteins as malaria vaccine candidates for human use.

  18. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P < 0.001), -C*15:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*16:01 (P = 0.027) in the patient group, compared to the controls, while the frequency of HLA-C*06:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*18:01 (P = 0.008) in the patients with pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  19. Localization of Enterobacterial Common Antigen: Immunogenic and Nonimmunogenic Enterobacterial Common Antigen-Containing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rinno, J.; Golecki, J. R.; Mayer, H.

    1980-01-01

    In rabbits immunized with intact bacteria, the immune response to the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) predominantly consists of the production of immunoglobulin M antibodies. This is not dependent on whether the animals are immunized for a short (2 weeks) or a long (3 months) period of time. The highest ECA-specific immunoglobulin G titers were observed after a short immunization with living bacteria. ECA-specific antisera were obtained by absorption with appropriate ECA-negative mutants. The absorbed antisera were then separated on Sephadex G-200. The resulting immunoglobulin G fractions were conjugated to ferritin by glutardialdehyde and used to visualize the distribution of ECA in E. coli. Bacterial strains either possessing the immunogenic form of ECA (F470, 2387) or solely the nonimmunogenic form (F614) or being devoid of both (ECA-negative mutants F1283 and F1327) were labeled with the conjugates. Freezeetchings of ferritin-labeled strains showed a dense labeling of the outer membrane in case of ECA-immunogenic strains, an essentially weaker labeling of the non-immunogenic ECA mutant and, as expected, no labeling of ECA-negative mutants. Comparable results were obtained with the indirect immunofluorescence technique: the whole cell envelope of strain F470 showed a brilliant fluorescence, whereas a much lesser, spotty distribution of fluorescence was noted with strain F614 and none at all was noted with the ECA-negative strains. These data show that ECA is localized in the outer membrane of ECA-containing strains and further demonstrate that there is more in the immunogenic strains than in the nonimmunogenic ones. Images PMID:6154038

  20. Sustained antigen availability during germinal center initiation enhances antibody responses to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tam, Hok Hei; Melo, Mariane B; Kang, Myungsun; Pelet, Jeisa M; Ruda, Vera M; Foley, Maria H; Hu, Joyce K; Kumari, Sudha; Crampton, Jordan; Baldeon, Alexis D; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Crotty, Shane; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Chakraborty, Arup K; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-10-25

    Natural infections expose the immune system to escalating antigen and inflammation over days to weeks, whereas nonlive vaccines are single bolus events. We explored whether the immune system responds optimally to antigen kinetics most similar to replicating infections, rather than a bolus dose. Using HIV antigens, we found that administering a given total dose of antigen and adjuvant over 1-2 wk through repeated injections or osmotic pumps enhanced humoral responses, with exponentially increasing (exp-inc) dosing profiles eliciting >10-fold increases in antibody production relative to bolus vaccination post prime. Computational modeling of the germinal center response suggested that antigen availability as higher-affinity antibodies evolve enhances antigen capture in lymph nodes. Consistent with these predictions, we found that exp-inc dosing led to prolonged antigen retention in lymph nodes and increased Tfh cell and germinal center B-cell numbers. Thus, regulating the antigen and adjuvant kinetics may enable increased vaccine potency.

  1. Serologic responses to somatic O and colonization-factor antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in travelers.

    PubMed

    Deetz, T R; Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L

    1979-07-01

    To improve the retrospective diagnoses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as a cause of travelers' diarrhea, as well as to determine the presence of colonization-factor antigens in these infections, a study of serologic responses to antigens of ETEC was done. Paired sera from 60 United States students in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, were analyzed for rises in titer of antibody to heat-labile toxin, eight somatic antigen O serogroups associated with ETEC, and two colonization-factor antigens, CFA/I and CFA/II. Only 9% had a response to O antigens, while 20% had responses to the colonization-factor antigens. Response to the colonization-factor antigens correlated significantly with response to the heat-labile toxin and with culture evidence of ETEC infection. Serologic studies confirmed that colonization-factor antigen has a role in naturally acquired cases of travelers' diarrhea and that it can be used as an additional determinant of infection with ETEC.

  2. Antibody specificity and antigen characterization of rat monoclonal antibodies against Streptococcus mutans cell wall-associated protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermans, F; Klein, J P; Cormont, F; Bazin, H; Ogier, J A; Frank, R M; Vreven, J

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 (serotype f) cell wall-associated antigens (wall-extracted antigens [WEA]) were derived from the fusion of Lou C plasmocytoma rat cells (IR 983 F) and spleen cells from Wistar R inbred rats immunized with WEA. Four cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against a component of S. mutans WEA have been established. All four monoclonal antibodies reacted only with two antigens of WEA from S. mutans OMZ175 by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and competitive ELISA. Western blot analysis of WEA showed that the four monoclonal antibodies recognized two related cell wall-associated proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000 and 76,000. Immunoprecipitation of whole cells with the monoclonal antibodies confirmed the surface localization of the two antigens. The ELISA and competitive ELISA were used to analyze the distribution of the epitopes on seven S. mutans serotypes. All S. mutans serotypes were found to express the recognized epitopes; however, different reactivity patterns could be distinguished among the various strains tested, and the four monoclonal antibodies reacted only weakly with S. mutans serotypes d and g. Images PMID:2410364

  3. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  4. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  5. Antigenic cartographic analysis of H7 avian influenza viruses with chicken serum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic cartography is a relatively new method that can be used to evaluate the antigenic relatedness among avian influenza virus isolates. Evaluation of antigenic relationships among avian influenza viruses can be applied to vaccine design and to understanding the evolution of the virus. Initia...

  6. Structure and serology of O-antigens as the basis for classification of Proteus strains.

    PubMed

    Knirel, Yuriy A; Perepelov, Andrei V; Kondakova, Anna N; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt; Rozalski, Antoni; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2011-02-01

    This review is devoted to structural and serological characteristics of the O-antigens (O-polysaccharides) of the lipopolysaccharides of various Proteus species, which provide the basis for classifying Proteus strains to O-serogroups. The antigenic relationships of Proteus strains within and beyond the genus as well as their O-antigen-related bioactivities are also discussed.

  7. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  8. Immunogenicity of 60 novel latency-related antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Vidal, Mᵃdel Mar; Latorre, Irene; Franken, Kees L. C. M.; Díaz, Jéssica; de Souza-Galvão, Maria Luiza; Casas, Irma; Maldonado, José; Milà, Cèlia; Solsona, Jordi; Jimenez-Fuentes, M. Ángeles; Altet, Neus; Lacoma, Alícia; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Ausina, Vicente; Prat, Cristina; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Domínguez, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our work here was to evaluate the immunogenicity of 60 mycobacterial antigens, some of which have not been previously assessed, notably a novel series of in vivo-expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (IVE-TB) antigens. We enrolled 505 subjects and separated them in individuals with and without latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) vs. patients with active tuberculosis (TB). Following an overnight and 7 days stimulation of whole blood with purified recombinant M. tuberculosis antigens, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were determined by ELISA. Several antigens could statistically significantly differentiate the groups of individuals. We obtained promising antigens from all studied antigen groups [dormancy survival regulon (DosR regulon) encoded antigens; resuscitation-promoting factors (Rpf) antigens; IVE-TB antigens; reactivation associated antigens]. Rv1733, which is a probable conserved transmembrane protein encoded in DosR regulon, turned out to be very immunogenic and able to discriminate between the three defined TB status, thus considered a candidate biomarker. Rv2389 and Rv2435n, belonging to Rpf family and IVE-TB group of antigens, respectively, also stood out as LTBI biomarkers. Although more studies are needed to support our findings, the combined use of these antigens would be an interesting approach to TB immunodiagnosis candidates. PMID:25339944

  9. Further studies on seroreactivity in leprosy by means of a lecithin-free cardiolipin antigen (cardchol) and other antigens ordinarily used in the serodiagnosis of treponematoses*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning

    1961-01-01

    In a previous study the reactivities of some lipoidal antigens in sera from patients with different types of leprosy were investigated. The present paper is a continuation of this earlier study and relates to an investigation of some 300 sera from leprosy patients in India. In particular, the reactivity of cardchol (a complement-fixing, lecithin-free, cardiolipin antigen) is compared with that of CWRM (an ”ordinary” cardiolipin antigen used in routine complement-fixation tests for the serodiagnosis of treponematoses). Cardchol, which is inferior to CWRM in reactivity with treponemal sera, has proved to be more reactive than CWRM in leprosy sera. The use of a lecithin-free cardiolipin antigen in serological investigations has revealed that the antilipoidal antibodies occurring in leprosy are most probably different from those demonstrated in treponematoses. Among the sera of non-syphilitic lepers, the percentage reactivity was significantly higher with cardchol than with CWRM. Thus, by changing the relative proportions of the three components of cardiolipin antigen, it has been possible to produce antigens with reactivities quite different from those of the antigens ordinarily used for the serological demonstration of syphilis. Cardchol is by no means a specific antigen for the demonstration of leprosy, but it has the ability to fix antibodies in certain leprosy sera that are not fixed by the ordinary CWRM antigen. PMID:14498723

  10. 20-kDa protein associated with the murine T-cell antigen receptor is phosphorylated in response to activation by antigen or concanavalin A

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, L.E.; Harford, J.; Schwartz, R.H.; Klausner, R.D.

    1985-04-01

    Antigen or concanavalin A activation of a murine T-cell hybrid specific for pigeon cytochrome resulted in phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that was specifically coprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody binding the T-cell antigen receptor. There was no evidence for phosphorylation of the antigen receptor itself. The phosphorylation of the 20-kDa polypeptide was dependent on the concentration of antigen or lectin used to activate the T-cell hybrid and reached a maximum 40 min after the addition of antigen. The 20-kDa protein was also radioiodinated with a hydrophobic photoactivatable labeling reagent. The amount of iodinated 20-kDa protein immunoprecipitable with the anti-receptor antibody did not increase with T-cell activation, indicating that the phosphorylation occurred on a molecule that was constitutively associated with the antigen receptor. Concanavalin A also induced phosphorylation of a 20-kDa polypeptide in a second antigen-specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybrid. Again, the phosphorylated polypeptide was precipitated only by a monoclonal antibody specific for the antigen receptor on this hybrid. Thus, the antigen or concanavalin A-induced activation of T-cell hybrids results in the rapid phosphorylation of a 20-kDa protein that is associated with the T-cell receptor.

  11. Viral Sequestration of Antigen Subverts Cross Presentation to CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tewalt, Eric F.; Grant, Jean M.; Granger, Erica L.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Heuss, Neal D.; Gregerson, Dale S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Norbury, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC). Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector TCD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV) antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated TCD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the TCD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation must also be taken into

  12. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  13. Antigenic differences in the H proteins of canine distemper viruses.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, K; Tokiyoshi, S; Hirayama, N; Nakamura, K; Ohashi, K; Wakasa, C; Mikami, T; Kai, C

    2000-02-01

    Antigenic properties between new Japanese field isolates and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) have been compared using four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (JD-5, JD-7, JD-11 and d-7) against the hemagglutinin (H) proteins of CDV. JD-5, JD-7 and JD-11 are newly established antibodies. Three MAbs, namely d-7, JD-5 and JD-11, reacted similarly to all the CDV strains examined. However, JD-7 reacted much more strongly with the vaccine strains and an old field isolate than the recent field isolates in immunofluorescence, radio immunoprecipitation and virus neutralization assays. These results indicate that an antigenic region in the H protein, concerned with neutralization and recognized by JD-7, has been altered in the recent field isolates.

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  15. Preparation of immunoliposomes directed against CD34 antigen as target.

    PubMed

    Mercadal, M; Carrion, C; Domingo, J C; Petriz, J; Garcia, J; de Madariaga, M A

    1998-04-22

    The My-10 monoclonal antibody has facilitated the search of haematopoietic stem cells by recognizing selectively the human CD34 antigen. In the present work, My-10 immunoliposomes directed specifically against CD34+ cells were prepared, characterized and tested in vitro. Binding to target cells at 4 degreesC of immunoliposomes containing carboxyfluorescein as aqueous marker was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These immunoliposomes demonstrated their capacity to bind specifically to CD34+ cells. Studies have shown that 9 antibodies/vesicle were sufficient to obtain a good binding efficiency. The product was stable over one month at 4 degreesC in terms of leakage of encapsulated carboxyfluorescein, particle size and antigen binding capacity.

  16. Chimaeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huan-huan; Wang, Dan-dan; Yan, Da-li; Hu, Yong; Yang, Su-jin; Liu, Si-wen

    2017-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, as one of the cancer immunotherapies, have heralded a new era of treating cancer. The accumulating data, especially about CAR-modified T cells against CD19 support that CAR T-cell therapy is a highly effective immune therapy for B-cell malignancies. Apart from CD19, there have been many trials of CAR T cells directed other tumour specific or associated antigens (TSAs/TAAs) in haematologic malignancies and solid tumours. This review will briefly summarize basic CAR structure, parts of reported TSAs/TAAs, results of the clinical trials of CAR T-cell therapies as well as two life-threatening side effects. Experiments in vivo or in vitro, ongoing clinical trials and the outlook for CAR T-cell therapies also be included. Our future efforts will focus on identification of more viable cancer targets and more strategies to make CAR T-cell therapy safer. PMID:28053197

  17. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  18. T-cell intracellular antigens in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Izquierdo, José M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) and TIA1-related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1) are 2 proteins discovered in 1991 as components of cytotoxic T lymphocyte granules. They act in the nucleus as regulators of transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. In the cytoplasm, TIA1 and TIAR regulate and/or modulate the location, stability and/or translation of mRNAs. As knowledge of the different genes regulated by these proteins and the cellular/biological programs in which they are involved increases, it is evident that these antigens are key players in human physiology and pathology. This review will discuss the latest developments in the field, with physiopathological relevance, that point to novel roles for these regulators in the molecular and cell biology of higher eukaryotes. PMID:26036275

  19. Evolution of Cryptococcal Antigen Testing: What is new?

    PubMed

    Nalintya, Elizabeth; Kiggundu, Reuben; Meya, David

    Over the last decade, an upsurge in both the frequency and severity of fungal infections due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the use of immunosuppressive therapy has occurred. Even diagnostic methods like culture and microscopy, which have low sensitivity and longer turn-around-times are not widely available, leading to delays in timely antifungal therapy and detrimental patient outcomes. The evolution of cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) testing to develop inexpensive and more sensitive methods to detect cryptococcal antigen is significant. These newer tests employ immunoassays as part of point-of-care platforms, which do not require complex laboratory infrastructure and they have the potential to detect early disease and reduce time to diagnosis of cryptococcal infection. Advocacy for widely available and efficacious life-saving antifungal treatment should be the only remaining challenge.

  20. T-cell intracellular antigens in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Izquierdo, José M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) and TIA1-related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1) are 2 proteins discovered in 1991 as components of cytotoxic T lymphocyte granules. They act in the nucleus as regulators of transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. In the cytoplasm, TIA1 and TIAR regulate and/or modulate the location, stability and/or translation of mRNAs. As knowledge of the different genes regulated by these proteins and the cellular/biological programs in which they are involved increases, it is evident that these antigens are key players in human physiology and pathology. This review will discuss the latest developments in the field, with physiopathological relevance, that point to novel roles for these regulators in the molecular and cell biology of higher eukaryotes.

  1. Herpesvirus Glycoproteins Undergo Multiple Antigenic Changes before Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) entry machinery—gB, gH/gL and gp150—changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion. PMID:22253913

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  3. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  4. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  5. Constraints on the Genetic and Antigenic Variability of Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Shannon M.; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Antigenic drift and genetic variation are significantly constrained in measles virus (MeV). Genetic stability of MeV is exceptionally high, both in the lab and in the field, and few regions of the genome allow for rapid genetic change. The regions of the genome that are more tolerant of mutations (i.e., the untranslated regions and certain domains within the N, C, V, P, and M proteins) indicate genetic plasticity or structural flexibility in the encoded proteins. Our analysis reveals that strong constraints in the envelope proteins (F and H) allow for a single serotype despite known antigenic differences among its 24 genotypes. This review describes some of the many variables that limit the evolutionary rate of MeV. The high genomic stability of MeV appears to be a shared property of the Paramyxovirinae, suggesting a common mechanism that biologically restricts the rate of mutation. PMID:27110809

  6. [Isolation and physico-chemical characteristics of human cancerocerebral antigen].

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, P G; Borisenko, S A; Tatarinov, Iu S

    1984-01-01

    During gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 human cancerocerebral antigen (CCA) was eluted as two protein fractions with molecular mass of 135,000 and 270.000 daltons. Only one band of protein with molecular mass of about 15,000 daltons was noted after electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gel containing SDS. As characteristic properties of CCA were recognized an electrophoretic polymorphism and a distinct trend to polymerization and isomeria. The antigen was not stained with dyes designed for staining base proteins, lipo-,glyco- and ferroproteins; CCA was thermostable (5 min at 80 degrees), it was inactivated by trypsin and protease but was resistant to pronase, hexokinase, alpha-amylase and beta-glucuronidase. A procedure was developed for isolation of CCA from brain, including fractionation with ammonium sulfate, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. The procedure enabled to obtain the CCA preparations suitable for radioimmunological, immunobiological assays and amino acid analyses.

  7. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside. PMID:25622092

  8. Analysis of antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, C A; Pringle, J H; Naylor, J; West, K P; Lauder, I

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To analyse the configuration of the antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease. METHODS--DNA extracted from 45 samples of Hodgkin's disease was analysed using Southern blotting and DNA hybridisation, using probes to the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene, the constant region of kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene, and the constant region of the beta chain of the T cell receptor gene. RESULTS--A single case of nodular sclerosing disease showed clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, all other samples having germline immunoglobulin genes. The nature of the clonal population in the diseased tissue is uncertain, because the intensity of the rearranged bands did not correlate with the percentage of Reed-Sternberg cells present. The T cell receptor genes were in germline configuration in all the samples. CONCLUSIONS--Antigen receptor gene rearrangement is a rare finding in unselected cases of Hodgkin's disease. Images PMID:8388407

  9. Constraints on the Genetic and Antigenic Variability of Measles Virus.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Shannon M; Lee, Benhur

    2016-04-21

    Antigenic drift and genetic variation are significantly constrained in measles virus (MeV). Genetic stability of MeV is exceptionally high, both in the lab and in the field, and few regions of the genome allow for rapid genetic change. The regions of the genome that are more tolerant of mutations (i.e., the untranslated regions and certain domains within the N, C, V, P, and M proteins) indicate genetic plasticity or structural flexibility in the encoded proteins. Our analysis reveals that strong constraints in the envelope proteins (F and H) allow for a single serotype despite known antigenic differences among its 24 genotypes. This review describes some of the many variables that limit the evolutionary rate of MeV. The high genomic stability of MeV appears to be a shared property of the Paramyxovirinae, suggesting a common mechanism that biologically restricts the rate of mutation.

  10. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  11. Targeting p53 as a general tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Theobald, M; Biggs, J; Dittmer, D; Levine, A J; Sherman, L A

    1995-01-01

    A major barrier to the design of immunotherapeutics and vaccines for cancer is the idiosyncratic nature of many tumor antigens and the possibility that T cells may be tolerant of broadly distributed antigens. We have devised an experimental strategy that exploits species differences in protein sequences to circumvent tolerance of high-affinity T cells. HLA transgenic mice were used to obtain cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for peptides from the human p53 tumor-suppressor molecule presented in association with HLA-A2.1. Although such p53-specific cytotoxic T cells did not recognize nontransformed human cells, they were able to lyse a wide variety of human tumor cells lines, thus confirming the existence of broadly distributed determinants that may serve as targets for immunotherapy. PMID:8618830

  12. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  13. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  14. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside.

  15. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  16. Allogeneic H-2 antigen expression is insufficient for tumor rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G A; Cole, G A; Clements, V K; Garcia, E P; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S

    1987-01-01

    Murine A strain (KkDdLd) sarcoma I (SaI) tumor cells have been transfected with a cloned H-2Kb gene. The resulting clones (SKB clones) stably express high levels of a molecule that is serologically and biochemically indistinguishable from the H-2Kb antigen. SKB clones are not susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated lysis by H-2Kb-specific bulk, cloned, or H-2Kb-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific effectors. Survival times of A/J and B10.A mice challenged i.p. with the H-2Kb-expressing transfectants and the parental SaI cells are similar, suggesting that the presence of an allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class I antigen on the surface of this tumor line is insufficient for tumor rejection. Images PMID:3500477

  17. Prostate Derived Ets Factor, an Immunogenic Breast Cancer Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Due to prostate restricted expression of Pse in normal tissues of mice, Pse is likely to be immunogenic in female mice. T cell responses of male and... female mice to Pse and a control antigen Her-2/neu were compared. Two different assays were used for this purpose; the ELISPOT assay and the...Cytotoxicity assay. To date, we have found that in the FVB strain of mice immunization with Pse induces specific T cell responses in female mice but not in

  18. Optoacoustic sensing of ocular bacterial antigen using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Page, Leland; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial contamination can be detected using a minimally invasive optical method, based on laser-induced optoacoustic spectroscopy, to probe for specific antigens associated with a specific infectious agent. As a model system, we have used a surface antigen (Ag), isolated from Chlamydia trachomatis, and a complementary antibody (Ab). A preparation of 0.2 mg/ml of monoclonal Ab specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag was conjugated to gold nanorods using standard commercial reagents, in order to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. The C. trachomatis Ag was absorbed in standard plastic microwells, and the binding of the complementary Ab-nanorod conjugate was tested in an immunoaffinity assay. Optoacoustic signals were elicited from the bound nanorods, using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system as the optical pump. The wavelength tuneability of the OPO optimized the spectroscopic measurement by exciting the nanorods at their optical absorption maxima. Optoacoustic responses were measured in the microwells using a probe beam deflection technique. Immunoaffinity assays were performed on several dilutions of purified C. trachomatis antigen ranging from 50 μg/ml to 1 pg/ml, in order to determine the detection limit for the optoacoustic-based assay. Only when the antigen was present, and the complementary Ab-NR reagent was introduced into the microwell, was an enhanced optoacoustic signal obtained, which indicated specific binding of the Ab-NR complex. The limit of detection with the current system design is between 1 and 5 pg/ml of bacterial Ag.

  19. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic banana plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G B Sunil; Ganapathi, T R; Revathi, C J; Srinivas, L; Bapat, V A

    2005-10-01

    Embryogenic cells of bananan cv. Rasthali (AAB) have been transformed with the 's' gene of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Four different expression cassettes (pHBS, pHER, pEFEHBS and pEFEHER) were utilized to optimize the expression of HBsAg in banana. The transgenic nature of the plants and expression of the antigen was confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The expression levels of the antigen in the plants grown under in vitro conditions as well as the green house hardened plants were estimated by ELISA for all the four constructs. Maximum expression level of 38 ng/g F.W. of leaves was noted in plants transformed with pEFEHBS grown under in vitro conditions, whereas pHER transformed plants grown in the green house showed the maximum expression level of 19.92 ng/g F.W. of leaves. Higher monoclonal antibody binding of 67.87% of the antigen was observed when it was expressed with a C-terminal ER retention signal. The buoyant density in CsCl of HBsAg derived from transgenic banana leaves was determined and found to be 1.146 g/ml. HBsAg obtained from transgenic banana plants is similar to human serum derived one in buoyant density properties. The transgenic plants were grown up to maturity in the green house and the expression of HBsAg in the fruits was confirmed by RT-PCR. These transgenic plants were multiplied under in vitro using floral apex cultures. Attempts were also made to enhance the expression of HBsAg in the leaves of transgenic banana plants by wounding and/or treatment with plant growth regulators. This is the first report on the expression of HBsAg in transgenic banana fruits.

  20. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  1. Antigen heterogeneity of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rabellino, E M; Grey, H M; LaForge, S; Pirofsky, B; Kashiwagi, N; Malley, A

    1976-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were immunized with normal human lymphoid cells, cultured lymphoid cells, and chronic leukemic lymphocytes. Antisera were analyzed by cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence techniques to study the antigenic characteristics of human lymphocytes. In an attempt to obtain a reagent specifically reactive with T (thymus-derived) lymphocytes, an antispleen antiserum was absorbed with cellf from five B- (bone marrow-derived) cell lines. After absorption, the antiserum killed 60-75% of peripheral blood lymphocytes and 40-50% of tonsil cells, so that there was a relationship between the percentage of killed cells and the proportion of T lymphocytes. However, when cells after cytotoxic treatment were assayed for rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (a T-cell marker) 5-20% of viable rosette-forming lymphocytes were found. Therefore, this antiserum was cytotoxic for only 75-90% of T cells. From studies performed with antisera prepared against spleen and B-cell lines, we conclude that lymphoblastoid cells are antigenically different and deficient in comparison to normal B lymphocytes. In addition, cultured B-cell lines appear to be antigenically heterogenous, as shown by the cytotoxic activity remaining in antispleen and anti-B-cell lines sera after absorption with various numbers and types of lymphoid cell lines. After absorption with normal lymphocytes, an antiserum produced against chronic lymphatic leukemia cells had specific activity associated with 12 chronic lymphatic leukemia cells tested. Absorption of the same antiserum with leukemic cells from two patients showed that a certain degree of antigenic heterogeneity also exists among chronic leukemic lymphocytes. PMID:815274

  2. A smart membrane based on an antigen-responsive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongsheng; Bowyer, Adrian; Eisenthal, Robert; Hubble, John

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogel membranes have been fabricated that incorporate antibody/antigen moieties. The permeability of large solutes through these membranes is dependent on the presence of soluble antigen that can compete with the internal interactions between antibody and antigen leading to an increase in gel mesh size. Specifically, the membrane's structure is based on a dextran backbone grafted with a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) antigen and a sheep anti-FITC IgG antibody. The backbone is covalently cross-linked by conjugated divinyl sulfone (DVS) groups. The gel structure is additionally stabilized by affinity crosslinks formed by biospecific interactions between the bound IgG and FITC. FTIR spectra of the gel are consistent with formation of covalent bonds between cysteine groups in the IgG and DVS groups in the dextran. Results obtained using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) confirmed the competitive interaction binding between IgG-FITC-dextran and free sodium fluorescein at pH 5.0. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of samples prepared using cryofixation and cryofracturing techniques showed that observed changes in permeability correlate with free fluorescein-dependent structural changes in the gel. Three-dimensional images obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy show that these changes occur throughout the gel and indicate that SEM results are not artifacts of sample preparation. The permeability of these gels, as shown by blue-dextran (12 kDa) diffusion, increases in response to the presence of free fluorescein of the external medium, which causes competitive displacement of the affinity cross-links. Sequential addition and removal of sodium fluorescein showed that these permeability changes are reversible.

  3. Carcinoembryonic antigen in the urine of patients with urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hall, R R; Laurence, D J; Darcy, D; Stevens, U; James, R; Roberts, S; Munro Neville, A

    1972-09-09

    Increased amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (C.E.A.) or C.E.A.-like material are found in the urine of many patients with transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder, including those presumed to be at an early stage of development. It is suggested that measurement of urinary C.E.A. is of clinical diagnostic value in the detection and follow-up of urothelial carcinomas.

  4. Recombinant antigens for serodiagnosis of cysticercosis and echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of cysticercosis/echinococcosis is primarily based on imaging techniques. These imaging techniques are sometimes limited by the small size of visualized lesions and atypical images, which are difficult to be distinguished from abscesses or neoplasms. Therefore, efforts have been directed toward identification and characterization of specific antigens of parasites for development of serodiagnostic method that can detect specific antibody. For cysticercosis, glycoproteins of 10-26 kDa in cyst fluid of Taenia solium have been widely accepted for serodiagnosis purpose. The glycoproteins consist of a very closely related family of 8-kDa proteins. We identified four genes (designated Ag1, Ag1V1, Ag2 and Ag2V1) encoding the 7- and 10-kDa polypeptides. Based on the antigenicities of these clones, Ag1V1 and Ag2 were chosen as ELISA antigens and the Ag1V1/Ag2 chimeric protein was expressed. The Ag1V1/Ag2 chimeric protein showed the similar sensitivity and specificity as the native glycoproteins. For alveolar echinococcosis, the 65-kDa protein of Echinococcus multilocularis protoscolices and Em18 has been considered as serodiagnostic antigens. The sensitivity and specificity of Em18 are very compatible to those of the recombinant 65-kDa protein. Recently, we demonstrated that Em18 was the proteolytic product of the 65-kDa protein following the action by cysteine proteinases. From the information of N-terminal amino acid sequences, molecular size and isoelectric point of Em18, recombinant Em18 ((349)K to (508)K of the 65-kDa protein, RecEm18) was expressed and evaluated for serodiagnostic value. RecEm18 has the potential for use in the differential serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis.

  5. Efficient chemoenzymatic synthesis of sialyl Tn-antigen and derivatives†

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Yu, Hai; Lau, Kam; Li, Yanhong; Muthana, Saddam; Wang, Junru; Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    An N-terminal and C-terminal truncated recombinant α2–6-sialyltransferase cloned from Photobacterium sp. JH-ISH-224, Psp2,6ST(15–501)-His6, was shown to be an efficient catalyst for one-pot three-enzyme synthesis of sialyl Tn (STn) antigens and derivatives containing natural and non-natural sialic acid forms. PMID:21725542

  6. Effects of Long-Term Immunization with Multiple Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    rheumatoid factor--Does not depend on activation of complement and detects small non- complement-fixing complexes. 4. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and other...and antibody may give rise to allergic encephalitis, orchitis, thyroiditis, or other abnormal conditions such as Arthus’ s reaction or a...booster inoculations after multiple antigens had been given over extended periods. They were evaluated periodically for specific antibody titers, delayed

  7. Antigen processing and presentation: evolution from a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jim

    2013-09-01

    Most detailed knowledge of the MHC outside of mammals has come from studies of chickens, originally due to the economic importance of the poultry industry. We have used our discoveries about the chicken MHC to develop a framework for understanding the evolution of the MHC, based on the importance of genomic organisation for gene co-evolution. In humans, MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, while the molecules involved in antigen processing are functionally monomorphic. The genes for tapasin, transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAPs) and inducible proteasome components (LMPs) are located in and beyond the class II region, far away from the class I genes in the class I region. In contrast, chickens express only one class I locus at high levels, which can result in strong MHC associations with resistance to particular infectious pathogens. The chicken TAP and tapasin genes are located very close to the class I genes, and have high levels of allelic polymorphism and moderate sequence diversity, co-evolving their specificities to work optimally with the dominantly expressed class I molecule. The salient features of the chicken MHC are found in many if not most non-mammalian species examined, and are likely to represent the ancestral organisation of the MHC. Comparison with the MHC organisation of humans and typical mammals suggests that a large inversion brought the class III region into the middle of the MHC, separating the antigen processing genes from the class I gene, breaking the co-evolutionary relationships and allowing a multigene family of well-expressed class I genes. Such co-evolution in the primordial MHC was likely responsible for the appearance of the antigen presentation pathways and receptor-ligand interactions at the birth of the adaptive immune system. Of course, much further work is required to understand this evolutionary framework in more detail.

  8. Antigen and Genome Detection of Arenavirus, Bunyavirus, and Filovirus Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    The specific aims of this project were to develop detection systems for recognizing and quanitating antigens and genomes of hemorrhagic fever viruses ...and to use these detection systems to investigate the pathogenesis of these viruses in animal models. These were to be accomplished using existing...antibodies and nucleic acid probes supplied by the MRDC as well as virus infected tissues or cell cultures. Pichinde virus , an arenavirus non

  9. Production of Antigens and Antibodies for Diagnosis of Arbovirus Diseases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-20

    Oriboca West Nile Dugbe Oropouche Sicilian sandfly fever Ganjam Piry Zika Germiston Qalyub Shuni Guaroa Quaranfil Catu b. Viruses were passaged...the following viruses was completed (liver was extracted in some cases): Virus Approximate volume (ml) Approximate volume Sucrose-acetone antigen...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Reagents were prepared for diagnosis by ELISA of 54 arthropod- borne viruses that cause human disease and are of potential

  10. Production of Antigens and Antibodies for Diagnosis of Arbovirus Diseases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-20

    arboviruses and residual infectivity was inactivated with beta-propiolactone. An additional 10 viruses were passaged in mice and the mice vere stored...beta- propiolactone. An additional 10 viruses were passaged in mice and the mice were stored frozen awaiting sucrose-acetone extraction of the brains...35 314 VS-New Jersey Hazelhurst CEl8V4sml 1 58 422 Additionally, 10 viruses were passaged in baby mice awaiting preparation of antigen lots. These were

  11. Neurochondrin is a neuronal target antigen in autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Miske, Ramona; Gross, Catharina C.; Scharf, Madeleine; Golombeck, Kristin S.; Hartwig, Marvin; Bhatia, Urvashi; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Bönte, Kathrin; Strippel, Christine; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Lohmann, Hubertus; Dettmann, Inga Madeleine; Deppe, Michael; Mindorf, Swantje; Warnecke, Tobias; Denno, Yvonne; Teegen, Bianca; Probst, Christian; Brakopp, Stefanie; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Wiendl, Heinz; Stöcker, Winfried; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a novel neuronal target antigen in 3 patients with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration. Methods: Three patients with subacute to chronic cerebellar ataxia and controls underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessment together with quantitative high-resolution structural MRI. Sera and CSF were subjected to comprehensive autoantibody screening by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunoblot. Immunoprecipitation with lysates of hippocampus and cerebellum combined with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the autoantigen, which was verified by recombinant expression in HEK293 cells and use in several immunoassays. Multiparameter flow cytometry was performed on peripheral blood and CSF, and peripheral blood was subjected to T-cell receptor spectratyping. Results: Patients presented with a subacute to chronic cerebellar and brainstem syndrome. MRI was consistent with cortical and cerebellar gray matter atrophy associated with subsequent neuroaxonal degeneration. IFA screening revealed strong immunoglobulin G1 reactivity in sera and CSF with hippocampal and cerebellar molecular and granular layers, but not with a panel of 30 recombinantly expressed established neural autoantigens. Neurochondrin was subsequently identified as the target antigen, verified by IFA and immunoblot with HEK293 cells expressing human neurochondrin as well as the ability of recombinant neurochondrin to neutralize the autoantibodies' tissue reaction. Immune phenotyping revealed intrathecal accumulation and activation of B and T cells during the acute but not chronic phase of the disease. T-cell receptor spectratyping suggested an antigen-specific T-cell response accompanying the formation of antineurochondrin autoantibodies. No such neurochondrin reactivity was found in control cohorts of various neural autoantibody-associated neurologic syndromes, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, cerebellar type of multiple system atrophy, hereditary

  12. Purification of Piscirickettsia salmonis and partial characterisation of antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, M.N.; Landolt, M.L.; Powell, D.B.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiological agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia, an economically significant disease affecting the salmon aquaculture industry. As with other rickettsial pathogens, antigenic analysis of P. salmonis has been limited by the inherent difficulties of purifying an intracellular organism away from host cell material. In this report, we describe the use of diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium (DMDS) density gradient centrifugation to purify P. salmonis grown in chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cells. Plaque assay titers and total protein assays confirmed that viable P. salmonis was consistently concentrated in a visible band within the DMDS density gradient at a density of 1.15 to 1.16 g ml-1. Recovery of purified, viable organisms from DMDS density gradients varied from 0.6 to 3%. Preparations of uninfected CHSE-214 cells, CHSE-214 cells infected with P. salmonis, and gradient-purified P. salmonis were compared using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to assess the degree of purification and to identify P. salmonis-specific proteins. Although gradient-purified P. salmonis preparations were not completely free of host cell material, 8 bacterial proteins were identified. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum was used in an immunoblot of proteins from purified P. salmonis to identify 3 major and 5 minor antigens. The major antigens of 56, 30 and 20 kDa were potential candidates for experimental vaccines and development of novel diagnostic assays.

  13. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  14. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start. PMID:25482233

  15. Exosomes in the Thymus: Antigen Transfer and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Thymocytes go through several steps of maturation and selection in the thymus in order to form a functional pool of effector T-cells and regulatory T-cells in the periphery. Close interactions between thymocytes, thymic epithelial cells, and dendritic cells are of vital importance for the maturation, selection, and lineage decision of the thymocytes. One important question that is still unanswered is how a relatively small epithelial cell population can present a vast array of self-antigens to the manifold larger population of developing thymocytes in this selection process. Here, we review and discuss the literature concerning antigen transfer from epithelial cells with a focus on exosomes. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released from a cell into the extracellular space. These vesicles can carry proteins, microRNAs, and mRNAs between cells and are thus able to participate in intercellular communication. Exosomes have been shown to be produced by thymic epithelial cells and to carry tissue-restricted antigens and MHC molecules, which may enable them to participate in the thymocyte selection process. PMID:26257734

  16. Humoral immune response to Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Shimauchi, H; Kusumoto, Y; Hamada, S

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen incorporated into liposomes, but not in Tris-HCl buffer, significantly raised the levels of anti-fimbriae antibodies in serum, particularly of the IgG class, after oral primary and booster immunizations in BALB/c mice. An approximately linear relationship was observed between the dose of fimbrial antigen and the level of fimbriae-specific antibodies produced; antibody production reached its maximum at an immunization dosage of 500 micrograms of fimbriae per mouse. Fimbriae-specific antibody production was enhanced by use of a semi-synthetic adjuvant, a stearoyl derivative of sodium beta-N-acetylglucosaminyl-(1----4)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-(L) - stearoyl-(D)-meso-diamino-pimelic acid-(D)-amide-D-alanine (GM)-53) in liposomes. High anti-fimbriae antibody levels in serum and saliva were maintained for several months in the mice that had received two orally administered boosters of fimbrial antigen with GM-53 in liposomes. Salivary anti-fimbriae antibody levels, particularly of the IgA class, were markedly raised. PMID:1968885

  17. The composed antigenic structure of the adenovirus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Nász, I

    1988-01-01

    Three panels of MAbs were prepared against AV1, AV35, and BAV2 hexons, respectively. It was shown, that in all cases, antibodies are developed against the genus specific determinant of the adenovirus hexon. The other MAbs specified numerous identical or overlapping epitopes on the hexon types studied. The epitopes could be characterized as intertype-, intersubgenus-, subgenus- and type-specific ones beside the genus-specific determinant based on the RPs of the MAbs from indirect ELISA and passive HA results. The identical epitopes are present in more than one copy on the trimeric form of the hexon capsomer. The epitopes on the hexon molecule could be separated into three antigenic sites, of which one antigenic site is characterized by seven epitope clusters (antigenic site II). Monoclonal antibodies were able to precipitate different hexon types in gel diffusion tests by which the differentiation of the distinct epitopes seemed to be possible. With the help of monoclonal antibodies to AV1 hexon, 17 hours after the infection, hexons (or epitopes) were detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of the infected cells showing different distribution patterns in indirect immunofluorescence assay.

  18. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia is regulated by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Slavin, Ileana; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Elías, Eliana V; Rivero, Fernando D; Saura, Alicia; Carranza, Pedro G; Luján, Hugo D

    2008-12-11

    Giardia lamblia (also called Giardia intestinalis) is one of the most common intestinal parasites of humans. To evade the host's immune response, Giardia undergoes antigenic variation-a process that allows the parasite to develop chronic and recurrent infections. From a repertoire of approximately 190 variant-specific surface protein (VSP)-coding genes, Giardia expresses only one VSP on the surface of each parasite at a particular time, but spontaneously switches to a different VSP by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that regulation of VSP expression involves a system comprising RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Dicer and Argonaute, known components of the RNA interference machinery. Clones expressing a single surface antigen efficiently transcribe several VSP genes but only accumulate transcripts encoding the VSP to be expressed. Detection of antisense RNAs corresponding to the silenced VSP genes and small RNAs from the silenced but not for the expressed vsp implicate the RNA interference pathway in antigenic variation. Remarkably, silencing of Dicer and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase leads to a change from single to multiple VSP expression in individual parasites.

  19. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  20. Binding of streptococcal antigens to muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Nisengard, R J; Bergey, E J

    1980-01-01

    Antigens extracted from cells of Streptococcus pyogenes T6 and Streptococcus mutans strains AHT, BHT, 10449, OMZ175, and K1R adsorbed to the sarcolemmal sheath of cardiac muscle cells in vitro. Similar preparations from S. salivarius, S. sanguis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactobacillus casei had weak or negligible tissue-binding activity. Tissue-bound bacterial antigens were detected with homologous rabbit antisera with both indirect immunofluorescence tests and an indirect radioimmunoassay. Serological cross-reactivity was observed between the tissue-binding factors of S. pyogenes and S. mutans cells but not between the bacteria and muscle tissue. In a comparative study of extraction procedures, the greatest yield of tissue-binding factors was obtained from group A streptococci by cell disruption in buffer at 4 degrees C. Hot aqueous phenol and hot water extracts were inactive. Antibodies specific for the tissue-binding factor(s) were readily adsorbed from rabbit anti-S. pyogenes serum by a preparation of isolated cytoplasmic membranes but not by a suspension of cell wall fragments. The heart-binding component of S. pyogenes cell extracts was inactivated by protease digestion and heat treatment and to a lesser extent by periodic acid oxidation. The capacity of heart cell components to adsorb streptococcal antigens was reduced by protease treatment but not by the action of neuraminidase, hyaluronidase, organic solvents, or detergents. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6991420

  1. Recognition of mycobacterial antigens by sera from patients with leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Lopez, F; Stoker, N G; Locniskar, M F; Dockrell, H M; Grant, K A; McAdam, K P

    1988-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae sonic extracts prepared from armadillo-derived bacteria were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting (immunoblotting) procedures and probed with serum or plasma samples from 20 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 14 healthy endemic controls. Five proteins of 33, 25, 18, 15, and 12 kilodaltons (kDa) were frequently recognized; the 33- and 15-kDa proteins were, respectively, recognized with high intensity by 16 and 13 of the 20 samples from patients with leprosy, whereas only one healthy donor had antibodies that recognized the 15-kDa protein. By the use of M. leprae-specific murine monoclonal antibodies it was demonstrated that the 33-, 25-, and 15-kDa antigens were different from those bound by the available murine monoclonal antibodies. The 18- and 12-kDa proteins detected had molecular masses similar to those detected by the corresponding murine monoclonal antibodies. The serum and plasma samples from patients with leprosy were also used to probe Western blots of a soluble extract of M. tuberculosis. They recognized, among others, antigens with molecular weights similar to those detected in the M. leprae antigenic preparations, although with less intensity and at a lower frequency. Images PMID:3068245

  2. Reverse immunoediting: When immunity is edited by antigen.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Anna; Dalla Santa, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Immune selective pressure occurring during cancer immunoediting shapes tumor features revealed at clinical presentation. However, in the "Escape" phase, the tumor itself has the chance to influence the immunological response. Therefore, the capacity of the immune response to sculpt the tumor characteristics is only one side of the coin and even the opposite is likely true, i.e. that an antigen can shape the immune response in a sort of "reverse immunoediting". This reciprocal modeling probably occurs continuously, whenever the immune system encounters a tumor/foreign antigen, and can be operative in the pathogen/immune system interplay, thus possibly permeating the protective immunity as a whole. In line with this view, the characterization of a T cell response as well as the design of both active and passive immunotherapy strategies should also take into account all Ag features (type, load and presentation). Overall, we suggest that the "reverse immunoediting" hypothesis could help to dissect the complex interplay between antigens and the immune repertoire, and to improve the outcome of immunotherapeutic approaches, where T cell responses are manipulated and reprogrammed.

  3. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D; Pride, M W; Brown, E L; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2001-02-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  4. Antigenic and virulence properties of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, S F; Chidambaram, M; Illyes, E F; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M; Reese, C P

    1995-01-01

    Antigenic properties of two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica, strains 59B0071 and 59B0072, that do not produce detectable leukotoxin were investigated. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a number of polyclonal sera from animals recovering from pasteurellosis revealed that both mutants secreted a variety of antigens that were also present in cultures of several wild-type strains. These antigens ranged from about 100 to 15 kDa. Mutant strain 59B0071 was found to be totally deficient in leukotoxin, as judged not only by Western blotting but also by cytotoxicity assays with bovine lymphoma (BL-3) cells or bovine polymorphonuclear cells as targets. The mutant strain 59B0071 had normal levels of a secreted sialylglycoprotease, however. When strains were tested for virulence in goat and cattle challenge experiments, a reduction in mortality and lung lesions was observed with the mutant 59B0071 in comparison with results obtained with wild-type strains. These results are consistent with an important role for leukotoxin in P. haemolytica virulence and suggest that leukotoxin-negative mutants may be useful tools in the investigation of other virulence properties involved in P. haemolytica infections. PMID:7868224

  5. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  6. Antigenic diversity and distribution of rabies virus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Gómez-Sierra, Mauricio; Hernández-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Juárez-Islas, Victor; Meléndez-Félix, Alejandra; Vargas-Pino, Fernando; Velázquez-Monroy, Oscar; Flisser, Ana

    2002-03-01

    Rabies remains a public health problem in the Americas because of the great diversity of wild reservoirs that maintain the virus in nature. Here we report the antigenic characterization of 254 rabies viruses isolated from 148 nonreservoir and 106 reservoir hosts collected in 27 states of Mexico. Nine out of 11 antigenic variants previously reported in the United States were detected in Mexico by using the limited panel of monoclonal antibodies donated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some rabies virus variants were isolated from their natural reservoirs, which were also taxonomically identified. Terrestrial reservoirs included stray dogs with V1, Urocyon cineroargenteus (gray foxes) with V7, and two subspecies of Spilogale putorius (spotted skunks) with different viral variants (V8 and V10). Aerial hosts included Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana and Desmodus rotundus, which harbored V9 and V4 and harbored V11, respectively. All variants, with the exception of V9, were isolated from nonreservoir hosts, while V3, V4, and V5 were not isolated from their natural reservoirs but only from livestock. Rabies virus antigenic typing allowed us to determine rabies reservoirs and their distribution in Mexico, data which will probably improve prevention and control of the illness in humans and in the reservoir hosts.

  7. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bouchez, Valérie; Hegerle, Nicolas; Strati, Francesco; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN), were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) or pertussis toxin (PT) deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE) cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells. PMID:26389958

  8. Neisseria lactamica antigens complexed with a novel cationic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B; Rosetti, Andreza S; Lincopan, Nilton; De Gaspari, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Colonization of the nasopharynx by non-pathogenic Neisseria species, including N. lactamica, has been suggested to lead to the acquisition of natural immunity against Neisseria meningitidis in young children. The aim of this study was to identify a model complex of antigens and adjuvant for immunological preparation against N. meningitidis B, based on cross reactivity with N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles (OMV) antigens and the (DDA-BF) adjuvant. Complexes of 25 µg of OMV in 0.1 mM of DDA-BF were colloidally stable, exhibiting a mean diameter and charge optimal for antigen presentation. Immunogenicity tests for these complexes were performed in mice. A single dose of OMV/DDA-BF was sufficient to induce a (DTH) response, while the same result was achieved only after two doses of OMV/alum. In addition, to achieve total IgG levels that are similar to a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF, it was necessary to give the mice a second dose of OMV/alum. Moreover, the antibodies induced from a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF had an intermediate avidity, but antibodies with a similar avidity were only induced by OMV/alum after two immunizations. The use of this novel cationic adjuvant for the first time with a N. lactamica OMV preparation revealed good potential for future vaccine design.

  9. Analyzing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pilin Antigenic Variation Using 454 Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella; Webber, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many pathogens use homologous recombination to vary surface antigens in order to avoid immune surveillance. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, achieves this in part by changing the sequence of the major subunit of the type IV pilus in a process termed pilin antigenic variation (Av). The N. gonorrhoeae chromosome contains one expression locus (pilE) and many promoterless, partial-coding silent copies (pilS) that act as reservoirs for variant pilin information. Pilin Av occurs by high-frequency gene conversion reactions, which transfer pilS sequences into the pilE locus. We have developed a 454 sequencing-based assay to analyze the frequency and characteristics of pilin Av that allows a more robust analysis of pilin Av than previous assays. We used this assay to analyze mutations and conditions previously shown to affect pilin Av, confirming many but not all of the previously reported phenotypes. We show that mutations or conditions that cause growth defects can result in Av phenotypes when analyzed by phase variation-based assays. Adapting the 454 sequencing to analyze pilin Av demonstrates the utility of this technology to analyze any diversity generation system that uses recombination to develop biological diversity. IMPORTANCE Measuring and analyzing complex recombination-based systems constitute a major barrier to understanding the mechanisms used to generate diversity. We have analyzed the contributions of many gonococcal mutations or conditions to the process of pilin antigenic variation. PMID:27381912

  10. Hepatitis B surface antigen in blood donors: further observations.

    PubMed

    Szmuness, W; Hirsch, R L; Prince, A M; Levine, R W; Harley, E J; Ikram, H

    1975-02-01

    A survey of 128,000 volunteer blood donors from the Greater New York metropolitan area revealed that first-time male donors were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) 2.5 times more frequently than were first-time female donors; Negroes and Mongols were positive four to 20 times more frequently than Caucasians. The ratio of ad to ay seemed to be higher in non-Caucasian antigen carriers than in Caucasian carriers. Among both Caucasians and non-Caucasians the rate of positivity declined after the age of 50. An excess prevalence of HBsAg was observed in donors with the lowest level of education and in those with the highest level. HBsAg was detectable nine times less frequently among repeat donors than among first-time donors (0.2 vs.1.90 per 1,000). Detection of HBsAg was unrelated to ABO-Rh blood groups. Several mechanisms for these wide variations of antigen detection are possible.

  11. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation. PMID:26018442

  12. Dendritic cell preactivation impairs MHC class II presentation of vaccines and endogenous viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Louise J.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Schnorrer, Petra; Mount, Adele; Lundie, Rachel J.; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    When dendritic cells (DCs) encounter signals associated with infection or inflammation, they become activated and undergo maturation. Mature DCs are very efficient at presenting antigens captured in association with their activating signal but fail to present subsequently encountered antigens, at least in vitro. Such impairment of MHC class II (MHC II) antigen presentation has generally been thought to be a consequence of down-regulation of endocytosis, so it might be expected that antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves (for instance, viral antigens) would still be presented by mature DCs. Here, we show that DCs matured in vivo could still capture and process soluble antigens, but were unable to present peptides derived from these antigens. Furthermore, presentation of viral antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves was also severely impaired. Indeed, i.v. injection of pathogen mimics, which caused systemic DC activation in vivo, impaired the induction of CD4 T cell responses against subsequently encountered protein antigens. This immunosuppressed state could be reversed by adoptive transfer of DCs loaded exogenously with antigens, demonstrating that impairment of CD4 T cell responses was due to lack of antigen presentation rather than to overt suppression of T cell activation. The biochemical mechanism underlying this phenomenon was the down-regulation of MHC II–peptide complex formation that accompanied DC maturation. These observations have important implications for the design of prophylactic and therapeutic DC vaccines and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms causing immunosuppression during systemic blood infections. PMID:17978177

  13. Regulation of cancer germline antigen gene expression: implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2010-05-01

    Cancer germline (CG; also known as cancer-testis) antigen genes are normally expressed in germ cells and trophoblast tissues and are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human malignancies. CG antigen genes have high clinical relevance as they encode a class of immunogenic and highly selective tumor antigens. CG antigen-directed immunotherapy is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of a number of solid tumor malignancies and has been demonstrated to be safe, provoke immune responses and be of therapeutic benefit. Achieving an improved understanding of the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation will facilitate the continued development of targeted therapeutic approaches against tumors expressing these antigens. Substantial evidence suggests epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation, as a primary regulator of CG antigen gene expression in normal and cancer cells as well as in stem cells. The roles of sequence-specific transcription factors and signal transduction pathways in controlling CG antigen gene expression are less clear but are emerging. A combinatorial therapeutic approach involving epigenetic modulatory drugs and CG antigen immunotherapy is suggested based on these data and is being actively pursued. In this article, we review the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation and discuss the implications of these mechanisms for the development of cancer immunotherapy approaches targeting CG antigens.

  14. A morphological and functional study on antigen binding and endocytosis by immunocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goud, B; Antoine, J C; Gonatas, N K; Stieber, A; Avrameas, S

    1980-01-01

    Immunoenzymatic techniques were used to study antigen binding and endocytosis by lymph node cells of rats immunized against horseradish peroxidase, hen ovalbumin and rabbit IgG. The number of antigen-binding cells varied and depended on the type of antigen used, the time after immunization, and was higher after a booster injection. In secondary responses (4 days after booster), about 80% of antigen-binding cells were proplasmocytes and plasmocytes; by a double staining procedure it was found that 82% of these cells bore in addition to surface antigen, specific intracytoplasmic antibody as well. About 20% of antigen-binding cells were small and medium lymphocytes which did not contain detectable intracytoplasmic antibody. For ultrastructural studies of the endocytosis, peroxidase was used as the antigen. This antigen was found in cytoplasmic compartments which consisted of vesicles, cisternae and large round bodies (lysosomes?) often located near the Golgi apparatus. However, the cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, involved in the synthesis of specific antibody were not sites of retrieval of endocytosed antigen. The effect of endocytosis of antigen on the secretion and synthesis of antibody was studied by the local haemolysis plaque assay and biosynthetic labelling. No change was detected in antibody secretion and synthesis as a result of antigen endocytosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7007216

  15. Network Theory Analysis of Antibody-Antigen Reactivity Data: The Immune Trees at Birth and Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Merbl, Yifat; Quintana, Francisco J.; Tauber, Alfred I.; Cohen, Irun R.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2011-01-01

    Motivation New antigen microarray technology enables parallel recording of antibody reactivities with hundreds of antigens. Such data affords system level analysis of the immune system's organization using methods and approaches from network theory. Here we measured the reactivity of 290 antigens (for both the IgG and IgM isotypes) of 10 healthy mothers and their term newborns. We constructed antigen correlation networks (or immune networks) whose nodes are the antigens and the edges are the antigen-antigen reactivity correlations, and we also computed their corresponding minimum spanning trees (MST) – maximal information reduced sub-graphs. We quantify the network organization (topology) in terms of the network theory divergence rate measure and rank the antigen importance in the full antigen correlation networks by the eigen-value centrality measure. This analysis makes possible the characterization and comparison of the IgG and IgM immune networks at birth (newborns) and adulthood (mothers) in terms of topology and node importance. Results Comparison of the immune network topology at birth and adulthood revealed partial conservation of the IgG immune network topology, and significant reorganization of the IgM immune networks. Inspection of the antigen importance revealed some dominant (in terms of high centrality) antigens in the IgG and IgM networks at birth, which retain their importance at adulthood. PMID:21408156

  16. Identification of Candida albicans antigens reactive with immunoglobulin E antibody of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, A; Homma, M; Torii, S; Tanaka, K

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans antigens which reacted with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies of 57 allergic patients were detected by immunoblotting. Of the various antigens, the 175-, 125-, 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigenic components reacted most frequently with the patient sera. To purify the major antigens, C. albicans cells were fractionated. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, but the 175- and 125-kDa antigens were not recovered in any fraction. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were purified from cytoplasmic fractions by DEAE and P11 ion-exchange chromatography. Antigens were isolated by cutting bands out of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The purified components confirmed by immunoblotting were next processed for amino acid sequencing. Parts of the sequences of the 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens had significant levels of homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolytic enzyme enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and aldolase, respectively. Rabbit IgG antibodies prepared against the 46- and 43-kDa antigens strongly cross-reacted with the homologous proteins of S. cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase did not cross-react with IgE of patient sera. This result suggests that IgE antibodies against only small parts of their epitopes are elevated in the allergic patients. Since enolase is reported to be a major antigen for systemic candidiasis, this enzyme may be the immunodominant protein in both allergies and fungal infections. Images PMID:1548078

  17. Contamination of passenger trains with Dermatophagoides (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) mite antigen in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uehara, K; Toyoda, Y; Konishi, E

    2000-01-01

    Passenger trains were surveyed for contamination with Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouesart) mites in Japan. A total of 492 dust samples were collected from upholstered seats in six commuter trains, one long-distance express train and three night trains in October, 1996 and January, April, and July, 1997. Mite antigen levels contained in fine dust fractions of these samples were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Most samples obtained from commuter trains showed relatively high mite antigen levels of > 10 microgm(-2) (corresponding to > 100 mites). Express and night trains showed lower antigen levels per square meter, but higher mite antigen levels per gram of fine dust than commuter trains, indicating relatively high mite antigen densities. Seasonal comparisons indicated that commuter trains showed the highest mean antigen level per square meter in winter (January), whereas the highest antigen level per gram of fine dust was observed in summer (July) in express and night trains.

  18. Taenia taeniaeformis: immunoprecipitation analysis of the protein antigens of oncospheres and larvae.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Mitchell, G F; Anders, R F; Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1983-12-01

    Biosynthetically or exogenously labeled proteins and immunoprecipitated protein antigens of established 28-day-old larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis were compared with proteins and antigens of infective oncospheres using single and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Immunoprecipitation was carried out using sera from infected mice and mouse antisera raised to larvae or oncospheres, and emphasis was placed on identifying antigens common to both oncospheres and larvae. Two major larval antigens of Mr 40,000 and 200,000, designated Tt40 and Tt200, are common to somatic larval preparations and oncospheres. Additionally, two major oncosphere antigens of Mr 55,000 and 60,000, designated Tt55 and Tt60, are also present in larval excretory and secretory (i.e., ES or exoantigen) products. Information obtained from these immunoprecipitation analyses will facilitate isolation and production of common as well as stage-specific protein antigens in the development of defined-antigen vaccines in this model system of cysticercosis.

  19. Brewing spoilage Lactobacilli detected using monoclonal antibodies to bacterial surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Gares, S L; Ingledew, W M; Ziola, B

    1999-01-01

    A panel of thirteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) was assembled that reacts with surface antigens on eight of eleven Lactobacillus brewing spoilage organisms, including one or more of L. brevis, L. buchneri, L. casei-alactosus, L. plantarum, or unspeciated isolate(s). Immunoblotting was done to identify the antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment and by surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. Protease susceptibility of extracted surface antigens was also examined. In most cases, Lactobacillus surface antigens detected by the Mabs appear to be noncovalently bound proteins readily altered or removed from the bacterium by various environmental conditions. This research identifies brewing conditions that need to be tested to ascertain whether bacterial surface antigen-reactive Mabs can be used for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Lactobacillus brewing spoilage organisms.

  20. Erythrocytes in human transplantation: effects of pretreatment with ABO group-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Dausset, J.; Legrand, L.; Barge, A.; Lawrence, H. S.; Converse, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Erythrocyte group antigens A and B can act as potent and group-specific transplantation antigens in man. ABO group-incompatible recipients pretreated with such antigens have rejected skin allografts obtained from donors incompatible for the same antigens in an accelerated (4-5 days) or white graft manner. Skin grafts applied to the same recipients from ABO-compatible donors were accorded first-set survival times. Intact erythrocyte suspensions and antigens isolated from hog (A substance) and horse (B substance) stomachs, were equally capable of inducing this type of allograft sensitivity. The latter observation broadens the spectrum of heterologous antigens capable of inducing allograft sensitivity in the mammalian host and provides a readily available, heat-stable, and water-soluble source of antigens for further studies of allograft rejection mechanisms in man. PMID:4877681