Science.gov

Sample records for 5th order bands

  1. Instantaneous frequency measurement by in-fiber 0.5th order fractional differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda-Wong, L.; Carrascosa, A.; Cuadrado-Laborde, C.; Cruz, J. L.; Díez, A.; Andrés, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility to retrieve the instantaneous frequency profile of a given temporal light pulse by in-fiber fractional order differentiation of 0.5th-order. The signal's temporal instantaneous frequency profile is obtained by simple dividing two temporal intensity profiles, namely the intensities of the input and output pulses of a spectrally-shifted fractional order differentiation. The results are supported by the experimental measurement of the instantaneous frequency profile of a mode-locked laser.

  2. A Comparison of In-Channel Dead Zone and Hyporheic Zone Transient Storage Parameter Estimates Between a 1st and 5th Order Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M.; Gooseff, M.; Morkeski, K.; Wollheim, W.; Hopkinson, C.; Peterson, B.; Vorosmarty, C.

    2007-12-01

    A major enhancement to our understanding of how watersheds function would be the ability to discriminate between in-channel dead zone ( DZ) and hyporheic zone ( HZ) transient storage, and an evaluation of how these properties scale across stream orders. The nature of DZ storage is to display faster exchange rates with the main channel and less overall sediment contact time than HZ storage. These differences have great significance to many in-stream processes such as nutrient cycling. The combination of high slope, coarse bed material and fluvial structure endemic to many 1st order streams can provide greater forcing of hyporheic flow paths than occurs within the lower gradient 5th order streams. Conversely many 5th order reaches exhibit large side pool and back eddy DZ areas not common along 1st order streams. This study builds on existing methods to delineate the DZ and HZ from the integrated signal of a conservative solute's breakthrough curve ( BTC). Data for this comparison were collected over the summer of 2007 within the Ipswich River watershed, a basin which drains into Plum Island Sound on the north shore of Massachusetts, USA. The conservative solute NaCl was injected into both a 1st order medium gradient stream and a 5th order low gradient stream. The BTCs collected in thalwegs from the NaCl injections were simulated using a version of the solute transport model OTIS containing two zones of transient storage. Hydrometric measurements of stream velocity were used to estimate average main channel cross sectional area ( A) and DZ cross sectional area ( ASDZ) for each reach to constrain parameter estimates and avoid model equifinality between the storage zones. Initial values for the exchange rate between main channel flow and DZ storage ( αDZ) were estimated from DZ BTCs. Our results indicate that although the overall storage zone is much larger in proportion to the main channel for the 1st order reach than for the 5th order reach, the percentage of median

  3. Documentation of the Fourth Order Band Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay-Rivas, E.; Hoitsma, D.

    1979-01-01

    A general circulation model is presented which uses quadratically conservative, fourth order horizontal space differences on an unstaggered grid and second order vertical space differences with a forward-backward or a smooth leap frog time scheme to solve the primitive equations of motion. The dynamic equations for motion, finite difference equations, a discussion of the structure and flow chart of the program code, a program listing, and three relevent papers are given.

  4. 168. GENERAL VIEW FROM 5TH AVE. VIEW SOUTH, ACROSS 5TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    168. GENERAL VIEW FROM 5TH AVE. VIEW SOUTH, ACROSS 5TH AVE., TOWARD BUILDING 506 (ON LEFT) AND BUILDING 435. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  5. Kids & Family Reading Report™. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholastic Inc., 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the 5th Edition of Scholastic's biannual study of children's and parents' attitudes and behaviors about reading. The latest research touches on reading aloud to children of all ages, the impact of reading independently for fun at school and at home, the importance of frequent reading, and the books children want most to read.…

  6. BOOK REVIEW: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 5TH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Book Review of Environmental Engineering, 5th Edition (Joseph A. Salvato, Nelson L. Nemerow, Franklin J. Agardy (Editors), John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Hoboken, New Jersey. 2003.). Author wrote review per the request of the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Environmental Quality.

  7. Chemisorption and magnetization: a bond order-rigid band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, R.; Salahub, D. R.

    1990-11-01

    We briefly review and analyze results of self-consistent LSD calculations on the effect of chemisorption of CO, H, O and C on the magnetism of nickel clusters. Guided by the similarities in these four cases, we propose a model which relates the change in magnetization of a ferromagnetic surface, caused by a chemisorbed species, to magnetic properties of the clean surface and to a qualitative description of the adsorbate-surface bond. The two key quantities in this model are the adsorbate-surface bond order and the spin polarization of the states at the Fermi energy. In the simplest version of this model, the bond order determines the number of electrons that will fill the metal band. In turn, the polarization of states at the Fermi energy determines how the electrons will partition in up and down spins. We contrast our model with the bond number model. Comparisons with experiments are made at a semi-quantitative level.

  8. Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars - 5th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Maselli, A.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.; Piranomonte, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 5th Edition of the Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars is one of the most complete lists of Active Galactic Nuclei whose emission properties are recognised as typical of blazars. It includes the list of sources and an essential compilation of multifrequency data from radio to gamma rays. The source list for the entire sky is also available online at the ASDC web site (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat/) where it is frequently updated to add new blazars and to improve the database.

  9. Communication: excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-14

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition. PMID:23676019

  10. Communication: Excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition.

  11. Application of Novel High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method to Photonic Band-Gap Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2004-01-13

    In this paper we motivate the use of a novel high order time domain vector finite element method that is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time; and in particular, we apply it to the case of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. Such structures have been extensively studied in the literature with several practical applications; in particular, for the low loss transmission of electromagnetic energy around sharp 90 degree bends [1]. Typically, such structures are simulated via a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations either in the frequency domain or directly in the time domain over a computational grid. The majority of numerical simulations performed for such structures make use of the widely popular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method [2], where the time dependent electric and magnetic fields are discretized over a ''dual'' grid to second order accuracy in space and time. However, such methods do not generalize to unstructured, non-orthogonal grids or to higher order spatial discretization schemes. To simulate more complicated structures with curved boundaries, such as the structure of [3], a cell based finite element method with curvilinear elements is preferred over standard stair-stepped Cartesian meshes; and to more efficiently reduce the effects of numerical dispersion, a higher order method is highly desirable. In this paper, the high order basis functions of [5] are used in conjunction with the high order energy conserving symplectic time integration algorithms of [6] resulting in a high order, fully mimetic, mixed vector finite element method.

  12. Computationally efficient banding of large covariance matrices for ordered data and connections to banding the inverse Cholesky factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Daniels, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this article, we propose a computationally efficient approach to estimate (large) p-dimensional covariance matrices of ordered (or longitudinal) data based on an independent sample of size n. To do this, we construct the estimator based on a k-band partial autocorrelation matrix with the number of bands chosen using an exact multiple hypothesis testing procedure. This approach is considerably faster than many existing methods and only requires inversion of (k + 1)-dimensional covariance matrices. The resulting estimator is positive definite as long as k < n (where p can be larger than n). We make connections between this approach and banding the Cholesky factor of the modified Cholesky decomposition of the inverse covariance matrix (Wu and Pourahmadi, 2003) and show that the maximum likelihood estimator of the k-band partial autocorrelation matrix is the same as the k-band inverse Cholesky factor. We evaluate our estimator via extensive simulations and illustrate the approach using high-dimensional sonar data. PMID:25147413

  13. Sudden restoration of the band ordering associated with the ferromagnetic phase transition in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Iriya; Ohya, Shinobu; Terada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The band ordering of semiconductors is an important factor in determining the mobility and coherence of the wave function of carriers, and is thus a key factor in device performance. However, in heavily doped semiconductors, the impurities substantially disturb the band ordering, leading to significant degradation in performance. Here, we present the unexpected finding that the band ordering is suddenly restored in Mn-doped GaAs ((Ga,Mn)As) when the Mn concentration slightly exceeds ∼0.7% despite the extremely high doping concentration; this phenomenon is very difficult to predict from the general behaviour of doped semiconductors. This phenomenon occurs with a ferromagnetic phase transition, which is considered to have a crucial role in generating a well-ordered band structure. Our findings offer possibilities for ultra-high-speed quantum-effect spin devices based on semiconductors. PMID:27349454

  14. Sudden restoration of the band ordering associated with the ferromagnetic phase transition in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Muneta, Iriya; Ohya, Shinobu; Terada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The band ordering of semiconductors is an important factor in determining the mobility and coherence of the wave function of carriers, and is thus a key factor in device performance. However, in heavily doped semiconductors, the impurities substantially disturb the band ordering, leading to significant degradation in performance. Here, we present the unexpected finding that the band ordering is suddenly restored in Mn-doped GaAs ((Ga,Mn)As) when the Mn concentration slightly exceeds ∼0.7% despite the extremely high doping concentration; this phenomenon is very difficult to predict from the general behaviour of doped semiconductors. This phenomenon occurs with a ferromagnetic phase transition, which is considered to have a crucial role in generating a well-ordered band structure. Our findings offer possibilities for ultra-high-speed quantum-effect spin devices based on semiconductors. PMID:27349454

  15. Stacking orders induced direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohui; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    The direct band gap of monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (STMDs) enables a host of new optical and electrical properties. However, bilayer STMDs are indirect band gap semiconductors, which limits its applicability for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. Here, we report that the direct band gap can be achieved in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures by alternating stacking orders. Specifically, when Se atoms from opposite layers are stacked directly on top of each other, AA and A’B stacked heterostructures show weaker interlayer coupling, larger interlayer distance and direct band gap. Whereas, when Se atoms from opposite layers are staggered, AA’, AB and AB’ stacked heterostructures exhibit stronger interlayer coupling, shorter interlayer distance and indirect band gap. Thus, the direct/indirect band gap can be controllable in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures. In addition, the calculated sliding barriers indicate that the stacking orders of bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures can be easily formed by sliding one layer with respect to the other. The novel direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures provides possible application for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. The results also show that the stacking order is an effective strategy to induce and tune the band gap of layered STMDs. PMID:27528196

  16. Stacking orders induced direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohui; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    The direct band gap of monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (STMDs) enables a host of new optical and electrical properties. However, bilayer STMDs are indirect band gap semiconductors, which limits its applicability for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. Here, we report that the direct band gap can be achieved in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures by alternating stacking orders. Specifically, when Se atoms from opposite layers are stacked directly on top of each other, AA and A'B stacked heterostructures show weaker interlayer coupling, larger interlayer distance and direct band gap. Whereas, when Se atoms from opposite layers are staggered, AA', AB and AB' stacked heterostructures exhibit stronger interlayer coupling, shorter interlayer distance and indirect band gap. Thus, the direct/indirect band gap can be controllable in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures. In addition, the calculated sliding barriers indicate that the stacking orders of bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures can be easily formed by sliding one layer with respect to the other. The novel direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures provides possible application for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. The results also show that the stacking order is an effective strategy to induce and tune the band gap of layered STMDs. PMID:27528196

  17. Overlay improvement by ASML HOWA 5th alignment strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Raf; Chiang, CY; Hsu, Wilson; Yang, Richer; Shih, Todd; Chen, Jackie; Chiu, Jonathan; Lin, Wythe

    2009-12-01

    Overlay control is more challenging when DRAM volume production continues to shrink its critical dimention (CD) to 70nm and beyond. Effected by process, the overlay behavior at wafer edge is quite different from wafer center. The big contribution to worse overlay at wafer edge which causes yield loss is misalignment. The analysis in wafer edge suggests that high order uncorrectable overlay residuals are often observed by certain process impact. Therefore, the basic linear model used for alignment correction is not sufficient and it is necessary to introduce an advanced alignment correction model for wafer edge overlay improvement. In this study, we demonstrated the achievement of moderating the poor overlay at wafer edge area by using a high order wafer alignment strategy. The mechanism is to use non-linear correction methods of high order models ( up to 5th order), with support by the function High Order Wafer Alignment (known as HOWA) in scanner. Instead of linear model for the 6 overlay parameters which come from average result, HOWA alignment strategy can do high order fitting through the wafer to get more accurate overlay parameters which represent the local wafer grid distortion better. As a result, the overlay improvement for wafer edge is achieved. Since alignment is a wafer dependent correction, with HOWA the wafer to wafer overlay variation can be improved dynamically as well. In addition, the effects of different mark quantity and sampling distribution from HOWA are also introduced in this paper. The results of this study indicate that HOWA can reduce uncorrectable overlay residual by 30~40% and improve wafer-to-wafer overlay variation significantly. We conclude that HOWA is a noteworthy strategy for overlay improvement. Moreover, optimized alignment mark numbers and distribution layout are also key factors to make HOWA successful.

  18. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea, 15-19 March 2004. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to discuss recent progress and future trends in the rapidly advancing wide band gap semiconductor science and technologies and their applications in blue laser and light emitting diodes.

  19. Correlation-driven charge order at the interface between a Mott and a band insulator.

    PubMed

    Pentcheva, Rossitza; Pickett, Warren E

    2007-07-01

    To study digital Mott insulator LaTiO3 and band insulator SrTiO3 interfaces, we apply correlated band theory within the local density approximation including a Hubbard U to (n, m) multilayers, 1ordering, and Ti3+ dxy-orbital ordering, with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the spins in the interface layer. Lattice relaxations lead to conducting behavior by shifting (slightly but importantly) the lower Hubbard band, but the charge and orbital order is robust against relaxation. PMID:17678179

  20. Working Together for Student Achievement. 5th Biennial Joint Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Washington state Board of Education (SBE) and the Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB) submitted this 5th biennial joint report to the Governor, Legislative Education Committees, and Superintendent of Public Instruction. The report outlines the collaborative work of the Boards, highlights accomplishments, and provides goals and…

  1. 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M. B. (Editor); Stanley, D. Cross (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Records are presented from the 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology. Topics included pollution prevention, inspection methods, advanced materials, aerospace materials and technical standards,materials testing and evaluation, advanced manufacturing,development in metallic processes, synthesis of nanomaterials, composite cryotank processing, environmentally friendly cleaning, and poster sessions.

  2. 5th Latin American pesticide residue workshop (LAPRW 2015)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited editorial proceedings article introduces the 6 research papers published in the special topical collection for the 5th Latin American Pesticide Residue Workshop held in Santiago, Chile, May 10-13, 2015. The meeting was a great success with more than 50 talks, 140 posters, 21 vendors, a...

  3. Band gap engineering via electrostatic chemical strain in cation ordered LaSrAlO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Rondinelli, James M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we employ density functional theory to examine a novel design route that employs A-site cation ordering to engineer the band gaps of (A,A')BO4 Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) oxides. Using LaSrAlO4 as a model material, we show that the band gap is highly sensitive to the A-site cation ordering ranging from 3-4.5 eV. When the [AlO2]-1 layers are interleaved between two chemically equivalent [LaO]1+ or [SrO]0+ layers, we obtain the smallest band gap with a reduction of ~1 eV determined from the Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid exchange-correlation functional. We relate the observed band gap reduction to the local bond distortions arising from electrostatic chemical strain induced changes to the O 2 p and La 5 d states in the valence and conduction bands, respectively. The project was supported by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (grant no. N66001-12-4224). The views, opinions, and/or findings reported here are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views of DARPA or DOD.

  4. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  5. The band gap of Cu2ZnSnSe4: Effect of order-disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, G.; Redinger, A.; Sendler, J.; Weiss, T. P.; Thevenin, M.; Guennou, M.; El Adib, B.; Siebentritt, S.

    2014-09-01

    The order-disorder transition in kesterite Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe), an interesting material for solar cell, has been investigated by spectrophotometry, photoluminescence (PL), and Raman spectroscopy. Like Cu2ZnSnS4, CZTSe is prone to disorder by Cu-Zn exchanges depending on temperature. Absorption measurements have been used to monitor the changes in band gap energy (Eg) of solar cell grade thin films as a function of the annealing temperature. We show that ordering can increase Eg by 110 meV as compared to fully disordered material. Kinetics simulations show that Eg can be used as an order parameter and the critical temperature for the CZTSe order-disorder transition is 200 ± 20 °C. On the one hand, ordering was found to increase the correlation length of the crystal. But on the other hand, except the change in Eg, ordering did not influence the PL signal of the CZTSe.

  6. Composition dependent valence band order in c-oriented wurtzite AlGaN layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuschl, B. Helbing, J.; Knab, M.; Lauer, H.; Madel, M.; Thonke, K.; Feneberg, M.

    2014-09-21

    The valence band order of polar wurtzite aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers is analyzed for a dense series of samples, grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire substrates, covering the complete composition range. The excitonic transition energies, found by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, were corrected to the unstrained state using input from X-ray diffraction. k∙p theory yields a critical relative aluminum concentration x{sub c}=(0.09±0.05) for the crossing of the uppermost two valence bands for strain free material, shifting to higher values for compressively strained samples, as supported by polarization dependent PL. The analysis of the strain dependent valence band crossing reconciles the findings of other research groups, where sample strain was neglected. We found a bowing for the energy band gap to the valence band with Γ₉ symmetry of b{sub Γ₉}=0.85eV, and propose a possible bowing for the crystal field energy of b{sub cf}=-0.12eV. A comparison of the light extraction efficiency perpendicular and parallel to the c axis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N quantum well structures is discussed for different compositions.

  7. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Frederico; et al

    2016-01-04

    We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, includingmore » the k-dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. In summary, we have fully characterized the band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire. This model system may be considered as a fingerprint of -conjugation of surface organic frameworks.« less

  8. Low-order-mode harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier in W band

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y. S.; Chen, C. H.; Yang, S. J.; Lai, C. H.; Lin, T. Y.; Lo, Y. C.; Hong, J. W.; Hung, C. L.; Chang, T. H.

    2012-09-15

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) allow for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. To avoid absolute instabilities, this work proposes a W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA operating at low-order modes. By amplifying a fundamental harmonic TE{sub 11} drive wave, the second harmonic component of the beam current initiates a TE{sub 21} wave to be amplified. Absolute instabilities in the gyro-TWA are suppressed by shortening the interaction circuit and increasing wall losses. Simulation results reveal that compared with Ka-band gyro-TWTs, the lower wall losses effectively suppress absolute instabilities in the W-band gyro-TWA. However, a global reflective oscillation occurs as the wall losses decrease. Increasing the length or resistivity of the lossy section can reduce the feedback of the oscillation to stabilize the amplifier. The W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA is predicted to yield a peak output power of 111 kW at 98 GHz with an efficiency of 25%, a saturated gain of 26 dB, and a bandwidth of 1.6 GHz for a 60 kV, 7.5 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of 8%.

  9. Low-order-mode harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier in W band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Y. S.; Hung, C. L.; Chang, T. H.; Chen, C. H.; Yang, S. J.; Lai, C. H.; Lin, T. Y.; Lo, Y. C.; Hong, J. W.

    2012-09-01

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) allow for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. To avoid absolute instabilities, this work proposes a W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA operating at low-order modes. By amplifying a fundamental harmonic TE11 drive wave, the second harmonic component of the beam current initiates a TE21 wave to be amplified. Absolute instabilities in the gyro-TWA are suppressed by shortening the interaction circuit and increasing wall losses. Simulation results reveal that compared with Ka-band gyro-TWTs, the lower wall losses effectively suppress absolute instabilities in the W-band gyro-TWA. However, a global reflective oscillation occurs as the wall losses decrease. Increasing the length or resistivity of the lossy section can reduce the feedback of the oscillation to stabilize the amplifier. The W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA is predicted to yield a peak output power of 111 kW at 98 GHz with an efficiency of 25%, a saturated gain of 26 dB, and a bandwidth of 1.6 GHz for a 60 kV, 7.5 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of 8%.

  10. Teacher and Parent Views on the Instruction of 5th Grade Students by Branch Teachers in the 4+4+4 Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildizhan, Yusuf Hayri

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the teacher and parent views on the instruction of 5th grade students by branch teachers. This study is designed according to the phenomenology design and uses qualitative data. In order to collect data, open-ended questions were asked to 18 teachers and 16 parents of 5th grade students on the subject, and…

  11. Band gap and chemically ordered domain structure of a graphene analogue BCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu, K.; Kanuri, S.; Raidongia, K.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, U. V.; Datta, R.

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized few layer graphene analogues of B xC yN z are characterized by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to determine the local phase, electronic structure and band gap. HREELS band gap studies of a B xC yN z composition reveal absorption edges at 2.08, 3.43 and 6.01 eV, indicating that the B xC yN z structure may consist of domains of different compositions. The K-absorption edge energy position of the individual elements in B xC yN z is determined and compared with h-BN and graphite. An understanding of these experimental findings is developed with complementary first-principles based calculations of the various ordered configurations of B xC yN z.

  12. Shear banding of colloidal glasses: observation of a dynamic first-order transition.

    PubMed

    Chikkadi, V; Miedema, D M; Dang, M T; Nienhuis, B; Schall, P

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate that application of an increasing shear field on a glass leads to an intriguing dynamic first-order transition in analogy with equilibrium transitions. By following the particle dynamics as a function of the driving field in a colloidal glass, we identify a critical shear rate upon which the diffusion time scale of the glass exhibits a sudden discontinuity. Using a new dynamic order parameter, we show that this discontinuity is analogous to a first-order transition, in which the applied stress acts as the conjugate field on the system's dynamic evolution. These results offer new perspectives to comprehend the generic shear-banding instability of a wide range of amorphous materials. PMID:25432056

  13. Combined topological and Landau order from strong correlations in Chern bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghofer, Maria; Kourtis, Stefanos

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, topologically nontrivial and nearly dispersionless bands have attracted attention as hosts for states analogous to fractional quantum-Hall states, but without a magnetic field. Indeed, such fractional Chern insulators were found and connections to fractional quantum-Hall states in Landau levels were established. We discuss here aspects where fractional Chern insulators differ from Landau levels. In particular, we present a class of states where both topological order and symmetry breaking arise spontaneously: the states show both fractional Hall conductivity and charge order. This coexistence of topological and conventional Landau order relies on the geometric frustration of the underlying lattice and consequently goes qualitatively beyond physics found in continuous Landau levels with their weak lattice. Supported by the Emmy-Noether program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  14. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Federico; di Giovannantonio, Marco; Contini, Giorgio; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Perepichka, Dmitrii F.

    2016-01-01

    On-surface covalent self-assembly of organic molecules is a very promising bottom-up approach for producing atomically controlled nanostructures. Due to their highly tuneable properties, these structures may be used as building blocks in electronic carbon-based molecular devices. Following this idea, here we report on the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) nanowires produced by surface-catalysed dehalogenative reaction. By scanning tunnelling spectroscopy we follow the quantization of unoccupied molecular states as a function of oligomer length, with Fermi level crossing observed for long chains. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-1D valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the band structure, including the gap size and charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour.

  15. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Federico; Di Giovannantonio, Marco; Contini, Giorgio; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Perepichka, Dmitrii F

    2016-01-01

    On-surface covalent self-assembly of organic molecules is a very promising bottom-up approach for producing atomically controlled nanostructures. Due to their highly tuneable properties, these structures may be used as building blocks in electronic carbon-based molecular devices. Following this idea, here we report on the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) nanowires produced by surface-catalysed dehalogenative reaction. By scanning tunnelling spectroscopy we follow the quantization of unoccupied molecular states as a function of oligomer length, with Fermi level crossing observed for long chains. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-1D valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the band structure, including the gap size and charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. PMID:26725974

  16. 5th Annual Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2008-06-01

    The 5th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration (GCNN) was held in the historic charming capital city of Bucharest, Romania in JW Marriott Grand Hotel on 3-6 March, 2008. The meeting was a unique blend of basic researchers and clinicians across the Globe presenting their recent findings in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in a beautiful exotic ambience. More than 300 students and researchers attended the congress and participated in deliberations. Over 60 representatives from various pharmaceutical industries from all over the world supported this event. This meeting was held for the first time as a joint venture with GCNN and the Society for study on Neuroproetction and Neuroplasticity (SSNN), and was a grand success both scientifically and socially. Thus, these joint meetings of the two societies (GCNN and SSNN) will continue in future in different European cities for the coming 5 years. PMID:18505353

  17. Band-Renormalization Effects and Predominant Antiferromagnetic Order in Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryo; Yokoyama, Hisatoshi

    2016-07-01

    Band renormalization effects (BRE) are comprehensively studied for a mixed state of dx2 - y2-wave superconducting (d-SC) and antiferromagnetic (AF) orders, in addition to simple d-SC, AF, and normal (paramagnetic) states, by applying a variational Monte Carlo method to a two-dimensional Hubbard (t-t'-U) model. In a weakly correlated regime (U/t ≲ 6), BRE are negligible on all the states studied. As previously shown, the effective band of d-SC is greatly renormalized but the modifications of physical quantities, including energy improvement, are negligible. In contrast, BRE on the AF state considerably affects various features of the system. Because the energy is markedly improved for t'/t < 0, the AF state occupies almost the whole underdoped regime in phase diagrams. A doped metallic AF state undergoes a kind of Lifshitz transition at t' = t'{L} ˜ - 0.05t as t'/t varies, irrespective of the values of U/t and δ (doping rate). Pocket Fermi surfaces arise around (π ,0) [(π /2,π /2)] for t' > t'{L} [t' < t'{L}], which corresponds to the electron-hole asymmetry observed in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) spectra. The coexistent state of the two orders is possible basically for t' > t'{L}, because the existence of Fermi surfaces near (π ,0) is a requisite for the electron scattering of {q} = (π ,π ). Actually, the coexistent state appears mainly for t'{L}/t < t'/t ≲ 0.2 in the mixed state. Nevertheless, the AF and coexisting states become unstable toward phase separation for - 0.05 ≲ t'/t ≲ 0.2 but become stable at other values of t'/t owing to the energy reduction by the diagonal hopping of doped holes. We show that this instability does not directly correlate with the strength of d-SC.

  18. 167. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 5TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    167. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 5TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN 5TH AVE. SHOWING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 504, 436, 11, AND 155. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  19. Raman scattering from layered superconductors: Effects of charge ordering, two-band superconductivity, and structural disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialitsin, Aleksej

    Subject of this dissertation is the investigation with experimental means of how the Raman response of three structurally similar materials -- MgB2, NbSe2, and CaC6 -- is affected by superconductivity (all three), charge ordering (NbSe2), or crystalline order-to-disorder phase transitions (CaC6). Universal characteristics of spectral renormalization pertaining to the superconducting phase transition are observed in all three compounds. Yet, the crystalline and electronic structures are sufficiently distinct, such that specific for each compound characteristics are imposed on this superconductivity-induced renormalization. Consequently, the method of polarized Raman scattering has been used to establish a variety of physical concepts: (1) Multi-band superconductivity in the layered superconductor MgB2 and its primary mediation by the strongly coupled 640 cm--1 E2g phonon. Additionally, it is shown how a Josephson-like coupling of two SC condensates in the reciprocal space is responsible for an exotic collective mode, the Leggett's resonance. (2) Interplay between the superconducting and the incommensurate charge-density-wave order parameters in NbSe2, which has been found to be consistent with an isotropic multi-band superconductivity scenario. This scenario is proposed in the frame of a picture that involves a combined 'superconductivity plus charge-density-wave' order parameter. (3) The Fano-Breit-Wigner line-shape formalism to account for an anti-resonance interference in the low temperature Raman response from NbSe2, in the polarization geometry corresponding to the non-symmetric E 2g symmetry channel. (4) Validity of the double resonant Raman scattering picture in the presence of disorder in the graphite intercalation compound CaC6. Simultaneously, it is explored how disorder suppresses superconductivity. To that end, the CaC6 superconducting coherence peak, too, is presented. All these phenomena are manifestations of electron-phonon coupling in solids. It is

  20. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F.; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  1. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-29

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials. PMID:27517772

  2. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  3. Managing Haemophilia for Life: 5th Haemophilia Global Summit.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Cedric; Dolan, Gerry; Jennings, Ian; Windyga, Jerzy; Lobet, Sébastien; Rodríguez-Merchán, E Carlos; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; O'Mahony, Brian

    2015-10-01

    The 5th Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Barcelona, Spain, in September 2014. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and explored issues relevant to the practical management of haemophilia, as well as key opportunities and challenges for care in the future. The topics outlined in this supplement were selected by the Scientific Steering Committee for their relevance to improving haemophilia care globally. In this supplement from the meeting, Gerry Dolan explores pharmacokinetics and dynamics in haemophilia, and Gerry Dolan and Ian Jennings jointly address the role of the laboratory in haemophilia care. The potential benefits of low-dose prophylaxis regimens for people with haemophilia in the developing world are reviewed by Jerzy Windyga, and the question of whether 'Future haemophilia research should be undertaken in the developing world' is debated by Jerzy Windyga and Cedric Hermans. Management strategies for ankle arthropathy are discussed by Sébastien Lobet and E. Carlos Rodríguez-Merchán, and the use of ultrasound for the early detection of haemophilic arthropathy is addressed by Matteo Nicola Dario Di Minno and Víctor Jiménez-Yuste. Finally, the role of patients in the future of haemophilia care is reviewed by Brian O'Mahony. PMID:26350039

  4. Teaching 5th grade science for aesthetic understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Mark A.

    Many scientists speak with great zeal about the role of aesthetics and beauty in their science and inquiry. Few systematic efforts have been made to teach science in ways that appeal directly to aesthetics and this research is designed to do just that. Drawing from the aesthetic theory of Dewey, I describe an analytic lens called learning for aesthetic understanding that finds power in the degree to which our perceptions of the world are transformed, our interests and enthusiasm piqued, and our actions changed as we seek further experiences in the world. This learning theory is contrasted against two other current and popular theories of science learning, that of learning for conceptual understanding via conceptual change theory and learning for a language-oriented or discourse-based understanding. After a lengthy articulation of the pedagogical strategies used to teach for aesthetic understanding the research is described in which comparisons are drawn between students in two 5th grade classrooms---one taught for the goal of conceptual understanding and the other taught for the goal of aesthetic understanding. Results of this comparison show that more students in the treatment classroom had aesthetic experiences with science ideas and came to an aesthetic understanding when studying weather, erosion, and structure of matter than students in the control group. Also statistically significant effects are shown on measures of interest, affect, and efficacy for students in the treatment class. On measures of conceptual understanding it appears that treatment class students learned more and forgot less over time than control class students. The effect of the treatment does not generally depend on gender, ethnicity, or prior achievement except in students' identity beliefs about themselves as science learners. In this case, a significant interaction for treatment class females on science identity beliefs did occur. A discussion of these results as well as elaboration and

  5. Variability Analysis of the Mechanical Parameters in order to Determine the Forming Limit Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraianu, Liana; Bichis, Ioana; Banabic, Dorel

    2011-05-01

    The variability of the so called noise factors greatly influences the results of any forming process (deep-drawing, stretching, etc.). By taking into account this variability, the number of the rejected parts and the manufacturing costs will decrease. The aim of this work is to evaluate the variability of the mechanical parameters of a DC04 steel sheet (0.85 mm thickness). The experimental data needed for evaluating the variability of the mechanical parameters has been obtained from uniaxial tensile tests. A total number of 113 experiments have been made using samples cut at 0°, 45° and 90° with respect to the rolling direction. In this way, the yield stress and the plastic anisotropy coefficient have been determined for each of the orientations mentioned above. The power hardening law offers the possibility to study the variability of the following parameters: yield stress, strength coefficient and strain-hardening exponent. Based on the dispersion of the stress-strain curves, the mechanical coefficients of the Swift hardening law have been determined using a new method. The input parameters exhibiting the most important influence on the scattering of the forming limit diagram have been also established. Finally, in order to determine the Forming Limit Band (FLB), a Monte-Carlo analysis (MCA) has been performed using values and correlations between the mechanical parameters.

  6. PREFACE: 5th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy & Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács-Dajka, Emese; Plachy, Emese; Molnár, László

    2010-04-01

    The 5th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy and Astrophysics was held on 2-4 September 2009 at the Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. This meeting fits into a conference series which can already be considered a tradition where the younger generation has the opportunity to present their work. The event was also a great opportunity for senior astronomers and physicists to form new connections with the next generation of researchers. The selection of invited speakers concentrated on the researchers currently most active in the field, mostly on a post-doctoral/tenure/fresh faculty position level. A number of senior experts and PhD students were also invited. As the conference focused on people rather than a specific field, various topics from theoretical physics to planetology were covered in three days. The programme was divided into six sections: Physics of the Sun and the Solar System Gravity and high-energy physics Galactic and extragalactic astronomy, cosmology Celestial mechanics and exoplanets Infrared astronomy and young stars Variable stars We had the pleasure of welcoming 10 invited review talks from senior researchers and 42 contributed talks and a poster from the younger generation. Participants also enjoyed the hospitality of the pub Pál at the Pálvölgyi-cave after giving, hearing and disputing countless talks. Brave souls even descended to the unbuilt, adventurous Mátyásvölgyi-cave. Memories of the conference were shadowed though. Péter Csizmadia, one of our participants and three other climbers attempted a first ever ascent to the Ren Zhong Feng peak in Sichuan, China, but they never returned from the mountains. Péter departed to China shortly after the conference, with best wishes from participants and friends. We dedicate this volume to his memory. The organisers thankthe Physics Doctoral School of Eötvös University for its hospitality. The workshop was supported by the Mecenatúra and Polányi Mihály Programmes of the National

  7. CuPt atomic ordering and band gap reduction in AlInP for green LED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Daniel; Mukherjee, Kunal; Alberi, Kirstin; Christian, Theresa; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Fitzgerald, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    Efficient light emission in the wavelength range of 575-595nm (green/amber) is necessary for high colour rendering index (CRI) colour-mixed white LED light sources. The present lack of efficient light emitters in this range is known as the 'green gap'. However, it is possible to achieve efficient green/amber light emission with III-V semiconductor alloys, specifically by using direct band gap AlInP alloys, where carrier confinement for device application can result from the band off-set between ordered and disordered material of the same composition. The greater size discrepancy between Al and In results in higher degrees of CuPt atomic ordering and larger band gap reductions than typically reported for other order materials, such as GaInP. Samples are grown lattice matched to InGaAs graded buffer layers grown on GaAs substrates and atomic ordering is observed by TEM. Photoluminescence and modulated reflectance characterization are used to quantify the band gap shift as a function of order parameter.

  8. The utility of a 5th nap in multiple sleep latency test

    PubMed Central

    Lykouras, Dimosthenis; Rees, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background This is the first study that aimed to look specifically at the utility of the 5th nap in the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), a test used to assist in the diagnosis of narcolepsy. Methods Data was retrospectively collected from the Sleep Disorders Centre of a Tertiary Hospital on patients that had a 5th nap during their MSLT from the 08th November 2011 to 12th November 2014. Results Fifty-three patients had a 5th nap performed out of 378 MSLT studies. In 16% of cases a diagnosis of narcolepsy was given directly due to the inclusion of the 5th nap on the MSLT. Here a 5th nap allowed diagnostic criteria of mean sleep latency <8 minutes and >2 SOREMPS to be met. In 53% of cases the mean sleep latency increased due to 5th nap inclusion; the mean sleep latency of the first four naps was 5.6 vs. 6.7 after inclusion of the 5th nap. Conclusions The 5th nap is not often performed within the MSLT studies. Our study shows that only a few patients may benefit from a 5th nap opportunity which also led to increase of the mean sleep latency at the expense of extra time, cost, labour and increased patient anxiety. PMID:26904269

  9. The anomalous Dispersion of the disorder-induced and the second order Raman bands in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, M. A.; Hanlon, E. B.; Marucci, A.; Corio, P.; Brown, S. D. M.; Empedocles, S. A.; Bawendi, M. G.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2001-03-01

    In this work we have studied the dispersion of the disorder-induced (D) and the second order (G^') Raman bands in single wall carbon nanotubes using several laser excitation energies (E_laser) in the range 1.5-3.0 eV. An anomalous step-like behavior was observed in the E_laser dependence of the G^'-band frequency. This result is interpreted as a manifestation of the one-dimensional (1D) behavior of the phonon spectrum in carbon nanotubes.(M. A. Pimenta et al., Brazilian Journal of Physics 30)(2), 423 (2000)

  10. Low index-contrast aperiodically ordered photonic quasicrystals for the development of isotropic photonic band-gap devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya Rose, T.; Di Gennaro, E.; Andreone, A.; Abbate, G.

    2010-05-01

    Photonic quasicrystals (PQCs) have neither true periodicity nor translational symmetry, however they can exhibit symmetries that are not achievable by conventional periodic structures. The arbitrarily high rotational symmetry of these materials can be practically exploited to manufacture isotropic band gap materials, which are perfectly suitable for hosting waveguides or cavities. In this work, formation and development of the photonic bandgap (PBG) in twodimensional 8-, 10- and 12-fold symmetry quasicrystalline lattices of low dielectric contrast (0.4-0.6) were measured in the microwave region and compared with the PBG properties of a conventional hexagonal crystal. Band-gap properties were also investigated by changing the direction of propagation of the incident beam inside the crystal. Various angles of incidence from 0° to 30° were used in order to investigate the isotropic nature of the band-gap.

  11. The 5th Engineering Foundation Conference: Advanced Heterostructure Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    The session on Heterostructure FET's concentrated on power devices. L. Eastman of Cornell University reported 5 W at 4 GHz with 70% efficiency and 15 dB of gain from a GE device, and 1 W at 4 GHz with 80% efficiency from Raytheon. J. Wolter described avalanche breakdown via DX centers in AlGaAs, and theoretical optimization of deep submicron HFET's for power handling was reported by M. Das. Silicon-germanium HBT's have made several improvements. K. Ismail of Cairo University and IBM showed how the Si/SiGe band lineup can be changed by strain relief, producing barriers to electrons as well as holes. Very high mobilities were reported, and the claim was made that SiGe devices at 77 K may be operationally equivalent to III-V devices at room temperature. This would clearly be important given the fabrication advantages of silicon-based technologies. Silicon-germanium HBT technology seemed to be too complex to insert into digital processes, but SiGe FET's may not be. Resonant-tunneling diodes (RTD's) have been combined into potentially multigigahertz shift-register circuits by G. Sollner at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. R. Behringer of AT&T reported experiments in optically controlled patterned growth of Na gratings using a technique that may be applicable to imaging In or Ga atoms during MBE growth. The consequences of optical phonon propagation in AlGaAs structures were discussed experimentally by G. Maracas of Motorola and L. Eastman of Cornell, and theoretically by K. W. Kim of the University of North Carolina. Interesting effects occur because optical phonons in GaAs cannot propagate in AlAs and conversely. HBT papers from III-V materials dwelt on materials issues nad centered on carbon doping and its associated strain and activation.

  12. Wave propagation in ordered, disordered, and nonlinear photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lidorikis, Elefterios

    1999-12-10

    Photonic band gap materials are artificial dielectric structures that give the promise of molding and controlling the flow of optical light the same way semiconductors mold and control the electric current flow. In this dissertation the author studied two areas of photonic band gap materials. The first area is focused on the properties of one-dimensional PBG materials doped with Kerr-type nonlinear material, while, the second area is focused on the mechanisms responsible for the gap formation as well as other properties of two-dimensional PBG materials. He first studied, in Chapter 2, the general adequacy of an approximate structure model in which the nonlinearity is assumed to be concentrated in equally-spaced very thin layers, or 6-functions, while the rest of the space is linear. This model had been used before, but its range of validity and the physical reasons for its limitations were not quite clear yet. He performed an extensive examination of many aspects of the model's nonlinear response and comparison against more realistic models with finite-width nonlinear layers, and found that the d-function model is quite adequate, capturing the essential features in the transmission characteristics. The author found one exception, coming from the deficiency of processing a rigid bottom band edge, i.e. the upper edge of the gaps is always independent of the refraction index contrast. This causes the model to miss-predict that there are no soliton solutions for a positive Kerr-coefficient, something known to be untrue.

  13. Some mice feature 5th pharyngeal arch arteries and double-lumen aortic arch malformations.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-01-01

    A 5th pair of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) has never been identified with certainty in mice. Murines in general are considered to not develop a 5th pair. If true, the significance of the mouse as a model for researching the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries is limited. We aimed to investigate whether mouse embryos develop a 5th pair of PAAs and to identify malformations known to be caused by defective remodelling of the 5th PAAs. We employed the high-resolution episcopic microscopy method for creating digital volume data and three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the great intrathoracic arteries of 30 mouse embryos from days 12-12.5 post conception and 180 mouse fetuses from days 14.5 and 15.5 post conception. The 3D models of the fetuses were screened for the presence of a double-lumen aortic arch malformation. We identified such a malformation in 1 fetus. The 3D models of the embryos were analysed for the presence of 5th PAAs. Six of the 30 embryos (20%) showed a 5th PAA bilaterally, and an additional 9 (30%) showed a 5th PAA unilaterally. Our results prove that some mice do develop a 5th pair of PAAs. They also show that malformations which occur rarely in humans and result from defective remodelling of the left 5th PAA can be identified in mice as well. Thus, the mouse does represent an excellent model for researching the mechanisms driving PAA remodelling and the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries. PMID:22287557

  14. Long-range orders and spin/orbital freezing in the two-band Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Karim; Hoshino, Shintaro; Nomura, Yusuke; Werner, Philipp

    2016-08-01

    We solve the orbitally degenerate two-band Hubbard model within dynamical mean field theory and map out the instabilities to various symmetry-broken phases based on an analysis of the corresponding lattice susceptibilities. Phase diagrams as a function of the Hund coupling parameter J are obtained both for the model with rotationally invariant interaction and for the model with Ising-type anisotropy. For negative J , an intraorbital spin-singlet superconducting phase appears at low temperatures, while the normal state properties are characterized by an orbital-freezing phenomenon. This is the negative-J analog of the recently discovered fluctuating-moment induced s -wave spin-triplet superconductivity in the spin-freezing regime of multiorbital models with J >0 .

  15. Work Values of 5th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Loyde W.; Fenner, Bradford

    1972-01-01

    Self Realization, Job Security, Money, and Altruism were found to be the most important work values, with 5th and 8th grade students differing from 11th grade students on Altruism and Self Realization. (Author)

  16. 25. April 5th one month's work. View looking north. Storehouse ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. April 5th one month's work. View looking north. Storehouse #1 under construction, storehouse #2 site work in progress toward foreground. - U.S. Navy Fleet Supply Base, Storehouse No. 1, 830 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  17. 17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor setback to left and atrium structure to right - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  18. 6. 5TH FLOOR, VIEW NORTH OF KETTLE SOAP STORAGE TANKS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 5TH FLOOR, VIEW NORTH OF KETTLE SOAP STORAGE TANKS (RIGHT) AND WEIGH HOPPERS OVER SITES OF REMOVED AMALGAMATORS (LEFT) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  19. Twenty-Eight Orders of Parametric Resonance in a Microelectromechanical Device for Multi-band Vibration Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contends to be the first to report the experimental observation of up to 28 orders of parametric resonance, which has thus far only been envisioned in the theoretical realm. While theory has long predicted the onset of n orders of parametric resonance, previously reported experimental observations have been limited up to about the first 5 orders. This is due to the rapid narrowing nature of the frequency bandwidth of the higher instability intervals, making practical accessibility increasingly more difficult. Here, the authors have experimentally confirmed up to 28 orders of parametric resonance in a micromachined membrane resonator when electrically undamped. While the implication of this finding spans across the vibration dynamics and transducer application spectrum, the particular significance of this work is to broaden the accumulative operational frequency bandwidth of vibration energy harvesting for enabling self-powered microsystems. Up to 5 orders were recorded when driven at 1.0 g of acceleration across a matched load of 70 kΩ. With a natural frequency of 980 Hz, the fundamental mode direct resonance had a −3 dB bandwidth of 55 Hz, in contrast to the 314 Hz for the first order parametric resonance; furthermore, the half power bands of all 5 orders accumulated to 478 Hz. PMID:27445205

  20. Twenty-Eight Orders of Parametric Resonance in a Microelectromechanical Device for Multi-band Vibration Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-01-01

    This paper contends to be the first to report the experimental observation of up to 28 orders of parametric resonance, which has thus far only been envisioned in the theoretical realm. While theory has long predicted the onset of n orders of parametric resonance, previously reported experimental observations have been limited up to about the first 5 orders. This is due to the rapid narrowing nature of the frequency bandwidth of the higher instability intervals, making practical accessibility increasingly more difficult. Here, the authors have experimentally confirmed up to 28 orders of parametric resonance in a micromachined membrane resonator when electrically undamped. While the implication of this finding spans across the vibration dynamics and transducer application spectrum, the particular significance of this work is to broaden the accumulative operational frequency bandwidth of vibration energy harvesting for enabling self-powered microsystems. Up to 5 orders were recorded when driven at 1.0 g of acceleration across a matched load of 70 kΩ. With a natural frequency of 980 Hz, the fundamental mode direct resonance had a -3 dB bandwidth of 55 Hz, in contrast to the 314 Hz for the first order parametric resonance; furthermore, the half power bands of all 5 orders accumulated to 478 Hz. PMID:27445205

  1. Twenty-Eight Orders of Parametric Resonance in a Microelectromechanical Device for Multi-band Vibration Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper contends to be the first to report the experimental observation of up to 28 orders of parametric resonance, which has thus far only been envisioned in the theoretical realm. While theory has long predicted the onset of n orders of parametric resonance, previously reported experimental observations have been limited up to about the first 5 orders. This is due to the rapid narrowing nature of the frequency bandwidth of the higher instability intervals, making practical accessibility increasingly more difficult. Here, the authors have experimentally confirmed up to 28 orders of parametric resonance in a micromachined membrane resonator when electrically undamped. While the implication of this finding spans across the vibration dynamics and transducer application spectrum, the particular significance of this work is to broaden the accumulative operational frequency bandwidth of vibration energy harvesting for enabling self-powered microsystems. Up to 5 orders were recorded when driven at 1.0 g of acceleration across a matched load of 70 kΩ. With a natural frequency of 980 Hz, the fundamental mode direct resonance had a ‑3 dB bandwidth of 55 Hz, in contrast to the 314 Hz for the first order parametric resonance; furthermore, the half power bands of all 5 orders accumulated to 478 Hz.

  2. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  3. Point-by-point inscription of first-order fiber Bragg grating for C-band applications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y; Zhou, K; Sugden, K; Bennion, I

    2007-12-24

    The influence of the fiber geometry on the point-by-point inscription of fiber Bragg gratings using a femtosecond laser is highlighted. Fiber Bragg gratings with high spectral quality and strong first-order Bragg resonances within the C-band are achieved by optimizing the inscription process. Large birefringence (1.2x10(-4)) and high degree of polarization-dependent index modulation are observed in these gratings. Potential applications of these gratings in resonators are further illustrated. PMID:19551129

  4. Design of high-order HTS dual-band bandpass filters with receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, N.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed two high-order high-temperature superconducting (HTS) dual-band bandpass filters (BPFs) with a receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems. They feature stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with two types of microstrip lines between them. One has a six-pole design, and the other has an eight-pole design. Both were designed to operate at 2.15 GHz with a 43-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the lower passband and at 3.50 GHz with a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the upper one. They were fabricated using YBa2Cu3Oy thin film on a CeO2-bufferd r-Al2O3 substrate. The measured results for both filters agree well with the simulated ones. The HTS dual-band BPF receiver subsystem uses a pulse tube cryocooler and a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA). We measured the frequency response of the six-pole dual-band BPF with and without a wideband LNA with a gain of 10 dB. The measured return losses were close.

  5. Numerical Fluid Dynamics Symposium, 5th, Tokyo, Japan, Dec. 19-21, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    Various papers on numerical fluid dynamics are presented. Individual topics discussed include: numerical analysis (NA) of shock structure problems, CFD development and a future high-speed computer, simulating vortex motion by 3D method, application of CFD to turbomachine design, numerical simulation (NS) of converging shock waves, NS of unsteady 3D shock wave phenomenon, 5th-order accurate compact upwind scheme, development of a multidimensional upwind scheme, fortified solution algorithm, large-eddy simulation of a bound jet, construction of collision model of diatomic molecules, VSL analysis of nonequilibrium flows around a hypersonic body, NA of chemically nonequilibrium flow, topological transition of flow past some axisymmetric bodies, modeling of scalar transport in free turbulence, a contribution to general application of the vortex method. Also addressed are: vortex simulation of artificial control of mixing layers, 3D motion of vortex filaments, Navier-Stokes simulation of 2D mixing layer, active control of vortex shedding frequency by a jet, direct NS of homogeneous turbulent sheer flow, NA of fuel spray jet by Eulerian method, NS of ignition using a premixed pulsed jet, NS of a scram jet combustor flow, numerical simulation of supersonic flow CO chemical laser, adaptive grid generation using optimal control theory, NS of characteristics of the Stalker tube, imcompressible flow solver using velocity vector and a new variable, unsteady analysis of helicopter rotor.

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of possible ferromagnetic ordering in wide band gap ZnO and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Sanyal, D.; Dechoudhury, S.; Bhowmick, D.; Rakshit, T.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-07-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic ordering has been induced in the ZnO thin film by 26 keV C ion implantation. Several orders of resistivity reduction have been observed after C implantation. Ab initio calculations in the frame work of density functional theory indicates that C substitution at the oxygen vacancy site can induce magnetic moment in ZnO. C substitution at zinc vacancy site cannot produce any ferromagnetic moment although zinc vacancy in undoped ZnO induces the same. It has also been shown that ferromagnetic ZnO with sufficient hole concentration at room temperature cannot be realized by adjusting native vacancies only. After C substitution in the system, donor like states appear near the conduction band causing more n-type character compared to undoped ZnO.

  7. The Effects of Biaxial Strain and Chemical Ordering on the Band Gap of InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    WRIGHT,ALAN F.; VANSCHILFGAARDE,MARK

    2000-07-17

    The authors have performed first-principles calculations to examine the effects of biaxial strain and chemical ordering on the band gap of wurtzite In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N in the range 0 {le} x {le} 0.5. The results for unstrained, random alloys are in good agreement with theoretical estimates and measurements on unstrained zinc-blende alloys, but are in poor agreement with recent measurements on strained wurtzite alloys which display significantly lower gaps. Biaxial strain is found to have a non-linear effect on calculated alloy gaps, increasing them for x < 0.25 and decreasing them for x > 0.25. However, the overall agreement with measured wurtzite values remains poor. Chemical ordering along the [0001] direction in strained alloys is found to decrease the band gaps considerably, yielding much improved agreement with measurements. They discuss their results with regard to current theories concerning the optical properties of wurtzite InGaN alloys.

  8. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  9. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  10. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  11. Development of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Chest Model for the 5(th) Percentile Female.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Iwamoto, Masami; Watanabe, Isao; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the human body have been developed to elucidate injury mechanisms due to automotive crashes. However, these models are mainly focused on 50(th) percentile male. As a first step towards a better understanding of injury biomechanics in the small female, a 3D FE model of a 5(th) percentile female human chest (FEM-5F) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of frontal impact, one set of lateral impact, two sets of oblique impact and a series of ballistic impacts. Two previous FE models, a small female Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS-AF05) occupant version 1.0Beta (Kimpara et al. 2002) and the Wayne State University Human Thoracic Model (WSUHTM, Wang 1995 and Shah et al. 2001) were integrated and modified for this model development. The model incorporated not only geometrical gender differences, such as location of the internal organs and structure of the bony skeleton, but also the biomechanical differences of the ribs due to gender. It includes a detailed description of the sternum, ribs, costal cartilage, thoracic spine, skin, superficial muscles, intercostal muscles, heart, lung, diaphragm, major blood vessels and simplified abdominal internal organs and has been validated against a series of six cadaveric experiments on the small female reported by Nahum et al. (1970), Kroell et al. (1974), Viano (1989), Talantikite et al. (1998) and Wilhelm (2003). Results predicted by the model were well-matched to these experimental data for a range of impact speeds and impactor masses. More research is needed in order to increase the accuracy of predicting rib fractures so that the mechanisms responsible for small female injury can be more clearly defined. PMID:17096277

  12. Magnetic ordering in the frustrated J1 - J2 Ising chain candidate BaNd2O4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aczel, Adam A.; Li, Ling; Garlea, Vasile O.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Weickert, Franziska; Jaime, M.; Maiorov, B.; Movshovich, R.; Civale, L.; Keppens, V.; et al

    2014-10-06

    The AR2O4 family (R = rare earth) has recently been attracting interest as a new series of frustrated magnets, with the magnetic R atoms forming zigzag chains running along the c axis. In this paper, we have investigated polycrystalline BaNd2O4 with a combination of magnetization, heat-capacity, and neutron powder diffraction measurements. Magnetic Bragg peaks are observed below TN = 1.7 K, and they can be indexed with a propagation vector of k = (0,1/2,1/2). The signal from magnetic diffraction is well described by long-range ordering of only one of the two types of Nd zigzag chains, with collinear up-up-down-down intrachainmore » spin configurations (double Néel state). Furthermore, low-temperature magnetization and heat-capacity measurements reveal two magnetic-field-induced spin transitions at 2.75 and 4 T for T = 0.46 K. The high-field phase is paramagnetic, while the intermediate-field state may arise from a spin transition of the long-range ordered Nd chains. Finally, one possible candidate for the field-induced ordered state corresponds to an up-up-down intrachain spin configuration, as predicted for a classical J1-J2 Ising chain with a double Néel ground state in zero field.« less

  13. Reflecting on the 5th World Environmental Education Congress, Montreal, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the development of the World Environmental Congress movement and its establishment as an important international forum. Reflecting on the 5th Congress, it notes the particular contribution of the Congress theme, "Our Common Home". Finally, it considers environmental education's place alongside other parallel transformative…

  14. 75 FR 63478 - 5th Annual PHEMCE Stakeholders Workshop and BARDA Industry Day

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ...The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is pleased to announce the upcoming 5th Annual Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise (PHEMCE) Stakeholders Workshop and BARDA Industry Day to be held January 10-12, 2011 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. This annual PHEMCE event will bring together private- and public-sector stakeholders......

  15. A Network Sets Things in Motion: TEDD Celebrates its 5(th) Anniversary.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    At the Annual Meeting at ZHAW Waedenswil on 22 October 2015, the TEDD-Network (Tissue Engineering for Drug Development and Substance Testing) celebrated its 5(th) anniversary. Since its foundation, TEDD has become an internationally renowned competence centre and includes currently 91 members from academia and industry. They cover the entire development and value chain. PMID:26671055

  16. Urban 5th Graders Conceptions during a Place-Based Inquiry Unit on Watersheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endreny, Anna Henderson

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how 33 urban 5th grade students' science conceptions changed during a place-based inquiry unit on watersheds. Research on watershed and place-based education was used as a framework to guide the teaching of the unit as well as the research study. A teacher-researcher designed the curriculum, taught the unit and…

  17. The 5th World Environmental Education Congress, 2009: A Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob; Sauve, Lucie; Briere, Laurence; Niblett, Blair; Root, Emily

    2010-01-01

    This paper contextualizes the 5th World Environmental Education Congress, discusses the theoretical underpinnings of the Congress theme "Earth Our Common Home," and relates this theorizing to the research project that was woven through the Congress. We provide a rationale for engaging in this research project, as an invitation for Congress…

  18. 10. Interior view, working house, scale floor (5th level). View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior view, working house, scale floor (5th level). View facing across floor toward no. 2 scale and garner. Tile structure at left center is weighmaster's shack; view facing east. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  19. An Investigation of Science and Technology Teachers' Views on the 5th Grade Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasdemir, Ikramettin

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the science and technology teachers' views on the implementation of 5th grade science course. Open-ended questions were used as a data collection tool. The study sample consisted of 28 science and technology teachers working in Erzurum in 2012-2013 education year. The data gathered were analysed via content…

  20. Vocabulary and Syntactic Knowledge Factors in 5th Grade Students' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined 5th grade students' levels of vocabulary knowledge and syntactic awareness relative to their reading comprehension performance. The aim was to explore the contributions of vocabulary and syntactic awareness as potential sources of reading comprehension difficulty for these readers. Overall, we found that both vocabulary…

  1. 78 FR 53454 - Filing Dates for the Louisiana Special Elections in the 5th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Louisiana Special Elections in the 5th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Louisiana has...

  2. The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT. A short presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Maselli, A.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.; Piranomonte, S.

    2015-05-01

    The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars is available in a printed version and online at the ASDC website (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat); it is also in the NED database. It presents several relevant changes with respect to the past editions which are briefly described in this paper.

  3. A Longitudinal Study of a 5th Grade Science Curriculum Based on the 5E Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Timothy P.; Schroeder, Carolyn; Tolson, Homer; Huang, Tse-Yang; Williams, Omah M.

    2014-01-01

    The Center for Mathematics and Science Education at Texas A&M University contracted with Region 4 Education Service Center (ESC) and a large, diverse school district to conduct a longitudinal study from 2005-2009. The state achievement test scores of 5th graders who were taught using a Grade 5 science textbook designed by Region 4 ESC were…

  4. Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade "keepin' it REAL" prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step…

  5. Oral Persuasion: A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Dennis W.

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - oral persuasion. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Two pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  6. 9. 5TH FLOOR, INTERIOR DETAIL TO EAST OF SOAP BIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 5TH FLOOR, INTERIOR DETAIL TO EAST OF SOAP BIN No. 4: UPPER SCREWS MOVED SOAP CHIPS HORIZONTALLY FROM BIN TO BIN; LOWER LEFT-AND RIGHT-HAND SCREWS MOVED CHIPS TO CHUTE LEADING TO 3RD FLOOR SOAP MILLS - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  7. How Arizona Compares: Real Numbers and Hot Topics. Policy Choices. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy is pleased to present "How Arizona Compares: Real Numbers and Hot Topics," the 5th edition of Arizona "Policy Choices." The Arizona "Policy Choices" volumes seek to do more than report. They are designed to assist decision making, stimulate debate, and serve as references. Arizona "Policy Choices" volumes have…

  8. The Effect of Progressive Sentence Development Activities on 5th Graders' Description Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamzadayi, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of progressive sentence development activities on 5th graders' description skills. The study was conducted based on the pretest-posttest quasi-experimental model with a control group. A total of 58 students participated in the study; 29 in the control group, and 29 in the experimental group. The…

  9. Successfully Promoting 21st Century Online Research Skills: Interventions in 5th-Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, Tara L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.; Tancock, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative study was developed to explore the ability to impact elementary student 21st Century online research skills with a planned classroom intervention curriculum. The repeated measures quasi-experimental study randomly assigned all 5th grade classes in a Midwestern, suburban school (n = 418) to a 12-week intervention or control…

  10. Effects of temperature and modified atmospheres on diapausing 5th instar codling moth metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diapausing 5th instars of codling moth, Cydia pomonella, are serious quarantine pests of in-shell walnuts. Previous research indicates that heat treatments in combination with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and low concentrations of oxygen may be effective for controlling this pest in walnuts...

  11. Karyotypic evolution and phylogenetic relationships in the order Chiroptera as revealed by G-banding comparison and chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Ao, Lei; Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Gu, Xiaoming; Feng, Qing; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Bats are a unique but enigmatic group of mammals and have a world-wide distribution. The phylogenetic relationships of extant bats are far from being resolved. Here, we investigated the karyotypic relationships of representative species from four families of the order Chiroptera by comparative chromosome painting and banding. A complete set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis (family Vespertilionidae) were hybridized onto metaphases of Cynopterus sphinx (2n = 34, family Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus sinicus (2n=36, family Rhinolophidae) and Aselliscus stoliczkanus (2n=30, family Hipposideridae) and delimited 27, 30 and 25 conserved chromosomal segments in the three genomes, respectively. The results substantiate that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of chromosome evolution in the order Chiroptera, with extensive conservation of whole chromosomal arms. The use of M. myotis (2n=44) probes has enabled the integration of C. sphinx, R. sinicus and A. stoliczkanus chromosomes into the previously established comparative maps between human and Eonycteris spelaea (2n=36), Rhinolophus mehelyi (2n=58), Hipposideros larvatus (2n=32), and M. myotis. Our results provide the first cytogenetic signature rearrangement that supports the grouping of Pteropodidae and Rhinolophoidea in a common clade (i.e. Pteropodiformes or Yinpterochiroptera) and thus improve our understanding on the karyotypic relationships and genome phylogeny of these bat species. PMID:17310301

  12. Topological band-order transition and quantum spin Hall edge engineering in functionalized X-Bi(111) (X = Ga, In, and Tl) bilayer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjae; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J D

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized X-Bi bilayers (X = Ga, In, and Tl) with halogens bonded on their both sides have been recently claimed to be the giant topological insulators due to the strong band inversion strengths. Employing the first-principles electronic structure calculation, we find the topological band order transition from the order p - p - s of the X-Bi bilayers with halogens on their both sides to the new order p - s - p of the bilayers (especially for X = Ga and In) with halogen on one side and hydrogen on the other side, where the asymmetric hydrogen bonding simulates the substrate. We further find that the p - s bulk band gap of the bilayer bearing the new order p - s - p sensitively depends on the electric field, which enables a meaningful engineering of the quantum spin Hall edge state by controlling the external electric field. PMID:27623710

  13. News from the "5th International Meeting on Inflammatory Bowel Diseases" CAPRI 2010.

    PubMed

    Latella, Giovanni; Fiocchi, Claudio; Caprili, Renzo

    2010-12-01

    At the "5th International Meeting on Inflammatory Bowel Diseases selected topics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including the environment, genetics, the gut flora, the cell response and immunomodulation were discussed in order to better understand specific clinical and therapeutic aspects. The incidence of IBD continues to rise, both in low and in high-incidence areas. It is believed that factors associated with 'Westernization' may be conditioning the expression of these disorders. The increased incidence of IBD among migrants from low-incidence to high-incidence areas within the same generation suggests a strong environmental influence. The development of genome-wide association scanning (GWAS) technologies has lead to the discovery of more than 100 IBD loci. Some, as the Th 17 pathway genes, are shared between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), while other are IBD subtype-specific (autophagy genes, epithelial barrier genes). Disease-specific therapies targeting these pathways should be developed. Epigenetic regulation of the inflammatory response also appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The importance of gut flora in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation was reinforced, the concepts of eubiosis and dysbiosis were introduced, and some strategies for reverting dysbiosis to a homeostatic state of eubiosis were proposed. The current status of studies on the human gut microbiota metagenome, metaprotome, and metabolome was also presented. The cell response in inflammation, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses, autophagy and inflammasome-dependent events were related to IBD pathogenesis. It was suggested that inflammation-associated ER stress responses may be a common trait in the pathogenesis of various chronic immune and metabolic diseases. How innate and adaptive immunity signaling events can perpetuate chronic inflammation was discussed extensively. Signal transduction pathways provide intracellular

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Roma BZCAT - 5th edition (Massaro+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2016-02-01

    In the 5th Edition we use similar denomination of blazars adopted in the previous editions. Each blazar is identified by a code, with 5BZ for all blazars, a fourth letter that specifies the type (B, G, Q or U), followed by the truncated equatorial coordinates (J2000). We introduced the edition number before the letters BZ to avoid possible confusion due to the fact that several sources changed their old names because of the new adopted classification. The codes are defined in the "Note (G1)" below. The 5th edition contains 1151 BZB sources, 92 of which are reported as candidates because we could not find their optical spectra in the literature, 1909 BZQ sources, 274 BZG sources and 227 BZU objects (1 data file).

  15. An 8 x 10 to the 5th bit bubble memory cell for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. J.; Murray, G. W.; Bohning, O. D.; Stermer, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple chip magnetic bubble memory cell design developed for NASA embodies the low power, low weight, environmental tolerance and reliability necessary for successful operation in spacecraft launch and mission environments. Packaging of multiple chips in a common magnetic bias, drive coil assembly reduces weight and volume overhead per chip and also reduces the number of coil drive components required. This 8 x 10 to the 5th bit cell is conduction cooled and provides a metal and ceramic sealed hermetic chip environment.

  16. Effects of the 5th and 7th Grade Enhanced Versions of the "keepin' it REAL" Substance Use Prevention Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elek, Elvira; Wagstaff, David A.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the outcomes of adapting the culturally-grounded, middle school, substance-use prevention intervention, "keepin' it REAL" ("kiR"), to target elementary school students and to address acculturation. At the beginning of 5th grade, 29 schools were randomly assigned to conditions obtained by crossing grade of implementation (5th,…

  17. Measuring Listening Comprehension Skills of 5th Grade School Students with the Help of Web Based System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acat, M. Bahaddin; Demiral, Hilmi; Kaya, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to measure listening comprehension skills of 5th grade school students with the help of web based system. This study was conducted on 5th grade students studying at the primary schools of Eskisehir. The scale used in the process of the study is "Web Based Listening Scale". In the process of the study,…

  18. The Effects of Reading from the Screen on the Reading Motivation Levels of Elementary 5th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydemir, Zeynep; Ozturk, Ergun

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of reading from the screen on elementary 5th grade students' reading motivation levels. It used the randomized control-group pretest-posttest model, which is a true experimental design. The study group consisted of 60 students, 30 experimental and 30 control, who were attending the 5th grade of a public…

  19. 47 CFR 90.676 - Transition administrator for reconfiguration of the 806-824/851-869 MHz band in order to separate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transition administrator for reconfiguration of the 806-824/851-869 MHz band in order to separate cellular systems from non-cellular systems. 90.676... cellular systems from non-cellular systems. The Transition Administrator will be an independent party...

  20. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  1. Preface to Special Topic: Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on Optofluidics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Zhenchuan

    2016-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Optofluidics (Optofluidics 2015) was held in Taipei, Taiwan, July 26-29, 2015. The aim of this conference was to provide a forum to promote scientific exchange and to foster closer networks and collaborative ties between leading international researchers in optics and micro/nanofluidics across various disciplines. The scope of Optofluidics 2015 was deliberately broad and interdisciplinary, encompassing the latest advances and the most innovative developments in micro/nanoscale science and technology. Topics ranged from fundamental research to its applications in chemistry, physics, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27076863

  2. Preface to Special Topic: Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on Optofluidics

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Zhenchuan

    2016-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Optofluidics (Optofluidics 2015) was held in Taipei, Taiwan, July 26–29, 2015. The aim of this conference was to provide a forum to promote scientific exchange and to foster closer networks and collaborative ties between leading international researchers in optics and micro/nanofluidics across various disciplines. The scope of Optofluidics 2015 was deliberately broad and interdisciplinary, encompassing the latest advances and the most innovative developments in micro/nanoscale science and technology. Topics ranged from fundamental research to its applications in chemistry, physics, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27076863

  3. A Social Medium: ASM's 5th Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria Meeting in Review

    PubMed Central

    Federle, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The 5th American Society for Microbiology Conference on Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria (CCCB-5), which convened from 18 to 21 October 2014 in San Antonio, TX, highlighted recent advances in our understanding of microbial intercellular signaling. While the CCCB meetings arose from interests in pheromone signaling and quorum sensing, it was evident at CCCB-5 that the cell-cell communication field is continuing to mature, expanding into new areas and integrating cutting-edge technologies. In this minireview, we recap some of the research discussed at CCCB-5 and the questions that have arisen from it. PMID:25917904

  4. PREFACE: The 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Thomas G.; Pappas, Evangelos

    2009-07-01

    The International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL) is held every two years. Its purpose is to bring together basic science and clinical researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from around the world to discuss the state-of-the-art of the gel dosimetry technique and to set the directions and trends for its future improvements. Gel dosimetry can be broadly defined as using a gel that can react to the absorption of ionizing radiation, and that can retain this information which can subsequently be retrieved by an external imaging modality. Examples of radiation-sensitive gels include, but are not limited to, polymer gel dosimeters, Fricke gel dosimeters and others. Imaging modalities that are of general use in this field are (in alphabetical order) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical light computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography. This volume comprises the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry (DOSGEL 2008). The conference, organised by the University of Crete, Medical Physics Department, took place in Hersonissos, Crete, Greece from 29 September to 3 October 2008. The meeting aimed to continue the series of biannual DOSGEL conferences and focused on the promotion of gel dosimetry techniques by setting the trends for their future improvements. The main scientific session topics of DOSGEL 2008 were the following: Chemistry and fundamental properties of polymer gel dosimeters Gel dosimetry with Optical Computed Tomography Gel dosimetry with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gel dosimetry with other than Optical CT and MR scan Techniques Other 3D dosimeters Gel dosimetry applications Local Organizing Committee Thomas G Maris (University of Crete, Greece, Chairman DOSGEL 2008) John Damilakis (University of Crete, Greece) Evangelos Pappas (University of Crete, Greece) Antonios Papadakis (University of Crete, Greece) Fotini Zacharopoulou (University of Crete, Greece) John Stratakis (University of Crete

  5. 5th Bionanotox and Applications International Research Conference, Peabody, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabb, Taneicie; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2011-06-01

    "BioNanoTox and Toxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery" was this year's theme at the 5th BioNanoTox and Applications International Research Conference held at the Peabody Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas on November 4-5th, 2010. This year, the international participation in this conference increased to 25 countries spanning the globe. The conference began with opening remarks by Paul Howard, Associate Director of the National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, United States. Two keynote speakers, Dr. Ananth V. Annapragada and Dr. Merle G. Paule presented lectures on "Toxicity of Novel Nanoparticles for CT imaging" and "The Biology of Neurotoxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery", respectively. Teachers, students, faculty, and scientists presented oral and poster presentations on fundamental and translational research related to BioNanoTox and related fields of science. Six presentation sessions were held over the two-day conference. There were 31 presentations and 39 posters from disciplines ranging from biology to chemistry, toxicology, nanotechnology, computational sciences, mathematics, engineering, plant science, and biotechnology. Poster presentation awards were presented to three high school students, three high school teachers, and three college students. In addition to poster awards a memorial, travel, and BioNanoTox award were presented. This year's meeting paved the way for a more outstanding meeting for the future.

  6. A first-order radiative transfer model for microwave radiometry of forest canopies at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic radiative transfer model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals ...

  7. Exploratory Factor Analysis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th Edition, Criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Lauren B; Koch, Ellen I; Saules, Karen K; Jefferson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    One change to the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) nomenclature highlighted in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th Edition (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) is the conceptualization of PTSD as a diagnostic category with four distinct symptom clusters. This article presents exploratory factor analysis to test the structural validity of the DSM-5 conceptualization of PTSD via an online survey that included the PTSD Checklist-5. The study utilized a sample of 113 college students from a large Midwestern university and 177 Amazon Mechanical Turk users. Participants were primarily female, Caucasian, single, and heterosexual with an average age of 32 years. Approximately 30% to 35% of participants met diagnostic criteria for PTSD based on two different scoring criteria. Results of the exploratory factor analysis revealed five distinct symptom clusters. The implications for the classification of PTSD are discussed. PMID:26669983

  8. Genomics into Healthcare: The 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Fortina, Paolo; AlKhaja, Najib; Al Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Nair, Pratibha; Innocenti, Federico; Patrinos, George P.; Kricka, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    The joint 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium, “Genomics into Healthcare” was coorganized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in collaboration with the Golden Helix Foundation (http://www.goldenhelix.org) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 19 November, 2013. The meeting was attended by over 900 participants, doctors and biomedical students from over 50 countries and was organized into a series of nine themed sessions that covered cancer genomics and epigenetics, genomic and epigenetic studies, genomics of blood and metabolic disorders, cytogenetic diagnosis and molecular profiling, next-generation sequencing, consanguinity and hereditary diseases, clinical genomics, clinical applications of pharmacogenomics, and genomics in public health. PMID:24526565

  9. Dental health in antique population of Vinkovci - Cibalae in Croatia (3rd-5th century).

    PubMed

    Peko, Dunja; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-08-01

    Roman city Cibalae (Vinkovci) - the birthplace of Roman emperors Valentinian I and Valens was a very well developed urban ares in the late antique what was evidenced by numerous archaeological findings. The aim of this paper is to get insight in dental health of antique population of Cibalae. One hundred individuals with 2041 teeth dated to 3rd - 5th century AD have been analyzed for caries, antemortem tooth loss, periapical diseases and tooth wear. Prevalence of antemortem tooth loss was 4.3% in males, 5.2% in females. Prevalence of caries per tooth was 8.4% in males, 7.0% in females. Compared to other Croatian antique sites, ancient inhabitants of Roman Cibalae had rather good dental health with low caries prevalence and no gender differences. Statistically significant difference was found between males in females in the prevalence of periapical lesions and degree of tooth wear. Periapical lesions were found only in males. PMID:27598951

  10. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  11. APTWG: The 5th Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Sun, Y. W.; Gao, Z.; Inagaki, S.; Chen, W.; Zhang, T.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-03-01

    This conference report gives a summary on the contributed papers and discussions presented at the 5th Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting held at Dalian, China from 9-12 June 2015. The main goal of the working group is to develop a predictive understanding of the basic mechanisms responsible for particle, momentum and energy transport in magnetically confined plasmas. The topics of the meeting in 2015 were organized under five main headings: (1) turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation, (2) effect of magnetic topology on MHD activity and transport, (3) non-diffusive contribution of momentum and particle transport, (4) non-local transport and turbulence spreading and coupling and (5) energetic particles and instability. The Young Researchers’ Forum which was held at this meeting is also described in this report.

  12. Recurrent Idiopathic Catatonia: Implications beyond the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, Stanley N.; Hurford, Irene; Bleier, Henry R.; Gorton, Gregg E.; Campbell, E. Cabrina

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of recurrent, life-threatening, catatonic stupor, without evidence of any associated medical, toxic or mental disorder. This case provides support for the inclusion of a separate category of “unspecified catatonia” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5) to be used to classify idiopathic cases, which appears to be consistent with Kahlbaum’s concept of catatonia as a distinct disease state. But beyond the limited, cross-sectional, syndromal approach adopted in DSM-5, this case more importantly illustrates the prognostic and therapeutic significance of the longitudinal course of illness in differentiating cases of catatonia, which is better defined in the Wernicke-Kleist-Leonhard classification system. The importance of differentiating cases of catatonia is further supported by the efficacy of antipsychotics in treatment of this case, contrary to conventional guidelines. PMID:26243853

  13. Design of broadband class-F power amplifier with high-order harmonic suppression for S-band application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junming, Lin; Guohao, Zhang; Yaohua, Zheng; Sizhen, Li; Zhihao, Zhang; Sidi, Chen

    2015-12-01

    A broadband class-F power amplifier for an S-band handset device is integrated on a 3 × 3 × 0.82 mm3 die using an InGaP/GaAs HBT process. With LC serial harmonic traps immersed into the broadband output matching circuit, good harmonic suppression performance can be achieved. A pure resistive impedance of the matching circuit, but near zero at second and infinite at third harmonic frequency, which enhances the efficiency, is obtained across 1.8-2.5 GHz. Tested with a continuous wave (CW) signal, the PA delivers an output power of 34 dBm and achieves a PAE of 57% at 2 GHz. In addition, excellent harmonic suppression levels of less than -53 dBc across the second to fifth harmonic are obtained.

  14. Mechanism of the Band Gap Opening across the Order-Disorder Transition of Si(111)4x1-In

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Carlos M; Guo, Jianchang; Ortega, J.; Flores, Fernando; Weitering, Harm H

    2009-03-01

    The ground state properties of indium atom chains on the Si(111)8 x 2-In surface and the nature of their insulator-metal (IM) transition near 120 K are under intense dispute. We compare experimental scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of the low temperature (LT) 8 x 2 phase with STM image calculations from Density Functional Theory (DFT). Our LT studies clearly indicate the existence of a frozen shear distortion between neighboring atom chains, resulting in the formation of indium hexagons. Tunneling spectra furthermore indicate that the IM transition coincides with the collapse of a -0.3 eV surface-state band gap at the r point of the 4 x 2 Brillouin zone. This implies that the IM transition is driven by a shear phonon, not by Fermi surface nesting.

  15. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a new first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic r-co model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over moderately to densely vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. A first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. The new model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the i-w model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The new model is tested against 1.4 GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the T-w model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the angle and polarization of the microwave observation.

  16. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic Tau-Omega model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. The first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. This model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the . model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The model is tested against 1.4-GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data, and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the . model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the incidence angle and polarization of the microwave observation. Index Terms Emission,microwave radiometry, scattering, soil, vegetation.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of the red-banded lobster Metanephrops thomsoni (Crustacea, Astacidea, Nephropidae): a novel gene order.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dong-Ha; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Joong-Ki; Kim, Sanghee

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the red-banded lobster, Metanephrops thomsoni (Decapoda, Astacidea, Nephropidae), is 19,835 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 24 transfer RNAs (including additional copies of trnW and trnL1), and 2 control regions (CR). The mitogenome of M. thomsoni has 10 long intergenic sequences (71-237 bp) with a high AT content (70.0%). The two CRs show 59.6% similarity and have an identical sequence region with a length of 295 bp. The mitogenome of M. thomsoni shows a novel gene arrangement compared with the pancrustacean ground pattern and is identical to that of M. sibogae, except for the two additional tRNAs (trnW and trnL1). Phylogenetic tree from maximum likelihood analysis using the concatenated sequences of 13 PCGs depicted M. thomsoni as one of the members of the superfamily Nephropoidea within Astacidea. PMID:26258503

  18. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  19. Need for Specific Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Lessons for 4th and 5th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Jacobs, Laurel; Waits, Juanita; Hartz, Vern; Martinez, Stephanie H.; Standfast, Rebecca D.; Farrell, Vanessa A.; Bawden, Margine; Whitmer, Evelyn; Misner, Scottie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) is linked to obesity. We hypothesized that school-based nutrition education would decrease SSB consumption. Design Self-selected interventional cohort with random selection for pre and post measurements Setting Arizona SNAP-Ed eligible schools Participants Randomly selected (9%) 4th and 5th grade classroom students Intervention The University of Arizona Nutrition Network (UANN) provided general nutrition education training and materials to teachers, to be delivered to their students. The UANN administered behavioral questionnaires to students in both Fall and Spring. Main Outcome Measure(s) Change in SSB consumption Analyses Descriptive statistics were computed for student demographics and beverage consumption on the day prior to testing. Paired t-tests evaluated change in classroom averages. Linear regression assessed potential correlates of SSB consumption. Results Fall mean SSB consumption was 1.1 (±0.2) times; mean milk and water intake were 1.6 (±0.2) and 5.2 (±0.7) times, respectively. Beverage consumption increased (3.2%) in springtime, with increased SSBs (14.4%) accounting for the majority (p=0.006). Change in SSB consumption was negatively associated with baseline SSB and water consumption, but positively associated with baseline milk fat (p≤0.05). Conclusions and Implications The results suggest the need for beverage specific education to encourage children to consume more healthful beverages in warmer weather. PMID:25239840

  20. Nernst-Ettingshausen effect at the trivial-nontrivial band ordering in topological crystalline insulator Pb1-x Sn x Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybko, K.; Pfeffer, P.; Szot, M.; Szczerbakow, A.; Reszka, A.; Story, T.; Zawadzki, W.

    2016-01-01

    The transverse Nernst-Ettingshausen (N-E) effect and electron mobility in Pb1-xSn x Se alloys are studied experimentally and theoretically as functions of temperature and chemical composition in the vicinity of vanishing energy gap E g . The study is motivated by the recent discovery that, by lowering the temperature, one can change the band ordering from a trivial to nontrivial one in which the topological crystalline insulator states appear at the surface. Our work presents several new aspects. It is shown experimentally and theoretically that the bulk N-E effect has a maximum when the energy gap E g of the mixed crystal goes through zero value. This result contradicts the claim made in the literature that the N-E effect changes sign when the gap vanishes. We successfully describe dc transport effects in the situation of extreme band’s nonparabolicity which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been tried before. A situation is reached in which both two-dimensional bands (topological surface states) and three-dimensional bands are linear in electron k vector. Various scattering modes and their contribution to transport phenomena in Pb1-x Sn x Se are analyzed. As the energy gap goes through zero, some transport integrals have a singular (nonphysical) behaviour and we demonstrate how to deal with this problem by introducing damping.

  1. When should orthostatic blood pressure changes be evaluated in elderly: 1st, 3rd or 5th minute?

    PubMed

    Soysal, Pinar; Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Koc Okudur, Saadet; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2016-01-01

    Detection of orthostatic hypotension (OH) is very important in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality, ischemic stroke, falls, cognitive failure and depression. It was aimed to determine the most appropriate time for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in elderly. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) including Head up Tilt Table (HUT) test was performed in 407 geriatric patients. Orthostatic changes were assessed separately for the 1st, 3rd and 5th minutes (HUT1, HUT3 and HUT5, respectively) taking the data in supine position as the basis. The mean age, recurrent falls, presence of dementia and Parkinson's disease, number of drugs, alpha-blocker and anti-dementia drug use, and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the patients with versus without OH; whereas, albumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly lower (p<0.05). However, different from HUT3 and HUT5, Charlson Comorbidity Index and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were higher, the use of antidiabetics, antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, opioid and levodopa were more common (p<0.05). Statistical significance of the number of drugs and fasting blood glucose level was prominent in HUT1 as compared to HUT3 (p<0.01, p<0.05). Comparison of the patients that had OH only in HUT1, HUT3or HUT5 revealed no difference in terms of CGA parameters. These results suggests that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined at the 1st minute might be more important for geriatric practice. Moreover, 1st minute measurement might be more convenient in the elderly as it requires shorter time in practice. PMID:27077324

  2. 5th International conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Bikash; Alam, Jan-E.; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2006-11-01

    The 5th International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPAQGP 2005) was held on 8 - 12 February 2005 at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics campus, Kolkata, India. The conference was enriched by the august presence of about 300 participants representing 18 countries across the globe. It had plenary talks and oral presentations, which form a part of these proceedings. Besides invited and contributed talks there were also a large number of poster presentations. The conference was energized by discussions of fresh experimental data from RHIC on strong elliptic flow, jet quenching, single photon spectra etc. Moreover, new theoretical results were brought to the discussion forum during this conference. Colour glass condensates, hydrodynamical flow, jet quenching and sQGP were intensely debated by the participants. The highlight of ICPAQGP 2005 was the presentation of fresh experimental results from the RHIC-IV run. The ICPAQGP series, since its inception in 1988, has placed emphasis on the role of quark matter in the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. The subsequent conferences held in 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 had also retained this focus. The conference was preceded by a Fest Colloquium in honour of Professor Bikash Sinha. Professor Sinha, regarded as the pioneer in establishing quark gluon plasma research in India, has successfully encouraged a group of young Indian researchers to devote themselves wholeheartedly to QGP research - both theoretical and experimental. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role mainly in the selection of speakers. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from selecting the contributory talks posters down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both committees for making ICPAQGP 2005 an interesting platform for scientific deliberation. The ICPAQGP 2005 was supported financially by

  3. Freezing Rain Diagnostic Study Over Eastern Canada Using the 5th Generation Canadian Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresson, É.; Paquin, D.; Laprise, R.; Theriault, J. M.; de Elía, R.

    2015-12-01

    Northeastern North America is often affected by freezing rain events during the cold season. They can have significant consequences (from road accidents, to severe power outages) despite their intensity and duration. The 1998 Ice Storm over Eastern Canada and Northeastern United States is an example of an extreme event with catastrophic consequences. A total of up to 150 mm of ice accumulated during 10 days were observed in some areas. This natural disaster has highlighted the need to better understand how such phenomena will evolve with future climate scenario. The goal is to investigate the feasibility of using regional climate modeling to diagnose the occurrence of freezing rain events over Quebec (Canada). To address this issue, we used the 5th generation of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5), from 1979 to 2014. An empirical method (Bourgouin, 2000) developed to determine the type of winter precipitations was chosen to diagnose freezing rain events. The study focused in the Montreal area and the St. Lawrence River Valley (Quebec, Canada). The sensitivity of the model to horizontal resolution was explored by using three resolutions: 0.44°, 0.22° and 0.11°. In general, freezing rain was diagnosed consistently at all resolutions but the higher one (0.11°) produced more realistic results due to a better representation of the orography. Using the higher resolution, the results showed that the climatology of the freezing rain occurrence in the Montreal area is comparable to available observations. It also suggested that the role of the specific orography of the region with the St. Lawrence River Valley can impact the characteristics of freezing rain events in this area. Overall, this study will contribute to a better preparedness for such events in the future. High resolution regional climate simulations are essential to improve the reproduction of local scale orographically-forced phenomena.

  4. Black sea surface temperature anomaly on 5th August 1998 and the ozone layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manev, A.; Palazov, K.; Raykov, St.; Ivanov, V.

    2003-04-01

    BLACK SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY ON 5th AUGUST 1998 AND THE OZONE LAYER THICKNESS A. Manev , K. Palazov , St. Raykov, V. Ivanov Solar Terrestrial Influences Laboratory, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences amanev@abv.bg This paper focuses on the peculiarities of the Black Sea surface temperature anomaly on 05.08.1998. Researching the daily temperature changes in a number of control fields in the course of 8-10 years, we have found hidden correlations and anomalous deviations in the sea surface temperatures on a global scale. Research proves the statistical reliability of the temperature anomaly on the entire Black Sea surface registered on 04.-05.08.1998. In the course of six days around these dates the temperatures are up to 2°C higher than the maximum temperatures in this period in the other seven years. A more detailed analysis of the dynamics of the anomaly required the investigation of five Black Sea surface characteristic zones of 75x75 km. The analysis covers the period 20 days - 10 days before and 10 days after the anomaly. Investigations aimed at interpreting the reasons for the anomalous heating of the surface waters. We have tried to analyze the correlation between sea surface temperature and the global ozone above the Black Sea by using simultaneously data from the two satellite systems NOAA and TOMS. Methods of processing and comparing the data from the two satellite systems are described. The correlation coefficients values for the five characteristic zones are very high and close, which proves that the character of the correlation ozone - sea surface temperature is the same for the entire Black Sea surface. Despite the high correlation coefficient, we have proved that causality between the two phenomena at the time of the anomaly does not exit.

  5. Patterns of Irregular Burials in Western Europe (1st-5th Century A.D.)

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco; Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Knüsel, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Irregular burials (IB—burials showing features that contrast with the majority of others in their geographic and chronological context) have been the focus of archaeological study because of their relative rarity and enigmatic appearance. Interpretations of IB often refer to supposed fear of the dead or to social processes taking place in time-specific contexts. However, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of IB for various geographical contexts is still lacking, a fact that hampers any discussion of these burials on a larger scale. Methods Here, we collected a bibliographic dataset of 375 IB from both Britain and Continental Europe, altogether spanning a time period from the 1st to the 5th century AD. Each burial has been coded according to ten dichotomous variables, further analyzed by means of chi-squared tests on absolute frequencies, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Results Even acknowledging the limits of this study, and in particular the bias represented by the available literature, our results point to interesting patterns. Geographically, IB show a contrast between Britain and Continental Europe, possibly related to historical processes specific to these regions. Different types of IB (especially prone depositions and depositions with the cephalic extremity displaced) present a series of characteristics and associations between features that permit a more detailed conceptualization of these occurrences from a socio-cultural perspective that aids to elucidate their funerary meaning. Conclusions and Significance Altogether, the present work stresses the variability of IB, and the need to contextualize them in a proper archaeological and historical context. It contributes to the discussion of IB by providing a specific geographic and chronological frame of reference that supports a series of hypotheses about the cultural processes possibly underlying their occurrence. PMID:26115408

  6. Experimental study of a W-band Gyroklystron amplifier operated in the high-order TE021 cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasypkin, E. V.; Gachev, I. G.; Antakov, I. I.

    2012-10-01

    We present experimental results for a 93.2-GHz gyroklystron amplifier operated in the high-order TE021 cavity mode in a cryomagnet. In a three-cavity gyroklystron, a peak output power of 340 kW with 27% efficiency, 23-dB saturated gain, and 0.41% (380 MHz) bandwidth was obtained with a 75-kV, 17-A electron beam. The output-power and efficiency restriction was due to the selfexcitation of the TE021 operating mode in the output cavity. The influence of the electron beam current and intermediate cavity Q-factor on output characteristics of a three-cavity gyroklystron has been studied experimentally.

  7. Factors influencing the temporal growth rate of the high order TM{sub 0n} modes in the Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dapeng Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan

    2015-06-15

    When the wavelength of overmoded Cherenkov oscillator goes into Ka-band, power handling capacity becomes an essential issue. Using the TM{sub 02} mode or higher order TM{sub 0n} modes as the operating mode is a potential solution. This paper is aimed to find some proper parameters to make the temporal growth rate of the TM{sub 02} mode higher in our previously studied Gigawatt (GW)-class Ka band oscillator. An accurate and fast calculation method of the “hot” dispersion equation is derived for rectangular corrugated SWSs, which are widely used in the high frequency Cherenkov devices. Then, factors that affect the temporal growth rate of the high order TM{sub 0n} modes are analyzed, including the depth of corrugation, the radius of drift tube, and the diode voltage. Results show that, when parameters are chosen properly, the temporal growth rate of the TM{sub 02} mode can be as high as 0.3 ns{sup −1}.

  8. WWW.com: A Brief Intervention to Bolster a 5th Grader's Regrouping Skills in Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Matthew; Harrison, Gina L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a brief math intervention using cognitive behaviour instruction (CBI) supplemented by a mnemonic cue system for a 5th grade student with math computation and fluency difficulties. Regrouping operations in addition and subtraction were the targeted skills. Curriculum-based measurements were conducted at the end…

  9. Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (5th, Chania, Greece, June 19-21, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Educational Data Mining Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2012) is held in picturesque Chania on the beautiful Crete island in Greece, under the auspices of the International Educational Data Mining Society (IEDMS). The EDM 2012 conference is a leading international forum for high quality research that mines large data sets of educational…

  10. Comparing Science Learning among 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-Grade Students: STS versus Textbook-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Robert E.; Choi, AeRan; Yager, Stuart O.; Akcay, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade teachers from five school districts each taught two sections of science--one with a Science-Technology-Society (STS) approach and the other with a more traditional textbook approach in which basic science concepts were the major organizers. Local, current, and personally relevant issues provided the context and…

  11. Process Evaluation of "Learn Young, Learn Fair": A Stress Management Programme for 5th and 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard; Lamberts, Petra; Vugts, Odette; Kok, Gerjo; Fekkes, Minne; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the process evaluation of a stress management program called "Learn Young, Learn Fair" for 5th and 6th graders. Studies, reviews and meta-analyses of prevention programs report that a common limitation in studies is the restricted documentation of process factors that contribute to the success of interventions. Program…

  12. Communicating Science to Impact Learning? A Phenomenological Inquiry into 4th and 5th Graders' Perceptions of Science Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelmez Burakgazi, Sevinc; Yildirim, Ali; Weeth Feinstein, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Rooted in science education and science communication studies, this study examines 4th and 5th grade students' perceptions of science information sources (SIS) and their use in communicating science to students. It combines situated learning theory with uses and gratifications theory in a qualitative phenomenological analysis. Data were gathered…

  13. From Cooks to Carpenters: Measuring - A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Helena

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - measuring. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Three pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  14. Brief Report: Data on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5th Ed.) in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coolican, Jamesie; Bryson, Susan E.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2008-01-01

    The Fifth Edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (SB5; Roid, G. H. (2003). "Stanford Binet intelligence scales" (5th ed.). Itasca, IL: Riverside Publishing) is relatively new, with minimal published research on general populations and none with special populations. The present study provides information on the cognitive profiles of…

  15. Health in the 5th 5-years Development Plan of Iran: Main Challenges, General Policies and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Vosoogh Moghaddam, A; Damari, B; Alikhani, S; Salarianzedeh, Mh; Rostamigooran, N; Delavari, A; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    Access to the right to the highest attainable level of health is a constitutional right that obliges governments and other players to take step to increase all individuals' chances of obtaining good health. At the least, health and education are two crucial requirements for this as well. Iran's vision 2025 is going to lead the country to a developed state with the highest rank of economic, scientific and technological status in the region. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social security, equal opportunities, etc, are also considered as part of characteristics of Iranian society in 2025. Although health system of Iran has many achievements in providing health services specially for the poor following the Islamic Revolution of 1979, but the evidences gathered to develop the 5(th) 5-years economical, social and cultural plan (5(th)5YDP:2011-2015), listed a variety of main challenges in stewardship, financing, resources generation and service provision functions of the existing health system. Thus, to overcome the main challenges, about 11% of general policies of 5(th)5YDP are directly address health related issues with emphasizing on healthy human and comprehensive health approach with considering: Integration of policy making, planning, evaluation, supervision and public financing; Developing both quantity and quality of health insurance system and reducing out-of-pocket expenditures for health services to 30% by the end of the 5th plan. The strategies of 5(th)5YDP adopted by the parliament as an Act will change the health system fundamentally through tuning the main drivers; so, its implementation needs brave leaders, capable managers, motivated technical staff and social mobilization. PMID:23865015

  16. FOREWORD: 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourc'h, Eric; Rodet, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific research presented during the 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2015 (http://complement.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2015.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 29, 2015. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011, and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012, May 2013 and May 2014. The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, Kernel methods, learning methods

  17. PREFACE: 5th International EEIGM/AMASE/FORGEMAT Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, Zoubir; Czerwiec, Thierry; Horwat, David; Jamart, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, contains manuscripts of talks that will be presented at the 5th International EEIGM/AMASE/FORGEMAT Conference on Advanced Materials Research that will be held at the Ecole Européenne d'Ingénieurs en Génie des Matériaux - European School of Materials Science and Engineering (EEIGM) in Nancy on November 4-5 2009. The conference will be organized by the EEIGM. The aim of the conference is to bring together scientists from the six European universities involved in the EEIGM and in the ''Erasmus Mundus'' AMASE Master (Advanced Materials Science and Engineering) programmes and in the Tempus FORGEMAT European project: Nancy-Université - EEIGM/INPL (Nancy, France), Universität des Saarlandes (Saarbrücken, Germany), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya - ETSEIB (Barcelona, Spain), Luleå Tekniska Universitet (Luleå, Sweden), Universidad Politecnica de Valencia - ETSII (Valencia, Spain) and AGH University of Science and Technology, (Kralow, Poland). This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and it will provide a forum for exchange of ideas, cooperation and future directions by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, equally shared between the four editors, 26 papers have been selected for publication in this issue. The papers are grouped together into different subject categories: polymers, metallurgy, ceramics, composites and nanocomposites, simulation and characterization. The editors would like to take this opportunity to thank all the participants who submitted their manuscripts during the conference and responded in time to the editors' request at every stage from reviewing to final acceptance. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for painstakingly reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are called for the sponsors of the conference including

  18. Storm Peak Laboratory 5th-6th Grade Climate and Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    science. At the end of the day each student has a data sheet with measurements recorded from 5 locations of different elevations to take back to the classroom. Following the field trip, SPL scientists and educators visit the school for a follow-up to help children grasp concepts, represent their data set collected in graphical formats, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. Currently, approximately 250 students annually participate in the SPL 5th and 6th grade climate education program.

  19. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  20. EDITORIAL: 5th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV'03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyung Jin; Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2004-06-01

    The advent of particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the late 20th century brought about a paradigm change in the technique of flow field measurement, from point measurement to field measurement. This revolution is a result of the recent advances in computers, video cameras, optics and lasers and a deeper understanding of the theory of image processing, and such advances continue by keeping pace with leading-edge technologies such as biotechnology, nanotechnology and so forth. Recently, the PIV technique has been extended in new directions such as stereoscopic PIV, holographic PIV, dynamic PIV, micro PIV and simultaneous PLIF/PIV techniques. This special issue contains research dealing with many of the most recent developments in PIV. The papers were selected from more than 120 papers presented at the 5th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV'03) held in Busan, Korea, during 22-24 September 2003. Special thanks are due to the invited speakers who have contributed their original work to this special issue, which will enhance the academic reputation of Measurement Science and Technology (MST). Fourteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of PIV'03. After the standard refereeing process of MST, nine papers were finally accepted for publication. The selected papers can be categorized into three groups: new PIV algorithms and evaluation methods, three-dimensional velocity field measurement techniques and micro/bio PIV applications. As a new PIV technique, Lecuona et al introduced PIV evaluation algorithms for industrial applications having high shear flow structures. Billy et al used a single-pixel-based cross-correlation method for measuring flow inside a microchannel. Foucaut et al carried out PIV optimization using spectral analysis for the study of turbulent flows. Doh et al applied a 3D PTV method to the wake behind a sphere using three CCD cameras. Hori and Sakakibara developed a high-speed scanning stereoscopic PIV system and

  1. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  2. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new

  3. Socioeconomic assessment of the proposed inactivation of the 5th Fighter Interceptor Squadron Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, C.R.; Sage, P.L.; Fichera, J.P.; Lufkin, P.; Stadelman, D.

    1988-12-01

    This assessment examines the potential socioeconomic impacts of inactivating the 5th Fighter Interceptor Squadron (FIS) at Minot Air Force Base (AFB), North Dakota. The study focuses on employment, population, and income impacts and estimates their effects on housing, community services, utilities, transportation, recreation and tourism, and public finance. This assessment is intended primarily for the use of Air Force and community planners concerned with the local consequences of the inactivation. 10 refs., 46 tabs.

  4. Summative assessment of 5th year medical students’ clinical reasoning by script concordance test: requirements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has not been reported in summative assessment of students across the multiple domains of a medical curriculum. We report the steps used to build a test for summative assessment in a medical curriculum. Methods A 51 case, 158-question, multidisciplinary paper was constructed to assess clinical reasoning in 5th-year. 10–16 experts in each of 7 discipline-based reference panels answered questions on-line. A multidisciplinary group considered reference panel data and data from a volunteer group of 6th Years, who sat the same test, to determine the passing score for the 5th Years. Results The mean (SD) scores were 63.6 (7.6) and 68.6 (4.8) for the 6th Year (n = 23, alpha = 0.78) and and 5th Year (n = 132, alpha =0.62) groups (p < 0.05), respectively. The passing score was set at 4 SD from the expert mean. Four students failed. Conclusions The SCT may be a useful method to assess clinical reasoning in medical students in multidisciplinary summative assessments. Substantial investment in training of faculty and students and in the development of questions is required. PMID:22571351

  5. Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in 1.5th Generation, 2nd Generation Immigrant Children, and Foreign Adoptees.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tony Xing

    2016-10-01

    Existing theories (e.g., acculturative stress theory) cannot adequately explain why mental disorders in immigrants are less prevalent than in non-immigrants. In this paper, the culture-gene co-evolutionary theory of mental disorders was utilized to generate a novel hypothesis that connection to heritage culture reduces the risk for mental disorders in immigrant children. Four groups of children aged 2-17 years were identified from the 2007 United States National Survey of Children's Health: 1.5th generation immigrant children (n = 1378), 2nd generation immigrant children (n = 4194), foreign adoptees (n = 270), and non-immigrant children (n = 54,877). The 1.5th generation immigrant children's connection to their heritage culture is stronger than or similar to the 2nd generation immigrants, while the foreign adoptees have little connection to their birth culture. Controlling for age, sex, family type and SES, the odds for having ADD/ADHD, Conduct Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, and Depression diagnosis were the lowest for the 1.5th generation immigrant children, followed by the 2nd generation immigrant children and the foreign adoptees. The foreign adoptees and non-adopted children were similar in the odds of having these disorders. Connection to heritage culture might be the underlying mechanism that explained recent immigrants' lower rates of mental disorders. PMID:26972324

  6. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, O.; Calzada, J. A.; Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5), held in Valladolid, Spain, 22-28 July 2007. This is the fifth of a series of conferences previously held in Goslar (Germany) 1999, QTS1; Cracow (Poland) 2001, QTS2; Cincinnati (USA) 2003, QTS3, and Varna (Bulgaria) 2005, QTS4. The QTS5 symposium gathered 181 participants from 39 countries working in different fields on Theoretical Physics. The spirit of the QTS conference series is to join researchers in a wide variety of topics in Theoretical Physics, as a way to make accessible recent results and the new lines of different fields. The QTS5 conference offered the following list of topics: Symmetries in String Theory, Quantum Gravity and related Symmetries in Quantum Field Theories, Conformal and Related Field Theories, Lattice and Noncommutative Theories, Gauge Theories Quantum Computing, Information and Control Foundations of Quantum Theory Quantum Optics, Coherent States, Wigner Functions Dynamical and Integrable Systems Symmetries in Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics Symmetries in Particle Physics, Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics Time Asymmetric Quantum Mechanics SUSY Quantum Mechanics, PT symmetries and pseudo-Hamiltonians Mathematical Methods for Symmetries and Quantum Theories Symmetries in Chemistry Biology and other Sciences Papers accepted for publication in the present issue are based on the contributions from the participants in the QTS5 conference after a peer review process. In addition, a special issue of Journal Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical contains contributions from plenary speakers, some participants as well as contributions from other authors whose works fit into the topics of the conference. The organization of the conference had the following pattern. In the morning there were five plenary or general sessions for all the participants, which aimed to

  7. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium on Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Izquierdo, J. M.; Kuru, S.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-08-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical appears on the occasion of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5), held in Valladolid, Spain, from 22-28 July 2007. This is the fith in a series of conferences previously held in Goslar (Germany) 1999, QTS1; Cracow (Poland) 2001, QTS2; Cincinnati (USA) 2003, QTS3; and Varna (Bulgaria) 2005, QTS4. The QTS5 symposium gathered 181 participants from 39 countries working in different fields of theoretical physics. The spirit of the QTS conference series is to join researchers in a wide variety of topics in theoretical physics, as a way of making accessible recent results and the new lines of different fields. This is based on the feeling that it is good for a physicist to have a general overview as well as expertise in his/her own field. There are many other conferences devoted to specific topics, which are of interest to gain deeper insight in many technical aspects and that are quite suitable for discussions due to their small size. However, we believe that general conferences like this are interesting and worth keeping. We like the talks, in both plenary and parallel sessions, which are devoted to specific topics, to be prepared so as to be accessible to any researcher in any branch of theoretical physics. We think that this objective is compatible with rigour and high standards. As is well known, similar methods and techniques can be useful for many problems in different fields. We hope that this has been appreciated during the sessions of the QTS5 conference. The QTS5 conference offered the following list of topics: 1. Symmetries in string theory, quantum gravity and related topics 2. Symmetries in quantum field theories, conformal and related field theories, lattice and noncommutative theories, gauge theories 3.Quantum computing, information and control 4. Foundations of quantum theory 5. Quantum optics, coherent states, Wigner functions 6. Dynamical and

  8. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, O.; Calzada, J. A.; Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5), held in Valladolid, Spain, 22-28 July 2007. This is the fifth of a series of conferences previously held in Goslar (Germany) 1999, QTS1; Cracow (Poland) 2001, QTS2; Cincinnati (USA) 2003, QTS3, and Varna (Bulgaria) 2005, QTS4. The QTS5 symposium gathered 181 participants from 39 countries working in different fields on Theoretical Physics. The spirit of the QTS conference series is to join researchers in a wide variety of topics in Theoretical Physics, as a way to make accessible recent results and the new lines of different fields. The QTS5 conference offered the following list of topics: Symmetries in String Theory, Quantum Gravity and related Symmetries in Quantum Field Theories, Conformal and Related Field Theories, Lattice and Noncommutative Theories, Gauge Theories Quantum Computing, Information and Control Foundations of Quantum Theory Quantum Optics, Coherent States, Wigner Functions Dynamical and Integrable Systems Symmetries in Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics Symmetries in Particle Physics, Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics Time Asymmetric Quantum Mechanics SUSY Quantum Mechanics, PT symmetries and pseudo-Hamiltonians Mathematical Methods for Symmetries and Quantum Theories Symmetries in Chemistry Biology and other Sciences Papers accepted for publication in the present issue are based on the contributions from the participants in the QTS5 conference after a peer review process. In addition, a special issue of Journal Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical contains contributions from plenary speakers, some participants as well as contributions from other authors whose works fit into the topics of the conference. The organization of the conference had the following pattern. In the morning there were five plenary or general sessions for all the participants, which aimed to

  9. Parameter optimization for a high-order band-pass continuous-time sigma-delta modulator MEMS gyroscope using a genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Chang, Honglong; Yuan, Weizheng; Wilcock, Reuben; Kraft, Michael

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a novel multiobjective parameter optimization method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) for the design of a sixth-order continuous-time, force feedback band-pass sigma-delta modulator (BP-ΣΔM) interface for the sense mode of a MEMS gyroscope. The design procedure starts by deriving a parameterized Simulink model of the BP-ΣΔM gyroscope interface. The system parameters are then optimized by the GA. Consequently, the optimized design is tested for robustness by a Monte Carlo analysis to find a solution that is both optimal and robust. System level simulations result in a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) larger than 90 dB in a bandwidth of 64 Hz with a 200° s-1 angular rate input signal; the noise floor is about -100 dBV Hz-1/2. The simulations are compared to measured data from a hardware implementation. For zero input rotation with the gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure, the spectrum of the output bitstream shows an obvious band-pass noise shaping and a deep notch at the gyroscope resonant frequency. The noise floor of measured power spectral density (PSD) of the output bitstream agrees well with simulation of the optimized system level model. The bias stability, rate sensitivity and nonlinearity of the gyroscope controlled by an optimized BP-ΣΔM closed-loop interface are 34.15° h-1, 22.3 mV °-1 s-1, 98 ppm, respectively. This compares to a simple open-loop interface for which the corresponding values are 89° h-1, 14.3 mV °-1 s-1, 7600 ppm, and a nonoptimized BP-ΣΔM closed-loop interface with corresponding values of 60° h-1, 17 mV °-1 s-1, 200 ppm.

  10. Emission lineshapes of the B850 band of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex in purple bacteria: A second order time-nonlocal quantum master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Jang, Seogjoo

    2013-04-01

    The emission lineshape of the B850 band in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria is calculated by extending the approach of 2nd order time-nonlocal quantum master equation [S. Jang and R. J. Silbey, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9312 (2003), 10.1063/1.1569239]. The initial condition for the emission process corresponds to the stationary excited state density where exciton states are entangled with the bath modes in equilibrium. This exciton-bath coupling, which is not diagonal in either site excitation or exciton basis, results in a new inhomogeneous term that is absent in the expression for the absorption lineshape. Careful treatment of all the 2nd order terms are made, and explicit expressions are derived for both full 2nd order lineshape expression and the one based on secular approximation that neglects off-diagonal components in the exciton basis. Numerical results are presented for a few representative cases of disorder and temperature. Comparison of emission line shape with the absorption line shape is also made. It is shown that the inhomogeneous term coming from the entanglement of the system and bath degrees of freedom makes significant contributions to the lineshape. It is also found that the perturbative nature of the theory can result in negative portion of lineshape in some situations, which can be removed significantly by inclusion of the inhomogeneous term and completely by using the secular approximation. Comparison of the emission and absorption lineshapes at different temperatures demonstrates the role of thermal population of different exciton states and exciton-phonon couplings.

  11. Long-range ferromagnetic order induced by a donor impurity band exchange in SnO{sub 2}:Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Aragón, F. H.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Chitta, V. A.; Hidalgo, P.; Brito, H. F.

    2013-11-28

    In this work, the structural and magnetic properties of Er-doped SnO{sub 2} (SnO{sub 2}:Er) nanoparticles are reported. The SnO{sub 2}:Er nanoparticles have been synthesized by a polymer precursor method with Er content from 1.0% to 10.0%. X-ray diffraction results indicate the formation of only the rutile-type structure in all samples. The estimated mean crystallite size shows a decrease from ∼10 to ∼4 nm when the Er content is increased from 1.0% to 10.0%. The particle size values have been corroborated by transmission electron microscopy technique. The thermal dependence of the magnetization is consistent with the 3+ oxidation state of erbium ions for all samples. A strong paramagnetic-like behavior coexisting with a ferromagnetic phase has been determined for samples with Er content below 5.0%. Above this concentration, only a paramagnetic behavior has been determined. Isothermal magnetization curves are consistent with the occurrence of long-range ferromagnetic order mediated by donor electrons forming bound magnetic polarons which overlap to produce a spin-split impurity band.

  12. 5-Step Methodology for Evaluation and Adaptation of Print Patient Health Information to Meet the <5th Grade Readability Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Schumann, Kristina P.; Dike, Ogechi

    2012-01-01

    Background In the setting of declining U.S. literacy, new policies include use of clear communication and low literacy accessibility practices with all patients. Reliable methods for adapting health information to meet such criteria remain a pressing need. Objectives To report method validation (Study 1) and method replication (Study 2) procedures and outcomes for a 5-step method for evaluating and adapting print health information to meet the current low literacy criterion of <5th grade readability. Materials Sets of 18 and 11 publicly-disseminated patient education documents developed by a university-affiliated medical center. Measures Three low-literacy criteria were strategically targeted for efficient, systematic evaluation and text modification to meet a <5th grade reading level: sentence length <15 words, writing in active voice, and use of common words with multisyllabic words (>2–3 syllables) minimized or avoided. Inter-rater reliability for the document evaluations was determined. Results Training in the methodology resulted in inter-rater reliability of 0.99–1.00 in Study 1 and 0.98–1.00 in Study 2. Original documents met none of the targeted low literacy criteria. In Study 1, following low-literacy adaptation, mean reading grade level decreased from 10.4±1.8 to 3.8±0.6 (p<0.0001), with consistent achievement of criteria for words per sentence, passive voice, and syllables per word. Study 2 demonstrated similar achievement of all target criteria, with a resulting decrease in mean reading grade level from 11.0±1.8 to 4.6±0.3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The 5-step methodology proved teachable and efficient. Targeting a limited set of modifiable criteria was effective and reliable in achieving <5th grade readability. PMID:22354210

  13. Validation of the 5th and 95th Percentile Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley criteria and injury metrics extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD's). For the ATD injury metrics, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Furthermore, each of these ATD's is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. The requirements require that physical testing be performed with both ATD's to demonstrate compliance. Before compliance testing can be conducted, extensive modeling and simulation are required to determine appropriate test conditions, simulate conditions not feasible for testing, and assess design features to better ensure compliance testing is successful. While finite element (FE) models are currently available for many of the physical ATD's, currently there are no complete models for either the 5th percentile female or the 95th percentile male Hybrid III with a straight spine and articulating pelvis. The purpose of this work is to assess the accuracy of the existing Livermore Software Technology Corporation's FE models of the 5th and 95th percentile ATD's. To perform this assessment, a series of tests will be performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Research Lab using their horizontal impact accelerator sled test facility. The ATD's will be placed in the Orion seat with a modified-advanced-crew-escape-system (MACES) pressure suit and helmet, and driven with loadings similar to what is expected for the actual Orion vehicle during landing, launch abort, and chute deployment. Test data will be compared to analytical predictions and modelling uncertainty factors will be determined for each injury metric. Additionally, the test data will be used to

  14. A report on 5th congress of Asia Pacific Pediatric Cardiac Society, New Delhi, India, 6-9 March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The 5th Congress of Asia Pacific Pediatric Cardiac Society was held in New Delhi from 6-9 March 2014. This article describes the journey of preparing and hosting one of the largest international events in the specialty of Pediatric Cardiac Care ever held in India. A total of 938 delegates, including 400 from outside India, participated. The scientific program was inclusive keeping in mind the diverse background of delegates from the member nations. Large numbers of research papers were presented, mostly by fellows in training. PMID:25684899

  15. IBA investigations of loose garnets from Pietroasa, Apahida and Cluj-Someşeni treasures (5th century AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugoi, R.; Oanţă-Marghitu, R.; Calligaro, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the archaeometric investigations of 418 loose garnets from Pietroasa and Cluj-Someşeni treasures and Apahida II and III princely grave inventories (5th century AD). The chemical composition of the gems was determined by external beam micro-PIXE technique at the AGLAE accelerator of C2RMF, Paris, France. Complementary observations made by Optical Microscopy revealed details on the gemstones cutting and polishing and permitted to identify certain mineral inclusions. The compositional results evidenced several types of garnets from the pyralspite series, suggesting distinct provenances for these Early Medieval gems.

  16. Reversible order-disorder related band gap changes in Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} via post-annealing of solar cells measured by electroreflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Krämmer, Christoph; Huber, Christian; Zimmermann, Christian; Lang, Mario; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael; Schnabel, Thomas; Ahlswede, Erik; Abzieher, Tobias

    2014-12-29

    We report on order–disorder related band gap changes in Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells which are induced by post-annealing. The band gap changes of the absorber are detected utilizing electroreflectance and analyzed by comparison with predictions of the stochastic Vineyard model. This yields a critical temperature of T{sub C}=195 °C above which the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} absorber layer is entirely disordered within the Cu–Zn layers of the kesterite unit cell. The temporal evolution of the band gap during annealing shows that the equilibrium value is reached on a timescale in the order of hours, depending on the annealing temperature. In contrast to other experimental techniques, electroreflectance precisely measures the band gap and is not influenced by defect-mediated radiative recombination.

  17. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  18. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    Parallel Velocity Shear Instability (Invited) * Low-Frequency Instabilities under a Cross-Field Electric Field in a K+-C60- Plasma * 3.3 Vortex Formation * Vortex Dynamics in Low Frequency Electrostatic Turbulence * Development of Spiral-Vortex Structures of the Plasma During Rotation in a Neutral Gas * Vortex Formation of Particles in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas (Invited) * CHAPTER 4: SOLITONS, SHOCKS, WAVES AND INSTABILITIES, AND RELATED NONLINEAR PHENOMENA * 4.1 Solitons and Shocks * Refraction and Reflection of Ion Acoustic Solitons by Space Charge Sheath * 2D and 3D Solitons in Plasma: Structure, Stability, Dynamics * Solitary Waves in an Ion-Beam Multi-Component Plasma System * Shock Formation in a Q-Machine Plasma with Negative Ions * 4.2 Waves and Instabilities * Single-Ended Q-Machine as a Source of Oscillations (Invited) * Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Period Doubling of the Potential Relaxation Instability in an Electron-Rich Q-Machine Plasma * Large Amplitude Electrostatic Ion Waves in an e- - e+ - p Plasma * Measurements of Alfvén Waves around the CRIT Releases-Implications for Current Limitation in Alfvén Wings * 4.3 Nonlinear Phenomena * Self-Organization Phenomena in a Q-Machine Plasma * Nonlinearity Related to Self-Organization in a Thermionic Vacuum Arc Discharge * Spontaneous Formation of Ordered Spatio-Temporal Structures in Laboratory and Nature * Nonlinear Evolution and Stabilization of Linearly Unstable Waves in an Electron-Beam Plasma * Disruption of an Electron Hole Due to its Interaction with Ion Acoustic Waves in a Plasma * Expanding Plasma Clouds with Dust Particles (Invited) * LIST OF PARTICIPANTS * AUTHOR INDEX

  19. PREFACE: 5th International Conference on Materials and Applications for Sensors and Transducers (IC-MAST2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Vlachos, D. S.; Giouroudi, I.; Kar-Narayan, S.; Potirakis, S.

    2016-03-01

    The 5th International Conference on Materials and Applications for Sensors and Transducers, Mykonos island, Greece, hosted about 110 oral and poster papers and more than 90 participants. IC-MAS, as an international annual conference which tries to meet the needs for various types of sensors, particularly those which may be manufactured by low cost methods (i.e. hybrid sensors, smart specialization devices, particular applications not necessarily requiring integrated micro-nano technologies), covering all types of materials and physical effects, appears to be a necessity. IC-MAST has been established as a high quality international conference by: I. Gathering together multinational researchers from all over the world, working in different materials for sensors and transducers and technical applications of sensors, but also in some cases in the management of the data coming from sensors and transducers. The careful selection of the conference place (like Aegean Sea, Budapest, Prague, Bilbao, Mykonos etc) allows for enjoying the local hospitality and sightseeing. II. Emphasizing in hybrid sensors and smart specialization devices produced by inexpensive methods, without excluding of course micro-nano technology, from all kinds of solid state, liquid and gaseous materials, as well as in particular transducer applications (design and development, as well as use of sensing data) III. Innovatively implementing the Virtual Paper Concept, allowing for large impact of research works presented in the conference by authors who either have no time or no funding support for visiting a conference; this year more than 12 virtual papers are presented in the 5th IC MAST, following a standardized procedure via the our robust and reliable Conference Site (www.icmast.net!) > IV. Allowing for lengthy technical and managerial discussions in terms of sensor, material and instrumentation development; furthermore, the different research groups gathered together are offered the particular

  20. Primary School 5th and 8th Graders' Understanding and Mental Models about the Shape of the World and Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk, Ayse; Doganay, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated primary school 5th and 8th graders' understanding and mental models related to the shape of the world and gravity, and how these models reflected the fact and what kind of a change there is from 5th to 8th graders. This research is based on a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in a low socioeconomic level…

  1. Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus Eggs in Canine Coprolite from the Sasanian Era in Iran (4(th)/5(th) Century CE).

    PubMed

    Mowlavi, Gholamreza; Makki, Mahsasadat; Heidari, Zahra; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Araujo, Adauto; Boenke, Nicole; Aali, Abolfazl; Stollner, Thomas; Mobedi, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Present paper is the second publication introducing the paleoparasitological findings from animal coprolites obtained from archeological site of Chehrabad salt mine in northwestern Iran. The current archeological site is located in northwest of Iran, dated to the Sassanian Era (4(th)/5(th) century CE). In the summer 2012 the carnivore coprolite was obtained within the layers in the mine and were thoroughly analyzed for parasites using TSP rehydration technique. Eggs of 0 were successfully retrieved from the examined coprolite and were confidently identified based on reliable references. Identifying of M. hirudinaceus eggs in paleofeces with clear appearance as demonstrated herein, is much due to appropriate preservation condition has been existed in the salt mine .The present finding could be regarded as the oldest acanthocephalan infection in Iran. PMID:26246822

  2. Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus Eggs in Canine Coprolite from the Sasanian Era in Iran (4th/5th Century CE)

    PubMed Central

    MOWLAVI, Gholamreza; MAKKI, Mahsasadat; HEIDARI, Zahra; REZAEIAN, Mostafa; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; ARAUJO, Adauto; BOENKE, Nicole; AALI, Abolfazl; STOLLNER, Thomas; MOBEDI, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Present paper is the second publication introducing the paleoparasitological findings from animal coprolites obtained from archeological site of Chehrabad salt mine in northwestern Iran. The current archeological site is located in northwest of Iran, dated to the Sassanian Era (4th/5th century CE). In the summer 2012 the carnivore coprolite was obtained within the layers in the mine and were thoroughly analyzed for parasites using TSP rehydration technique. Eggs of 0 were successfully retrieved from the examined coprolite and were confidently identified based on reliable references. Identifying of M. hirudinaceus eggs in paleofeces with clear appearance as demonstrated herein, is much due to appropriate preservation condition has been existed in the salt mine .The present finding could be regarded as the oldest acanthocephalan infection in Iran. PMID:26246822

  3. The Hetu'u Global Network: Using the rare June 5th/6th Transit of Venus to Bring Astronomy to the Remote Easter Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline; Rodriguez, D.

    2013-01-01

    There are rare times in astronomy when a celestial event, visible in broad daylight, can be used to measure a fundamental parameter and inspire a globe full of school age students. The June 5th/6th transit of Venus was one such event. In celebration, nine astronomy postdocs from the Chilean mainland traveled to Easter Island to lead a series of astronomy outreach activities over three days, culminating in a transit-viewing event. Our team dubbed "Equipo Hetu'u" or "Team Star" in the Rapa Nui (Easter Island native) language spent two days giving astronomy talks and doing hands-on demonstrations at the Museo Antropologico P. Sebastian Englert. In the final day-and-a-half leading up to the transit, we visited the science classes in the majority of the schools on the island, in order to spread the message about the once-in-a-lifetime transit event, highlighting how we planned on using it to measure the distance to the Sun. We estimate over 25% 1500 people) of this remote island participated in one or more of our organized activities. Our experience with this project is an excellent lesson on how to organize, lead, and fully execute a major outreach endeavor that inspires hundreds with minimal resources (save the spectacular event provided by the cosmos).

  4. [The current situation and issues of medical English education and suggestions toward improvement--reports from the 5th meeting of the Japan Society for Medical English Education].

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Hiroshi

    2002-12-01

    This is a report from the 5th academic meeting of the Japan Society for Medical English Education held at Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare on August 3rd and 4th of 2002. It also includes a course description of our English courses, their problems and some suggestions for improvement. First, I report several papers presented at the meeting that are useful and suggestive for the English education at our university in order to bring them to everyone's attention and to improve our English program. The topics of the papers include; what "Medical English" is; reports of English courses taught by medical doctors; reports of English courses for developing specific proficiencies such as listening, writing summaries and delivering oral presentations. Next, I give a course description of our present English program and point out some problems that should be dealt with. In this connection, I make several suggestions for future improvement. Lastly, I refer to the "strategies to educate the Japanese who can use English", which were proposed recently by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and suggest our improvement be in line with these strategies. PMID:12506860

  5. Communicating Science to Impact Learning? A Phenomenological Inquiry into 4th and 5th Graders' Perceptions of Science Information Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmez Burakgazi, Sevinc; Yildirim, Ali; Weeth Feinstein, Noah

    2016-04-01

    Rooted in science education and science communication studies, this study examines 4th and 5th grade students' perceptions of science information sources (SIS) and their use in communicating science to students. It combines situated learning theory with uses and gratifications theory in a qualitative phenomenological analysis. Data were gathered through classroom observations and interviews in four Turkish elementary schools. Focus group interviews with 47 students and individual interviews with 17 teachers and 10 parents were conducted. Participants identified a wide range of SIS, including TV, magazines, newspapers, internet, peers, teachers, families, science centers/museums, science exhibitions, textbooks, science books, and science camps. Students reported using various SIS in school-based and non-school contexts to satisfy their cognitive, affective, personal, and social integrative needs. SIS were used for science courses, homework/project assignments, examination/test preparations, and individual science-related research. Students assessed SIS in terms of the perceived accessibility of the sources, the quality of the content, and the content presentation. In particular, some sources such as teachers, families, TV, science magazines, textbooks, and science centers/museums ("directive sources") predictably led students to other sources such as teachers, families, internet, and science books ("directed sources"). A small number of sources crossed context boundaries, being useful in both school and out. Results shed light on the connection between science education and science communication in terms of promoting science learning.

  6. Clinical development of new prophylactic antimalarial drugs after the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Magill, Alan J; Ohrt, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is of continuing concern in nonimmune traveling populations. Traditionally, antimalarial drugs have been developed as agents for dual indications (treatment and prophylaxis). However, since 2000, when the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki (DH2000) was adopted, development of new malaria prophylaxis drugs in this manner has ceased. As a consequence, there may not be any new drugs licensed for this indication in the foreseeable future. Major pharmaceutical companies have interpreted DH2000 to mean that the traditional development paradigm may be considered unethical because of doubt over the likelihood of benefit to endemic populations participating in clinical studies, the use of placebo, and the sustainability of post-trial access to study medications. In this article, we explore the basis of these concerns and suggest that the traditional development paradigm remains ethical under certain circumstances. We also consider alternative approaches that may be more attractive to sponsors as they either do not use placebo, or utilize populations in endemic countries who may unambiguously benefit. These approaches represent the way forward in the future, but are at present unproven in clinical practice, and face numerous regulatory, logistical and technical challenges. Consequently, in the short term, we argue that the traditional clinical development paradigm remains the most feasible approach and is ethical and consistent with the spirit of DH2000 under the appropriate circumstances. PMID:19209263

  7. Attitudes towards General Practice: a comparative cross-sectional survey of 1st and 5th year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kruschinski, Carsten; Wiese, Birgitt; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive attitudes towards General Practice can be understood as a prerequisite for becoming a General Practitioner (GP) and for collaboration with GPs later on. This study aimed to assess attitudes of medical students at the beginning and the end of medical school. Methods: A total of 160 1st year students at Hannover Medical School were surveyed. Their attitudes were compared to those of 287 5th year students. Descriptive, bi- and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate influences of year of study and gender. Results: Year of study and gender both were associated with the attitudes towards General Practice. The interest in General Practice and patient-orientation (communication, care of older patients with chronic diseases) was higher in 1st year students compared to more advanced students. Female students valued such requirements more than male students, the differences in attitudes between the years of study being more pronounced in male students. Conclusion: Despite some limitations caused by the cross-sectional design, the attitudes towards General Practice competencies changed to their disadvantage during medical school. This suggests a formative influence of the strategies used in medical education. Educational strategies, however, could be used to bring about a change of attitudes in the other direction. PMID:23255966

  8. Fast food consumption and food prices: evidence from panel data on 5th and 8th grade children.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tamkeen; Powell, Lisa M; Wada, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Fast food consumption is a dietary factor associated with higher prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States. The association between food prices and consumption of fast food among 5th and 8th graders was examined using individual-level random effects models utilizing consumption data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), price data from American Chamber of Commerce Researchers Association (ACCRA), and contextual outlet density data from Dun and Bradstreet (D&B). The results found that contextual factors including the price of fast food, median household income, and fast food restaurant outlet densities were significantly associated with fast food consumption patterns among this age group. Overall, a 10% increase in the price of fast food was associated with 5.7% lower frequency of weekly fast food consumption. These results suggest that public health policy pricing instruments such as taxes may be effective in reducing consumption of energy-dense foods and possibly reducing the prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children and young adolescents. PMID:22292115

  9. Historical and future land carbon cycle, results from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlingstein, Pierre; Anav, Alessandro; Murray-Tortarolo, Guillermo; Wenzel, Sabrina; Cox, Peter; Eyring, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    The 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) provided a unique source of Earth System Models simulations, generating an unprecedented range of analysis of many components of the climate system. In this presentation we will focus on the land carbon cycle, its response to the historical perturbation and its projected response in the future under the forcing of the different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. There is a broad agreement across models on the evolution of the carbon exchange between the atmosphere and the land since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Carbon sink driven by atmospheric CO2 increase more than compensates now the carbon sources due to land use changes, consistent with independent estimates. The future of the land carbon cycle is significantly more uncertain, even for a given RCP scenario. There is no overall agreement across models on the sign of the land carbon sink by the end of the 21st century, land carbon cycle sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 increase and climate change being strongly model dependent. Model evaluation and use of emerging constraint should help reduce uncertainties in future carbon cycle projections.

  10. Fast Food Consumption and Food Prices: Evidence from Panel Data on 5th and 8th Grade Children

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tamkeen; Powell, Lisa M.; Wada, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Fast food consumption is a dietary factor associated with higher prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States. The association between food prices and consumption of fast food among 5th and 8th graders was examined using individual-level random effects models utilizing consumption data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), price data from American Chamber of Commerce Researchers Association (ACCRA), and contextual outlet density data from Dun and Bradstreet (D&B). The results found that contextual factors including the price of fast food, median household income, and fast food restaurant outlet densities were significantly associated with fast food consumption patterns among this age group. Overall, a 10% increase in the price of fast food was associated with 5.7% lower frequency of weekly fast food consumption. These results suggest that public health policy pricing instruments such as taxes may be effective in reducing consumption of energy-dense foods and possibly reducing the prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children and young adolescents. PMID:22292115

  11. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  12. Final Report for DOE Support of 5th the International Workshop on Oxide Surfaces (IWOX-V)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles T. Campbell

    2007-02-02

    The 5th International Workshop on Oxide Surfaces (IWOX-V) was held at Granlibakken Conference center in Lake Tahoe, CA, January 7-12. The total attendance was ~90. The breakdown of attendees by country is as follows: USA 41 Germany 18 Japan 7 UK 5 Italy 5 France 4 Austria 3 Denmark 3 Cech. Repub. 1 Ireland 1 New Zealand 1 India 1 The technical program included oral sessions on the electronic and magnetic properties of oxide surfaces, surface and interface structure, advances in theory, surface defects, thin film oxides on metals and on oxides, thin film metals on oxides, surface photochemistry, surface reactivity, and interactions with water. Two evening poster sessions had similar themes. As in previous years, the program stimulated significant interest and discussion among the attendees. The local expenses (food and lodging, $918 per person) for eight foreign invited speakers were covered by BES funds. In addition, partial reimbursement for travel ($328 per person) was supported by BES funds for two more foreign invited speakers.

  13. Implementing SPRINTT [Student Polar Research with IPY National(and International)Teacher Training] in 5th Grade Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    I implemented the new NSF-funded SPRINTT (Student Polar Research with IPY National (and International) Teacher Training) curriculum with a 5th grade science class. SPRINTT, developed at U.S. Satellite Laboratory, Inc., is a 5-8 week science program teaching 5th through 10th graders to investigate climate change using polar data. The program includes perspectives of both Western scientists and the indigenous Northern population. The course contains three phases: Phase 1 includes content, data interpretation, and hands-on experiments to study Frozen Water, Frozen Land, and Food; Phase 2 (optional) includes further content on specific polar topics; and Phase 3 is a scaffolded research investigation. Before the course, teachers were trained via live webinars. This curriculum capitalizes on children’s innate fascination with our planet’s final frontier and combines it with the politically and scientifically relevant topic of climate change. In 2009, I used SPRINTT with 23 heterogeneous fifth grade students at National Presbyterian School in Washington DC for an environmental science unit. Overall, it was a success. The students met most of the learning objectives and showed enthusiasm for the material. I share my experiences to help other educators and curriculum developers. The Phase 1 course includes earth science (glaciers, sea ice, weather and climate, greenhouse gases, seasons, and human impacts on environments), life science (needs of living things, food and energy transfer, adaptations, and ecosystems and biomes) and physical science (phases of matter). Tailoring the program, I focused on Phase 1, the most accessible material and content, while deemphasizing the more cumbersome Phase 3 online research project. Pre-assessments documented the students’ misconceptions and informed instruction. The investigations were appropriately educational and interesting. For example, students enjoyed looking at environmental factors and their impact on the people in the

  14. Intraocular tissue ablation using an optical fibre to deliver the 5th harmonic of a Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joseph; Yu, Xiaobo; Yu, Paula K.; Cringle, Stephen J.; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2009-02-01

    We report the evaluation of a system which delivers the 5th harmonic of an Nd:YAG (213nm) via optical fibre to ocular tissue sites. The 213nm beam is concentrated, using a hollow glass taper, prior to launch into 200 μm or 600 μm core diameter silica/silica optical fibre. The fibre tip was tapered to enhance the fluence delivered. An operating window of fluence values that could be delivered via 330 - 1100mm lengths of optical fibre was determined. The lower value of 0.2J/cm2 determined by the ablation threshold of the tissue and the upper value of 1.3J/cm2 by the launch, transmission and tip characteristics of the optical fibre. The fluence output decreased as a function of both transmitted pulse energy and number of pulses transmitted. Fresh retinal tissue was cleanly ablated with minimal damage to the surrounding tissue. Lesions were generated using 1, 3 and 10 pulses with fluences from 0.2 to 1.0J/cm2. The lesion depth demonstrated clear dose dependence. Lesions generated in ex vivo preparations of human trabecular meshwork in a fluid environment also demonstrated dose dependence, 50 pulses being sufficient to create a hole within the trabecular meshwork extending to Schlemm's canal. The dose dependence of the ablation depth combined with the ability of this technique to create a conduit through to Schlemm's canal demonstrates the potential of this technique for ophthalmological applications requiring precise and controlled intraocular tissue removal and has potential applications in the treatment and management of glaucoma.

  15. Indian Health Career Handbook and Report on Ned Hatathli Seminar for Southern Arizona Indian Students (5th, Tucson, Arizona, February 6-7, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Arnold, Ed.; And Others

    Utilizing comments from teachers, professionals, college and high school students, this report is derived from the 5th Ned Hatathli Seminar, sponsored by the Navajo Health Authority, and presents factual information relative to American Indian participation in Indian Health careers. The following major speeches are presented: (1) "The Practice of…

  16. Engaging Minds. Proceedings of the National Academy for Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning Annual Conference (5th, Galway, Ireland, June 9-10, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy for Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication contains the papers presented at the 5th Annual Conference of National Academy for Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (NAIRTL) and the 9th Galway Symposium. Presenters from across Ireland and overseas share their perspectives. The theme of engagement touches on the very heart of what a "higher" education should be…

  17. Immediate and Short-Term Effects of the 5th Grade Version of the "keepin' it REAL" Substance Use Prevention Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira; Wagstaff, David A.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Marsiglia, Flavio; Dustman, Patricia; Reeves, Leslie; Harthun, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the immediate and short-term outcomes of adapting a culturally-grounded middle school program, "keepin' it REAL", for elementary school students. After curriculum adaptation, 10 schools were randomly assigned to the intervention in 5th grade with follow-up boosters in 6th grade; 13 schools were randomly assigned to the control…

  18. International Roundtable on The Lifelong Learning and New Technologies Gap: Reaching the Disadvantaged (5th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 8-10, 1999). Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Adult Literacy, Philadelphia, PA.

    Three elements defined the focus of the 5th Roundtable: lifelong learning, the new technologies gap, and reaching the disadvantaged. Participants referred frequently to the digital divide, a term that captures differential access to and use of information and communication technology (ICT). The questions that guided discussion related to ICT and…

  19. Evaluation of the Effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding of the Subjects Related to "Matter and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çinar, Derya; Bayraktar, Sule

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th grade students' conceptual understanding of the subjects related to "Matter and Change". This research is a qualitative research and its design is a multiple (compare) case study. In this study, semi-structured interviews related to the…

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding of the Subjects Related to "Matter and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çinar, Derya; Bayraktar, Sule

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th grade students' conceptual understanding of the subjects related to "Matter and Change". This research is a qualitative research and its design is a multiple (compare) case study. In this study, semi-structured interviews related to the…

  1. Measures of self-efficacy and norms for low-fat milk consumption are reliable and related to beverage consumption among 5th graders at school lunch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the reliability and validity of scales measuring low-fat milk consumption self-efficacy and norms during school lunch among a cohort of 5th graders. Two hundred seventy-five students completed lunch food records and a psychosocial questionnaire measuring self-efficacy ...

  2. Determination of Motivation of 5th Grade Students Living in Rural and Urban Environments towards Science Learning and Their Attitudes towards Science-Technology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenar, Ismail; Köse, Mücahit; Demir, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In this research, determination of motivation of 5th grade students living in rural and urban environments towards science learning and their attitudes towards science-technology course is aimed. This research is conducted based on descriptive survey model. Samples are selected through teleological model in accordance with the aim of this…

  3. The Effect of Direct Instruction Strategy on Math Achievement of Primary 4th and 5th Grade Students with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Makahleh, Ahmad Abdulhameed Aufan

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to verify the effect of direct instruction strategy on Math achievment of students with learning difficulties in the fourth and fifth grade levels and measure the improvement in their attitudes to Mathematics. Sample consisted of sixty (60) students with Math learning difficulties attending 4th and 5th grade level resource rooms…

  4. Color Duplex Assessment of 4th and 5th Internal Mammary Artery Perforators: The Pedicles of the Medially Based Lower Pole Breast Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Monem, Kareem; Elshahat, Ahmed; Abou-Gamrah, Sherif; Eldin Abol-Atta, Hossam; Abd Eltawab, Reda; Massoud, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Reconstruction of a breast after mastectomy using the contralateral lower pole breast flap is an appealing procedure because it uses the tissues that were going to be excised during reduction of the sound breast to achieve symmetry. Literature mentioned that these flaps are supplied by the lower internal mammary artery perforators (IMAPs) with no further details. The aim of this study was to determine the site, size, and number of the 4th and 5th IMAPs by using preoperative color Duplex ultrasound and intraoperative exploration. Method: Twenty breasts in 10 patients who presented for reduction mammoplasty were included in this study. Preoperative color duplex was used to determine IMAPs in the 4th and 5th intercostal spaces. These perforators were localized intraoperatively. Intravenous fluorescein injection was used to determine the perfusion of the lower pole breast flap on the basis of these perforators. Results: Statistically, the 4th IMAPs diameters were significantly larger than the 5th IMAPs diameters (P < .05). The lower pole breast flap was perfused through these perforators. Conclusion: Color Duplex ultrasound is an accurate tool to preoperatively determine the 4th and 5th IMAPs. PMID:22292100

  5. Final technical report: Partial support for US participants in the 5th International Marine Biotechnology Conference, Townsville, Australia, Sept 29 - Oct 5, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, Yonathan; Hill, R.; Robb, F.

    2001-04-09

    Funding was provided for US participants in the 5th International Marine Biotechnology Conference held in Townsville, Australia from September 29 to October 5, 2000. DOE funds were used for travel awards for six US participants in this conference. DOE funds were successfully used to advance participation of US scientists in the important emerging field of marine biotechnology.

  6. An Analysis of the Learning Activities Covered in the 5th Grade Science Textbooks Based on 2005 and 2013 Turkish Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogdu, Cemil; Idin, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the learning activities covered in 5th grade elementary science textbooks which depend on 2005 and 2013 elementary science curricula. Two elementary science textbooks [which] depend on 2005 science curriculum and two elementary science textbooks [which] depend on 2013 science curriculum were researched. The…

  7. An Analysis of the Learning Activities Covered in the 5th Grade Science Textbooks Based on 2005 and 2013 Turkish Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogdu, Cemil; Idin, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the learning activities covered in 5th grade elementary science textbooks which depend on 2005 and 2013 elementary science curricula. Two elementary science textbooks depends on 2005 science curriculum and two elementary science textbooks depend on 2013 science curriculum were researched. The study is a…

  8. The Social Interactions of Students with Disabilities in a 5th Grade Level Inclusive Classroom and the Effect on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall-Reed, Estella

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative, ethnographic case study of 3 students with disabilities. The purpose of this research study was to observe and collect descriptive accounts of the social interactions that exist between the cultures in a 5th grade level inclusive classroom, such as the interactions between the special education students, general…

  9. Comparison of the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grondhuis, Sabrina Nicole; Mulick, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A review of hospital records was conducted for children evaluated for autism spectrum disorders who completed both the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition (SB5). Participants were between 3 and 12 years of age. Diagnoses were autistic disorder (n = 26, 55%) and pervasive…

  10. U.S. Dietary and Physical Activity Guideline Knowledge and Corresponding Behaviors among 4th and 5th Grade Students: A Multi-Site Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Martinez, Stephanie; Armstrong-Florian, Traci; Farrell, Vanessa; Martinez, Cathy; Whitmer, Evelyn; Hartz, Vern; Blake, Samuel; Nicolini, Ariana; Misner, Scottie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of U.S. dietary and physical activity recommendations and corresponding behaviors were surveyed among 4th and 5th graders in five Arizona counties to determine the need for related education in SNAP-Ed eligible schools. A <70% target response rate was the criterion. Participants correctly identified recommendations for: fruit, 20%;…

  11. EUNIS '99: Information Technology Shaping European Universities. Proceedings of the International European University Information Systems (5th, Espoo, Finland, June 7-9, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document presents the proceedings from the 5th International European University Information Systems (EUNIS) Conference on Information Technology that took place in Helsinki, Finland on June 7-9, 1999. Topics of the conference proceedings were divided into five tracks (A through E): Use of Information Technology in Learning and Teaching;…

  12. Integration of physical activity and technology motion devices within a combined 5th and 6th grade science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kevin Eugene

    Background: National recommendations to increase school-based physical activity and promote academic success advise incorporating movement into traditional classroom lessons. Classroom-based physical activities have favorable associations with indicators of cognitive functioning, academic behaviors, and academic achievement. Purpose: This study analyzed the Active Science framework, which incorporated school-based physical activity within interactive science classroom lessons. Specifically, the study measured the effects of the Active Science framework on student physical activity levels in the classroom, student learning of science inquiry skills and content knowledge, and student perceptions of physical activity and science. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of the framework. Subjects: Participants were 37 Hispanic girls (age=11.1 +/-0.8 yr) in mixed 5th/6th grade science classes in a private, urban middle school. Methods: Physical activity levels of the students during the Active Science framework were measured using pedometers and heart rate monitors. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the levels of learning achieved by the students in science inquiry skills and content during the Active Science framework. Student perceptions and attitudes toward science and physical activity were measured during student focus groups and pre-post perception surveys. Lesson plan evaluations completed by the teachers and structured interviews provided data on implementation of the framework. Results: Physical activity results showed heart rate (146 +/-9 bpm); maximal heart rate (196 +/-10.6 bpm); time (35 +/-2.5 mins); steps (3050 +/-402.7); calories (99 +/-8.4 kcal); and distance (1.1 +/-0.2 miles) while performing the activity portion of the science lessons were consistent with national recommendations for accumulating school-based physical activity. Significant increases in science content and skills test scores with a 22

  13. 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: summary of main findings and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H M G; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Cook, T M

    2014-10-01

    We present the main findings of the 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA). Incidences were estimated using reports of accidental awareness as the numerator, and a parallel national anaesthetic activity survey to provide denominator data. The incidence of certain/probable and possible accidental awareness cases was ~1:19,600 anaesthetics (95% confidence interval 1:16,700-23,450). However, there was considerable variation across subtypes of techniques or subspecialities. The incidence with neuromuscular block (NMB) was ~1:8200 (1:7030-9700), and without, it was ~1:135,900 (1:78,600-299,000). The cases of AAGA reported to NAP5 were overwhelmingly cases of unintended awareness during NMB. The incidence of accidental awareness during Caesarean section was ~1:670 (1:380-1300). Two-thirds (82, 66%) of cases of accidental awareness experiences arose in the dynamic phases of anaesthesia, namely induction of and emergence from anaesthesia. During induction of anaesthesia, contributory factors included: use of thiopental, rapid sequence induction, obesity, difficult airway management, NMB, and interruptions of anaesthetic delivery during movement from anaesthetic room to theatre. During emergence from anaesthesia, residual paralysis was perceived by patients as accidental awareness, and commonly related to a failure to ensure full return of motor capacity. One-third (43, 33%) of accidental awareness events arose during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia, mostly due to problems at induction or towards the end of anaesthesia. Factors increasing the risk of accidental awareness included: female sex, age (younger adults, but not children), obesity, anaesthetist seniority (junior trainees), previous awareness, out-of-hours operating, emergencies, type of surgery (obstetric, cardiac, thoracic), and use of NMB. The following factors were not risk factors for accidental awareness: ASA physical status, race, and use or omission

  14. Effect on Physical Activity of a Randomized Afterschool Intervention for Inner City Children in 3rd to 5th Grade

    PubMed Central

    Crouter, Scott E.; de Ferranti, Sarah D.; Whiteley, Jessica; Steltz, Sarah K.; Osganian, Stavroula K.; Feldman, Henry A.; Hayman, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Less than 45% of U.S. children meet the 60 min.d-1 physical activity (PA) guideline. Structured after-school PA programing is one approach to help increase activity levels. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of a supervised after-school PA and nutrition education program on activity levels. Methods Forty-two 3rd-5th graders from an inner-city school in Boston, MA were randomly assigned to a 10-wk after-school program of either: 1) weekly nutrition education, or 2) weekly nutrition education plus supervised PA 3 d.wk-1 at a community-based center. At baseline and follow-up, PA was measured using accelerometry and fitness (VO2max) was estimated using the PACER 15-m shuttle run. Additional measures obtained were non-fasting finger stick total cholesterol (TC) and glucose levels, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (%BF), and blood pressure (BP). Values are presented as mean±SE, unless noted otherwise. Results Thirty-six participants completed the study (mean±SD; age 9.7±0.9 years). Participants attended >80% of the sessions. After adjusting for accelerometer wear time and other design factors, light and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) increased in the nutrition+PA group (+21.5±14.5 and +8.6±8.0 min.d-1, respectively) and decreased in the nutrition only group (-35.2±16.3 and -16.0±9.0 min.d-1, respectively); mean difference between groups of 56.8±21.7 min.d-1 (light PA, p = 0.01) and 24.5±12.0 min.d-1 (MVPA, p = 0.04). Time spent in sedentary behaviors declined in the nutrition+PA group (-14.8±20.7 min.d-1) and increased in the nutrition only group (+55.4±23.2 min.d-1); mean difference between groups of -70.2±30.9 min.d-1 (p = 0.02). Neither group showed changes in TC, BP, WC, %BF, BMI percentile, or fitness (p>0.05). Conclusions The supervised afterschool community-based nutrition and PA program was well accepted and had high attendance. The changes in light PA and MVPA has potential

  15. PREFACE: PASREG 2005: The 5th International Workshop on Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masato; Cardwell, David; Salama, Kamel; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2006-07-01

    Large grain, (RE)BCO bulk superconductors fabricated by top-seeded melt growth (TSMG) have outstanding potential for a variety of engineering applications such as magnetic separators, flywheel energy storage, magnetic bearings and permanent magnet-like devices due to their ability to generate large magnetic fields. Recent developments in materials and systems research has led to the manufacture of proto-type devices for use in magnetron sputtering, magnetic stirrers and a mobile magnetic separator based on bulk materials technology. This issue contains selected papers presented at the 5th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials held on 21-23 October 2005 at Tokyo Marine University to report progress made in this field over the previous two years. The workshop followed those held previously in Cambridge, UK (1997), Morioka, Japan (1999), Seattle, USA (2001), and Jena, Germany (2003). A total of 76 papers were presented at this workshop, of which 27 were presented in oral form and 49 were presented as posters. This issue contains a total of 36 selected papers in the following categories of bulk (RE)BCO large grain material: processing, characterization, and applications. The editors are grateful for the support of many colleagues both within and outside the immediate bulk community who reviewed the manuscripts to guarantee their high technical quality. Finally, the attendees wish to acknowledge the efforts of Professor Mitsuru Izumi and his research staff from Tokyo Marine University for being generous hosts during the workshop, and the efforts of Professor Masato Murakami for the overall organization of the meeting. The International PASREG Board selected the following distinguished researchers as recipients of the 2005 PASREG Award of Excellence to acknowledge their contribution to the development of bulk high temperature superconductors: • Dr Michael Strasik (Boeing, Seattle, USA) • Dr Hiroshi

  16. Two Successful Outreach Programs at Storm Peak Laboratory: GRASP for Undergraduates and Partnership for 5th Grade Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.; Wright, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term atmospheric research. The SPL mission statement is to ensure that the laboratory will continue to integrate climate research and education by advancing discovery and understanding within the field of pollution, aerosol and cloud interactions. During the last year, SPL has created two successful outreach programs reaching very different audiences. First, to engage students from local elementary schools, SPL established a 5th grade climate education program. This program is based on a partnership between SPL and Yampatika's&penvironmental educators. Yampatika is a non-profit outdoor environmental education organization. The program spans three days for each school and includes five elementary schools. During the first day, educators from Yampatika visit each classroom to introduce the concepts of climate and weather as well as teach students how to use scientific equipment. During the field program on the second day, students measure and record information about temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed, and particle concentration while they travel to SPL via the gondola (in winter) or Suburban (in fall). Once at the laboratory, students tour the facility, discuss SPL research activities, and explore application of these activities to their curriculum. Following the field trip, Yampatika educators and SPL scientists will visit the school for a follow-up to help children explore concepts, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. The second program, Geoscience Research at Storm Peak (GRASP), was designed to engage students from underrepresented groups and created a partnership between three Minority Serving Institutions and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). Undergraduate students from Tennessee State University, Howard University

  17. Engineering chiral density waves and topological band structures by multiple-Q superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Ozawa, Ryo; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic orders characterized by multiple ordering vectors harbor noncollinear and noncoplanar spin textures and can be a source of unusual electronic properties through the spin Berry phase mechanism. We theoretically show that such multiple-Q states are stabilized in itinerant magnets in the form of superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down (UUDD) spin states, which accompany the density waves of vector and scalar chirality. The result is drawn by examining the ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical localized moments, especially when the Fermi surface is tuned to be partially nested by the symmetry-related commensurate vectors. We unveil the instability toward a double-Q UUDD state with vector chirality density waves on the square lattice and a triple-Q UUDD state with scalar chirality density waves on the triangular lattice, using the perturbative theory and variational calculations. The former double-Q state is also confirmed by large-scale Langevin dynamics simulations. We also show that, for a sufficiently large exchange coupling, the chirality density waves can induce rich nontrivial topology of electronic structures, such as the massless Dirac semimetal, Chern insulator with quantized topological Hall response, and peculiar edge states which depend on the phase of chirality density waves at the edges.

  18. Proceedings for the 5th Asia-Pacific Conference on Disaster Medicine: creating an agenda for action.

    PubMed

    De Grace, M; Ericson, D; Folz, H; Greene, W; Ho, K; Pearce, L

    2001-01-01

    Disaster medicine has come to the forefront and has become the focus of interest not only in the medical community, but also in the eyes of the public. The 5th APCDM was convened in Vancouver, Canada, 27-30 September 2000. It brought together over 300 delegates from 32 countries to share their experiences and thoughts regarding disaster events and how to effectively manage them. The conference was devoted to the task of establishing priorities and creating an Agenda for Action. From the discussions, key actions required were defined: COMMUNICATIONS: (1) Identify existing regional telehealth groups and gather lessons to be learned from them; (2) Form a telehealth advisory group to work with regional groups to compile telehealth initiatives, identify international protocols in telehealth already in existence, and solicit feedback before setting international standards; and (3) Increase corporate partnerships in the fields of telehealth and telecommunications, and invite corporations to send delegates to future APCDM meetings. This should be an initiative of the APCDM, the World Association of Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), or the European Society of Emergency Medicine. EDUCATION AND RESEARCH: (1) Formalize education in disaster medicine and management. The World Health Organization and WADEM should take a leadership role; (2) WADEM is requested to hold a conference with a focus on qualitative research; (3) WHO is requested to continue the provision of international research teams, but to advocate for the development of national disaster research infrastructure; (4) Make research findings and reports available on web sites of such organizations as WHO and PAHO; (5) Develop the translation of research for community utilization. The WHO and PAHO are organizations that are requested to consider this action; and (6) WADEM/APCDM are requested to focus future conferences on applied research. INFORMATION AND DATA: (1) Create an "Information and Data Clearinghouse

  19. It takes a community to define a discipline: the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters It takes a community to define a discipline: the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan

    2012-03-01

    commentary environment, a unique service in itself, and also a specific forum for research published in ERL. Individual topics often come up that warrant not only single articles, but collections of assessments, and ERL has published focus issues in key areas of environmental science including: tropical deforestation, wind energy, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and climate engineering. ERL is currently publishing seven high-quality focus issues in cutting-edge areas such as arctic vegetation dynamics and cryospheric changes. Research letters appearing in ERL have received regular and significant coverage in the wider media, with several major news outlets and agencies choosing to cover ERL research, such as Nature, BBC News, New Scientist, The Guardian, Scientific American, Le Monde and many others. 4.The future community of ERL The process of community support will take many forms at ERL. The journal is growing—we have published the highest number of articles ever in a single volume in 2011 and are looking to continue this growth through into 2012. ERL had an over 50% increase in submissions from 2010 to 2011. One initiative to mark the journal's 5th anniversary was the 'Best articles' collection [1] a nominated compilation of articles showcasing the quality of published work in ERL as well as the subject area breadth. Co-authors of the five winning articles have been awarded free publication in ERL until the end of 2012. We can also see the open access model working, in that our articles are highly downloaded outside of the traditionally strong geographical areas of academia (North America and Western Europe), showing that the journal's readership is geographically diverse with high interest from Asia, South America and Africa. The journal is committed to progress and innovation; coming soon will be a set of new communication tools and online innovations, including: Video abstracts from the start of 2012 (for example, the video commentary published alongside this

  20. Subchromosomal band interval mapping and ordering of DNA markers in the region 3q26.3-q27 involved in the Dup(3q) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzu, P.; Baldini, A.

    1994-12-01

    The duplication 3q syndrome is characterized by the partial trisomy of a segment of the long arm of chromosome 3. This segment, although variable in size, includes 3q26.3-q27 as the minimal region of overlap. We have previously used patient chromosome breakpoints to select cosmids within this region. In this report, we have used two- and three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase and interphase chromosomes to perform high-resolution cytological mapping of the six cosmids identified. The results allowed us to determine the centromere-telomere orientation, the order, and the relative distances of the markers used. Because some of the markers used are part of the consensus chromosome 3 map, our data can be easily integrated with existing mapping information about this chromosome. Our data provide a framework for further physical mapping studies of this region. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  2. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  3. FOREWORD: The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchang-Brillet, Wad Lydia; Wyart, Jean-François; Zeippen, Claude

    1996-01-01

    The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas was held in Meudon, France, from August 28 to 31 1995. It was the fifth in a series started by the Atomic Spectroscopic Group at the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1983. Then followed the meetings in Toledo, USA, Amsterdam, The Nether- lands and Gaithersburg, USA, with a three year period. The original title of the series ended with "... for Astrophysics and Fusion Research" and became more general with the 4th colloquium in Gaithersburg. The purpose of the present meeting was, in line with tradition, to bring together "producers" and "users" of atomic data so as to ensure optimal coordination. Atomic physicists who study the structure of atoms and their radiative and collisional properties were invited to explain the development of their work, emphasizing the possibilities of producing precise transition wavelengths and relative line intensities. Astrophysicists and laboratory plasma physicists were invited to review their present research interests and the context in which atomic data are needed. The number of participants was about 70 for the first three meetings, then exploded to 170 at Gaithersburg. About 140 participants, coming from 13 countries, attended the colloquium in Meudon. This large gathering was partly due to a number of participants from Eastern Europe larger than in the past, and it certainly showed a steady interest for interdisciplinary exchanges between different communities of scientists. This volume includes all the invited papers given at the conference and, in the appendix, practical information on access to some databases. All invited speakers presented their talks aiming at good communication between scientists from different backgrounds. A separate bound volume containing extended abstracts of the poster papers has been published by the Publications de l'Observatoire de Paris, (Meudon 1996), under the responsibility of

  4. Noise exposure in marching bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  5. Compositional short-range ordering in metallic alloys: Band-filling, charge-transfer, and size effects from a first-principles all-electron Landau-type theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.; Pinski, F. J.

    1994-07-01

    Using a mean-field statistical description, we derive a general formalism to investigate atomic short-range order in alloys based on a density-functional description of the finite-temperature, grand potential of the random alloy. This ``first-principles,'' Landau-type approach attempts to treat several contributions (electronic structure, Fermi surface, electrostatics, magnetism, etc.) to the electronic energy on an equal footing. An important ingredient for the statistical averaging is the replacement of the molecular mean fields (Weiss fields) with Onsager cavity fields, which forces the diagonal part of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to be obeyed. To show its general applicability and usefulness, we apply the theory to three fcc alloy systems. In Cu0.75Pd0.25, the incommensurate atomic short-range order is driven by a Fermi-surface effect, in agreement with earlier work. In contrast, Pd0.5Rh0.5 exhibits clustering tendencies, with both band-filling and charge-rearrangement effects being important in setting the spinodal temperature at 1150 K, in good agreement with experiment. In the final examples of three nickel-rich NiCr alloys, previously ignored electrostatic effects are found to play a significant role in determining the atomic short-range order.

  6. Band Together!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After nearly a decade as band director at St. James High School in St. James, Missouri, Derek Limback knows that the key to building a successful program is putting the program itself above everything else. Limback strives to augment not only his students' musical prowess, but also their leadership skills. Key to his philosophy is instilling a…

  7. (S)Partners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Joseph J; Eisenmann, Joey C; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Jager, Kathleen B; Sehnert, Scott T; Yee, Kimbo E; Klavinski, Rita A; Feltz, Deborah L

    2008-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA). In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-disciplinary team of Michigan State University (MSU) faculty, clinicians, and health profession students was formed to "(S)partner" with elementary school physical education (PE) teachers and MSU Extension staff to develop and implement a cost-effective, sustainable program aimed at CVD risk factor prevention and management for 5th grade students. This (S)partnership is intended to augment and improve the existing 5th grade PE, health and nutrition curriculum by achieving the following aims: 1) improve the students' knowledge, attitudes and confidence about nutrition, PA and heart health; 2) increase the number of students achieving national recommendations for PA and nutrition; and 3) increase the number of students with a desirable CVD risk factor status based on national pediatric guidelines. Secondary aims include promoting school staff and parental support for heart health to help children achieve their goals and to provide experiential learning and service for MSU health profession students for academic credit. Methods/Design This pilot effectiveness study was approved by the MSU IRB. At the beginning and the end of the school year students undergo a CVD risk factor assessment conducted by MSU medical students and graduate students. Key intervention components include eight lesson plans (conducted bi-monthly) designed to promote heart healthy nutrition and PA behaviors conducted by PE teachers with assistance from MSU undergraduate dietetic and kinesiology students (Spartners). The final

  8. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4–5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented. PMID:25060862

  9. Autism according to diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders 5(th) edition: The need for further improvements.

    PubMed

    Posar, Annio; Resca, Federica; Visconti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) introduced significant changes in the classification of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including the abolition of the diagnostic subcategories proposed by DSM-IV-Text Revision. DSM-5 describes three levels of increasing severity of ASD. The authors report two explanatory cases with ASD (verbal boys, aged about 7 and a half years, without intellectual disability). According to DSM-5, both cases fall into the lowest severity level of ASD. However, their neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile varies significantly. While the first boy showed a prevalent impairment of visuoconstructional and visuoperceptual abilities, the second one presented a predominant involvement of verbal functions, with qualitative impairments in communication. A further step forward in the definition and classification of ASD, taking into account both intensity and quality of symptoms, is recommended in order to formulate a reliable prognosis, plan an individualized treatment and monitor the clinical course over time. PMID:26167220

  10. Autism according to diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders 5th edition: The need for further improvements

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Resca, Federica; Visconti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) introduced significant changes in the classification of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including the abolition of the diagnostic subcategories proposed by DSM-IV-Text Revision. DSM-5 describes three levels of increasing severity of ASD. The authors report two explanatory cases with ASD (verbal boys, aged about 7 and a half years, without intellectual disability). According to DSM-5, both cases fall into the lowest severity level of ASD. However, their neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile varies significantly. While the first boy showed a prevalent impairment of visuoconstructional and visuoperceptual abilities, the second one presented a predominant involvement of verbal functions, with qualitative impairments in communication. A further step forward in the definition and classification of ASD, taking into account both intensity and quality of symptoms, is recommended in order to formulate a reliable prognosis, plan an individualized treatment and monitor the clinical course over time. PMID:26167220

  11. Preparation and formation mechanism of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) MgO, MgSO 4, CaCO 3, and SrCO 3, and photonic stop band properties of 3DOM CaCO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakane, Masahiro; Kato, Rika; Murayama, Toru; Ueda, Wataru

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) magnesium (Mg) oxide (MgO), MgSO 4, calcium (Ca) carbonate (CaCO 3), and strontium (Sr) carbonate (SrCO 3) were prepared using a colloidal crystal of polymer spheres as a template. Ethanol or ethanol-water solution of metal salts (acetate or nitrate) and citric acid was infiltrated into the void of the colloidal crystal template of a monodispersed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sphere. Heating of this PMMA-metal salt-citric acid composite produced the desired well-ordered 3DOM materials with a high pore fraction, which was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of citric acid is crucial for production of the 3DOM structures. Reaction of citric acid with metal salt produces metal citrate solid in the void of PMMA spheres, which is necessary to maintain the 3DOM structure during the calcination process. 3DOM CaCO 3 shows opalescent colors because of it's photonic stop band properties.

  12. Evidence of a pseudogap driven by competing orders of multi-band origin in the ferromagnetic superconductor Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Mohammad; Paul, Arpita; Thakur, Gohil S.; Gayen, Sirshendu; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Avtar; Das, Shekhar; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    From temperature and magnetic field dependent point-contact spectroscopy on the ferromagnetic superconductor Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2 (bulk superconducting {{T}\\text{c}}=2.5 K) we observe (a) a pseudogap in the normal state that sustains to a remarkably high temperature of 40 K and (b) two-fold enhancement of T c upto 5 K in the point-contact geometry. In addition, Andreev reflection spectroscopy reveals a superconducting gap of 6 meV for certain point-contacts suggesting that the mean field T c of this system could be approximately 40 K, the onset temperature of pseudo-gap. Our results suggest that quantum fluctuations originating from other competing orders in Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2 forbid a global phase coherence at high temperatures thereby suppressing T c. Apart from the known ordering to a ferromagnetic state, our first-principles calculations reveal nesting of a multi-band Fermi surface and a significant electron-phonon coupling that could result in charge density wave-like instabilities.

  13. Evidence of a pseudogap driven by competing orders of multi-band origin in the ferromagnetic superconductor Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mohammad; Paul, Arpita; Thakur, Gohil S; Gayen, Sirshendu; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Avtar; Das, Shekhar; Ganguli, Ashok K; Waghmare, Umesh V; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-18

    From temperature and magnetic field dependent point-contact spectroscopy on the ferromagnetic superconductor Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2 (bulk superconducting [Formula: see text] K) we observe (a) a pseudogap in the normal state that sustains to a remarkably high temperature of 40 K and (b) two-fold enhancement of T c upto 5 K in the point-contact geometry. In addition, Andreev reflection spectroscopy reveals a superconducting gap of 6 meV for certain point-contacts suggesting that the mean field T c of this system could be approximately 40 K, the onset temperature of pseudo-gap. Our results suggest that quantum fluctuations originating from other competing orders in Sr0.5Ce0.5FBiS2 forbid a global phase coherence at high temperatures thereby suppressing T c. Apart from the known ordering to a ferromagnetic state, our first-principles calculations reveal nesting of a multi-band Fermi surface and a significant electron-phonon coupling that could result in charge density wave-like instabilities. PMID:27089948

  14. Using a Spreadsheet to Compute the Maximum Wind Sector 99.5th Percentile X/Q Value in Accordance with DOE-STD-3009-2014.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Linda

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Standard 3009-2014 requires one of two methods to determine the simple Gaussian relative concentration (X/Q) of pollutant at plume centerline downwind to a receptor for a 2-h exposure duration from a ground-level release (i.e., less than 10 m height) which are (1) the 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method and (2) the 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method. This paper describes how to determine the simple Gaussian 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method using an electronic spreadsheet. Refer to a previous paper to determine the simple Gaussian 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method using an electronic spreadsheet (Vickers 2015). The method described herein is simple, quick, accurate, and transparent because all of the data, calculations, and results are visible for validation and verification. PMID:27023153

  15. The 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics: Making progress in the number of women in physics around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Beth

    2015-04-01

    A short report on the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP) will be presented. In particular, a summary of the structure of the 5th ICWIP that occurred in Waterloo, Canada in August 2014 will be provided and placed into context of the previous four conferences. In addition, a synopsis of the recent efforts that are happening around the world to encourage girls and women to participate in physics will be given. Several US projects have been very successful in introducing girls to science and physics (e.g., ``Expanding Your Horizons'' intervention) and encouraging undergraduate women physics majors to continue into physics careers (e.g., Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics). Projects from other countries, such as the Juno Project in the UK that rates physics departments on their climate for women, might be implemented by US physics professional societies as well as colleges and universities. Several projects originating from the conference will be described: the new ``HERstories: Encouraging words from women in physics'' video based on interviews with delegates of the Conference, the My STEM Story project (http://mystemstory.wlu.ca), and the proceedings of the conference. Partial support provided by NSF #PHY-1419453.

  16. 5th International ACC Symposium: Classification of Adrenocortical Cancers from Pathology to Integrated Genomics: Real Advances or Lost in Translation?

    PubMed

    de Krijger, Ronald E; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-02-01

    For the clinician, despite its rarity, adrenocortical cancer is a heterogeneous tumor both in term of steroid excess and tumor evolution. For patient management, it is crucial to have an accurate vision of this heterogeneity, in order to use a correct tumor classification. Pathology is the best way to classify operated adrenocortical tumors: to recognize their adrenocortical nature and to differentiate benign from malignant tumors. Among malignant tumors pathology also aims at prognosis assessment. Although progress has being made for prognosis assessment, there is still a need for improvement. Recent studies have established the value of Ki67 for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) prognostication, aiming also at standardization to reduce variability. The use of genomics to study adrenocortical tumors gives a very new insight in their pathogenesis and molecular classification. Genomics studies of ACC give now a clear description of the mRNA (transcriptome) and miRNA expression profile, as well as chromosomal and methylation alterations. Exome sequencing also established firmly the list of the main ACC driver genes. Interestingly, genomics study of ACC also revealed subtypes of malignant tumors with different pattern of molecular alterations, associated with different outcome. This leads to a new vision of adrenocortical tumors classification based on molecular analysis. Interestingly, these molecular classifications meet also the results of pathological analysis. This opens new perspectives on the development and use of various molecular tools to classify, along with pathological analysis, ACC, and guides patient management at the area of precision medicine. PMID:26676358

  17. Teachers' Inclusive Strategies to Accommodate 5th Grade Pupils' Crossing of Cultural Borders in Two Greek Multicultural Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliouras, Panagiotis; Evangelou, Odysseas

    2012-04-01

    The demographic changes in Greek schools underline the need for reconsidering the way in which migrant pupils move from their everyday culture into the culture of school science (a process known as "cultural border crossing"). Migrant pupils might face difficulties when they attempt to transcend cultural borders and this may influence their progress in science as well as the construction of suitable academic identities as a means of promoting scientific literacy. In the research we present in this paper, adopting the socioculturally driven thesis that learning can be viewed and studied as a meaning-making, collaborative inquiry process, we implemented an action research program (school year 2008-2009) in cooperation with two teachers, in a primary school of Athens with 85% migrant pupils. We examined whether the two teachers, who became gradually acquainted with cross-cultural pedagogy during the project, act towards accommodating the crossing of cultural borders by implementing a variety of inclusive strategies in science teaching. Our findings reveal that both teachers utilized suitable cross-border strategies (strategies concerning the establishment of a collaborative inquiry learning environment, and strategies that were in accordance with a cross-border pedagogy) to help students cross smoothly from their "world" to the "world of science". A crucial key to the teachers' expertise was their previous participation in collaborative action research (school years 2004-2006), in which they analyzed their own discourse practices during science lessons in order to establish more collaborative inquiry environments.

  18. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop DICE2010: Space-Time-Matter - Current Issues in Quantum Mechanics and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2011-07-01

    These proceedings present the Invited Lectures and Contributed Papers of the Fifth International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2010, held at Castello Pasquini, Castiglioncello (Tuscany), 13-17 September 2010. These proceedings are intended to document the stimulating exchange of ideas at this conference for both the interested public and the wider scientific community, as well as for the participants. The number of participants attending this series of meetings has been growing steadily, which reflects its increasing attraction. Our intention to bring together leading researchers, advanced students, and renowned scholars from various areas in order to stimulate new ideas and their exchange across the borders of specialization seems to bear fruit. In this way, the series of meetings has continued successfully from the beginning with DICE 2002 [1], followed by DICE 2004 [2], DICE 2006 [3], and DICE 2008 [4], uniting more than 100 participants representing almost 30 countries worldwide. It has been a great honour and inspiration to have Professor Luc Montagnier (Nobel Prize for Medicine 2008) from the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention with us, who presented the lecture DNA waves and water (included in this volume). The discussions took place under the wider theme Space-Time-Matter - current issues in quantum mechanics and beyond in the very pleasant and inspiring atmosphere of Castello Pasquini, which - with its beautiful surroundings, overlooking the Tuscany coast - hosted the conference very successfully for the second time. The five-day program was grouped according to the following topics: Gravity and Quantum Mechanics Quantum Coherent Processes in Biology / Many-Body Systems From Quantum Foundations to Particle Physics The Deep Structure of Spacetime Quantum - Relativity - Cosmology A Public Roundtable Discussion formed an integral part of the program under the theme Sull' Onda Della Coerenza" - le nuove

  19. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop DICE2010: Space-Time-Matter - Current Issues in Quantum Mechanics and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2011-07-01

    These proceedings present the Invited Lectures and Contributed Papers of the Fifth International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2010, held at Castello Pasquini, Castiglioncello (Tuscany), 13-17 September 2010. These proceedings are intended to document the stimulating exchange of ideas at this conference for both the interested public and the wider scientific community, as well as for the participants. The number of participants attending this series of meetings has been growing steadily, which reflects its increasing attraction. Our intention to bring together leading researchers, advanced students, and renowned scholars from various areas in order to stimulate new ideas and their exchange across the borders of specialization seems to bear fruit. In this way, the series of meetings has continued successfully from the beginning with DICE 2002 [1], followed by DICE 2004 [2], DICE 2006 [3], and DICE 2008 [4], uniting more than 100 participants representing almost 30 countries worldwide. It has been a great honour and inspiration to have Professor Luc Montagnier (Nobel Prize for Medicine 2008) from the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention with us, who presented the lecture DNA waves and water (included in this volume). The discussions took place under the wider theme Space-Time-Matter - current issues in quantum mechanics and beyond in the very pleasant and inspiring atmosphere of Castello Pasquini, which - with its beautiful surroundings, overlooking the Tuscany coast - hosted the conference very successfully for the second time. The five-day program was grouped according to the following topics: Gravity and Quantum Mechanics Quantum Coherent Processes in Biology / Many-Body Systems From Quantum Foundations to Particle Physics The Deep Structure of Spacetime Quantum - Relativity - Cosmology A Public Roundtable Discussion formed an integral part of the program under the theme Sull' Onda Della Coerenza" - le nuove

  20. Health effects of different dietary iron intakes: a systematic literature review for the 5th Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Domellöf, Magnus; Thorsdottir, Inga; Thorstensen, Ketil

    2013-01-01

    Background The present literature review is part of the NNR5 project with the aim of reviewing and updating the scientific basis of the 4th edition of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) issued in 2004. Objective The objective of this systematic literature review was to assess the health effects of different intakes of iron, at different life stages (infants, children, adolescents, adults, elderly, and during pregnancy and lactation), in order to estimate the requirement for adequate growth, development, and maintenance of health. Methods The initial literature search resulted in 1,076 abstracts. Out of those, 276 papers were identified as potentially relevant. Of those, 49 were considered relevant and were quality assessed (A, B, or C). An additional search on iron and diabetes yielded six articles that were quality assessed. Thus, a total of 55 articles were evaluated. The grade of evidence was classified as convincing (grade 1), probable (grade 2), suggestive (grade 3), and inconclusive (grade 4). Results There is suggestive evidence that prevention or treatment of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) improves cognitive, motoric, and behavioral development in young children, and that treatment of IDA improves attention and concentration in school children and adult women. There is insufficient evidence to show negative health effects of iron intakes in doses suggested by the NNR 4. There is insufficient evidence to suggest that normal birth weight, healthy, exclusively breast-fed infants need additional dietary iron before 6 months of life in the Nordic countries. An iron concentration of 4–8 mg/L in infant formulas seems to be safe and effective for normal birth weight infants. There is probable evidence that iron supplements (1–2 mg/kg/day) given up to 6 months of age to infants with low birth weight (<2,500 g) prevents IDA and possibly reduce the risk of behavioral problems later on. There is probable evidence that ID and IDA in

  1. The 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: summary of main findings and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H MacG; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Cook, T M

    2014-10-01

    We present the main findings of the 5th National Audit Project on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia. Incidences were estimated using reports of accidental awareness as the numerator, and a parallel national anaesthetic activity survey to provide denominator data. The incidence of certain/probable and possible accidental awareness cases was ~1:19 600 anaesthetics (95% CI 1:16 700-23 450). However, there was considerable variation across subtypes of techniques or subspecialties. The incidence with neuromuscular blockade was ~1:8200 (1:7030-9700), and without it was ~1:135 900 (1:78 600-299 000). The cases of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia reported to 5th National Audit Project were overwhelmingly cases of unintended awareness during neuromuscular blockade. The incidence of accidental awareness during caesarean section was ~1:670 (1:380-1300). Two thirds (82, 66%) of cases of accidental awareness experiences arose in the dynamic phases of anaesthesia, namely induction of and emergence from anaesthesia. During induction of anaesthesia, contributory factors included: use of thiopental; rapid sequence induction; obesity; difficult airway management; neuromuscular blockade; and interruptions of anaesthetic delivery during movement from anaesthetic room to theatre. During emergence from anaesthesia, residual paralysis was perceived by patients as accidental awareness, and commonly related to a failure to ensure full return of motor capacity. One third (43, 33%) of accidental awareness events arose during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia, most due to problems at induction or towards the end of anaesthesia. Factors increasing the risk of accidental awareness included: female sex; age (younger adults, but not children); obesity; anaesthetist seniority (junior trainees); previous awareness; out-of-hours operating; emergencies; type of surgery (obstetric, cardiac, thoracic); and use of neuromuscular blockade. The following factors were

  2. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  3. Using Community-based Participatory Research to Adapt keepin’ it REAL: Creating a Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade “keepin’ it REAL” prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step adaptation model, emphasized a collaborative approach, both transformative and empowering. Essential adaptation elements were the Risk-to-Resiliency Continuum; the teaching of a wide range of skills including risk assessment, decision making, and resistance strategies; and, maintaining the theoretical grounding of Narrative Theory, Communication Competence, and Focus Theory of Norms. This paper describes how CBPR methodology can be conducted successfully while focusing on sustained theoretical grounding and effective research practices in a school-based setting. PMID:21057596

  4. Investigation of the aerodynamic performance and noise characteristics of a 1/5th scale model of the Dowty Rotol R212 propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebble, W. J. G.

    1983-11-01

    The four-bladed Dowty Rotol R212 propeller (NACA 16 sections) was studied at 1/5th scale (0.7 m diameter) in 1.5 m acoustic tunnel. Propeller power absorption and thrust were measured over a range of rotational speeds up to 8000 rev/min at mainstream speeds from 15 to 60 m/sec for a range of blade settings. Slipstream wake surveys show outward movement of the position of the peak pressure as propeller loading is increased. Noise analysis demonstrates the predominance of multiple tones whose number and intensity increase with helical-tip Mach number. An empirical formula shows that the fundamental tone sound pressure level varies with tip speed and power loading in an identical manner to that observed on an ARA-D section propeller.

  5. [Synthesis of juvenile hormones in vitro by the corpora allata of 5th stage larva of Locusta migratoria migratorioides (R and F) (Insecta, Orthopteroida)].

    PubMed

    Caruelle, J P; Baehr, J C; Cassier, P

    1979-04-01

    Corpora allata of Locusta migratoria 5th stage larvae synthesize J.H.1, J.H.2 and J.H.3 in vitro. The C.A. of insects of different ages exbit different rates of J.H. synthesis. J.H.1 and J.H.2 synthesis is less than 1 ng/48 h/gland. During the same time the J.H.3 production may be as much as 25.6 ng/gland. J.H. synthetic activity is the same between right and left C.A. The release of J.H. from the C.A. occurs immediately following synthesis. These results are compared with in vivo haemolymphatic J.H. levels. PMID:113127

  6. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations. PMID:27018206

  7. Parasite-Antigen Driven Expansion of IL-5− and IL-5+ Th2 Human Subpopulations in Lymphatic Filariasis and Their Differential Dependence on IL-10 and TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Hanna, Luke E.; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Kumaran, P. Paul; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Two different Th2 subsets have been defined recently on the basis of IL-5 expression – an IL-5+Th2 subset and an IL-5−Th2 subset in the setting of allergy. However, the role of these newly described CD4+ T cells subpopulations has not been explored in other contexts. Methods To study the role of the Th2 subpopulation in a chronic, tissue invasive parasitic infection (lymphatic filariasis), we examined the frequency of IL-5+IL-4+IL-13+ CD4+ T cells and IL-5−IL-4 IL-13+ CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic, infected individuals (INF) and compared them to frequencies (Fo) in filarial-uninfected (UN) individuals and to those with filarial lymphedema (CP). Results INF individuals exhibited a significant increase in the spontaneously expressed and antigen-induced Fo of both Th2 subpopulations compared to the UN and CP. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between the Fo of IL-5+Th2 cells and the absolute eosinophil and neutrophil counts; in addition there was a positive correlation between the frequency of the CD4+IL-5−Th2 subpopulation and the levels of parasite antigen – specific IgE and IgG4 in INF individuals. Moreover, blockade of IL-10 and/or TGFβ demonstrated that each of these 2 regulatory cytokines exert opposite effects on the different Th2 subsets. Finally, in those INF individuals cured of infection by anti-filarial therapy, there was a significantly decreased Fo of both Th2 subsets. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both IL-5+ and IL-5−Th2 cells play an important role in the regulation of immune responses in filarial infection and that these two Th2 subpopulations may be regulated by different cytokine-receptor mediated processes. PMID:24498448

  8. Nuclear Electricity. 5th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hore-Lacy, Ian

    Educators must address the need for young people to be informed about both the scientific concepts and the reasons for controversy when dealing with controversial issues. Young people must be given the opportunity to form their own opinions when presented with evidence for conflicting arguments. Previous editions of "Nuclear Electricity" have…

  9. Environmental chemistry. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    This book is organized around several major sections: aquatic Chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, the geosphere and hazardous wastes, toxicological chemistry, and resources and energy. Specific topics discussed in the book include a general introduction to environment chemistry, basic principles of aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, the essential role of microorganisms in aquatic chemical phenomena, atmospheric chemistry, a discussion of major threats to the global atmosphere (particularly greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting chemicals), the geosphere and hazardous substances, soil chemistry, and the nature and sources of hazardous wastes. The environmental chemistry of hazardous wastes, their treatment, minimization, and recycling, and the effects of these hazardous substances in also presented.

  10. Offshore observations of aftershocks following the January 5th 2013 Mw 7.5 Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault earthquake, southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; Gulick, S. P.; Levoir, M. A.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present initial results from a rapid-response ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment that recorded aftershock activity on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather (QC-F) fault following the Mw 7.5 earthquake on January 5th 2013 near Craig, Alaska. This earthquake was the second of two Mw > 7 events on this fault system in a 3 month time period; the Craig earthquake followed a Mw 7.8 thrust event that occurred in October 2012, west of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Although the QC-F is a major plate boundary fault, little is known about the regional fault structure, interseismic coupling, and rheological controls on the depth distribution of seismic slip along the continent-ocean transform. The majority of the QC-F fault system extends offshore western British Columbia and southeast Alaska, making it difficult to characterize earthquakes and fault deformation with land-based seismic and geodetic instruments. This experiment is the first ever offshore seismometer deployment to record earthquake activity along this northern segment of the QC-F system, and was set in motion with help from the US Coast Guard, who provided a vessel and crew to deploy and recover the OBS array on short notice. The seismic array utilized 6 GeoPro short period OBS from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, which recorded approximately 3 weeks of aftershock activity in April-May of 2013. Combining high-quality local OBS recordings with land-based seismic observations from Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) stations to the east, we present more precise aftershock locations and depths that help to better characterize fault zone architecture along the northern section of the QC-F. Although moment tensor solutions indicate that the January 5th mainshock sustained slip consistent with Pacific-North America plate motions, aftershock focal mechanisms indicate some interaction with neighboring faults, such as the Chatham Straight fault. This new OBS dataset will also help to

  11. The 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: patient experiences, human factors, sedation, consent and medicolegal issues.

    PubMed

    Cook, T M; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H MacG; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Pandit, J J

    2014-10-01

    The 5th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland into accidental awareness during general anaesthesia yielded data related to psychological aspects from the patient, and the anaesthetist, perspectives; patients' experiences ranged from isolated auditory or tactile sensations to complete awareness. A striking finding was that 75% of experiences were for < 5 min, yet 51% of patients (95% CI 43-60%) experienced distress and 41% (95% CI 33-50%) suffered longer-term adverse effect. Distress and longer-term harm occurred across the full range of experiences but were particularly likely when the patient experienced paralysis (with or without pain). The patient's interpretation of what is happening at the time of the awareness seemed central to later impact; explanation and reassurance during suspected accidental awareness during general anaesthesia or at the time of report seemed beneficial. Quality of care before the event was judged good in 26%, poor in 39% and mixed in 31%. Three quarters of cases of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (75%) were judged preventable. In 12% of cases of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia, care was judged good and the episode not preventable. The contributory and human factors in the genesis of the majority of cases of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia included medication, patient and education/training. The findings have implications for national guidance, institutional organisation and individual practice. The incidence of 'accidental awareness' during sedation (~1:15 000) was similar to that during general anaesthesia (~1:19 000). The project raises significant issues about information giving and consent for both sedation and anaesthesia. We propose a novel approach to describing sedation from the patient's perspective which could be used in communication and consent. Eight (6%) of the patients had resorted

  12. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: further delineation of phenotype, cohesin biology and educational focus, 5th Biennial Scientific and Educational Symposium abstracts.

    PubMed

    Kline, Antonie D; Calof, Anne L; Schaaf, Cheri A; Krantz, Ian D; Jyonouchi, Soma; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gauze, Maria; Carrico, Cheri S; Woodman, Julie; Gerton, Jennifer L; Vega, Hugo; Levin, Alex V; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Champion, Michele; Goodban, Marjorie T; O'Connor, Julia T; Pipan, Mary; Horsfield, Julia; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ishman, Stacey L; Dorsett, Dale

    2014-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is the prototype for the cohesinopathy disorders that have mutations in genes associated with the cohesin subunit in all cells. Roberts syndrome is the next most common cohesinopathy. In addition to the developmental implications of cohesin biology, there is much translational and basic research, with progress towards potential treatment for these conditions. Clinically, there are many issues in CdLS faced by the individual, parents and caretakers, professionals, and schools. The following abstracts are presentations from the 5th Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Scientific and Educational Symposium on June 20-21, 2012, in conjunction with the Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation National Meeting, Lincolnshire, IL. The research committee of the CdLS Foundation organizes the meeting, reviews and accepts abstracts and subsequently disseminates the information to the families. In addition to the basic science and clinical discussions, there were educationally-focused talks related to practical aspects of management at home and in school. AMA CME credits were provided by Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD. PMID:24504889

  13. Consensus for Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma from The 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014): Current Practice and Future Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Chul; Yu, Jeong Il; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Zeng, Zhao Chong; Hong, Ji Hong; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Kim, Mi Sook; Chi, Kwan Hwa; Liang, Po-Ching; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lau, Wan-Yee; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    A consensus meeting to develop practice guidelines and to recommend future clinical trials for radiation therapy (RT), including external beam RT (EBRT), and selective internal RT (SIRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was held at the 5th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert consortium. Although there is no randomized phase III trial evidence, the efficacy and safety of RT in HCC has been shown by prospective and retrospective studies using modern RT techniques. Based on these results, the committee came to a consensus on the utility and efficacy of RT in the management of HCC according to each disease stage as follows: in early and intermediate stage HCC, if standard treatment is not compatible, RT, including EBRT and SIRT can be considered. In locally advanced stage HCC, combined EBRT with transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and SIRT can be considered. In terminal stage HCC, EBRT can be considered for palliation of symptoms and reduction of morbidity caused by the primary tumor or its metastases. Despite the currently reported benefits of RT in HCC, the committee agreed that there is a compelling need for large prospective studies, including randomized phase III trial evidence evaluating the role of RT. Specifically studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of sequential combination of EBRT and SIRT are strongly recommended. PMID:27493892

  14. Vitamin D status and associated occupational factors in Korean wage workers: data from the 5th Korea national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES 2010–2012)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vitamin D deficiency is increasing worldwide. However, few studies have attempted to examine the vitamin D status of wage workers and the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and working conditions. Hence, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and the association between occupational conditions and vitamin D deficiency among Korean wage workers. Methods Wage workers aged 20–65 years from the 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES 2010–2012; n = 5409) were included in our analysis. We measured the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and identified the correlations with the working conditions of these subjects. Results The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in male and female subjects was 69.5% and 83.1%, respectively. Among the male subjects, a significant correlation between vitamin D deficiency and working conditions was observed among shift workers, office workers, and permanent workers. No significant correlation with any type of working conditions was observed among female subjects. Conclusion The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among Korean wage workers was very high and was found to correlate significantly with working conditions, likely because of insufficient exposure to sunlight associated with certain types of work. Wage workers require more frequent outdoor activity and nutrition management to maintain sufficient vitamin D level. PMID:25852939

  15. Consensus for Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma from The 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014): Current Practice and Future Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Chul; Yu, Jeong Il; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Zeng, Zhao Chong; Hong, Ji Hong; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Kim, Mi Sook; Chi, Kwan Hwa; Liang, Po-Ching; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lau, Wan-Yee; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-07-01

    A consensus meeting to develop practice guidelines and to recommend future clinical trials for radiation therapy (RT), including external beam RT (EBRT), and selective internal RT (SIRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was held at the 5th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert consortium. Although there is no randomized phase III trial evidence, the efficacy and safety of RT in HCC has been shown by prospective and retrospective studies using modern RT techniques. Based on these results, the committee came to a consensus on the utility and efficacy of RT in the management of HCC according to each disease stage as follows: in early and intermediate stage HCC, if standard treatment is not compatible, RT, including EBRT and SIRT can be considered. In locally advanced stage HCC, combined EBRT with transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and SIRT can be considered. In terminal stage HCC, EBRT can be considered for palliation of symptoms and reduction of morbidity caused by the primary tumor or its metastases. Despite the currently reported benefits of RT in HCC, the committee agreed that there is a compelling need for large prospective studies, including randomized phase III trial evidence evaluating the role of RT. Specifically studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of sequential combination of EBRT and SIRT are strongly recommended. PMID:27493892

  16. A Simple Band for Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-08-01

    The author has noted that flexible gastric bands have occasionally stenosed the gastric stoma or allowed it to dilate. A band was developed using a soft outer silicone rubber tube over a holding mechanism made out of a nylon cable tie passed within the silicone tube. This simple, easily applied band is rigid, resisting scar contracture and dilatation. PMID:10757939

  17. 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: patient experiences, human factors, sedation, consent, and medicolegal issues.

    PubMed

    Cook, T M; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H M G; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Pandit, J J

    2014-10-01

    The 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland into accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA) yielded data related to psychological aspects from the patient, and the anaesthetist, perspectives; patients' experiences ranged from isolated auditory or tactile sensations to complete awareness. A striking finding was that 75% of experiences were for <5 min, yet 51% of patients [95% confidence interval (CI) 43-60%] experienced distress and 41% (95% CI 33-50%) suffered longer term adverse effect. Distress and longer term harm occurred across the full range of experiences but were particularly likely when the patient experienced paralysis (with or without pain). The patient's interpretation of what is happening at the time of the awareness seemed central to later impact; explanation and reassurance during suspected AAGA or at the time of report seemed beneficial. Quality of care before the event was judged good in 26%, poor in 39%, and mixed in 31%. Three-quarters of cases of AAGA (75%) were judged preventable. In 12%, AAGA care was judged good and the episode not preventable. The contributory and human factors in the genesis of the majority of cases of AAGA included medication, patient, and education/training. The findings have implications for national guidance, institutional organization, and individual practice. The incidence of 'accidental awareness' during sedation (~1:15,000) was similar to that during general anaesthesia (~1:19,000). The project raises significant issues about information giving and consent for both sedation and anaesthesia. We propose a novel approach to describing sedation from the patient's perspective which could be used in communication and consent. Eight (6%) of the patients had resorted to legal action (12, 11%, to formal complaint) at the time of reporting. NAP5 methodology provides a standardized template that might usefully inform

  18. 5th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention: summary of key research and implications for policy and practice - operations research.

    PubMed

    Kort, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    Operations research was added as a fourth scientific track to the pathogenesis conference series at the 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2009) in recognition of the importance of this growing research field and the need for applied research to inform and evaluate the scale up of some key interventions in HIV treatment, care and prevention.Several studies demonstrated how task shifting and the decentralization of health services can leverage scarce health care resources to support scale-up efforts. For example, a Ugandan study comparing home-based and facility-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery found that both delivered equivalent clinical outcomes, but home-based delivery resulted in substantial cost savings to patients; and a retrospective cohort analysis of an HIV care programme in Lesotho demonstrated that devolving routine patient management to nurses and trained counsellors resulted in impressive gains in annual enrolment, retention in care and other clinical indicators.Studies also demonstrated how the use of trained counsellors and public health advisors could effectively expand both clinical and public health capacity in low-income settings. Studies evaluating the impact of integrating HIV and TB care resulted in improved treatment outcomes in coinfected populations, the development of environmental interventions to reduce TB transmission, and uncovering of the extent of multi-drug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and XDR-TB) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.Some mathematical modelling and cost-effectiveness studies presented at this meeting addressed interventions to increase retention in care, and strengthened the evidentiary basis for universal voluntary testing and immediate ART on reducing HIV transmission; debate continued about the relative merits of clinical versus laboratory monitoring. Finally, a provocative plenary presentation outlined the shortfalls of current prevention

  19. Relationship between Long Working Hours and Suicidal Thoughts: Nationwide Data from the 4th and 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jung, Pil Kyun; Roh, Jaehoon; Seok, Hongdeok; Won, Jong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Background Long working hours are a worldwide problem and may increase the risk of various health issues. However, the health effects of long working hours on suicidal thoughts have not been frequently studied. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between long working hours and suicidal thoughts in the rapidly developing country of Korea. Methods Data from 12,076 participants (7,164 men, 4,912 women) from the 4th and 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were used for the current analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for suicidal thoughts. Combined effects of long working hours and lower socioeconomic status or sleep disturbance were also estimated. Results Compared to groups who worked less than 52 hours per week, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for suicidal thoughts in groups who worked 60 hours or more per week were 1.36 (1.09–1.70) for males and 1.38 (1.11–1.72) for females, even after controlling for household income, marital status, history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, health-related behaviors, and past two weeks’ experience of injury, intoxication, or acute or chronic diseases, as well as type of work. The combined effects of long working hours with lower socioeconomic status, or with sleep disturbance, were also significantly higher compared to participants who worked less than 52 hours per week with higher socioeconomic status, or with 6–8 hours of nighttime sleep. Conclusion In this study, long working hours were linked to suicidal thoughts for both genders. Additionally, the odds of those suicidal thoughts were higher for lower socioeconomic groups. To prevent adverse psychological health problems such as suicidal thoughts, a strategy regarding long working hours should be investigated. PMID:26080022

  20. Isogeometric analysis of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-Vergiat, Luc; McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2014-08-01

    Numerical modeling of shear bands present several challenges, primarily due to strain softening, strong nonlinear multiphysics coupling, and steep solution gradients with fine solution features. In general it is not known a priori where a shear band will form or propagate, thus adaptive refinement is sometimes necessary to increase the resolution near the band. In this work we explore the use of isogeometric analysis for shear band problems by constructing and testing several combinations of NURBS elements for a mixed finite element shear band formulation. Owing to the higher order continuity of the NURBS basis, fine solution features such as shear bands can be resolved accurately and efficiently without adaptive refinement. The results are compared to a mixed element formulation with linear functions for displacement and temperature and Pian-Sumihara shape functions for stress. We find that an element based on high order NURBS functions for displacement, temperature and stress, combined with gauss point sampling of the plastic strain leads to attractive results in terms of rate of convergence, accuracy and cpu time. This element is implemented with a -bar strain projection method and is shown to be nearly locking free.

  1. 76 FR 11681 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ...This document summarizes the Fourth Report and Order, which establishes a new 800 MHz band plan for the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). This action is necessary to meet the Commission's goals to improve public safety communications in the 800 MHz band. The effect of this order ensures an orderly and efficient transition to the new 800 MHz band plan in the...

  2. How Do 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Students' Categories of Cognitive Reflections in Interviews on Derivational Morphology Compare to Their Upper Level Spelling Inventory Orthographic Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darcie D.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-seven 4th, 5th and 6th grade students were administered the "Derivational Relatedness Interview" (DRI) (Templeton, Smith, Moloney, Van Pelt, & Ives, 2009). The purpose of this instrument is to explore students' understanding of derivational morphology. During the same week, the subjects were also administered an Upper…

  3. Mountain Dew[R] or Mountain Don't?: A Pilot Investigation of Caffeine Use Parameters and Relations to Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in 5th- and 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Bell, Debora J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Caffeine, the only licit psychoactive drug available to minors, may have a harmful impact on students' health and adjustment, yet little is known about its use or effects on students, especially from a developmental perspective. Caffeine use in 5th- and 10th-grade students was examined in a cross-sectional design, and relations and…

  4. A Study on Reading Comprehension Skills of Primary School 5th Grade Students--Learning Basic Reading and Writing Skills through Phonics-Based Sentence Method or Decoding Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusdemir Kayiran, Bilge; Karabay, Aysegul

    2012-01-01

    This research aims at investigating the influence of two methods implemented in primary reading and writing teaching programs--phonics-based sentence method and decoding (analysis) method--on primary school 5th grade students' reading comprehension achievement. Also, the study considers the relationship between socio-economic status and reading…

  5. A Response to Lawrence Ferrara's Chapter Four in R. Phelps, R. Sadoff, E. Warburton, and L. Ferrara, "A Guide to Research in Music Education," 5th Edition (Lanham, Maryland, Scarecrow Press, Inc., 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A reply to Lawrence Ferrara's Chapter 4 in R. Phelps, R. Sadoff, E. Warburton, and L. Ferrara, "A Guide to Research in Music Education," 5th Edition is presented. It it curious that Ferrara disagrees with Jack Heller and Edward J. P. O'Connor's view that "philosophy" is not "research," yet in the chapter headings in the book A Guide to Research in…

  6. Effect of Chronic Rhinosinusitis With or Without Nasal Polyp on Quality of Life in South Korea: 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Korean

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Han, Kyungdo; Kim, Soo Whan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This is the first study of its kind to investigate the relationship between chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with or without nasal polyps (NP) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the general adult Korean population. We sought to evaluate the association after adjustment for confounding factors. We also evaluated HRQoL according to presence of NP in CRS patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we used nationally representative samples from the 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010–2012). A total of 17,490 participants were included in the study, of which 613 were diagnosed with CRS. Univariate analysis was conducted on healthy versus CRS groups, segregated by gender with weighted prevalence of demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, and comorbid diseases. Subanalysis was carried out to evaluate the relationship between CRS with or without NP and HRQoL using EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D) and visual analog scale (EQ-VAS). The odds ratios for EQ-5D were estimated by multiple logistic regression analyses with confounder adjustment. Results Weighted prevalence of CRS of adult male was found to be 3.7% and CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) 0.5%, while female CRS was 3.3% and CRSwNP 0.3%. There was no significant difference between the groups (P#x0003d;0.332). The scores for female, EQ-5D index (P for trend<0.001) and EQ-VAS (P for trend=0.002) showed decreasing trend from healthy participants to CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) and from CRSsNp to CRSwNP. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, and comorbid diseases, EQ-5D scores; EQ-5D index (P<0.001) and EQ-VAS (P<0.001) exhibited poorer HRQoL compared to healthy participants, exclusively within the female group. Conclusion These data suggest that female patients with CRS are at higher risk of poor HRQoL. In addition, HRQoL of female CRSwNP was lower compared to those of CRSsNP and healthy participants. PMID:27090274

  7. EDITORIAL: PLASMA 2006: The 5th International Conference on the Intrinsic Josephson Effect and Plasma Oscillations in High-TC Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Paul; Yurgens, August

    2007-02-01

    The 5th International Conference on the Intrinsic Josephson Effect and Plasma Oscillations in High-TC Superconductors (known as `PLASMA' for short) took place in London from July 17th to 19th 2006. The meeting was organised jointly by the Superconductivity Group of the Institute of Physics and the European Science Foundation network `Arrays of Quantum Dots and Josephson Junctions' (AQDJJ). It was sponsored by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, AQDJJ, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Physics and the National Institute of Materials Science (NIMS). The meeting was chaired by Paul Warburton of University College London who wishes to put on record his thanks to the conference sponsors for their generosity, without which the conference could not have taken place. Since the previous PLASMA conference in Tsukuba in 2004 the most significant advance in intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) research has arguably been the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in IJJs. At the time of the conference this had been observed by both the RIEC/NIMS/AIST collaboration in Japan and by Paul M\\"uller's group in Erlangen. We therefore felt that the conference presented an ideal and timely opportunity for the IJJ community to learn from the more established community of researchers on macroscopic quantum phenomena in low-TC superconductors---and indeed vice versa. As a result a number of leading researchers from the field of low-TC Josephson qubit devices gave several illuminating presentations. Other sessions included those on Josephson vortex dynamics in layered systems and terahertz oscillations in IJJs, in addition to a lively poster session on the first evening. The conference was rounded off by an excellent summary of the highlights of the meeting given by Professor Hu-Jong Lee. The conference organisers would like to thank all those who made the meeting possible and contributed to its smooth running. In addition to the international organising

  8. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  9. First Eigenmode Transmission by High Efficient CSI Estimation for Multiuser Massive MIMO Using Millimeter Wave Bands

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Kazuki; Iwakuni, Tatsuhiko; Ohta, Atsushi; Arai, Takuto; Shirato, Yushi; Kurosaki, Satoshi; Iizuka, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Drastic improvements in transmission rate and system capacity are required towards 5th generation mobile communications (5G). One promising approach, utilizing the millimeter wave band for its rich spectrum resources, suffers area coverage shortfalls due to its large propagation loss. Fortunately, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) can offset this shortfall as well as offer high order spatial multiplexing gain. Multiuser MIMO is also effective in further enhancing system capacity by multiplexing spatially de-correlated users. However, the transmission performance of multiuser MIMO is strongly degraded by channel time variation, which causes inter-user interference since null steering must be performed at the transmitter. This paper first addresses the effectiveness of multiuser massive MIMO transmission that exploits the first eigenmode for each user. In Line-of-Sight (LoS) dominant channel environments, the first eigenmode is chiefly formed by the LoS component, which is highly correlated with user movement. Therefore, the first eigenmode provided by a large antenna array can improve the robustness against the channel time variation. In addition, we propose a simplified beamforming scheme based on high efficient channel state information (CSI) estimation that extracts the LoS component. We also show that this approximate beamforming can achieve throughput performance comparable to that of the rigorous first eigenmode transmission. Our proposed multiuser massive MIMO scheme can open the door for practical millimeter wave communication with enhanced system capacity. PMID:27399715

  10. First Eigenmode Transmission by High Efficient CSI Estimation for Multiuser Massive MIMO Using Millimeter Wave Bands.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Kazuki; Iwakuni, Tatsuhiko; Ohta, Atsushi; Arai, Takuto; Shirato, Yushi; Kurosaki, Satoshi; Iizuka, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Drastic improvements in transmission rate and system capacity are required towards 5th generation mobile communications (5G). One promising approach, utilizing the millimeter wave band for its rich spectrum resources, suffers area coverage shortfalls due to its large propagation loss. Fortunately, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) can offset this shortfall as well as offer high order spatial multiplexing gain. Multiuser MIMO is also effective in further enhancing system capacity by multiplexing spatially de-correlated users. However, the transmission performance of multiuser MIMO is strongly degraded by channel time variation, which causes inter-user interference since null steering must be performed at the transmitter. This paper first addresses the effectiveness of multiuser massive MIMO transmission that exploits the first eigenmode for each user. In Line-of-Sight (LoS) dominant channel environments, the first eigenmode is chiefly formed by the LoS component, which is highly correlated with user movement. Therefore, the first eigenmode provided by a large antenna array can improve the robustness against the channel time variation. In addition, we propose a simplified beamforming scheme based on high efficient channel state information (CSI) estimation that extracts the LoS component. We also show that this approximate beamforming can achieve throughput performance comparable to that of the rigorous first eigenmode transmission. Our proposed multiuser massive MIMO scheme can open the door for practical millimeter wave communication with enhanced system capacity. PMID:27399715

  11. Dilatational band formation in bone

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Diab, Tamim; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Boskey, Adele L.; Gundberg, Caren M.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Toughening in hierarchically structured materials like bone arises from the arrangement of constituent material elements and their interactions. Unlike microcracking, which entails micrometer-level separation, there is no known evidence of fracture at the level of bone’s nanostructure. Here, we show that the initiation of fracture occurs in bone at the nanometer scale by dilatational bands. Through fatigue and indentation tests and laser confocal, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies on human and bovine bone specimens, we established that dilatational bands of the order of 100 nm form as ellipsoidal voids in between fused mineral aggregates and two adjacent proteins, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN). Laser microdissection and ELISA of bone microdamage support our claim that OC and OPN colocalize with dilatational bands. Fracture tests on bones from OC and/or OPN knockout mice (OC−/−, OPN−/−, OC-OPN−/−;−/−) confirm that these two proteins regulate dilatational band formation and bone matrix toughness. On the basis of these observations, we propose molecular deformation and fracture mechanics models, illustrating the role of OC and OPN in dilatational band formation, and predict that the nanometer scale of tissue organization, associated with dilatational bands, affects fracture at higher scales and determines fracture toughness of bone. PMID:23129653

  12. Multiple ordering in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a self-consistent band calculation of the ground-state energy and charge orderings based on a tight-binding scheme in magnetite are presented. They show that below a critical (about 2.2) value of the ratio of interatomic Coulomb energy to bandwidth the lowest energy state has no order. Between this critical value and 2.5, the preferred state is multiply ordered.

  13. X-Band/Ka-Band Dichroic Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jacqueline C.

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic plate designed nearly transparent to circularly polarized microwaves at frequencies between 31.8 and 34.7 GHz (in and near Ka band) and reflective at frequencies between 8.4 and 8.5 GHz (in the X band). Made of electrically conductive material and contains rectangular holes in staggered pattern.

  14. International Symposium on Numerical Methods in Engineering, 5th, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland, Sept. 11-15, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Ralph; Periaux, Jaques; Shaw, Richard Paul

    Recent advances in computational mechanics are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include spectral superpositions on finite elements for shear banding problems, strain-based finite plasticity, numerical simulation of hypersonic viscous continuum flow, constitutive laws in solid mechanics, dynamics problems, fracture mechanics and damage tolerance, composite plates and shells, contact and friction, metal forming and solidification, coupling problems, and adaptive FEMs. Consideration is given to chemical flows, convection problems, free boundaries and artificial boundary conditions, domain-decomposition and multigrid methods, combustion and thermal analysis, wave propagation, mixed and hybrid FEMs, integral-equation methods, optimization, software engineering, and vector and parallel computing.

  15. Overview of the 80(th) Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society - The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan - - The 5(th) Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Satoh, Kimio; Fukuda, Koji; Sugimura, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Nakano, Makoto; Tsuburaya, Ryuji; Aoki, Tatsuo; Hao, Kiyotaka; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Ito, Kenta; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-07-25

    The 80(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Sendai, Japan, on March 18-20, 2016, which coincided with the 5(th)anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit the Tohoku area on March 11, 2011. Thus, the main themes for this meeting were "The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan" and "The 5(th)Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake". Despite the provincial location, approximately 15,000 people attended during the 3-day meeting, and there were in-depth discussions in each of the various sessions on these themes. Especially, to our great pleasure, the Japanese Royals, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, kindly visited the panel exhibition of the Great East Japan Earthquake and spoke words of appreciation to us. The meeting successfully completed and we sincerely appreciate the great cooperation and support from all affiliates. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1689-1694). PMID:27385500

  16. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  17. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CFS is the clear fluid that flows in the space around the spinal cord and brain. Oligoclonal bands are proteins called immunoglobulins. The ... system. Oligoclonal bands may be a sign of multiple sclerosis.

  18. Lucky guess or knowledge: a cross-sectional study using the Bland and Altman analysis to compare confidence-based testing of pharmacological knowledge in 3rd and 5th year medical students.

    PubMed

    Kampmeyer, Daniela; Matthes, Jan; Herzig, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Multiple-choice-questions are common in medical examinations, but guessing biases assessment results. Confidence-based-testing (CBT) integrates indicated confidence levels. It has been suggested that correctness of and confidence in an answer together indicate knowledge levels thus determining the quality of a resulting decision. We used a CBT approach to investigate whether decision quality improves during undergraduate medical education. 3rd- and 5th-year students attended formative multiple-choice exams on pharmacological issues. Students were asked to indicate their confidence in a given answer. Correctness of answers was scored binary (1-correct; 0-wrong) and confidence levels were transformed to an ordinal scale (guess: 0; rather unsure: 0.33; rather sure: 0.66; very sure: 1). 5th-year students gave more correct answers (73 ± 16 vs. 49 ± 13 %, p < 0.05) and were on average more confident regarding the correctness of their answers (0.61 ± 0.18 vs. 0.46 ± 0.13, p < 0.05). Correlation of these parameters was stronger for 5th-year students (r = 0.81 vs. r = 0.52), but agreement of confidence and correctness ('centration') was lower. By combining the Bland-and-Altman approach with categories of decision-quality we found that 5th-year students were more likely to be 'well-informed' (41 vs. 5 %), while more 3rd-students were 'uninformed' (24 vs. 76 %). Despite a good correlation of exam results and confidence in given answers increased knowledge might be accompanied by a more critical view at the own abilities. Combining the statistical Bland-and-Altman analysis with a theoretical approach to decision-quality, more advanced students are expected to apply correct beliefs, while their younger fellows are rather at risk to hesitate or to act amiss. PMID:25103688

  19. Flat Band Quastiperiodic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua; Flach, Sergej; Danieli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Translationally invariant lattices with flat bands (FB) in their band structure possess irreducible compact localized flat band states, which can be understood through local rotation to a Fano structure. We present extension of these quasi-1D FB structures under incommensurate lattices, reporting on the FB effects to the Metal-Insulator Transition.

  20. Classroom Order and Student Learning in Late Elementary School: A Multilevel Transactional Model of Achievement Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskins, Clare S.; Herres, Joanna; Kobak, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the association between classroom order in 4th and 5th grades and student achievement growth over a school year. A three level transactional model tested the effects of classroom order on students' rates of growth in math and reading during the school year controlling for starting achievement levels, student risk factors, and…

  1. PREFACE: MEM07: The 5th Annual Workshop on Mechanical and Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Princeton, NJ, USA, 21 24 August 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbalestier, D. C.; Osamura, K.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2008-05-01

    MEM07 was the 5th international workshop concentrating on the mechanical and electrical properties of composite superconductors, which are the technological conductor forms from which practical superconducting devices are made. Such superconducting conductors respond to important challenges we currently face, especially those concerned with the proper management of the world's energy resources. Superconductivity provides a means to address the challenges in the generation, transmission and distribution, and use of energy. For energy generation, the ITER Fusion Tokomak (now underway in France) provides exciting new challenges for the whole superconductivity community, due to the enormous size and strong fields of the plasma confinement superconducting magnets that will form the largest and most powerful superconducting machine yet built. Significant attention was paid at MEM07 to the modeling, characterization, testing and validation of the high-amperage Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors needed for ITER. As for electric energy industry uses, there was much discussion of both first generation (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox conductors and the rapidly emerging second generation coated conductors made from YBa2Cu37-x. High-performing, affordable conductors of these materials are vital for large capacity transmission cables, energy storage systems, fault current limiters, generators and motors—many prototypes of which are being pursued in technologically advanced countries. There is a broad consensus that the prototype stage for high-current-high-field superconducting applications is nearing its end and that large scale applications are technologically feasible. However full industrialization of large-scale superconducting technologies in electric utility applications will benefit from continuous improvement in critical current, lower ac loss, higher strength and other vital conductor properties. The establishment of optimal procedures for the system design accompanying scale

  2. Banded ion morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Bands of ions have been observed at constant pitch angle by the Dynamics Explorer High- and Low-Altitude Plasma Instruments at auroral latitudes. The observed ion-dispersion pattern shows lower-energy ions toward the equatorward side of the band and higher-energy ions toward the poleward side of the band. Ion bands have their highest-energy flux at small pitch angles. The observed bands have been correlated with storm phase (by Dst) and substorm phase (by AE). Bands are more likely to occur during main-storm phase than during recovery storm phase. Substorm correlations are statistically significant, but there is a hint that most bands occur during substorm recovery phase. Two models have the potential of producing ion signatures that are similar to the band feature. They are the time-of-flight mechanism and the convective dispersion mechanism. Under a time-of-flight mechanism, ions are dispersed along a magnetic filed line with higher-energy particles outrunning lower energy particles. Ions are dispersed perpendicular to the magnetic field under convective dispersion. A time-of-flight effect does not explain the band energy-latitude dependence observed in the southern night or northern day very well, whereas the convective dispersion mechanism easily accomplishes this.

  3. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs.

  4. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    PubMed Central

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest. PMID:26905029

  5. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest.

  6. On the inability of magnetically constricted transition regions to account for the 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 6th K plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, James F., Jr.; Moore, Ronald L.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1987-01-01

    Static models of the plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere incorporating not only conduction and radiation but also the effects of large magnetic constrictions are examined. It is found that the bulk of the solar plasma at temperatures below 7 x 10 to the 5th K cannot be produced by a conductive transition region when it is modeled by flux tubes with constriction compatible with observations. The present findings suggest that the major portion of the UEV plasma may be maintained in an ensemble of small, individual magnetic loops located within the supergranular network and having peak temperatures ranging from chromospheric to coronal values.

  7. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  8. Singing with the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Timothy Meyer; Wright, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Usually band, orchestra, and choir directors work independently. However, the authors--one a choral director, the other a band director--have learned that making music together makes friends. Not only can ensemble directors get along, but joint concerts may be just the way to help students see how music can reach the heart. Combined instrumental…

  9. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  10. Progressive Band Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  11. Selecting band combinations with thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A problem arises in making color composite images because there are 210 different possible color presentations of TM three-band images. A method is given for reducing that 210 to a single choice, decided by the statistics of a scene or subscene, and taking into full account any correlations that exist between different bands. Instead of using total variance as the measure for information content of the band triplets, the ellipsoid of maximum volume is selected which discourages selection of bands with high correlation. The band triplet is obtained by computing and ranking in order the determinants of each 3 x 3 principal submatrix of the original matrix M. After selection of the best triplet, the assignment of colors is made by using the actual variances (the diagonal elements of M): green (maximum variance), red (second largest variance), blue (smallest variance).

  12. Nonlinear optical properties of organic materials V; Proceedings of the 5th Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 22-24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David J.

    The present volume on nonlinear optical properties of organic materials discusses organic nonlinear optics, polymers for nonlinear optics, characterization of nonlinear properties, photorefractive and second-order materials, harmonic generation in organic materials, and devices and applications. Particular attention is given to organic semiconductor-doped polymer glasses as novel nonlinear media, heterocyclic nonlinear optical materials, loss measurements in electrooptic polymer waveguides, the phase-matched second-harmonic generation in planar waveguides, electrooptic measurements in poled polymers, transient effects in spatial light modulation by nonlinearity-absorbing molecules, the electrooptic effects in organic single crystals, surface acoustic wave propagation in an organic nonlinear optical crystal, nonlinear optics of astaxanthin thin films; and advanced high-temperature polymers for integrated optical waveguides. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  13. PIXE analyses over a long period: The case of Neolithic variscite jewels from Western Europe (5th-3th millennium BC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querré, G.; Calligaro, T.; Domínguez-Bella, S.; Cassen, S.

    2014-01-01

    PIXE analysis of archeological variscite beads and pendants from the Neolithic period that were excavated in Spain, Portugal and France and of variscite geological references samples from European occurrences were carried out from 1999 to 2013 in order to trace back the circulation of this precious gemstone over three millennia. Transformations of the AGLAE external beam system and progress in spectrum processing have induced some apparent compositional variation, affecting in particular the phosphorus/aluminum ratio. This long term evolution has been taken into account with the help of geostandards to build a large and coherent geochemical database of minor and trace elements in variscite. This database allowed us to determine the provenance of the raw material and thus of the circulation of the jewels.

  14. EDITORIAL: Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009) Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio and the 4th International Conference on Artificial Muscles were held in Osaka, Japan, 23-27 November 2009. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers presented at this international conference and congress. Of the 76 or so papers presented at the conference, only 10 papers were finally selected, reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular reviewing procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites and their applications. In particular, an electromechanical model for self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes is presented which discusses the concept of creating self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes where actuator and sensor elements are separated by a grounded shielding electrode. Eventually, an electromechanical model of the device is also proposed and validated. Following that, there is broad coverage of polytetrahydrofurane-polyethylene oxide-PEDOT conducting interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) for high speed actuators. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) is incorporated within the IPNs, which are synthesized from polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) networks. PEO/PTHF IPNs are prepared using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and dimethacrylate and hydroxythelechelic PTHF as starting materials. The conducting IPN actuators are prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene (EDOT) using FeCl3 as an oxidizing agent within the PEO/PTHF IPN host matrix. Subsequently, giant and reversible magnetorheology of carrageenan/iron oxide magnetic gels are discussed and the effect of magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties

  15. Chiral Bands and Triaxiality

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C.M.

    2004-02-27

    The results obtained with the GASP array in the A=130 mass region are reviewed, emphasizing the discovery excited highly-deformed bands and their decay out, the study of the odd-odd Pr nuclei up to high spins, the discovery of stable triaxial bands in Nd nuclei close to the N=82 shell closure. The very recent studies of nuclei near the proton drip line are described. A discussion of the origin of the various doublet bands observed in odd-odd nuclei of the A=130 mass region is presented.

  16. Validation of S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night Band and M Bands Performance Using Ground Reference Targets of Libya 4 and Dome C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xuexia; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Chiang, Kwofu

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides methodologies developed and implemented by the NASA VIIRS Calibration Support Team (VCST) to validate the S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band (DNB) and M bands calibration performance. The Sensor Data Records produced by the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) and NASA Land Product Evaluation and Algorithm Testing Element (PEATE) are acquired nearly nadir overpass for Libya 4 desert and Dome C snow surfaces. In the past 3.5 years, the modulated relative spectral responses (RSR) change with time and lead to 3.8% increase on the DNB sensed solar irradiance and 0.1% or less increases on the M4-M7 bands. After excluding data before April 5th, 2013, IDPS DNB radiance and reflectance data are consistent with Land PEATE data with 0.6% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 2% or less difference for Dome C site. These difference are caused by inconsistent LUTs and algorithms used in calibration. In Libya 4 site, the SCIAMACHY spectral and modulated RSR derived top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance are compared with Land PEATE TOA reflectance and they indicate a decrease of 1.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The radiance of Land PEATE DNB are compared with the simulated radiance from aggregated M bands (M4, M5, and M7). These data trends match well with 2% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 4% or less difference for Dome C. This study demonstrate the consistent quality of DNB and M bands calibration for Land PEATE products during operational period and for IDPS products after April 5th, 2013.

  17. Validation of S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band and M bands performance using ground reference targets of Libya 4 and Dome C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuexia; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Chiang, Kwofu

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides methodologies developed and implemented by the NASA VIIRS Calibration Support Team (VCST) to validate the S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band (DNB) and M bands calibration performance. The Sensor Data Records produced by the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) and NASA Land Product Evaluation and Algorithm Testing Element (PEATE) are acquired nearly nadir overpass for Libya 4 desert and Dome C snow surfaces. In the past 3.5 years, the modulated relative spectral responses (RSR) change with time and lead to 3.8% increase on the DNB sensed solar irradiance and 0.1% or less increases on the M4-M7 bands. After excluding data before April 5th, 2013, IDPS DNB radiance and reflectance data are consistent with Land PEATE data with 0.6% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 2% or less difference for Dome C site. These difference are caused by inconsistent LUTs and algorithms used in calibration. In Libya 4 site, the SCIAMACHY spectral and modulated RSR derived top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance are compared with Land PEATE TOA reflectance and they indicate a decrease of 1.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The radiance of Land PEATE DNB are compared with the simulated radiance from aggregated M bands (M4, M5, and M7). These data trends match well with 2% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 4% or less difference for Dome C. This study demonstrate the consistent quality of DNB and M bands calibration for Land PEATE products during operational period and for IDPS products after April 5th, 2013.

  18. Using a Distant Abdominal Skin Flap to Treat Digital Constriction Bands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzi; Song, Kexin; Ding, Ning; Shu, Chang; Wang, Youbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, a Vohwinkel syndrome case is presented where in 5th digit constriction bands in the right hand were reconstructed using a distant abdominal skin flap. Vohwinkel syndrome, or keratoderma hereditarium mutilans, is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic skin condition that causes palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and constricts finger and/or toe bands. In a typical manifestation, the finger and toe constriction bands lead to progressive strangulation and autoamputation, which requires immediate clinical treatment. Topical keratolytics and systemic retinoids have been used to treat hyperkeratosis but without consistent results. Only 1 effective approach for autoamputation has been accepted, reconstructive surgery. Applying a distant abdominal skin flap produced satisfying postoperative effects at the 18-month follow-up. PMID:26871826

  19. Design of an optical system for a 5th generation multi-spectral air-to-air missile considering the imaging performance degradation due to the aerodynamic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Paulo R., Jr.; da Silva, Maurício; Paoli, Eduardo T.

    2009-05-01

    An air-to-air missile is always submitted to extremes conditions of temperature, such as a hot runway in the desert dropping down to very cold conditions at high altitudes. It is evident that the optical system must be able to provide satisfactory image quality under any circumstances without causing any major degradation to the image. Under this perspective, two different designs of optical systems will be considered for this missile: one catadioptric, using a modified Cassegrain telescope and another one purely dioptric. Both optical systems must be able to focus energy in two different arrays of detectors, one for the near infrared radiation and the other one for the medium infrared. Due to the special missile flight profile, the temperature operational range will be determined and considered in order to design and athermalize the optical systems. Due to the large temperatures range, the missile optical system will experience deformation effects that will cause defocus and image degradation. A correct choice of materials, including the telescope body and dome shroud must be determined to minimize the defocus effect. Also a thermal compensator ought to be strategically placed on both designs to provide focus correction for all the temperatures range. Following that, the optical designs will be analyzed for effects of stray light and ghost image to find out what are the most suitable absorbing paint and anti-reflective coatings to be used. In the last step, both systems will be classified accordingly to their characteristics of performance, weight, size, viability and price and the best will integrate the missile optical system.

  20. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ... panel on weight loss surgery: executive report update. Obesity . 2009;17:842-62. PMID: 19396063 www.ncbi. ...

  1. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... lining), heartburn , or stomach ulcers Infection in the port, which may need antibiotics or surgery Injury to ... may not be able to reach the access port to tighten or loosen the band (you would ...

  2. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  3. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy ... Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous system (CNS) and collect waste products, as well as ...

  4. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. Oligoclonal bands may be a sign of multiple sclerosis. How the Test is Performed A sample of ... Performed This test helps support the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it does not confirm the diagnosis. ...

  5. The effect of differentiated curriculum enhancements on the achievement of at-risk and normally achieving students in 5th grade science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Pamela Mccrea

    2007-12-01

    At-risk students show consistent patterns of under achievement and social maladjustment in school which leads to their demise in high school (McMillian & Reed, 1994). Similarly, special education students are at increased risk of not completing high school and do not perform as well on national achievement tests than their nondisabled peers (Land & Legters, 2002). It is possible that students at-risk for academic failure will not meet graduation requirements unless interventions are put in place to alleviate this problem. It has been documented that science textbooks contain difficult vocabulary and high reading levels that are challenging for struggling students. Using approaches such as activities oriented instruction, which supports the cooperative learning/peer tutoring model is one approach that has been successful with normally achieving and special education students. This research examined the effect of differentiated curriculum enhancements with peer tutoring on the achievement of at-risk and normally achieving students in science. A crossover design was implemented in three fifth grade inclusive classes, consisting of typically achieving students, students at-risk, and students with learning disabilities. The participants included 16 at-risk students, three special education students and 44 normally achieving students. The science review activities were implemented during two consecutive science units. One unit covered Earth and Space science. The other unit covered Light and Sound. Each curriculum enhancement had identification and production level activities. The identification level provided prompts; the production level did not provide prompts. Pretest and posttest were administered. Overall findings of the study revealed a significant interaction between experimental condition and treatment order, suggesting an advantage for students using differentiated curriculum enhancements. Main effects analysis suggested that students performed better on one

  6. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  7. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  8. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  9. Preparation and formation mechanism of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3}, and photonic stop band properties of 3DOM CaCO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sadakane, Masahiro; Kato, Rika; Murayama, Toru; Ueda, Wataru

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) magnesium (Mg) oxide (MgO), MgSO{sub 4}, calcium (Ca) carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), and strontium (Sr) carbonate (SrCO{sub 3}) were prepared using a colloidal crystal of polymer spheres as a template. Ethanol or ethanol-water solution of metal salts (acetate or nitrate) and citric acid was infiltrated into the void of the colloidal crystal template of a monodispersed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sphere. Heating of this PMMA-metal salt-citric acid composite produced the desired well-ordered 3DOM materials with a high pore fraction, which was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of citric acid is crucial for production of the 3DOM structures. Reaction of citric acid with metal salt produces metal citrate solid in the void of PMMA spheres, which is necessary to maintain the 3DOM structure during the calcination process. 3DOM CaCO{sub 3} shows opalescent colors because of it's photonic stop band properties. - Graphical abstract: Well-ordered 3-dimensionally ordered macroporous MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3} materials were obtained in a high pore fraction. Highlights: > An easy preparation method of 3D ordered macroporous (3DOM) MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3} materials. > Their structural characterization. > Their formation mechanism. > Photonic properties of 3DOM CaCO{sub 3}.

  10. Achieving Higher Energies via Passively Driven X-band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Taylan; Sipahi, Nihan; Milton, Stephen; Biedron, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Due to their higher intrinsic shunt impedance X-band accelerating structures significant gradients with relatively modest input powers, and this can lead to more compact particle accelerators. At the Colorado State University Accelerator Laboratory (CSUAL) we would like to adapt this technology to our 1.3 GHz L-band accelerator system using a passively driven 11.7 GHz traveling wave X-band configuration that capitalizes on the high shunt impedances achievable in X-band accelerating structures in order to increase our overall beam energy in a manner that does not require investment in an expensive, custom, high-power X-band klystron system. Here we provide the design details of the X-band structures that will allow us to achieve our goal of reaching the maximum practical net potential across the X-band accelerating structure while driven solely by the beam from the L-band system.

  11. Two-band superconductor magnesium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X. X.

    2008-11-01

    This review focuses on the most important features of the 40 K superconductor MgB2—the weakly interacting multiple bands (the σ and π bands) and the distinct multiple superconducting energy gaps (the σ and π gaps). Even though the pairing mechanism of superconductor MgB2 is the conventional electron-phonon coupling, the prominent influence of the two bands and two gaps on its properties sets it apart from other superconductors. It leads to markedly different behaviors in upper critical field, vortex structure, magnetoresistance and many other superconducting and normal-state properties in MgB2 from single-band superconductors. Further, it gives rise to new physics that does not exist in single-band superconductors, such as the internal Josephson effects between the two order parameters. These unique phenomena depend sensitively on scattering inside and between the two bands, and the intraband and interband scattering can be modified by chemical substitution and irradiation. MgB2 has brought unprecedented attention to two-band superconductivity, which has been found to exist in other old and new superconductors. The legacy of MgB2 will be long lasting because of this, as well as the lessons it teaches in terms of the search for new phonon-mediated higher Tc superconductors.

  12. Development of softcopy environment for primary color banding visibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-pitch banding is one of the most unwanted artifacts in laser electrophotographic (EP) printers. It is perceived as a quasiperiodic fluctuation in the process direction. Therefore, it is essential for printer vendors to know how banding is perceived by humans in order to improve print quality. Monochrome banding has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers; but there is no literature that deals with the banding of color laser printers as measured from actual prints. The study of color banding is complicated by the fact that the color banding signal is physically defined in a three-dimensional color space, while banding perception is described in a one-dimensional sense such as more banding or less banding. In addition, the color banding signal arises from the independent contributions of the four primary colorant banding signals. It is not known how these four distinct signals combine to give rise to the perception of color banding. In this paper, we develop a methodology to assess the banding visibility of the primary colorant cyan based on human visual perception. This is our first step toward studying the more general problem of color banding in combinations of two or more colorants. According to our method, we print and scan the cyan test patch, and extract the banding profile as a one dimensional signal so that we can freely adjust the intensity of banding. Thereafter, by exploiting the pulse width modulation capability of the laser printer, the extracted banding profile is used to modulate a pattern consisting of periodic lines oriented in the process direction, to generate extrinsic banding. This avoids the effect of the halftoning algorithm on the banding. Furthermore, to conduct various banding assessments more efficiently, we also develop a softcopy environment that emulates a hardcopy image on a calibrated monitor, which requires highly accurate device calibration throughout the whole system. To achieve the same color appearance as the hardcopy

  13. EDITORIAL: Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009) Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio and the 4th International Conference on Artificial Muscles were held in Osaka, Japan, 23-27 November 2009. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers presented at this international conference and congress. Of the 76 or so papers presented at the conference, only 10 papers were finally selected, reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular reviewing procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites and their applications. In particular, an electromechanical model for self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes is presented which discusses the concept of creating self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes where actuator and sensor elements are separated by a grounded shielding electrode. Eventually, an electromechanical model of the device is also proposed and validated. Following that, there is broad coverage of polytetrahydrofurane-polyethylene oxide-PEDOT conducting interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) for high speed actuators. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) is incorporated within the IPNs, which are synthesized from polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) networks. PEO/PTHF IPNs are prepared using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and dimethacrylate and hydroxythelechelic PTHF as starting materials. The conducting IPN actuators are prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene (EDOT) using FeCl3 as an oxidizing agent within the PEO/PTHF IPN host matrix. Subsequently, giant and reversible magnetorheology of carrageenan/iron oxide magnetic gels are discussed and the effect of magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties

  14. Regression Analysis by Example. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samprit; Hadi, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. "Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition" has been expanded and thoroughly…

  15. Designing Effective Instruction. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gary R.; Ross, Steven M.; Kemp, Jerrold E.

    2006-01-01

    This valuable resource provides instructional designers with the guidance they need to meet the challenge of creating effective and efficient instruction. Maintaining a careful balance between theory and application, the Fifth Edition presents a practical, easy-to-follow approach to instructional design that can be applied to K-12 classrooms,…

  16. Radiology of bone diseases. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, G.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of bone. This book presents alterations in overall characteristics such as density and bone texture. It describes Salterations in specific anatomic regions of bone, as well ad discuss solitary bone lesions. The style in which the diseases are grouped according to specific regions and morphologic alterations rather than by individual pathologic condition is the most powerful aspect of this format.

  17. 5TH BIOTECHNOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OCEAN MARGINS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    DR. ARTURO MASSOL, PROGRAM CHAIR; DR. ROSA BUXEDA, PROGRAM CO-CHAIR

    2004-01-08

    BI-OMP supports DOE's mission in Climate Change Research. The program provides the fundamental understanding of the linkages between carbon and nitrogen cycles in ocean margins. Researchers are providing a mechanistic understanding of these cycles, using the tools of modern molecular biology. The models that will allow policy makers to determine safe levels of greenhouse gases for the Earth System.

  18. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  19. Measurement in Physical Education. 5th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Donald K.

    Concepts of measurement in physical education are presented in this college-level text to enable the preservice physical education major to develop skills in determining pupil status, designing effective physical activity programs, and measuring student progress. Emphasis is placed upon discussion of essential statistical methods, test…

  20. Peace Corps 5th Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    Projects, operations, and future plans are covered in this annual report for the fifth year of the Peace Corps. An introduction overviews past and future activities of the Peace Corps and its volunteers. Section 2 reviews the year 1966 and covers these topics: the new director, Jack Vaughn; countries in which new programs were begun; the…

  1. Vortex in holographic two-band superfluid/superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mu-Sheng; Wu, Shang-Yu; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We construct numerically static vortex solutions in a holographic model of two-band superconductor with an interband Josephson coupling in both the superfluid and superconductor regime. We investigate the effects of the interband coupling on the order parameter of each superconducting band in the vortex solution, and we find that it is different for each of the two bands. We compute also the free energy, critical magnetic field, magnetic penetration length and coherence lengths for the two bands, and we study their dependence on the interband coupling and temperature. Interestingly, we find that the coherence lengths of the two bands are close to identical.

  2. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  3. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:17500950

  4. Order Nidovirales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, entitled "Order Nidovirales", is for inclusion in the Ninth Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), to be published as both a single volume text and online. The chapter details the taxonomy of members of the Nidovirus order, including family Arteriviridae o...

  5. Topologically induced avoided band crossing in an optical checkerboard lattice.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Matthias; Wirth, Georg; Kock, Thorge; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-02-17

    We report on the condensation of bosons in the 4th band of an optical checkerboard lattice providing a topologically induced avoided band crossing involving the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Bloch bands. When the condensate is slowly tuned through the avoided crossing, accelerated band relaxation arises and the zero momentum approximately C4-invariant condensate wave function acquires finite momentum order and reduced C2 symmetry. For faster tuning Landau-Zener oscillations between different superfluid orders arise, which are used to characterize the avoided crossing. PMID:22401220

  6. Designer disordered materials with large, complete photonic band gaps

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Marian; Torquato, Salvatore; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present designs of 2D, isotropic, disordered, photonic materials of arbitrary size with complete band gaps blocking all directions and polarizations. The designs with the largest band gaps are obtained by a constrained optimization method that starts from a hyperuniform disordered point pattern, an array of points whose number variance within a spherical sampling window grows more slowly than the volume. We argue that hyperuniformity, combined with uniform local topology and short-range geometric order, can explain how complete photonic band gaps are possible without long-range translational order. We note the ramifications for electronic and phononic band gaps in disordered materials. PMID:19918087

  7. Band diagram of strained graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick; Bonilla, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The influence of ripple waves on the band diagram of zigzag strained graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is analyzed by utilizing the finite element method. Such waves have their origin in electromechanical effects. With a novel model, we demonstrate that electron-hole band diagrams of GNRs are highly influenced (i.e. level crossing of the bands are possible) by two combined effects: pseudo-magnetic fields originating from electroelasticity theory and external magnetic fields. In particular, we show that the level crossing point can be observed at large external magnetic fields (B ≈ 100T ) in strained GNRs, when the externally applied tensile edge stress is on the order of -100 eV/nm and the amplitude of the out-of-plane ripple waves is on the order of 1nm.

  8. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials. PMID:25557859

  9. Colloquium: Topological band theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lin, Hsin; Das, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. This review begins by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which involve a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder and interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary, and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f -electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites, and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultrathin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. This Colloquium concludes by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.

  10. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials.

  11. The Steel Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes studying the steel drum, an import from Trinidad, as an instrument of intellectual growth. Describes how developing a steel drum band provided Montessori middle school students the opportunity to experience some important feelings necessary to emotional growth during this difficult age: competence, usefulness, independence, and…

  12. Europa Triple Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This picture of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, was obtained on February 20, 1997, by the Solid State Imaging system onboard the Galileo spacecraft during its sixth orbit around Jupiter. The area is centered at 9.3 degrees north latitude, 275.7 degrees west longitude, on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. As Europa moves in its orbit around Jupiter, the trailing hemisphere is the portion which is always on the moon's backside opposite to its direction of motion. The area depicted is about 32 kilometers by 40 kilometers (20 miles by 25 miles). Resolution is 54 meters (59 yards). The Sun illuminates the scene from the right (east).

    A section of a triple band crosses the upper left of the picture and extends for hundreds of miles across the surface. Triple bands derive their name from their appearance at lower resolution as a narrow bright band flanked by a pair of darker bands. At the high resolution of this picture, however, the triple band is much more complex and is composed of a system of ridges 6 kilometers (4 miles) across. Some ridges reach heights of about 180 meters (200 yards). Other features include a hill in the center of the picture about 480 meters (500 yards) high. Two mounds about 6 kilometers across (4 miles) are seen in the bottom of the picture. The ridges, hills and mounds probably all represent uplifts of the icy crust of Europa by processes originating from the interior.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  13. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Vukusic, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Interference is the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics: specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer structure and solve it using recursion relations. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursion. We compare to experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. Thus, using only the phenomenon of interference and the idea of recursion, we are able to elucidate the concept of band structure in the context of the experimentally observed high reflectance and iridescent appearance of structurally colored beetles.

  14. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  15. TDRS Ku band gateway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Cynthia; Lecha, Javier; Principe, Caleb M.; Ross, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    The Wideband Transport Frame Formatter (WTFF) is the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) ku-band return link gateway. The WTFF system is a multiplexing device developed to process and downlink the high rate data generated by a wide variety of users. The WTFF is designed to frame and format high data rate user channels into transport frames and multiplex according to a predefined schedule into two bit streams that are compatible with TDRS Ku I and Q band service. The combined data rate will be 300 Mbps. The WTFF will service up to eight input channels generating data in the range of 10 to 150 Mbps. In addition to these input channels, audio data will be accepted by the WTFF system and inserted in the downlink. A second function of the WTFF is to provide telecommunication coding as assigned to each virtual channel to ensure a given quality of service.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  18. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  19. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  20. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  1. Symmetrical band-pass loudspeaker systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiak, Grzegorz Piotr

    2001-12-01

    Loudspeaker systems are analyzed in a doctoral dissertation. The dissertation concerns loudspeaker systems, which are known as subwoofers or band-pass loudspeaker systems. Their advantages include: high- quality sound reproduction in the low-frequency range, small dimensions, small nonlinear distortions and the fact that they can be placed anywhere in a room or car. Band-pass loudspeaker systems are used widely in the so- called Home Theatre as well as to provide sound in cinema, theatre, concert, discotheque, opera, operetta, philharmonic and amphitheater halls, at open-air concerts, and so on. Various designs are mass-produced by a large number of manufacturers. The study covers an analysis of band-pass loudspeaker systems to which the frequency transformation, i.e. the reactance transformation, has been applied. Since this is a symmetrical transformation, amplitude frequency responses of the studied band-pass systems are also symmetrical (logarithmic scale of a frequency). As a result, the high-pass loudspeaker system design method, known as the Thiele-Small, Benson analysis, can be employed. The investigations include the formulation of band-pass system equations (fourth, sixth and eighth-order polynomials) and the subsequent derivation of relations for the calculation of system parameters. The obtained results enable the calculation of optimum designs for prescribed alignments, e.g. (Chebyshev) equal-ripple, (Butterworth) maximally flat, or quasi-maximally flat (QB). The analysis covers fourth, sixth and eighth-order symmetrical systems. Eighth-order systems have been divided into three kinds according to three ways of physical realization. The doctoral dissertation includes band-pass loudspeaker systems, which can be designed with active or passive filters or without the filter. Designed systems consist of a loudspeaker whose front of a diaphragm is loaded with a Helmholtz resonator, i.e. an enclosure with a vent, which radiates sound outwards. The back is

  2. Rotational bands in neutron-rich 160-162Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Escrig, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Binder, B.; Dietrich, A.; Haertlein, T.; Bauer, H.; Gund, Ch.; Pansegrau, D.; Schwalm, D.; Bazzacco, D.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Ur, C.

    2004-02-27

    We have studied the high spin states in 160-162Ho in order to investigate the properties of the rotational bands and their dependence on the single particle orbits involved. The reaction 158,160Gd(7Li,xn) at 56 MeV were used to produce the Ho isotopes of interest. In all three Ho isotopes the known rotational bands have been significantly extended. New band-crossings have been observed for the first time in this work.

  3. Cool Bands: Wing bands decrease rate of heating, but not equilibrium temperature in Anartia fatima.

    PubMed

    Brashears, Jake; Aiello, Annette; Seymoure, Brett M

    2016-02-01

    Butterflies regulate their internal thoracic temperature in order to optimize performance activities (e.g. flight, foraging). Previous research has shown that butterfly wings, particularly the innermost portions, play a role in thermoregulation. We investigated to see whether a lightly colored wing band would alter the thermal properties of the banded peacock butterfly (Anartia fatima) with two within subject experiments in a laboratory setting: (1) band color manipulation in which euthanized individuals were heated to thermal equilibrium with the band unaltered and then again with the wing darkened; (2) wing ablation in which individuals already run through experiment 1 were heated to equilibrium two more times; once with the outer portion of the wing including the band removed and then with the entire wing removed. Individuals were spread so that the dorsal surface of the wing was exposed to illumination from a lamp suspended above. Twelve Anartia fatima males were collected in Panama and were run through experiment one. Four individuals were run through experiment two. We found no effect of darkening the band on the internal thoracic equilibrium temperature, but the darkened band did increase the rate of heating. The wing ablation experiment revealed that wing removal lowered the internal thoracic equilibrium temperature but did not affect the heating rate. Therefore we show that butterfly bands may be important in butterfly thermoregulation and we discuss the importance of the wing band on thermoregulatory abilities in Anartia fatima with respect to the butterfly's natural history. We conclude that the wing band may allow butterflies to reduce heat stress induced by their warm environments. PMID:26857983

  4. Translational Research in Oncology Research & Development and Its Impact on Early Development in China: report of the 5th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at 2013 AACR Annual Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lingjie; Dai, Yun; Luo, Roger

    2013-01-01

    In April 2013, the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) held its 5th annual meeting in conjunction with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington DC. The USCACA executive committee reported activities and programs and highlighted the partnership and collaboration between USCACA and other major organizations. The key initiatives and programs of USCACA included 1) USCACA-TIGM Esophageal Cancer Program that funds translational research of esophageal cancer prevention and treatment at the Xinxiang Medical University in Henan province, China; 2) the USCACA-NFCR-AFCR Scholarship Program, which has supported 10 young outstanding Chinese cancer researchers and will award 4 fellowships at the Guangzhou International Symposium on Oncology in November this year; 3) USCACA-Hengrui Training Program for Early Phase Clinical Research, which has supported the training of a Chinese scholar at two major cancer centers in the US; and 4) USCACA has continued its partnership with the Chinese Journal of Cancer, which has reached significant international impact. PMID:23823625

  5. Analysis of archaeological triacylglycerols by high resolution nanoESI, FT-ICR MS and IRMPD MS/MS: Application to 5th century BC-4th century AD oil lamps from Olbia (Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Nicolas; Rolando, Christian; Høtje, Jakob Munk; Tokarski, Caroline

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the precise identification of triacylglycerols (TAGs) extracted from archaeological samples using a methodology based on nanoelectrospray and Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The archaeological TAG identification needs adapted sample preparation protocols to trace samples in advanced degradation state. More precisely, the proposed preparation procedure includes extraction of the lipid components from finely grinded ceramic using dichloromethane/methanol mixture with additional ultrasonication treatment, and TAG purification by solid phase extraction on a diol cartridge. Focusing on the analytical approach, the implementation of "in-house" species-dependent TAG database was investigated using MS and InfraRed Multiphoton Dissociation (IRMPD) MS/MS spectra; several vegetal oils, dairy products and animal fats were studied. The high mass accuracy of the Fourier transform analyzer ([Delta]m below 2.5 ppm) provides easier data interpretation, and allows distinction between products of different origins. In details, the IRMPD spectra of the lithiated TAGs reveal fragmentation reactions including loss of free neutral fatty acid and loss of fatty acid as [alpha],[beta]-unsaturated moieties. Based on the developed preparation procedure and on the constituted database, TAG extracts from 5th century BC to 4th century AD Olbia lamps were analyzed. The structural information obtained succeeds in identifying that bovine/ovine fats were used as fuel used in these archaeological Olbia lamps.

  6. Abdominal Organ Location, Morphology, and Rib Coverage for the 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile Males and Females in the Supine and Seated Posture using Multi-Modality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ashley R.; Gayzik, F. Scott; Moreno, Daniel P.; Martin, R. Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use data from a multi-modality image set of males and females representing the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (n=6) to examine abdominal organ location, morphology, and rib coverage variations between supine and seated postures. Medical images were acquired from volunteers in three image modalities including Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and upright MRI (uMRI). A manual and semi-automated segmentation method was used to acquire data and a registration technique was employed to conduct a comparative analysis between abdominal organs (liver, spleen, and kidneys) in both postures. Location of abdominal organs, defined by center of gravity movement, varied between postures and was found to be significant (p=0.002 to p=0.04) in multiple directions for each organ. In addition, morphology changes, including compression and expansion, were seen in each organ as a result of postural changes. Rib coverage, defined as the projected area of the ribs onto the abdominal organs, was measured in frontal, lateral, and posterior projections, and also varied between postures. A significant change in rib coverage between postures was measured for the spleen and right kidney (p=0.03 and p=0.02). The results indicate that posture affects the location, morphology and rib coverage area of abdominal organs and these implications should be noted in computational modeling efforts focused on a seated posture. PMID:24406951

  7. Using a Distant Abdominal Skin Flap to Treat Digital Constriction Bands: A Case Report for Vohwinkel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzi; Song, Kexin; Ding, Ning; Shu, Chang; Wang, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a Vohwinkel syndrome case is presented where in 5th digit constriction bands in the right hand were reconstructed using a distant abdominal skin flap. Vohwinkel syndrome, or keratoderma hereditarium mutilans, is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic skin condition that causes palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and constricts finger and/or toe bands. In a typical manifestation, the finger and toe constriction bands lead to progressive strangulation and autoamputation, which requires immediate clinical treatment. Topical keratolytics and systemic retinoids have been used to treat hyperkeratosis but without consistent results. Only 1 effective approach for autoamputation has been accepted, reconstructive surgery.Applying a distant abdominal skin flap produced satisfying postoperative effects at the 18-month follow-up. PMID:26871826

  8. 76 FR 51978 - Unlicensed Operation in the TV Broadcast Bands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... adopted a Second Memorandum Opinion and Order (Second MO&O) in ET Docket No. 04-186, 75 FR 75814, December... Microsoft Corporation as TV bands device database administrators. The TV bands databases will be used by... the tenth entity designated to develop a database that will enable the introduction of this new...

  9. An empirical basis for Mach bands

    PubMed Central

    Lotto, R. Beau; Williams, S. Mark; Purves, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Mach bands, the illusory brightness maxima and minima perceived at the initiation and termination of luminance gradients, respectively, are generally considered a direct perceptual manifestation of lateral inhibitory interactions among retinal or other lower order visual neurons. Here we examine an alternative explanation, namely that Mach bands arise as a consequence of real-world luminance gradients. In this first of two companion papers, we analyze the natural sources of luminance gradients, demonstrating that real-world gradients arising from curved surfaces are ordinarily adorned by photometric highlights and lowlights in the position of the illusory bands. The prevalence of such gradients provides an empirical basis for the generation of this perceptual phenomenon. PMID:10220450

  10. Intersecting kink bands quantified by laser scanning and differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, R. E.; Crider, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Microtopography derived from laser scanning is expressed by DEMs that can be analyzed using differential geometry. We apply this technique to rock hand samples containing intersecting kink bands in order to quantitatively describe the shape of a folded surface and understand the localization of strain in deformed rocks. This study is the first to apply laser scanning and geometric curvature analysis to intersecting kink bands in order to better describe the variation of kink band geometries and intersections in plan view and to evaluate relationships between different kink band parameters. A complex set of monoclinal contractional kink bands is well exposed in outcrops of the Darrington Phyllite on Samish Island, northwestern Washington, which provide a three-dimensional view of kink band geometries. Kink bands in cross section have straight, parallel boundaries that deform a well-defined foliation; in plan view, however, kink band hinges curve and anastomose across the foliation surface, and adjacent bands commonly intersect. Three types of intersections are common: crossing (X), bifurcating (Y), and obliquely truncating (λ); many kink bands also taper out along strike. Geometric curvature analyses were performed on millimeter-resolution DEMs of hand samples containing intersecting kink bands. Maps of different curvature parameters (e.g. mean curvature, geologic curvature) clearly outline kink bands in the samples and illuminate the behavior of kink band hinges in each type of intersection. In X-type intersections, curvature increases where two hinges of similar kink sense cross (i.e. anticlinal/anticlinal hinges), increasing strain; where two hinges of opposing sense cross (anticlinal/synclinal), curvature decreases and the surface is effectively unfolded. In Y-type intersections, a single parent band widens and splits into two equally narrow daughter bands, and new inner hinges are nucleated below the bifurcation point. The two daughter bands accommodate

  11. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  12. New high order schemes in BATS-R-US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; van der Holst, B.; Daldorff, L.; Chen, Y.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Michigan global magnetohydrodynamics code BATS-R-US has long relied on the block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to increase accuracy in regions of interest, and we used a second order accurate TVD scheme. While AMR can in principle produce arbitrarily accurate results, there are still practical limitations due to computational resources. To further improve the accuracy of the BATS-R-US code, recently, we have implemented a 4th order accurate finite volume scheme (McCorquodale and Colella, 2011}), the 5th order accurate Monotonicity Preserving scheme (MP5, Suresh and Huynh, 1997) and the 5th order accurate CWENO5 scheme (Capdeville, 2008). In the first implementation the high order accuracy is achieved in the uniform parts of the Cartesian grids, and we still use the second order TVD scheme at resolution changes. For spherical grids the new schemes are only second order accurate so far, but still much less diffusive than the TVD scheme. We show a few verification tests that demonstrate the order of accuracy as well as challenging space physics applications. The high order schemes are less robust than the TVD scheme, and it requires some tricks and effort to make the code work. When the high order scheme works, however, we find that in most cases it can obtain similar or better results than the TVD scheme on twice finer grids. For three dimensional time dependent simulations this means that the high order scheme is almost 10 times faster requires 8 times less storage than the second order method.

  13. Developmental Changes in Infants' Sensitivity to Octave-Band Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trehub, Sandra E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Localization responses to octave-band noises with center frequencies at 200, 400, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 10,000 Hz were obtained from infants 6, 12, and 18 months old in order to investigate infants' auditory sensitivity. (MP)

  14. Dichroic Filter for Separating W-Band and Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Durden, Stephen L.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Long, Ezra M.; Sosnowski, John B.; Higuera, Raymond J.; Chen, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACEs) mission development would advance cloud profiling radar from that used in CloudSat by adding a 35-GHz (Ka-band) channel to the 94-GHz (W-band) channel used in CloudSat. In order to illuminate a single antenna, and use CloudSat-like quasi-optical transmission lines, a spatial diplexer is needed to add the Ka-band channel. A dichroic filter separates Ka-band from W-band by employing advances in electrical discharge machining (EDM) and mode-matching analysis techniques developed and validated for designing dichroics for the Deep Space Network (DSN), to develop a preliminary design that both met the requirements of frequency separation and mechanical strength. First, a mechanical prototype was built using an approximately 102-micron-diameter EDM process, and tolerances of the hole dimensions, wall thickness, radius, and dichroic filter thickness measured. The prototype validated the manufacturing needed to design a dichroic filter for a higher-frequency usage than previously used in the DSN. The initial design was based on a Ka-band design, but thicker walls are required for mechanical rigidity than one obtains by simply scaling the Ka-band dichroic filter. The resulting trade of hole dimensions for mechanical rigidity (wall thickness) required electrical redesign of the hole dimensions. Updates to existing codes in the linear solver decreased the analysis time using mode-matching, enabling the electrical design to be realized quickly. This work is applicable to missions and instruments that seek to extend W-band cloud profiling measurements to other frequencies. By demonstrating a dichroic filter that passes W-band, but reflects a lower frequency, this opens up the development of instruments that both compare to and enhance CloudSat.

  15. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  16. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Van Baalen, Mary; Shavers, Mark R.; Dodge, Charles; Semones, Edward J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  17. Retention of riveted aluminum leg bands by wild turkeys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Vreeland, Wendy C.; Casalena, Mary Jo; Schiavone, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    In order for mark–recapture models to provide unbiased estimates of population parameters, it is critical that uniquely identifying tags or marks are not lost. We double-banded male and female wild turkeys with aluminum rivet bands and estimated the probability that a bird would be recovered with both bands <1–225 wk since banding (mean = 51.2 wk, SD = 44.0). We found that 100% of females (n = 37) were recovered with both bands. For males, we recovered 6 of 188 turkeys missing a rivet band for a retention probability of 0.984 (95% CI = 0.96–0.99). If male turkeys are double-banded with rivet bands the probability of recovering a turkey without any marks is <0.001. We failed to detect a change in band retention over time or differences between adults and juveniles. Given the low cost and high retention rates of rivet aluminum bands, we believe they are an effective marking technique for wild turkeys and, for most studies, will minimize any concern about the assumption that marks are not lost.

  18. Dark Bands on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dark crisscrossing bands on Jupiter's moon Europa represent widespread disruption from fracturing and the possible eruption of gases and rocky material from the moon's interior in this four-frame mosaic of images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. These and other features suggest that soft ice or liquid water was present below the ice crust at the time of disruption. The data do not rule out the possibility that such conditions exist on Europa today. The pictures were taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) on June 27, 1996. Many of the dark bands are more than 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long, exceeding the length of the San Andreas fault of California. Some of the features seen on the mosaic resulted from meteoritic impact, including a 30- kilometer (18.5 mile) diameter crater visible as a bright scar in the lower third of the picture. In addition, dozens of shallow craters seen in some terrains along the sunset terminator zone (upper right shadowed area of the image) are probably impact craters. Other areas along the terminator lack craters, indicating relatively youthful surfaces, suggestive of recent eruptions of icy slush from the interior. The lower quarter of the mosaic includes highly fractured terrain where the icy crust has been broken into slabs as large as 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) across. The mosaic covers a large part of the northern hemisphere and includes the north pole at the top of the image. The sun illuminates the surface from the left. The area shown is centered on 20 degrees north latitude and 220 degrees west longitude and is about as wide as the United States west of the Mississippi River. The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. Resolving the forbidden band of SF6.

    PubMed

    Boudon, V; Manceron, L; Kwabia Tchana, F; Loëte, M; Lago, L; Roy, P

    2014-01-28

    Sulfur hexafluoride is an important molecule for modeling thermophysical and polarizability properties. It is also a potent greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose concentration in the atmosphere, although very low is increasing rapidly; its global warming power is mostly conferred by its strong infrared absorption in the ν3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm(-1). This heavy species, however, features many hot bands at room temperature (at which only 31% of the molecules lie in the ground vibrational state), especially those originating from the lowest, v6 = 1 vibrational state. Unfortunately, the ν6 band itself (near 347 cm(-1)), in the first approximation, is both infrared- and Raman-inactive, and no reliable spectroscopic information could be obtained up to now and this has precluded a correct modeling of the hot bands. It has been suggested theoretically and experimentally that this band might be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction with infrared-active fundamentals and appears in high pressure measurements as a very faint, unresolved band. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 163 ± 2 K temperature, coupled to synchrotron radiation and a high resolution interferometer, the spectrum of the ν6 far-infrared region has been recorded. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of hot bands. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution, is indeed ν6. The fully resolved spectrum has been analyzed, thanks to the XTDS software package. The band appears to be activated by faint Coriolis interactions with the strong ν3 and ν4 fundamental bands, resulting in the appearance of a small first-order dipole moment term, inducing unusual selection rules. The band center (ν6 = 347.736707(35) cm(-1)) and rovibrational parameters are now accurately determined for the v6 = 1 level. The ν6 perturbation-induced dipole moment is estimated to be 33 ± 3

  20. Resonant radiation from oscillating higher order solitons.

    PubMed

    Driben, R; Yulin, A V; Efimov, A

    2015-07-27

    We present radiation mechanism exhibited by a higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution the higher-order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in formation of multipeak frequency comb-like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is corroborated by numerical simulations. It is shown that for longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening. PMID:26367574

  1. Resonant radiation from oscillating higher order solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Driben, R.; Yulin, A. V.; Efimov, A.

    2015-07-15

    We present radiation mechanism exhibited by a higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution the higher-order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in formation of multipeak frequency comb-like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is corroborated by numerical simulations. Research showed that for longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  2. Ion cyclotron bands in VLF saucers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Kaichi; Fung, Shing F.; Calvert, Wynne

    1990-01-01

    In the wideband VLF data obtained by the polar orbiting DE-1 satellite over the polar night ion trough region of the upper ionosphere, conspicuous frequency-band structures are found to occur both in absorption and emission, particularly associating with VLF saucers. The attenuation bands indicate that the ions of atomic hydrogen from the polar ionosphere are accelerated by the ac electric fields of VLF waves oscillating normal to the static magnetic field, analogous to a cyclotron accelerator. The observed frequencies of the cyclotron harmonics suggest that the acceleration is taking place in the layer below the satellite at a geocentric distance of less than about 1.5 earth radii. This example indicates the existence of upward propagating hiss at those altitudes inside the auroral zone. On the other hand, the frequency shifts of the emission bands are attributed to a combination of two different types of Doppler shift, one due to the orbital motion of the satellite and the other due to the upward motion of the medium at the emission source. This indicates the existence of an upward plasma flow at the source, with a velocity of the order of 20 km/s inside the saucer. The amount of this frequency shift decreases with increasing harmonic order, indicating a higher phase velocity for the electrostatic waves of higher harmonic order.

  3. Robust photonic band gap from tunable scatterers

    PubMed

    Zhang; Lei; Wang; Zheng; Tam; Chan; Sheng

    2000-03-27

    We show theoretically and experimentally that photonic band gaps can be realized using metal or metal-coated spheres as building blocks. Robust photonic gaps exist in any periodic structure built from such spheres when the filling ratio of the spheres exceeds a threshold. The frequency and the size of the gaps depend on the local order rather than on the symmetry or the global long range order. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained in the microwave regime. Calculations show that the approach can be scaled up to optical frequencies even in the presence of absorption. PMID:11018959

  4. Development of Wide Band Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujihara, H.; Ichikawa, R.

    2012-12-01

    Wide Band feeds are being developed at NICT, NAOJ, and some universities in Japan for VLBI2010, SKA, and MARBLE. SKA, the Square Kilometre Array, will comprise thousands of radio telescopes with square kilometer aperture size for radio astronomy. MARBLE consists of small portable VLBI stations developed at NICT and GSI in Japan. They all need wide band feeds with a greater than 1:10 frequency ratio. Thus we have been studying wide band feeds with dual linear polarization for these applications.

  5. Garage Band or GarageBand[R]? Remixing Musical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I suggest that it is perhaps time to consider the pedagogy of popular music in more extensive terms than conventional rock band practices have to offer. One direction in which this might lead is the expansion of the informal pedagogy based on a "garage band" model to encompass various modes of digital artistry wherever this artistry…

  6. Recursive SAM-based band selection for hyperspectral anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuanlei; Liu, Daizhi; Yi, Shihua

    2010-10-01

    Band selection has been widely used in hyperspectral image processing for dimension reduction. In this paper, a recursive SAM-based band selection (RSAM-BBS) method is proposed. Once two initial bands are given, RSAM-BBS is performed in a sequential manner, and at each step the band that can best describe the spectral separation of two hyperspectral signatures is added to the bands already selected until the spectral angle reaches its maximum. In order to demonstrate the utility of the proposed band selection method, an anomaly detection algorithm is developed, which first extracts the anomalous target spectrum from the original image using automatic target detection and classification algorithm (ATDCA), followed by maximum spectral screening (MSS) to estimate the background average spectrum, then implements RSAM-BBS to select bands that participate in the subsequent adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) target detection. As shown in the experimental result on the AVIRIS dataset, less than five bands selected by the RSAM-BBS can achieve comparable detection performance using the full bands.

  7. [Orthogonal projection divergence-based hyperspectral band selection].

    PubMed

    Su, Hong-jun; Sheng, Ye-hua; Yang, He; Du, Qian

    2011-05-01

    Due to the high data dimensionality of a hyperspectral image, dimensionality reduction algorithm has attracted much attention in hyperspectral image analysis. Band selection algorithm, which selects appropriate bands from the original set of spectral bands, can preserve original information from the data and is useful for image classification and recognition. In the present paper, a novel band selection algorithm based on orthogonal projection divergence (OPD) is proposed, it aims to discriminate the interesting objects from background and noise information, maximize the spectral similarity between different spectral vectors by projecting the original data to feature space. Two HYDICE Washington DC Mall images and an HYMAP Purdue campus image data were experimented, and support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for classification. The selected band number varies from 5 to 40 in order to study the impacts of different band selection algorithms on different features. For the computation complex, the sequential floating forward search (SFFS) was used to get the appropriate bands. The experiments have proved that our proposed OPD algorithm can outperform other traditional band selection methods such as SAM, ED, SID, and LCMV-BCC for hyperspectral image analysis. It is proven that OPD band selection is effective and robust in hyperspectral remote sensing dimensionality reduction PMID:21800589

  8. A comparative study of the effect of cholesterol on bicelle model membranes using X-band and Q-band EPR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Harishchandra; Inbaraj, Johnson J.

    2009-01-01

    X-band and Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the structure and dynamics of cholesterol containing phospholipid bicelles based upon molecular order parameters (Smol), orientational dependent hyperfine splittings and line shape analysis of the corresponding EPR spectra. The nitroxide spin label 3-β-doxyl-5-α-cholestane (cholestane) was incorporated into DMPC/DHPC bicelles to report the alignment of bicelles in the static magnetic field. The influence of cholesterol on aligned phospholipid bicelles in terms of ordering, the ease of alignment, phase transition temperature have been studied comparatively at X-band and Q-band. At a magnetic field of 1.25 T (Q-band), bicelles with 20 mol% cholesterol aligned at a much lower temperature (313 K), when compared to 318 K at a 0.35 T field strength for X-band, showed better hyperfine splitting values (18.29 G at X-band vs. 18.55 G at Q-band for perpendicular alignment and 8.25 G at X-band vs. 7.83 G at Q-band for the parallel alignment at 318 K) and have greater molecular order parameters (0.76 at X-band vs. 0.86 at Q-band at 318 K). Increasing cholesterol content increased the bicelle ordering, the bicelle-alignment temperature and the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature. We observed that Q-band is more effective than X-band for studying aligned bicelles, because it yielded a higher ordered bicelle system for EPR spectroscopic studies. PMID:19501076

  9. Band of Rubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together.

    The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the movie. Collisions like this replenish the dust in the asteroid belt, making it detectable to Spitzer.

    The alien belt circles a faint, nearby star called HD 69830 located 41 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Compared to our own solar system's asteroid belt, this one is larger and closer to its star - it is 25 times as massive, and lies just inside an orbit equivalent to that of Venus. Our asteroid belt circles between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

    Because Jupiter acts as an outer wall to our asteroid belt, shepherding its debris into a series of bands, it is possible that an unseen planet is likewise marshalling this belt's rubble. Previous observations using the radial velocity technique did not locate any large gas giant planets, indicating that any planets present in this system would have to be the size of Saturn or smaller.

    Asteroids are chunks of rock from 'failed' planets, which never managed to coalesce into full-sized planets. Asteroid belts can be thought of as construction sites that accompany the building of rocky planets.

  10. Paleomagnetic dating of liesegang bands

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, K.A.; Elmore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic analysis, in conjunction with petrographic studies, was used to date the formation of hematite liesegang bands in the Ordovician Upper Arbuckle Group in southern Oklahoma. The hematite bands form symmetrical patterns on both sides of calcite-filled fractures in dolomite beds. The bands decrease in abundance and become more diffuse away from the fractures. Dedolomite is common near the fractures. Samples from distinctly banded dolomite near the fractures contain a relatively strong chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) with a southeasterly declination and shallow inclination. Samples farther from the fractures that are less distinctly banded or have no bands contain a weaker and less table CRM. Petrographic evidence and stable demagnetization to 600/sup 0/C indicate that the CRM resides in hematite. Samples were collected from both flanks of the Arbuckle Anticline (late Pennsylvanian folding), and a fold test demonstrates that the CRM is post-folding. The pole position for the CRM corresponds to the Early Permian (approx. 280 Ma) part of the Apparent Polar Wander Path for stable North America. These results suggest that the liesegang bands formed in the Early Permian, probably by rhythmic precipitation of hematite from fluids that moved out from the fractures. The fluids also apparently caused dedolomitization and precipitation of calcite in intercrystalline pore spaces. These fluids were probably the source of iron for the bands, although iron released from dedolimitization of ferroan dolomite may have been a local source.

  11. Orbiter KU-band transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halterman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The design, build, and test of an engineering breadboard Ku band quadraphase shift keyed and wideband frequency modulated transmitter are described. This orbiter Ku band transmitter drawer is to simulate the orbiter transmitter and meet the functional requirements of the orbiter communication link.

  12. The Moral Ends of Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical framework through which to reimagine and revitalize contemporary music education practices, using the large ensemble paradigm called "band" as the primary unit of analysis. Literature suggests that band places too much emphasis on teacher control and external measures of validation. Critics propose replacing…

  13. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  14. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  15. Effective tree scattering and opacity at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates vegetation effects at L-band by using a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model and truck-based microwave measurements over natural conifer stands to assess the performance of the tau-omega model over trees. The tau-omega model is a zero-order RT solution and it accounts f...

  16. SF_6: the Forbidden Band Unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, V.; Manceron, L.; Kwabia-Tchana, F.; Roy, P.

    2013-06-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF_6) is a greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose strong infrared absorption in the ν_3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm^{-1} induces a global warming potential 23900 times bigger than CO_2. This heavy species features many hot bands at room temperature (at which the ground state population is only 30 %), especially those originating from the v_6=1 state. Unfortunately, the ν_6 band itself (near 347 cm^{-1}) being, in first approximation, both infrared and Raman inactive, no reliable information could be obtained about it up to now. A long time ago, some authors suggested that this band may be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction and may appear as a very faint band, with an integrated intensity about 2 millionths of that of ν_3. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 165± 2 K temperature, we recorded a spectrum of the ν_6 far-infrared region thanks to the performances of the AILES Beamline at the SOLEIL french synchrotron facility. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of the 2ν_6-ν_6 hot band and to reduce the neighboring, stronger ν_4-ν_2 difference band. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution is indeed ν_6. We present its fully resolved spectrum. It appears to be activated thanks to unidentified faint interactions resulting in the presence of a first-order dipole moment term that induces unusual selection rules. This spectrum was analyzed thanks to the XTDS software package, leading to accurate molecular spectroscopic parameters that should be useful to model the hot bands of SF_6. W. B. Person, B. J. Krohn, J. Mol. Spectrosc. {98}, 229-257 (1983), C. Chappados, G. Birnbaum, J. Mol. Spectrosc. {105}, 206-214 (1984). Ch. Wenger, V. Boudon, M. Rotger, M. Sanzharov and J.-P. Champion, J. Mol. Spectrosc., {251} 102-113 (2008).

  17. Global model of lower band and upper band chorus from multiple satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Sicard-Piet, Angélica; Boscher, Daniel; Yearby, Keith H.; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Gyroresonant wave particle interactions with whistler mode chorus play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere, affecting both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. Knowledge of the variability of chorus wave power as a function of both spatial location and geomagnetic activity, required for the computation of pitch angle and energy diffusion rates, is thus a critical input for global radiation belt models. Here we present a global model of lower band (0.1fce < f < 0.5fce) and upper band (0.5fce < f < fce) chorus, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency, using data from five satellites, extending the coverage and improving the statistics of existing models. From the plasmapause out to L* = 10 the chorus emissions are found to be largely substorm dependent with the largest intensities being seen during active conditions. Equatorial lower band chorus is strongest during active conditions with peak intensities of the order 2000 pT2 in the region 4 < L* < 9 between 2300 and 1200 MLT. Equatorial upper band chorus is both weaker and less extensive with peak intensities of the order a few hundred pT2 during active conditions between 2300 and 1100 MLT from L* = 3 to L* = 7. Moving away from the equator midlatitude chorus is strongest in the lower band during active conditions with peak intensities of the order 2000 pT2 in the region 4 < L* < 9 but is restricted to the dayside between 0700 and 1400 MLT.

  18. Effective band structure of random III-V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Random substitutional alloys have no long range order (LRO) or translational symmetry so rigorously speaking they have no E(k) band structure or manifestations thereof. Yet, many experiments on alloys are interpreted using the language of band theory, e.g. inferring Van Hove singularities, band dispersion and effective masses. Many standard alloy theories (VCA- or CPA-based) have the LRO imposed on the alloy Hamiltonian, assuming only on-site disorder, so they can not be used to judge the extent of LRO that really exists. We adopt the opposite way, by using large (thousand atom) randomly generated supercells in which chemically identical alloy atoms are allowed to have different local environments (a polymorphous representation). This then drives site-dependent atomic relaxation as well as potential fluctuations. The eigenstates from such supercells are then mapped onto the Brillouin zone (BZ) of the primitive cell, producing effective band dispersion. Results for (In,Ga)X show band-like behaviour only near the centre and faces of the BZ but rapidly lose such characteristics away from γ or for higher bands. We further analyse the effects of stoichiometry variation, internal relaxation, and short-range order on the alloy band structure.

  19. RF environment survey of Space Shuttle related EEE frequency bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.; Prigel, B.; Postelle, J.

    1977-01-01

    Radio frequency assignments within the continental United States in frequency bands between 121 MHz abd 65 GHz were surveyed and analyzed in order to determine current utilization of anticipated frequency bands for the shuttle borne electromagnetic environment experiment. Data from both government and nongovernment files were used. Results are presented in both narrative form and in histograms which show the total number of unclassified assignments versus frequency and total assigned power versus frequency.

  20. Band gap in tubular pillar phononic crystal plate.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongshun; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a phononic crystal (PC) plate with tubular pillars is presented and investigated. The band structures and mode displacement profiles are calculated by using finite element method. The result shows that a complete band gap opens when the ratio of the pillar height to the plate thickness is about 1.6. However, for classic cylinder pillar structures, a band gap opens when the ratio is equal or greater than 3. A tubular pillar design with a void room in it enhances acoustic multiple scattering and gives rise to the opening of the band gap. In order to verify it, a PC structure with double tubular pillars different in size (one within the other) is introduced and a more than 2times band gap enlargement is observed. Furthermore, the coupling between the resonant mode and the plate mode around the band gap is characterized, as well as the effect of the geometrical parameters on the band gap. The behavior of such structure could be utilized to design a pillar PC with stronger structural stability and to enlarge band gaps. PMID:27376841

  1. Temperature-dependent internal photoemission probe for band parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yan-Feng; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2012-11-01

    The temperature-dependent characteristic of band offsets at the heterojunction interface was studied by an internal photoemission (IPE) method. In contrast to the traditional Fowler method independent of the temperature (T), this method takes into account carrier thermalization and carrier/dopant-induced band-renormalization and band-tailing effects, and thus measures the band-offset parameter at different temperatures. Despite intensive studies in the past few decades, the T dependence of this key band parameter is still not well understood. Re-examining a p-type doped GaAs emitter/undoped AlxGa1-xAs barrier heterojunction system disclosed its previously ignored T dependency in the valence-band offset, with a variation up to ˜-10-4 eV/K in order to accommodate the difference in the T-dependent band gaps between GaAs and AlGaAs. Through determining the Fermi energy level (Ef), IPE is able to distinguish the impurity (IB) and valence bands (VB) of extrinsic semiconductors. One important example is to determine Ef of dilute magnetic semiconductors such as GaMnAs, and to understand whether it is in the IB or VB.

  2. Rotational Bands in 172W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J.; Guess, C. J.; Tandel, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Hartley, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Shirwadkar, U.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.

    2015-10-01

    Studying the structure of rotational bands in 172W is valuable for gaining a better understanding of deformed nuclei. Highly excited states of the isotope were populated from a 230 MeV 50Ti beam incident on a 128Te target at Argonne National Laboratory using the ATLAS accelerator. γ emissions from 172W in the range were measured using Compton suppressed germanium detectors in the Gammasphere array. Using this data, three new rotational bands were found, and several other bands were expanded. Swarthmore College Summer Research Fellowship.

  3. Joint Skewness and Its Application in Unsupervised Band Selection for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiurui; Sun, Kang; Ji, Luyan; Tang, Hairong; Zhao, Yongchao

    2015-04-01

    Few band selection methods are specially designed for small target detection. It is well known that the information of small targets is most likely contained in non-Gaussian bands, where small targets are more easily separated from the background. On the other hand, correlation of band set also plays an important role in the small target detection. When the selected bands are highly correlated, it will be unbeneficial for the subsequent detection. However, the existing non-Gaussianity-based band selection methods have not taken the correlation of bands into account, which generally result in high correlation of obtained bands. In this paper, combining the third-order (third-order tensor) and second-order (correlation) statistics of bands, we define a new concept, named joint skewness, for multivariate data. Moreover, we also propose an easy-to-implement approach to estimate this index based on high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD). Based on the definition of joint skewness, we present an unsupervised band selection for small target detection for hyperspectral data, named joint skewness band selection (JSBS). The evaluation results demonstrate that the bands selected by JSBS are very effective in terms of small target detection.

  4. Joint Skewness and Its Application in Unsupervised Band Selection for Small Target Detection

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiurui; Sun, Kang; Ji, Luyan; Tang, Hairong; Zhao, Yongchao

    2015-01-01

    Few band selection methods are specially designed for small target detection. It is well known that the information of small targets is most likely contained in non-Gaussian bands, where small targets are more easily separated from the background. On the other hand, correlation of band set also plays an important role in the small target detection. When the selected bands are highly correlated, it will be unbeneficial for the subsequent detection. However, the existing non-Gaussianity-based band selection methods have not taken the correlation of bands into account, which generally result in high correlation of obtained bands. In this paper, combining the third-order (third-order tensor) and second-order (correlation) statistics of bands, we define a new concept, named joint skewness, for multivariate data. Moreover, we also propose an easy-to-implement approach to estimate this index based on high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD). Based on the definition of joint skewness, we present an unsupervised band selection for small target detection for hyperspectral data, named joint skewness band selection (JSBS). The evaluation results demonstrate that the bands selected by JSBS are very effective in terms of small target detection. PMID:25873018

  5. Report on holographic tests at S-band and K-band on the DSS-63 64 metre antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godwin, M. P.; Schoessow, E. P.; Richards, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution holographic tests were carried out on DSS-63 at S-band and K-band during May l985. These tests followed a mechanical retrofit which involved the addition of structural bracing to the backing structure. Geosynchronous satellite beacons were used as sources for the tests. At a resolution of 0.4m the S-band and K-band tests revealed rms deviations of the surface to be 2.73mm and 1.53mm, respectively. The difference between these two results is thought to be due mainly to contamination of the S-band surface error map by expected and generally predictable subreflector diffraction effects. The S-band map is also known to be contaminated by diffraction from the subreflector support struts and has a higher noise level than the K-band map. A list of corrections to be applied to the reflector panels is derived from the K-band map. These corrections are predicted to reduce the rms deviation from 1.53mm to 0.86mm at 0.4m resolution. Comparison with results obtained before the mechanical retrofit suggests the major effect of the added structural bracing to be reduction of a third order deformation of the reflector about its axis.

  6. Simulation of radar backscattering from snowpack at X-band and Ku-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Michel; Phan, Xuan-Vu; Ferro-Famil, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a multilayer snowpack electromagnetic backscattering model, based on Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT). This model is capable of simulating the interaction of electromagnetic wave (EMW) at X-band and Ku-band frequencies with multilayer snowpack. The air-snow interface and snow-ground backscattering components are calculated using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) by [1], whereas the volume backscattering component is calculated based on the solution of Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equation at order 1. Case study has been carried out using measurement data from NoSREx project [2], which include SnowScat data in X-band and Ku-band, TerraSAR-X acquisitions and snowpack stratigraphic in-situ measurements. The results of model simulations show good agreement with the radar observations, and therefore allow the DMRT model to be used in various applications, such as data assimilation [3]. [1] A.K. Fung and K.S. Chen, "An update on the iem surface backscattering model," Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 75 - 77, april 2004. [2] J. Lemmetyinen, A. Kontu, J. Pulliainen, A. Wiesmann, C. Werner, T. Nagler, H. Rott, and M. Heidinger, "Technical assistance for the deployment of an x- to ku-band scatterometer during the nosrex ii experiment," Final Report, ESA ESTEC Contract No. 22671/09/NL/JA., 2011. [3] X. V. Phan, L. Ferro-Famil, M. Gay, Y. Durand, M. Dumont, S. Morin, S. Allain, G. D'Urso, and A. Girard, "3d-var multilayer assimilation of x-band sar data into a detailed snowpack model," The Cryosphere Discussions, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 4881-4912, 2013.

  7. Frequency Arrangement For 700 MHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancans, G.; Bobrovs, V.; Ivanovs, G.

    2015-02-01

    The 694-790 MHz (700 MHz) band was allocated by the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) in ITU Region 1 (Europe included), to the mobile service on a co-primary basis with other services to which this band was allocated on the primary basis and identified for the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). At the same time, the countries of Region 1 will be able also to continue using these frequencies for their broadcasting services if necessary. This allocation will be effective immediately after 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15). In order to make the best possible use of this frequency band for mobile service, a worldwide harmonized frequency arrangement is to be prepared to allow for large economies of scale and international roaming as well as utilizing the available spectrum in the best possible way, minimizing possible interference between services, facilitating deployment and cross-border coordination. The authors analyze different possible frequency arrangements and conclude on the frequency arrangement most suitable for Europe.

  8. Bonds, bands and elasticity of smithsonite rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouibes, A.; Zaoui, A.; Tunega, D.

    2013-07-01

    The objective here is to spread out in detail the various fundamental state properties of smithsonite rock (ZnCO3) for which the most intrinsic quantities remain still unknown. First-principles electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory with the pseudopotential method were performed using diverse functionals. A number of mechanical quantities were evaluated such as bulk modulus, elastic constants, Young's and shear moduli, and transversal and longitudinal sound velocities (VS and VP). Fitting the compression data of smithsonite to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state gives a bulk modulus of 124.17 GPa, which reflects an important rigidity compared to the other carbonates. The analysis of the band structure reveals a band-gap energy of 3.36 eV that is close enough to some semiconductors rather than insulators. Finally the chemical bonding was analyzed through the electronic charge density of the total contributions of the valence bands. A pronounced charge transfer was observed towards the carbonate ion, indicating thereby the ionic character of ZnCO3.

  9. Chemically induced compaction bands: Triggering conditions and band thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2014-02-01

    During compaction band formation, various mechanisms can be involved at different scales. Mechanical and chemical degradation of the solid skeleton and grain damage are important factors that may trigger instabilities in the form of compaction bands. Here we explore the conditions of compaction band formation in quartz- and carbonate-based geomaterials by considering the effect of chemical dissolution and grain breakage. As the stresses/deformations evolve, the grains of the material break, leading to an increase of their specific surface. Consequently, their dissolution is accelerated and chemical softening is triggered. By accounting for (a) the mass diffusion of the system, (b) a macroscopic failure criterion with dissolution softening, and (c) the reaction kinetics at the microlevel, a model is proposed and the conditions for compaction instabilities are investigated. Distinguishing the microscale (grain level) from the macrolevel (representative elementary volume) and considering the heterogeneous microstructure of the representative elementary volume, it is possible to discuss the thickness and periodicity of compaction bands. Two case studies are investigated. The first one concerns a sandstone rock reservoir which is water flooded and the second one a carbonate rock in which CO2 is injected for storage. It is shown that compaction band instabilities are possible in both cases.

  10. Spectral image fusion using band reduction and contourlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2014-06-01

    Spectral images have relatively low spatial resolution, compared to high-resolution single band panchromatic (PAN) images. Therefore, fusing a spectral image with a PAN image has been widely studied to produce a high-resolution spectral image. However, raw spectral images are too large to process and contain redundant information that is not utilized in the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel fusion method that employs a spectral band reduction and contourlets. The band reduction begins with the best two band combination, and this two-band combination is subsequently augmented to three, four, and more until the desired number of bands is selected. The adopted band selection algorithm using the endmember extraction concept employs a sequential forward search strategy. Next, the image fusion is performed with two different spectral images based on the frequency components that are newly obtained by contourlet transform (CT). One spectral image that is used as a dataset is multispectral (MS) image and the other is hyperspectral (HS) image. Each original spectral image is pre-processed by spectrally integrating over the entire spectral range to obtain a PAN source image that is used in the fusion process. This way, we can eliminate the step of image co-registration since the obtained PAN image is already perfectly aligned to the spectral image. Next, we fuse the band-reduced spectral images with the PAN images using contourlet-based fusion framework. The resultant fusion image provides enhanced spatial resolution while preserving the spectral information. In order to analyze the band reduction performance, the original spectral images are fused with the same PAN images to serve as a reference image, which is then compared to the band-reduced spectral image fusion results using six different quality metrics.

  11. Band loss by nestling mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaczynski, C.F.; Kiel, W.H.

    1963-01-01

    Nestling mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) were banded and checked for band loss prior to fledging at Parchman, Mississippi, during the months of June-August, 1960. Three hundred seventy-seven nestlings 4-6 days of age were banded, 117 with size 3 bands, 120 with size 3A bands, and 140 with size 3A bands secured by Dalzoflex tape. Two hundred twenty nestlings 7-9 days of age were banded, 114 with size 3 bands and 106 with size 3A bands. In the 4- to 6-day age group, 66.3 percent of the size 3A bands were lost. This was a statistically significant departure from the 7.7 percent loss of size 3 bands. No taped bands were lost. However, predators ate 13.8 percent of the nestlings with taped bands and significantly fewer of the nestlings banded without tape. In the 4- to 6-day age group, percentages of nestlings known to be available for band recovery at 9 days or older were: size 3, 69.2 percent; size 3A with tape, 59.0 percent; size 3A, 25.8 percent. In the 7-to 9-day age group, there was a 3.3 percent loss of size 3A bands and no loss of size 3 bands. The minimum age at which nestlings were banded without subsequent loss of bands was 6 days for size 3 and 8 days for size 3A.

  12. Aberrations of the cathode objective lens up to fifth order.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R M; Wan, W; Schramm, S M

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we discuss a topic that was close to Prof. Gertrude Rempfer s interests for many years. On this occasion of her 100th birthday, we remember and honor Gertrude for her many outstanding contributions, and for the inspiring example that she set. We derive theoretical expressions for the aberration coefficients of the uniform electrostatic field up to 5th order and compare these with raytracing calculations for the cathode lens used in Low Energy Electron Microscopy and Photo Electron Emission Microscopy experiments. These higher order aberration coefficients are of interest for aberration corrected experiments in which chromatic (C(c)) and spherical (C₃) aberrations of the microscope are set to zero. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the results of raytracing. Calculations of image resolution using the Contrast Transfer Function method show that sub-nanometer resolution is achievable in an aberration corrected LEEM system. PMID:22188906

  13. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  14. Automated Extraction of Absorption Bands from Reflectance Special

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguenin, R. L.; Vale, L.; Mcintire, D.; Jones, J.

    1985-01-01

    A multiple high order derivative spectroscopy technique has been developed for deriving wavelength positions, half widths, and heights of absorption bands in reflectance spectra. The technique is applicable to laboratory spectra as well as medium resolution (100-200/cm) telescope or spacecraft spectra with moderate (few percent) noise. The technique permits absorption band positions to be detected with an accuracy of better than 3%, and often better than 1%. The high complexity of radiative transfer processes in diffusely reflected spectra can complicate the determination of absorption band positions. Continuum reflections, random illumination geometries within the material, phase angle effects, composite overlapping bands, and calibration uncertainties can shift apparent band positions by 20% from their actual positions or mask them beyond detection. Using multiple high order derivative analysis, effects of scattering continua, phase angle, and calibration (smooth features) are suppressed. Inflection points that characterize the positions and half widths of constituent bands are enhanced by the process and directly detected with relatively high sensitivity.

  15. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  16. Correlations in a Band Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentef, Michael; Kunes, Jan; Kampf, Arno P.; Werner, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Using DMFT we find a discontinuous band-to-Mott insulator transition upon an increase in the local Coulomb repulsion in a covalent band insulator [1,2], defined as a band insulator with partially filled local orbitals. The corresponding band gap is a hybridization gap arising from a particular pattern of hopping integrals. Similar characteristics apply to materials such as FeSi, FeSb2 or CoTiSb [3], some of which exhibit temperature dependent magnetic and transport properties reminiscent of Kondo insulators. Both charge and spin gaps in the covalent band insulator shrink with increasing Coulomb repulsion. At moderate interaction strengths the gap renormalization is well described by a renormalization factor analogous to the quasiparticle weight in a Fermi liquid. [4pt] [1] M. Sentef, J. Kunes, P. Werner, and A.P. Kampf, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155116 (2009) [0pt] [2] A.P. Kampf, M. Kollar, J. Kunes, M. Sentef, and D. Vollhardt, arXiv:0910.5126

  17. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  18. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Subrata; Cervenka, Gregory; Ha, Ji Hee; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a ‘white-opsin’ that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation. PMID:26360377

  19. A reward band study of mallards to estimate band reporting rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Burnham, K.P.

    1976-01-01

    Reward bands ($10) were placed on 2,122 hatching-year mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and an additional 11,490 received conventional bands (controls) to estimate band reporting rates. An analysis of band recoveries indicated that the reporting rate was dependent primarily upon three factors: (1) the distance banded birds were recovered from the banding site, (2) band collecting activities of conservation agencies (usually near banding sites), and ( 3) the intensity of banding effort in the region (frequency of banded birds in the population of the region). Reporting rates were uniformly depressed near the banding sites, but they showed an east-west cline at distances greater than 80 km from the banding sites. The reporting rate was highest in the west. Limited data on historical band reporting rates were compiled. Recommendations are given for adjusting band recoveries to account for the nonreporting of bands for 1957-73.

  20. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Fardin, Marc A.; Manneville, Sebastien; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Even in simple geometries, many complex fluids display nontrivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known for several decades, but in recent years, we have seen an upsurge in studies offering an ever-more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and soft glassy materials and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  1. Banded Terrain in East Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-460, 22 August 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera image shows banded terrain in easternmost Hellas Planitia, between the distal ends of Dao and Harmakhis valleys. These bands probably indicate the location of eroded, layered bedrock that has been covered by a mantling deposit that, itself, became eroded to form the very small pits and bumps that pervade the region. This picture is located near 41.1oS, 275.0oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/upper left.

  2. Wide band data collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkiewicz, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) approached NASA Headquarters in 1986 about the need to collect data daily from seismic stations around the world as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) mission. A typical IRIS Seismic Station generates 16 Megabytes of data per day when there is seismic activity. The Preliminary Design Parameters of the Wide Band Data Collection System are summarized.

  3. Resistive band for turbomachine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Herbert Chidsey; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-08-25

    A turbomachine system includes a rotor that defines a longitudinal axis of the turbomachine system. A first blade is coupled to the rotor, and the first blade has first and second laminated plies. A first band is coupled to the first blade and is configured to resist separation of the first and second laminated plies.

  4. Band structure in 113Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of collective bands in 113Sn, populated in the reaction 100Mo(19F,p 5 n ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV, has been studied. A new positive-parity sequence of eight states extending up to 7764.9 keV and spin (39 /2+) has been observed. The band is explained as arising from the coupling of the odd valence neutron in the g7 /2 or the d5 /2 orbital to the deformed 2p-2h proton configuration of the neighboring even-A Sn isotope. Lifetimes of six states up to an excitation energy of 9934.9 keV and spin 47 /2-belonging to a Δ I =2 intruder band have been measured for the first time, including an upper limit for the last state, from Doppler-shift-attenuation data. A moderate average quadrupole deformation β2=0.22 ±0.02 is deduced from these results for the five states up to spin 43 /2- . The transition quadrupole moments decrease with increase in rotational frequency, indicating a reduction of collectivity with spin, a feature common for terminating bands. The behavior of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia as a function of rotational frequency has been studied and total Routhian surface calculations have been performed in an attempt to obtain an insight into the nature of the states near termination.

  5. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  6. Curriculum Guide for Beginners Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazar, W. Gayre

    This curriculum guide for beginners band is the product of a team of teachers, administrators, and supervisory personnel. The prime objectives in the beginning instrument class is the development of correct playing habits, with emphasis on posture, holding position, embouchure, breathing, tonguing, good tone production and intonation. Subjects…

  7. Tolerance bands for functional data.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Lasitha N; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2016-06-01

    Often the object of inference in biomedical applications is a range that brackets a given fraction of individual observations in a population. A classical estimate of this range for univariate measurements is a "tolerance interval." This article develops its natural extension for functional measurements, a "tolerance band," and proposes a methodology for constructing its pointwise and simultaneous versions that incorporates both sparse and dense functional data. Assuming that the measurements are observed with noise, the methodology uses functional principal component analysis in a mixed model framework to represent the measurements and employs bootstrapping to approximate the tolerance factors needed for the bands. The proposed bands also account for uncertainty in the principal components decomposition. Simulations show that the methodology has, generally, acceptable performance unless the data are quite sparse and unbalanced, in which case the bands may be somewhat liberal. The methodology is illustrated using two real datasets, a sparse dataset involving CD4 cell counts and a dense dataset involving core body temperatures. PMID:26574904

  8. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David A.; Flood, William S.; Arthur, Allan A.; Voelker, Ferdinand

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  9. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  10. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  11. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  12. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  13. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and...

  14. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  15. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Adam G; Ahn, J.W.; Maingi, Rajesh; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 mu m wavelengths and transmits 7-10 mu m wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  16. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    McLean, A G; Ahn, J-W; Maingi, R; Gray, T K; Roquemore, A L

    2012-05-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 μm wavelengths and transmits 7-10 μm wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation. PMID:22667624

  17. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2012-05-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 μm wavelengths and transmits 7-10 μm wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  18. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, A. G.; Ahn, J-W.; Maingi, R.; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2012-05-15

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 {mu}m wavelengths and transmits 7-10 {mu}m wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  19. Industry looks at military exceptionally high frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F. L.

    1982-10-01

    Various programs and systems in the developing EHF communications band usage, including satellites, are examined. Commercial systems, built by companies which also hold military contracts, are beginning to feature capabilities formerly reserved for the military, in order to meet increased demands for voice, video, and data links. The C-band, from 4-6 GHz is becoming oversubscribed, leading to the implementation of the Ku-band, from 11-14 GHz. Saturation of these bands is expected to occur in the early 1990s. The Japanese have been experimenting with the 20/30 THz bands since 1976, the Italians are planning the Italsat, and ESA is developing the L-Sat, all in the same frequency bands. NASA explored the region partially with the ATS-6 spacecraft, but funding has lagged. Plans exist for an Advanced Communications Technology Satellite, operating up to 50 GHz, to be launched in 1987 and function for two years. It is suggested that military users may benefit from leasing dedicated commercial satellite channels, while the commercial operators will profit from greater guaranteed use of the equipment.

  20. Resolution of the Band Gap Prediction Problem for Materials Design.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Jason M; Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-01

    An important property with any new material is the band gap. Standard density functional theory methods grossly underestimate band gaps. This is known as the band gap problem. Here, we show that the hybrid B3PW91 density functional returns band gaps with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) from experiment of 0.22 eV over 64 insulators with gaps spanning a factor of 500 from 0.014 to 7 eV. The MAD is 0.28 eV over 70 compounds with gaps up to 14.2 eV, with a mean error of -0.03 eV. To benchmark the quality of the hybrid method, we compared the hybrid method to the rigorous GW many-body perturbation theory method. Surprisingly, the MAD for B3PW91 is about 1.5 times smaller than the MAD for GW. Furthermore, B3PW91 is 3-4 orders of magnitude faster computationally. Hence, B3PW91 is a practical tool for predicting band gaps of materials before they are synthesized and represents a solution to the band gap prediction problem. PMID:26944092

  1. Multi - band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry data integration for landslide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Silvia; Mateos, Rosa; Mora, Oscar; García, Inma; Sánchez, Ciscu; Sanabria, Margarita; López, Maite; Mulas, Joaquin; Hernández, Mario; Herrera, Gerardo

    2013-04-01

    We present a methodology to perform a geomorphological assessment of ground movements over wide areas, by improving Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) analysis for landslide studies. The procedure relies on the integrated use of multi-band EO data acquired by different satellite sensors in different time intervals, to provide a detailed investigation of ground displacements. The methodology, throughout the cross-comparison and integration of PS data in different microwave bands (ALOS in L-band, ERS1/2 and ENVISAT in C-band, COSMOSKY-MED in X-band), is applied on the Tramontana Range in the northwestern part of Mallorca island (Spain), extensively affected by mass movements across time, especially during the last years. We increase the confidence degree of the available interferometric data and we homogenize all PS targets by implementing and classifying them through common criteria. Therefore, PSI results are combined with geo-thematic data and pre-existing landslide inventories of the study area, in order to improve the landslide database, providing additional information on the detected ground displacements. The results of this methodology are used to elaborate landslide activity maps, permitting to jointly exploit heterogeneous PS data for analyzing landslides at regional scale. Moreover, from a geomorphological perspective, the proposed approach exploits the implemented PS data to achieve a reliable spatial analysis of movement rates, whatever referred to certain landslide phenomena or to other natural processes, in order to perform ground motion activity maps within a wide area.

  2. 75 FR 35363 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... markets, 72 FR 39756, July 20, 2007. Rather than specify a band plan for Puerto Rico, the Commission... Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be..., 69 FR 67823, November 22, 2004. In a Second Memorandum Opinion and Order, adopted in May 2007,...

  3. Hypersonic crystal band gaps in Ni/Cu superlattice nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Guang; Shen, Tie

    2016-03-01

    The hexagonal and tetragonal ordered arrays were prepared by Ni/Cu superlattice nanowires on the porous anodic alumina membrane template, and their phonon band structures were calculated by using the plane wave expansion method. Numerical results show that the hypersonic band gaps can be acquired by adjusting the structural parameters. Along the different wave-vector directions, the width and position of band gap would vary. If the nanowires'filling fraction is increased continuously, the width of the first band gap firstly increases and then decreases within a certain range. The height of superlattice nanowire elementary unit can only affect the width of band gap within a quite narrow range. When the height of elementary unit remains unchanged, the decrease of the Cu-component ratio can contribute to the formation of a wider band gap. Additionally, the wide band gap is more easily formed in tetragonal structure than in hexagonal structure.

  4. High power X-band TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kuang, E.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaechter, L.

    1995-12-31

    The recent research into multi-stage X-Band TWT`s producing output powers of 100--200 MW has shown that it is essential to minimize the reflections in each stage of the amplifier in order to avoid sideband development. These reflections also cause fluctuations in the RF output power envelope. Following extensive MAGIC code simulations they have designed tapers that adiabatically increase the iris diameter in the output sections of the amplifier to provide a smooth, broad-band transition from the slow-wave structure to cylindrical waveguide. They report results, extracting in the TM{sub 01} mode, showing smooth output pulses in the range 30--50 MW, with no evidence of sidebands. A second approach seeks to isolate the first amplifier stage with a drift tube beyond cutoff. The second stage and output section are quasi-periodic structures designed to minimize reflections, and allow the radial or longitudinal RF power extraction to be distributed over an extended region. The first stage of this system has been developed and initial operation results using an 0.8--1.0 MV, 0.5--1.0 kA, 50 ns cylindrical beam will be reported.

  5. W-band free-electron masers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H. P.; Jackson, R. H.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical analyses of high power W-band (i.e., {approx_equal}94 GHz) free-electron maser amplifiers are presented for a helical wiggler/cylindrical waveguide configuration using the three-dimensional slow-time-scale ARACHNE simulation code [9]. The geometry treated by ARACHNE is that of an electron beam propagating through the cylindrical waveguide subject to a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field. Two configurations are discussed. The first is the case of a reversed-guide field geometry where the guide field is oriented antiparallel to the helicity of the wiggler field. Using a 330 kV/20 A electron beam, efficiencies of the order of 7% are calculated with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 5 GHz. The second example employs a strong guide field of 20 kG oriented parallel to the helicity of the wiggler. Here, efficiencies of greater than 8% are possible with a FWHM bandwidth of 4.5 GHz using a 300 kV/20 A electron beam. A normalized emittance of 95 mm-mrad is assumed in both cases, and no beam losses are observed for either case. Both cases assume interaction with the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode, which has acceptably low losses in the W-band.

  6. A comparative study of RADAR Ka-band backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, D.; Pierdicca, N.; Guerriero, L.; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Calleja, Eduardo; Rommen, B.; Giudici, D.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Ka-band RADAR frequency range has not yet been used for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from space so far, although this technology may lead to important applications for the next generation of SAR space sensors. Therefore, feasibility studies regarding a Ka-band SAR instrument have been started [1][2], for the next generation of SAR space sensors. In spite of this, the lack of trusted references on backscatter at Ka-band revealed to be the main limitation for the investigation of the potentialities of this technology. In the framework of the ESA project "Ka-band SAR backscatter analysis in support of future applications", this paper is aimed at the study of wave interaction at Ka-band for a wide range of targets in order to define a set of well calibrated and reliable Ka-band backscatter coefficients for different kinds of targets. We propose several examples of backscatter data resulting from a critical survey of available datasets at Ka-band, focusing on the most interesting cases and addressing both correspondences and differences. The reliability of the results will be assessed via a preliminary comparison with ElectroMagnetic (EM) theoretical models. Furthermore, in support of future technological applications, we have designed a prototypal software acting as a "library" of earth surface radar response. In our intention, the output of the study shall contribute to answer to the need of a trustworthy Ka-Band backscatter reference. It will be of great value for future technological applications, such as support to instrument analysis, design and requirements' definition (e.g.: Signal to Noise Ratio, Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero).

  7. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  8. Ku-band miniature modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Ku-band microminiature modulators were designed to convert a 10 mW signal at 400 MHz to a 10 mW signal at 15 GHz. The designs incorporate gallium arsenide Schottky barrier varactors used in upper-sideband up-converters. The use of Ku-band microstrip circulators and hairpin resonator bandpass filters at 2.1 GHz and 2.5 GHz is included. The design and fabrication of a single up-conversion unit with a double up-conversion unit are compared. Various filter configurations are studies, and the use of both alumina and quartz substrates are considered. The various impedance matching networks are evaluated using computer aided design techniques.

  9. ALMA Band 5 Cartridge Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billade, Bhushan; Lapkin, I.; Nystrom, O.; Sundin, E.; Fredrixon, M.; Finger, R.; Rashid, H.; Desmaris, V.; Meledin, D.; Pavolotsky, A.; Belitsky, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Work presented here concerns the design and performance of the ALMA Band 5 cold cartridge, one of the 10 frequency channels of ALMA project, a radio interferometer under construction at Atacama Desert in Chile. The Band 5 cartridge is a dual polarization receiver with the polarization separation performed by orthomode transducer (OMT). For each polarization, Band 5 receiver employs sideband rejection (2SB) scheme based on quadrature layout, with SIS mixers covering 163-211 GHz with 4-8 GHz IF. The LO injection circuitry is integrated with mixer chip and is implemented on the same substrate, resulting in a compact 2SB assembly. Amongst the other ALMA bands, the ALMA Band 5 being the lowest frequency band that uses all cold optics, has the largest mirror. Consequently, ALMA Band 5 mirror along with its support structure leaves very little room for placing OMT, mixers and IF subsystems. The constraints put by the size of cold optics and limited cartridge space, required of us to revise the original 2SB design and adopt a design where all the components like OMT, mixer, IF hybrid, isolators and IF amplifier are directly connected to each other without using any co-ax cables in-between. The IF subsystem uses the space between 4 K and 15 K stage of the cartridge and is thermally connected to 4 K stage. Avoiding co-ax cabling required use of custom designed IF hybrid, furthermore, due to limited cooling capacity at 4 K stage, resistive bias circuitry for the mixers is moved to 15 K stage and the IF hybrid along with an integrated bias-T is implemented using superconducting micro-strip lines. The E-probes for both LO and RF waveguide-to-microstrip transitions are placed perpendicular to the wave direction (back-piece configuration). The RF choke at the end of the probes provides a virtual ground for the RF/LO signal, and the choke is DC grounded to the chassis. The on-chip LO injection is done using a microstrip line directional coupler with slot-line branches in the

  10. ASTRONOMY: Researchers Get Spectrum Bands.

    PubMed

    Taubes, G

    2000-06-23

    Radio astronomers have been in danger of losing a precious band of the electromagnetic spectrum--the millimeter wavelengths, which promise insight into subjects as diverse as the origins of life and the birth of stars--to the burgeoning telecommunications industry, as millimeter wavelengths also look promising for transmitting high-bandwidth wireless information over relatively short distances. Earlier this month, however, astronomers won an international agreement that guarantees critical wavelengths safe for research. PMID:17758893

  11. Infrared radiation parameterizations for the minor CO2 bands and for several CFC bands in the window region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Chou, Ming-Dah; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    1993-01-01

    Fast and accurate parameterizations have been developed for the transmission functions of the CO2 9.4- and 10.4-micron bands, as well as the CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-22 bands located in the 8-12-micron region. The parameterizations are based on line-by-line calculations of transmission functions for the CO2 bands and on high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of the absorption coefficients for the CFC bands. Also developed are the parameterizations for the H2O transmission functions for the corresponding spectral bands. Compared to the high-resolution calculations, fluxes at the tropopause computed with the parameterizations are accurate to within 10 percent when overlapping of gas absorptions within a band is taken into account. For individual gas absorption, the accuracy is of order 0-2 percent. The climatic effects of these trace gases have been studied using a zonally averaged multilayer energy balance model, which includes seasonal cycles and a simplified deep ocean. With the trace gas abundances taken to follow the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Low Emissions 'B' scenario, the transient response of the surface temperature is simulated for the period 1900-2060.

  12. Nonzero Quadrupole Moments of Candidate Tetrahedral Bands

    SciTech Connect

    Bark, R. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Smit, F. D.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Lindsay, R.

    2010-01-15

    Negative-parity bands in the vicinity of {sup 156}Gd and {sup 160}Yb have been suggested as candidates for the rotation of tetrahedral nuclei. We report the observation of the odd and even-spin members of the lowest energy negative-parity bands in {sup 160}Yb and {sup 154}Gd. The properties of these bands are similar to the proposed tetrahedral band of {sup 156}Gd and its even-spin partner. Band-mixing calculations are performed and absolute and relative quadrupole moments deduced for {sup 160}Yb and {sup 154}Gd. The values are inconsistent with zero, as required for tetrahedral shape, and the bands are interpreted as octupole vibrational bands. The failure to observe the in-band E2 transitions of the bands at low spins can be understood using the measured B(E1) and B(E2) values.

  13. Band-selective radiofrequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Helen; Freeman, Ray

    A theoretical treatment is given of the general problem of designing amplitude-modulated radiofrequency pulses that will excite a specified band of frequencies within a high-resolution NMR spectrum with uniform intensity and phase but with negligible excitation elsewhere. First a trial pulse envelope is defined in terms of a finite Fourier series and its frequency-domain profile calculated through the Bloch equations. The result is compared with the desired target profile to give a multidimensional error surface. The method of simulated annealing is then used to find the global minimum on this surface and the result refined by standard gradient-descent optimization. In this manner, a family of new shaped radio-frequency pulses, known as BURP ( band-selective, uniform response, pure-phase) pulses, has been created. These are of two classes—pulses that excite or invert z magnetization and those that act as general-rotation πr/2 or π pulses irrespective of the initial condition of the nuclear magnetization. It was found convenient to design the latter class as amplitude-modulated time-symmetric pulses. Tables of Fourier coefficients and pulse-shape ordinates are given for practical implementation of BURP pulses, together with the calculated frequency-domain responses and experimental verifications. Examples of the application of band-selective pulses in conventional and multidimensional spectroscopy are given. Pure-phase pulses of this type should also find applications in magnetic resonance imaging where refocusing schemes are undesirable.

  14. Incompressible Polaritons in a Flat Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Matteo; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.; Blatter, Gianni; Huber, Sebastian D.; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We study the interplay of geometric frustration and interactions in a nonequilibrium photonic lattice system exhibiting a polariton flat band as described by a variant of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We show how to engineer strong photonic correlations in such a driven, dissipative system by quenching the kinetic energy through frustration. This produces an incompressible state of photons characterized by short-ranged crystalline order with period doubling. The latter manifests itself in strong spatial correlations, i.e., on-site and nearest-neighbor antibunching combined with extended density-wave oscillations at larger distances. We propose a state-of-the-art circuit QED realization of our system, which is tunable in situ.

  15. Incompressible Polaritons in a Flat Band.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Matteo; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P L; Blatter, Gianni; Huber, Sebastian D; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We study the interplay of geometric frustration and interactions in a nonequilibrium photonic lattice system exhibiting a polariton flat band as described by a variant of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We show how to engineer strong photonic correlations in such a driven, dissipative system by quenching the kinetic energy through frustration. This produces an incompressible state of photons characterized by short-ranged crystalline order with period doubling. The latter manifests itself in strong spatial correlations, i.e., on-site and nearest-neighbor antibunching combined with extended density-wave oscillations at larger distances. We propose a state-of-the-art circuit QED realization of our system, which is tunable in situ. PMID:26551811

  16. W/V-Band RF Propagation Experiment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.; Simons, Rainee N.; Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Budinger, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of frequency spectrum for space-to-ground communications applications has generally progressed from the lowest available bands capable of supporting transmission through the atmosphere to the higher bands, which have required research and technological advancement to implement. As communications needs increase and the available spectrum in the microwave frequency bands (3 30 GHz) becomes congested globally, future systems will move into the millimeter wave (mm-wave) range (30 300 GHz). While current systems are operating in the Ka-band (20 30 GHz), systems planned for the coming decades will initiate operations in the Q-Band (33 50 GHz), V-Band (50 75 GHz) and W Band (75 110 GHz) of the spectrum. These bands offer extremely broadband capabilities (contiguous allocations of 500 MHz to 1GHz or more) and an uncluttered spectrum for a wide range of applications. NASA, DoD and commercial missions that can benefit from moving into the mm-wave bands include data relay and near-Earth data communications, unmanned aircraft communications, NASA science missions, and commercial broadcast/internet services, all able to be implemented via very small terminals. NASA Glenn Research Center has a long history of performing the inherently governmental function of opening new frequency spectrum by characterizing atmospheric effects on electromagnetic propagation and collaborating with the satellite communication industry to develop specific communications technologies for use by NASA and the nation. Along these lines, there are critical issues related to W/V-band propagation that need to be thoroughly understood before design of any operational system can commence. These issues arise primarily due to the limitations imposed on W/V-band signal propagation by the Earth s atmosphere, and to the fundamental lack of understanding of these effects with regards to proper system design and fade mitigation. In this paper, The GRC RF propagation team recommends measurements

  17. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Aziz N.; Awadallah, Attia A.; Phillips, Adel H.; Ahmed, Riham R.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model & LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  18. Community-based Music Education: Influences of Industrial Bands in the American South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCroy, Hoyt F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a case study focusing on the mill-supported Lindale Band in Lindale, Georgia in order to examine the influences of industry on instrumental music education in the U.S. South. Investigates the history of U.S. industrial bands and the philosophical parallels between industry and progressive education. (CMK)

  19. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  20. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-05-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  1. Lessons Learned from Laparoscopic Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-11-01

    The author reviews 27 laparoscopic gastric banding operations, of which 19 cases were completed. Of the 27 operations, eight were revisions of earlier laparoscopic banding. The lessons learned from these cases are highlighted. PMID:10757955

  2. Robust band gap of TiS3 nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2016-06-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed on the band structure of mono- and few-layer TiS3 nanofilms. It is found that the band gap character of the TiS3 films is quite robust, almost independent of layer thickness, vertical strain and stacking order, which is in sharp contrast to most other two-dimensional materials, such as MoS2. The robustness of the band gap originates from the location of the CBM and VBM states, which are at the center atoms of TiS3, and are thus unaffected by the layer-layer coupling. Such a property of TiS3 nanofilms promises good application potential in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, and also makes TiS3 a good platform to study the electronic properties of a material in the two-dimensional limit. PMID:27029227

  3. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  4. Pseudogaps in the three-band Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    Using the strong coupling diagram technique, the energy spectrum of the three-band Hubbard model is investigated. In these calculations, the series in powers of the copper-oxygen hybridization for the irreducible part is approximated by two lowest-order terms. For parameters of hole-doped cuprates the calculated energy spectrum consists of lower and upper Hubbard subbands of predominantly copper nature, oxygen bands with some admixture of copper states and the Zhang-Rice states of mixed nature. The spectrum contains two pseudogaps, the lower of which separates the Hubbard subband from Zhang-Rice and oxygen bands. The pseudogaps arise due to multiple reabsorption of carriers in states with double occupancy of sites by holes or electrons.

  5. Identification of the UIR bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    Starlight undergoing multiple scattering processes within fluffy grains results in extinction, UV 2175A bump, DIBs and the UIR bands. Spectroscopic lab and DIB data has identified the highly fluorescent molecule Dipyridyl Magnesium Tetrabenzoporphyrin (MgTBP). Reflection and Raman scattering experimental data will be presented which designates this molecule as the primary source for UIR signals. MgTBP sublimes at about 500OC. It is produced via high temperature plasma synthesis within and subsequently ejected from comets which in turn are by-products of solar system-planetary development. Interstellar dust is the left-over refuse which implies prodigious solar system evolution in each galaxy.

  6. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  7. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with

  8. Black Scholes’ model and Bollinger bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xudong; Zheng, Weian

    2006-11-01

    Bollinger bands are well-known in stock market as a popular technical analysis tool. We found that Black-Scholes stock price model had this Bollinger bands property also. In this paper, we give the proof of this phenomenon, and give a new distribution of a statistics generated by the Bollinger bands.

  9. Nylon cable band reactions in ovariohysterectomized bitches.

    PubMed

    Werner, R E; Straughan, A J; Vezin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nylon cable bands used as ligatures caused postsurgical complications in 5 ovariohysterectomized bitches. Clinical signs included fever, stiffness, strangury, draining fistulae, vaginal discharge, and tenesmus. Most signs first appeared several years after surgery, and all signs were resolved after removal of the bands. On the basis of our experience, we suggest that nylon cable bands not be used for ovariohysterectomy ligations. PMID:1537693

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Hamza, Zareena V; Thampi, Madhavan Venugopalan; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period. PMID:27081225

  11. S and Ku band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of the two part S- and Ku-band source development program are described. The S- and Ku-band sources were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. A high performance S- and Ku-band microwave signal source using state-of-the-art oscillator and microwave source technology was developed.

  12. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  13. Understanding Asteroid Disruptions Using Very Young Dust Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy Kehoe, Ashley J.; Kehoe, T. J.; Colwell, J. E.; Dermott, S. F.

    2013-10-01

    Zodiacal dust bands are structures that result from the dynamical sculpting of the dust particles released in the catastrophic disruption of an asteroid. Partial dust bands are the recently discovered younger siblings of the dust bands, ones that are still forming and due to very recent disruptions within the last few hundred thousand years. During the early stages of formation, these structures retain information on the original catastrophic disruptions that produced them (since the dust has not yet been lost or significantly altered by orbital or collisional decay). The first partial dust band, at about 17 degrees latitude, was revealed using a very precise method of co-adding the IRAS data set. We have shown that these partial dust bands exhibit structure consistent with a forming band, can be used to constrain the original size distribution of the dust produced in the catastrophic disruption of an asteroid, and these very young structures also allow a much better estimate of the total amount of dust released in the disruption. In order to interpret the observations and constrain the parameters of the dust injected into the cloud following an asteroid disruption, we have developed detailed models of the dynamical evolution of the dust that makes up the band. We model the dust velocity distribution resulting from the initial impact and then track the orbital evolution of the dust under the effects of gravitational perturbations from all the planets as well as radiative forces of Poynting-Robertson drag, solar wind drag and radiation pressure and use these results to produce maps of the thermal emission. Through the comparison of our newly completed dynamical evolution models with the coadded observations, we can put constraints on the parameters of dust producing the band. We confirm the source of the band as the very young Emilkowalski cluster ( <250,000 years; Nesvorny et al., 2003) and present our most recent estimates of the size-distribution and cross

  14. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution χimp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in χimp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility χloc and to compare them with χimp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in χimp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding χloc less accurate than χimp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of χloc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than χimp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to χimp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  15. V-band IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.; Ying, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A V-band transmitter for communication application was developed that has 30 dB gain and consists of six stages of IMPATT amplifiers. The low and medium power stages are stable amplifiers while the two high power stages are triggered oscillators. Hybrid couplers in the form of Magic Tees were used for power combining two single diode IMPATT modules in the high driver stage and for a single diode IMPATT modules at the output stage. Output power of 4 watts CW across a 2.5 GHz band centered at 60 GHz was achieved with an input power of 4 mW. Dynamic range of the amplifier chain is in excess of 7 dB. A single diode one watt stable amplifier over a bandwidth greater than 2.5 GHz, a high power ( 1 watt) stable amplifier capable of operating in either the constant current or constant voltage mode and verification of the advantages of the latter mode of operation; and a 10 channel modulator with built in test equipment (specifically protective circuitry, failure monitoring, and mode of failure indicated) were also developed. The performance requirements of circulators/isolators for reflection amplifiers were also defined and verified.

  16. Band structure of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Clark, R. M.; Cline, D.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Diamond, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Görgen, A.; Hayes, A. B.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, I.-Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Schmidt, G.; Stephens, F. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Teng, R.; Vetter, K.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Over a period of several years we have performed three separate experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron in which 235U (thick target) was Coulomb-excited. The program involved stand-alone experiments with Gammmasphere and with the 8pi Spectrometer using 136Xe beams at 720 MeV, and a CHICO-Gammasphere experiment with a 40Ca beam at 184 MeV. In addition to extending the known negative-parity bands to high spin, we have assigned levels in some seven positive-parity bands which are in some cases (e.g., [631]1/2, [624]7/2, and [622]5/2) strongly populated by E3 excitation. The CHICO data have been analyzed to extract E2 and E3 matrix elements from the observed yields. Additionally, many M1 matrix elements could be extracted from the γ-ray branching ratios. A number of new features have emerged, including the unexpected attenuation of magnetic transitions between states of the same Nilsson multiplet, the breakdown of Coriolis staggering at high spin, and the effect of E3 collectivity on Coriolis interactions.

  17. Scaled Opposite Spin Second Order Moller-Plesset Correlation Energy: An Economical Electronic Structure Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yousung; Lochan, Rohini C.; Dutoi, Anthony D.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-08-02

    A simplified approach to treating the electron correlation energy is suggested in which only the alpha-beta component of the second order Moller-Plesset energy is evaluated, and then scaled by an empirical factor which is suggested to be 1.3. This scaled opposite spin second order energy (SOS-MP2) yields results for relative energies and derivative properties that are statistically improved over the conventional MP2 method. Furthermore, the SOS-MP2 energy can be evaluated without the 5th order computational steps associated with MP2 theory, even without exploiting any spatial locality. A 4th order algorithm is given for evaluating the opposite spin MP2 energy using auxiliary basis expansions, and a Laplace approach, and timing comparisons are given.

  18. Thematic mapper studies band correlation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, S. G.; Kiang, R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral data representative of thematic mapper candidate bands 1 and 3 to 7 were obtained by selecting appropriate combinations of bands from the JSC 24 channel multispectral scanner. Of all the bands assigned, only candidate bands 4 (.74 mu to .80 mu) and 5 (.80 mu to .91 mu) showed consistently high intercorrelation from region to region and time to time. This extremely high correlation persisted when looking at the composite data set in a multitemporal, multilocation domain. The GISS investigations lend positive confirmation to the hypothesis, that TM bands 4 and 5 are redundant.

  19. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  20. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  1. The Effects of Band Director Leadership Style and Student Leadership Ability on Band Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, P. Dru

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between band director leadership styles and the strength of student leadership within the bands. This study also examined the differences between leadership styles, student leadership strength, and band festival ratings (marching and concert). Subjects (N = 42) were band directors from Texas and Arkansas who…

  2. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  3. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  4. Effective Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional for multi-band isotropic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorishin, Konstantin V.

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that interband mixing of gradients of two order parameters (drag effect) in an isotropic bulk two-band superconductor plays important role - such a quantity of the intergradients coupling exists that the two-band superconductor is characterized with a single coherence length and a single Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter. Other quantities or neglecting of the drag effect lead to existence of two coherence lengths and dynamical instability due to violation of the phase relations between the order parameters. Thus so-called type-1.5 superconductors are impossible. An approximate method for solving of set of GL equations for a multi-band superconductor has been developed: using the result about the drag effect it has been shown that the free-energy functional for a multi-band superconductor can be reduced to the GL functional for an effective single-band superconductor.

  5. S-band transponder experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Gottlieb, P.; Muller, P. M.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment which derives data from three lunar-orbiting objects, the command-service module (CSM), the lunar module (LM), and the subsatellite in the S-band is described. Each provides detailed information on the near-side lunar gravitational field. The primary emphasis is on the low-altitude (20 km) CSM data. The LM data cover a very short time span and are somewhat redundant with the CSM data. The resolution of the high-altitude (100 km) CSM data is not as great as that of the low altitude data. The low-altitude CSM and LM data coverage and the complementary coverage obtained during the Apollo 14 mission are presented. The experiment uses the same technique of gravity determination employed on the Lunar Orbiter, in the data of which the large anomalies called mascons were first observed. The data consist of variations in the spacecraft speed as measured by the Earth-based radio tracking system.

  6. Circular birefringence of banded spherulites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Freudenthal, John; Nichols, Shane; Kahr, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Crystal optical properties of banded spherulites of 21 different compounds--molecular crystals, polymers, and minerals--with helically twisted fibers were analyzed with Mueller matrix polarimetry. The well-established radial oscillations in linear birefringence of many polycrystalline ensembles is accompanied by oscillations in circular birefringence that cannot be explained by the natural optical activity of corresponding compounds, some of which are centrosymmetric in the crystalline state. The circular birefringence is shown to be a consequence of misoriented, overlapping anisotropic lamellae, a kind of optical activity associated with the mesoscale stereochemistry of the refracting components. Lamellae splay as a consequence of space constraints related to simultaneous twisting of anisometric lamellae. This mechanism is supported by quantitative simulations of circular birefringence arising from crystallite twisting and splaying under confinement. PMID:24625095

  7. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  8. Deformation bands at andesitic stratovolcanoes and their impact on permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Varley, Nick; Baud, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The edifice-forming andesitic rocks at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) host a multitude of curious planar to subplanar deformation features. During a recent field campaign (May/June 2014) we collected 14 blocks from different localities around the volcano (from debris-flow tracks and parasitic dome "Volcancito"), chosen to represent the variety of observable features. First order observations suggest that, while some of these bands (usually distinguished by a difference in colour) are essentially planar, others have undergone various degrees of post-formation viscous deformation. In the most extreme cases, the bands have been twisted and stretched to the point were they are preserved as wispy lenses. Scanning electron microscopy has shown that the different bands are characterised by very different microstructural textures, suggesting fundamentally different mechanisms of genesis. For example, some features are bands of higher porosity than the surrounding host rock in which the groundmass appears to have been removed by the movement of hydrothermal fluids along pre-existing cracks or in thicker (1-2 cm) zones now characterised by pervasive microporous textures. Some bands, observable because macropores (1 mm) have been filled by secondary mineralisation, contain a lower porosity than the adjacent host rock. We also find evidence of variably efficient bubble elongation, possibly indicating "frozen" decompression events within pumiceous samples. We cored cylindrical samples from the blocks to contain bands either parallel or perpendicular to the fluid (gas) flow direction in our laboratory permeameter setup (other samples were cored to contain no bands; i.e., the host rock). Our permeability measurements show that some features act as conduits while others serve as barriers to fluid flow. The importance of such features is emphasised by their large impact on permeability; changes in permeability can be as high as two orders of magnitude for certain bands. These data do

  9. Topics in topological band systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen

    The discovery of integer quantum Hall effect and its subsequent theoretical formulation heralded a new paradigm of thinking in condensed matter physics, which has by now blossomed into the rapidly growing field of topological phases. In this work we investigate several mutually related topics in the framework of topological band theory. In Chapter 2, we study solutions to boundary states on a lattice and see how they are related to the bulk topology. To elicit a real space manifestation of the non-trivial topology, the presence of a physical edge is not strictly necessary. We study two other possibilities, namely the entanglement spectrum associated with an imaginary spatial boundary, and the localization centers of Wannier functions, in Chapters 3,4, and 5. Topological classification through discrete indices is so far possible only for systems described by pure quantum states---in the existing scheme, quantization is lost for systems in mixed states. In Chapter 6, we present a program through which discrete topological indices can be defined for topological band systems at finite temperature, based on Uhlmann's parallel transport of density matrices. The potential of topologocal insulators in realistic applications lies in the existence of Dirac nodes on its surface spectrum. Dirac physics, however, is not exclusive to TI surfaces. In a recently discovered class of materials known as Weyl semimetals, energy nodes which emit linear dispersions also occur in the bulk material. In Chapter 7, we study the possibility of resonance states induced by localized impurities near the nodal energy in Weyl semimetals, which will help us in understanding the stability of density-of-state suppression at the energy nodes. Finally, in Chapter 8, we apply the topological characterization developed for noninteracting particles to a class of interacting spin models in 3D, which are generalizations of Kitaev's honeycomb model, and identify several exotic quantum phases such as spin

  10. Single Molecule Studies of the Diffusion of Band 3 in Sickle Cell Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Spector, Jeff; Kodippili, Gayani C; Ritchie, Ken; Low, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by an inherited mutation in hemoglobin that leads to sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization and premature HbS denaturation. Previous publications have shown that HbS denaturation is followed by binding of denatured HbS (a.k.a. hemichromes) to band 3, the consequent clustering of band 3 in the plane of the erythrocyte membrane that in turn promotes binding of autologous antibodies to the clustered band 3, and removal of the antibody-coated erythrocytes from circulation. Although each step of the above process has been individually demonstrated, the fraction of band 3 that is altered by association with denatured HbS has never been determined. For this purpose, we evaluated the lateral diffusion of band 3 in normal cells, reversibly sickled cells (RSC), irreversibly sickled cells (ISC), and hemoglobin SC erythrocytes (HbSC) in order to estimate the fraction of band 3 that was diffusing more slowly due to hemichrome-induced clustering. We labeled fewer than ten band 3 molecules per intact erythrocyte with a quantum dot to avoid perturbing membrane structure and we then monitored band 3 lateral diffusion by single particle tracking. We report here that the size of the slowly diffusing population of band 3 increases in the sequence: normal cellsband 3 is free to diffuse decreases roughly in the same order, with band 3 diffusing in two compartments of sizes 35 and 71 nm in normal cells, but only a single compartment in HbSC cells (58 nm), RSC (45 nm) and ISC (36 nm). These data suggest that the mobility of band 3 is increasingly constrained during SCD progression, suggesting a global impact of the mutated hemoglobin on erythrocyte membrane properties. PMID:27598991

  11. Parallel preconditioning for the solution of nonsymmetric banded linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Amodio, P.; Mazzia, F.

    1994-12-31

    Many computational techniques require the solution of banded linear systems. Common examples derive from the solution of partial differential equations and of boundary value problems. In particular the authors are interested in the parallel solution of block Hessemberg linear systems Gx = f, arising from the solution of ordinary differential equations by means of boundary value methods (BVMs), even if the considered preconditioning may be applied to any block banded linear system. BVMs have been extensively investigated in the last few years and their stability properties give promising results. A new class of BVMs called Reverse Adams, which are BV-A-stable for orders up to 6, and BV-A{sub 0}-stable for orders up to 9, have been studied.

  12. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  13. Electronic correlation effects in multi-band systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kok Wee

    different bands, excitonic instabilities are found in many different scattering channels. This analysis suggest a collection of competing orders in the system ground states. This result is consistent with the experimental observation that bilayer graphene is an insulator. Next, we study nematic order in the metallic phase of iron pnictides. In contrast to graphene, the density of states is finite at the Fermi surface. By careful investigating the scattering processes near these Fermi surface, and then identifying the most relevant collective modes from these processes, we find that a Pomeranchuk instability can be driven by magnetic fluctuations. This instability eventually leads to the break down of the isotropic metallic phase which electronic system exhibit broken crystalline rotational symmetry but preserve translation symmetry. As the experiment suggests, this can be a candidate for nematic order in the metallic phase.

  14. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large

  15. Peierls distortion and electronic bands in phosphorus allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovsky, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    A small difference between the rhombohedral phosphorus lattice (A-7 phase) and the simple cubic phase, as well as between phosphorene and the cubic structure, is used in order to construct their quasiparticle band dispersion. We exploit the Peierls idea of the Brillouin zone doubling/folding, which has been previously employed in consideration of semimetals of the V period and IV-VI semiconductors. In a common framework, individual properties of phosphorus allotropes are revealed.

  16. Lifetime measurements in the superdeformed band of sup 192 Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.F.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Khoo, T.L.; Ridley, S.L.; Wolfs, F.L.H. ); Ye, D.; Beard, K.B.; Garg, U. ); Drigert, M.W. ); Benet, P.; Daly, P.J. ); Wyss, R. Royal Institute of Technology, S-10444 Stockholm ); Nazarewicz, W. )

    1990-06-25

    Lifetimes were measured for transitions in the superdeformed band of {sup 192}Hg with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The results yield an essentially constant quadrupole moment of 20{plus minus}2 {ital e} b and indicate that the sidefeeding lifetimes are of the same order as the state lifetimes. The data are consistent with calculations using the cranked Woods-Saxon Strutinsky method with pairing.

  17. Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure Experiences. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, J. Robert; Schlatter, Barbara Elwood

    2008-01-01

    Originally published in 1989, "Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure Experiences" has become a standard in the park, recreation, and leisure service industry. This title has been used to teach beginning and experienced programmers in over 100 higher-education institutions, both nationally and internationally. Designed in a user-friendly…

  18. NASA-marks 5th anniversary of first lunar landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of the Apollo 11 Flight are presented as a tribute to the fifth anniversary of the first landing on the moon. The document contains: (1) a general description of the Apollo 11 Flight, (2) Presidential statements, (3) Apollo historical summary, (4) Apollo mission facts, (5) information on astronauts who are no longer in the program, and (6) transcripts of the landing sequence and first extravehicular activities on the moon.

  19. Immigration: Law, Customs, History. 5th Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Gayle; And Others

    A fifth grade unit presents the history of immigration to the United States from a legal perspective. The eight sections are suitable for a comprehensive unit but may also be used selectively. Section A contains teacher materials: a chronological chart tying immigration laws to historical and cultural events, an overview of immigration…

  20. Workshop report for the AIAA 5th Aeroacoustics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Summaries of current understandings, technological tools and remaining controversies in the field of aeroacoustics are presented, with attention also given to developments in means of noise suppression to comply with proposed and projected regulations. Topics include jet noise mechanisms and their suppression; turbomachinery noise, including noise sources, noise prediction by the modal approach and experimental methods; duct acoustics, with discussion of sound attenuation and propagation, the application of finite element methods, and the radiation of sound from inlets; helicopter rotor, airplane propeller and V/STOL noise; aircraft interior noise; and general acoustics, atmospheric propagation and the sonic boom.

  1. Background Materials for Chairman's Workshop. 5th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimble, Gregory A.

    Information for newly appointed heads of graduate departments of psychology is presented as background material for the 1974 Chairman's Workshop. Topics include the following: the budgetary situation, pressures for increased teaching loads, effects upon recruiting faculty, faculty morale, graduate and undergraduate student morale, the intellectual…

  2. The 5th Generation model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2009-05-01

    The Standard model of Particle Physics is able to account for all known HEP phenomenon, yet it is not able to predict the masses of the quarks or leptons nor can it explain why they have their respective values. The Checker Board Model (CBM) predicts that there are 5 generation of quarks and leptons and shows a pattern to those masses, namely each three quarks or leptons (within adjacent generations or within a generation) are related to each other by a geometric mean relationship. A 2D structure of the nucleus can be imaged as 2D plate spinning on its axis, it would for all practical circumstances appear to be a 3D object. The masses of the hypothesized ``up'' and ``dn'' quarks determined by the CBM are 237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively. These new quarks in addition to a lepton of 7.4 MeV make up one of the missing generations. The details of this new particle physics model can be found at the web site: checkerboard.dnsalias.net. The only areas were this theory conflicts with existing dogma is in the value of the mass of the Top quark. The particle found at Fermi Lab must be some sort of composite particle containing Top quarks.

  3. Multicultural Education: Issues and Perspectives. 5th Edition, Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.; Banks, Cherry A. McGee

    2004-01-01

    With this collection of chapters by leading scholars and researchers in the field, the reader can develop the knowledge and skills needed to maximize the opportunities that diversity offers while minimizing its challenges. The reader will explore current and emerging research, concepts, debates, and teaching strategies for educating students from…

  4. Screening and Brief Intervention Enter Their 5th Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saitz, Richard

    2007-01-01

    About 40 years since the first controlled study, screening and brief intervention (SBI) are being disseminated into practice. But many unanswered questions remain. Studies in this special issue address what we know and don't know about alcohol and drug SBI, cost-effectiveness, patient preferences, education for clinicians, quality performance…

  5. CAS CERN Accelerator School 5th General Accelerator Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.

    1994-01-01

    The fifth CERN Accelerator School (CAS) basic course on General Accelerator Physics was given at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, from 7 to 18 September 1992. Its syllabus was based on the previous similar courses held at Gif-sur-Yvette in 1984, Aarhus 1986, Salamanca 1988 and Juelich 1990, and whose proceedings were published as CERN Reports 85-19, 87-10, 89-05 and 91-04, respectively. However, certain topics were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while new subjects were introduced. As far as the proceedings of this school are concerned the opportunity was taken not only to include the lectures presented but also to select and revise the most appropriate chapters from the previous similar schools. In this way the present volumes constitute a rather complete introduction to all aspects of the design and construction of particle accelerators, including optics, emittance, luminosity, longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics, insertions, chromaticity, transfer lines, resonances, accelerating structures, tune shifts, coasting beams, lifetime, synchrotron radiation, radiation damping, beam-beam effects, diagnostics, cooling, ion and positron sources, RF and vacuum systems, injection and extraction, conventional, permanent and superconducting magnets, cyclotrons, RF linear accelerators, microtrons, as well as applications of particle accelerators (including therapy) and the history of accelerators. See hints under the relevant topics.

  6. 5th international photovoltaic science and engineering conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The variety of potential future missions under consideration by NASA will impose a broad range of requirements on space solar arrays, and mandates the development of new solar cells which can offer a wide range of capabilities to mission planners. Major advances in performance have recently been achieved at several laboratories in a variety of solar cell types. Many of those recent advances are reviewed, the areas are examined where possible improvements are yet to be made, and the requirements are discussed that must be met by advanced solar cell if they are to be used in space. The solar cells of interest include single and multiple junction cells which are fabricated from single crystal, polycrystalline and amorphous materials. Single crystal cells on foreign substrates, thin film single crystal cells on superstrates, and multiple junction cells which are either mechanically stacked, monolithically grown, or hybrid structures incorporating both techniques are discussed. Advanced concentrator array technology for space applications is described, and the status of thin film, flexible solar array blanket technology is reported.

  7. Proceedings of the 5th Annual Users' Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, M. (Editor); Harris, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) was conceived in 1979. It was proposed to be a general purpose software executive that could be applied in various systems. The success of this concept and of TAE was demonstrated. Topics included: TAE current status; TAE development; TAE applications; and UNIX emphasis.

  8. Highlights of the 5th Annual ATS Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Stuart

    The convention was held in Bath, hosted by Ron Maddison. The Lord Mayor of Bath held a reception in the Roman Baths before the keynote address by Dr. Allan Chapman, The Brotherhood of Big Reflecting Telescopes: William Herschel to William Lassell. An ATS award was presented to Dr. Henry King for The History of the Telescope, as was one presented to Robert Hambleton, ATS editor. The lectures included one given by Patrick Moore, Peter Louwman, Rolf Willach, Eugene Rudd, and Ken Launie. Tours were conducted of the Science Museum London's Blythe House, the Royal Society, the Whipple Museum and the University Observatory, both at Cambridge, Wollsthorpe Manor, Issac Newton's home, the University of London Observatory at Mill Hill, and the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. Several pictures of the convention are included in the article.

  9. Purdue University Physics 152L [Manual] (5th Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN.

    This document is a laboratory manual for an undergraduate physics course at Purdue University, the major goals of which are to develop students' laboratory skills, to illustrate principles and phenomena described in the physics lectures, and to promote conceptual change about the major topics in Newtonian mechanics. A hardware and software guide…

  10. Educational and Training Opportunities in Sustainable Agriculture. 5th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Jane Potter

    This directory lists 151 programs in alternative farming systems (systems that aim at maintaining agricultural productivity and profitability, while protecting natural resources, especially sustainable, low-input, regenerative, biodynamic or organic farming and gardening). It includes programs conducted by colleges and universities, research…

  11. How Zucchini Won 5th-Grade Hearts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Denise

    1987-01-01

    Describes an innovative gardening/nutrition education program in Tucson, Arizona, public elementary schools--Meals for Millions "Sow and Grow"--where children in kindergarten to sixth grade invest time and "tender loving cultivation" into their own school vegetable gardens and learn to like foods--zucchini--that are good for them. (Author/BB)

  12. Nutrition Super Stars [5th and 6th Grades].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtkooper, Linda; And Others

    This nutrition and physical fitness curriculum kit provides a means for students, teachers, parents, and school health and food service staff to learn about the nutritional value of food and the relationship of food and physical fitness to growth, development, and health; develop food and activity habits which promote good health; and share this…

  13. PREFACE: 5th International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM'13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akramin Shafie, Amir; Raisuddin Khan, Md

    2013-12-01

    The Fifth International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM2013), took place in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia from 2-4 July 2013. The biannual conference which started in 2001 is regularly organized by Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) with the aims to serve as a platform for exchange of ideas on advances of in mechatronics and their applications as well as to foster research and worldwide collaboration. The theme for the 2013 conference was 'Mechatronics: Sustainable Development through Innovative Solutions'. The ICOM 2013 Conference consisted of Keynote Speeches (5) and oral contributions (150). The topics of the conference were: Mechatronic systems and Applications Intelligent Systems Control and Instrumentation Signal and Image Processing Machine Vision Robotics and Automation Manufacturing Mechatronics Green Mechatronics Mechatronic Education Smart Materials and Structures Active Vibration Control Computer and Information Technology MEMS and NEMS Biomechatronics and Rehabilitation Engineering Autonomous Systems Energy and Sustainability Transportation System It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by ICOM 2013. We thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. We would also like to express our gratitude to the Organizing Committee, the Institutions and Sponsors and everyone who contributed to this conference through their supports and invaluable efforts. Editors Amir A Shafie aashafie@iium.edu.my Raisuddin Khan raisuddin@iium.edu.my Mahbubur Rashid mahbub@iium.edu.my Department of Mechatronics, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM), Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Organizing Committee Md Raisuddin Khan Md Mozasser Rahman Shahrul Naim Sidek Muhammad Mahbubur Rashid Amir Akramin Shafie Nahrul Khair Alang Md Rasyid Rini Akmeliati Roslizar Mat Ali Hazlina Md Yusof Asan Gani Abdul Muthalif Wahju Sediono Salmiah Ahmad Iskandar Al-Thani Mahmood Yasir Mohd Mustafah Moinul Bhuiyan Zulkifli Zainal Abidin Nadzril Sulaiman Momoh J Salami Conference logos

  14. First-order inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result if inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models.

  15. First-order inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Microstrip Triband Bandstop Fitler with Sharp Stop Band Skirts and Independently Controllable Second Stop Band Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Young

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact planar triband bandstop filter (TBBSF) with compact size and high selectivity. The structure of the filter incorporates two folded trisection stepped-impedance resonators (TSSIRs). One of these resonators is designed to operate at the first and third center frequencies and the other resonator is designed to operate at the second center frequency of the proposed filter. To achieve a compact size filter, alternating impedance lines of the resonators are folded widthwise and also one resonator is embedded within another. Theoretical analysis and design procedures are described, including the synthesis equations for each resonator. The main advantage of the proposed method is that the filter provides flexibility to tune the second center frequency and control the corresponding bandwidth without changing the first and third stop band response. Additionally, several reflection zeros (RZs) are introduced in the pass band to improve its flatness. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed design method, both the first and second order TBBSFs were designed, simulated, and fabricated, with center frequencies of 1.92 GHz, 3.55 GHz, and 5.5 GHz. PMID:25019098

  17. Parallel preconditioners for monolithic solution of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-Vergiat, Luc; McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Shear bands are one of the most fascinating instabilities in metals that occur under high strain rates. They describe narrow regions, on the order of micron scales, where plastic deformations and significant heating are localized which eventually leads to fracture nucleation and failure of the component. In this work shear bands are described by a set of four strongly coupled thermo-mechanical equations discretized by a mixed finite element formulation. A thermo-viscoplastic flow rule is used to model the inelastic constitutive law and finite thermal conductivity is prescribed which gives rise to an inherent physical length scale, governed by competition of shear heating and thermal diffusion. The residual equations are solved monolithically by a Newton type method at every time step and have been shown to yield mesh insensitive result. The Jacobian of the system is sparse and has a nonsymmetric block structure that varies with the different stages of shear bands formation. The aim of the current work is to develop robust parallel preconditioners to GMRES in order to solve the resulting Jacobian systems efficiently. The main idea is to design Schur complements tailored to the specific block structure of the system and that account for the varying stages of shear bands. We develop multipurpose preconditioners that apply to standard irreducible discretizations as well as our recent work on isogeometric discretizations of shear bands. The proposed preconditioners are tested on benchmark examples and compared to standard state of practice solvers such as GMRES/ILU and LU direct solvers. Nonlinear and linear iterations counts as well as CPU times and computational speedups are reported and it is shown that the proposed preconditioners are robust, efficient and outperform traditional state of the art solvers.

  18. Adaptive Confidence Bands for Nonparametric Regression Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, T. Tony; Low, Mark; Ma, Zongming

    2014-01-01

    A new formulation for the construction of adaptive confidence bands in non-parametric function estimation problems is proposed. Confidence bands are constructed which have size that adapts to the smoothness of the function while guaranteeing that both the relative excess mass of the function lying outside the band and the measure of the set of points where the function lies outside the band are small. It is shown that the bands adapt over a maximum range of Lipschitz classes. The adaptive confidence band can be easily implemented in standard statistical software with wavelet support. Numerical performance of the procedure is investigated using both simulated and real datasets. The numerical results agree well with the theoretical analysis. The procedure can be easily modified and used for other nonparametric function estimation models. PMID:26269661

  19. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementations study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Nessibou, T.; Nilsen, P. W.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    The interfaces between the Ku-band system and the TDRSS, between the S-band system and the TDRSS, GSTDN and SGLS networks, and between the S-band payload communication equipment and the other Orbiter avionic equipment were investigated. The principal activities reported are: (1) performance analysis of the payload narrowband bent-pipe through the Ku-band communication system; (2) performance evaluation of the TDRSS user constraints placed on the S-band and Ku-band communication systems; (3) assessment of the shuttle-unique S-band TDRSS ground station false lock susceptibility; (4) development of procedure to make S-band antenna measurements during orbital flight; (5) development of procedure to make RFI measurements during orbital flight to assess the performance degradation to the TDRSS S-band communication link; and (6) analysis of the payload interface integration problem areas.

  20. Assessment of Thematic Mapper Band-to-band Registration by the Block Correlation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  1. Assessment of Thematic Mapper band-to-band registration by the block correlation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  2. Four-dimensional investigation of the 2nd order volume autocorrelation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, O.; Tzallas, P.; Benis, E. P.; Kruse, J.; Peralta Conde, A.; Kalpouzos, C.; Charalambidis, D.

    2009-10-01

    The 2nd order volume autocorrelation technique, widely utilized in directly measuring ultra-short light pulses durations, is examined in detail via model calculations that include three-dimensional integration over a large ionization volume, temporal delay and spatial displacement of the two beams of the autocorrelator at the focus. The effects of the inherent displacement to the 2nd order autocorrelation technique are demonstrated for short and long pulses, elucidating the appropriate implementation of the technique in tight focusing conditions. Based on the above investigations, a high accuracy 2nd order volume autocorrelation measurement of the duration of the 5th harmonic of a 50 fs long laser pulse, including the measurement of the carrier wavelength oscillation, is presented.

  3. High order conservative differencing for viscous terms and the application to vortex-induced vibration flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yiqing; Zha, Gecheng; Chen, Xiangying

    2009-12-01

    A new set of conservative 4th-order central finite differencing schemes for all the viscous terms of compressible Navier-Stokes equations are proposed and proved in this paper. These schemes are used with a 5th-order WENO scheme for inviscid flux and the stencil width of the central differencing scheme is designed to be within that of the WENO scheme. The central differencing schemes achieve the maximum order of accuracy in the stencil. This feature is important to keep the compactness of the overall discretization schemes and facilitate the boundary condition treatment. The algorithm is used to simulate the vortex-induced oscillations of an elastically mounted circular cylinder. The numerical results agree favorably with the experiment.

  4. Josephson systems based on ballistic point contacts between single-band and multi-band superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Y. S.; Kiyko, A. S.; Omelyanchouk, A. N.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-11-01

    The Josephson effect in ballistic point contacts between single-band and multi-band superconductors was investigated. It was found that in the case of Josephson junctions formed by a single-band and an s±-wave two-band superconductor as well as by a single-band and a three-band superconductor the junctions become frustrated, showing the φ-contact properties. Depending on the ground state of a three-band superconductor with time-reversal symmetry breaking, the Josephson junction can have from one to three energy minima, some of which can be locally stable. We also study the behavior of a dc SQUID based on the Josephson junctions between single-band and multi-band superconductors. Some features on the dependences of the critical current and the total magnetic flux on the applied flux of a dc SQUID based on the Josephson point contacts between a single-band superconductor and an s±-wave superconductor, three-band superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry and three-band superconductor without broken time-reversal symmetry as compared to the conventional dc SQUIDs based on single-band superconductors were found. The results can be used as an experimental tool to detect the existence of multi-band structure and time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  5. Effect of PCM encoding on wide band telemetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, T. F.; Nichols, M. H.

    In order to comply with certain mission requirements, it is necessary to encode telemetry data into pulse code modulation (PCM). For this reason, test data have been obtained in order to determine the effects of quantization errors and bit errors with special reference to wide-band noise-like data signals involving data reduction by spectral analysis. The use of notch noises tests for determining coder/decoder (CODEC) performance has been evaluated. Test procedures and test results are given using CODEC configurations of 4 to 12 bits per word. Parameters for encoding constant bandwidth (CBW) and proportional bandwidth (PBW) subcarrier multiplexes for PCM transmission are included.

  6. Topological Raman band in the carbon nanohorn.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Kouta; Gotoh, Hideki

    2013-09-13

    Raman spectroscopy has been used in chemistry and physics to investigate the fundamental process involving light and phonons. The carbon nanohorn introduces a new subject to Raman spectroscopy, namely topology. We show theoretically that a photoexcited carrier with a nonzero winding number activates a topological D Raman band through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The topology-induced D Raman band can be distinguished from the ordinary D Raman band for a graphene edge by its peak position. PMID:24074113

  7. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  8. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  9. Band engineering of thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanzhong; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G J

    2012-12-01

    Lead chalcogenides have long been used for space-based and thermoelectric remote power generation applications, but recent discoveries have revealed a much greater potential for these materials. This renaissance of interest combined with the need for increased energy efficiency has led to active consideration of thermoelectrics for practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. The simple high symmetry NaCl-type cubic structure, leads to several properties desirable for thermoelectricity, such as high valley degeneracy for high electrical conductivity and phonon anharmonicity for low thermal conductivity. The rich capabilities for both band structure and microstructure engineering enable a variety of approaches for achieving high thermoelectric performance in lead chalcogenides. This Review focuses on manipulation of the electronic and atomic structural features which makes up the thermoelectric quality factor. While these strategies are well demonstrated in lead chalcogenides, the principles used are equally applicable to most good thermoelectric materials that could enable improvement of thermoelectric devices from niche applications into the mainstream of energy technologies. PMID:23074043

  10. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1984-03-20

    A broad-band beam bunther is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-

  11. Proportion of recovered waterfowl bands reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geis, A.D.; Atwood, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    Data from the annual mail survey of waterfowl hunters in the United States were used to estimate the total numbers of banded waterfowl that were shot. These estimates were compared with Banding Office records to estimate the proportion of recovered bands that was reported. On the average, about two banded birds were recovered for each one reported. The proportion reported was higher for some areas and for some species than for others. The proportion reported was higher when more of the reports came through employees of conservation agencies.

  12. Possible chiral bands in {sup 194}Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Masiteng, P. L.; Ramashidzha, T. M.; Maliage, S. M.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Vymers, P. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Kau, J.; Komati, F.; Lindsay, R.; Matamba, I.; Mutshena, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-10-28

    High spin states in {sup 194}Tl, excited through the {sup 181}Ta({sup 18}O,5n) fusion evaporation reaction, were studied using the AFRODITE array at iThemba LABS. Candidate chiral bands built on the {pi}h{sub 9/2} x {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup 1} configuration were found. Furthermore these bands were observed through a band crossing caused by the excitation of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} pair. Above the band crossing the excitation energies remain close, suggesting that chirality may persist for the four quasiparticle configuration too.

  13. Diffuse interstellar bands in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, O.; Henning, Thomas; Pfau, Werner; Stognienko, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code for radiation transport calculations is used to compare the profiles of the lambda lambda 5780 and 6613 Angstrom diffuse interstellar bands in the transmitted and the reflected light of a star embedded within an optically thin dust cloud. In addition, the behavior of polarization across the bands were calculated. The wavelength dependent complex indices of refraction across the bands were derived from the embedded cavity model. In view of the existence of different families of diffuse interstellar bands the question of other parameters of influence is addressed in short.

  14. Flat-band engineering of mobility edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Flach, Sergej

    2015-06-01

    Properly modulated flat-band lattices have a divergent density of states at the flat-band energy. Quasiperiodic modulations are known to host a metal-insulator transition already in one space dimension. Their embedding into flat-band geometries consequently allows for a precise engineering and fine tuning of mobility edges. We obtain analytic expressions for singular mobility edges for two flat-band lattice examples. In particular, we engineer cases with arbitrarily small energy separations of mobility edge, zeroes, and divergencies.

  15. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-01-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  16. Systematic topology optimization of solid-solid phononic crystals for multiple separate band-gaps with different polarizations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zong-Fa; Wu, Bin; He, Cun-Fu

    2016-02-01

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) have attracted considerable interest due to their unique and outstanding band-gap characteristics. In many applications, it is desirable to have a unit cell with specific band-gaps. The distribution of elastic materials within a unit cell has significant effect on the band-gaps, which is extremely difficult to be determined without systematic synthesis method. In this paper, topology optimization techniques are utilized to obtain two-dimensional (2D) square lattice PnCs with maximized relative band-gaps between multiple consecutive bands. The optimization follows two-stage design process using Genetic algorithms (GAs) in combination with finite element method (FEM). Three numerical examples are given to optimize 2D steel/epoxy PnCs in one-eighth symmetry for coupled mode, shear mode and mixed mode respectively. The results show that the optimized PnCs with different band-gaps, which can easily be found by the developed method, have different materials layout, and the PnCs with the lowest order band-gap are simple lattice and have the highest value of application in noise reduction and vibration isolation. Some optimized PnCs with higher order band-gaps have the same lattice as those with the lowest order band-gap, and whose absolute band-gaps are inversely proportional to the minimum feature size of primitive cells. PMID:26456279

  17. Ultrathin flexible dual band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yan; Chen, Lin; Shi, Cheng; Cheng, Zhaoxiang; Zang, Xiaofei; Xu, Boqing; Zhu, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    We propose an ultrathin and flexible dual band absorber operated at terahertz frequencies based on metamaterial. The metamaterial structure consists of periodical split ring resonators with two asymmetric gaps and a metallic ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Particularly, the dielectric spacer is a free-standing polyimide film with thickness of 25 μm, resulting in highly flexible for our absorber and making it promising for non-planar applications such as micro-bolometers and stealth aircraft. Experimental results show that the absorber has two resonant absorption frequencies (0.41 THz and 0.75 THz) with absorption rates 92.2% and 97.4%, respectively. The resonances at the absorption frequencies come from normal dipole resonance and high-order dipole resonance which is inaccessible in the symmetrical structure. Multiple reflection interference theory is used to analyze the mechanism of the absorber and the results are in good agreement with simulated and experimental results. Furthermore, the absorption properties are studied under various spacer thicknesses. This kind of metamaterial absorber is insensitive to polarization, has high absorption rates (over 90%) with wide incident angles range from 0° to 45° and the absorption rates are also above 90% when wrapping it to a curved surface.

  18. Novel structural flexibility identification in narrow frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Moon, F. L.

    2012-12-01

    A ‘Sub-PolyMAX’ method is proposed in this paper not only for estimating modal parameters, but also for identifying structural flexibility by processing the impact test data in narrow frequency bands. The traditional PolyMAX method obtains denominator polynomial coefficients by minimizing the least square (LS) errors of frequency response function (FRF) estimates over the whole frequency range, but FRF peaks in different structural modes may have different levels of magnitude, which leads to the modal parameters identified for the modes with small FRF peaks being inaccurate. In contrast, the proposed Sub-PolyMAX method implements the LS solver in each subspace of the whole frequency range separately; thus the results identified from a narrow frequency band are not affected by FRF data in other frequency bands. In performing structural identification in narrow frequency bands, not in the whole frequency space, the proposed method has the following merits: (1) it produces accurate modal parameters, even for the modes with very small FRF peaks; (2) it significantly reduces computation cost by reducing the number of frequency lines and the model order in each LS implementation; (3) it accurately identifies structural flexibility from impact test data, from which structural deflection under any static load can be predicted. Numerical and laboratory examples are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Radar cross section statistics of dismounts at Ku-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Burns, Bryan L.; Verge, Tobias J.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Dunkel, Ralf; Doerry, Armin W.

    2011-06-01

    Knowing the statistical characteristics of a target's radar cross-section (RCS) is crucial to the success of radar target detection algorithms. A wide range of applications currently exist for dismount (i.e. human body) detection and monitoring using ground-moving target indication (GMTI) radar systems. Dismounts are particularly challenging to detect. Their RCS is orders of magnitude lower than traditional GMTI targets, such as vehicles. Their velocity of about 0 to 1.5 m/s is also much slower than vehicular targets. Studies regarding the statistical nature of the RCS of dismounts focus primarily on simulations or very limited empirical data at specific frequencies. This paper seeks to enhance the existing body of work on dismount RCS statistics at Ku-band, which is currently lacking, and has become an important band for such remote sensing applications. We examine the RCS probability distributions of different sized humans in various stances, across aspect and elevation angle, for horizontal (HH) and vertical (VV) transmit/receive polarizations, and at diverse resolutions, using experimental data collected at Ku-band. We further fit Swerling target models to the RCS distributions and suggest appropriate detection thresholds for dismounts in this band.

  20. Anisotropic Two-band Transverse Thermoelectrics in Zero Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Tang, Y.; Heinselmann, K.; Grayson, M.; Birner, S.

    2012-02-01

    Narrow gap materials with anisotropic electron and hole band conductance are shown to function as anisotropic two-band transverse (A2T) thermoelectrics, whereby longitudinal electrical currents generate transverse Peltier heat flow. Unlike the Ettingshausen effect which requires external magnetic field, a large transverse Seebeck coefficient in A2T thermoelectric results from the anisotropic electron and hole mass tensors without magnetic field. Compared to synthetic transverse thermoelectrics, A2T thermoelectric coolers can be scaled to nanoscale, and the intrinsic nature of this phenomenon is promising for cryogenic applications. With exponentially tapered coolers, arbitrary δT can be reached with sufficiently thick layers and a small electric field. Equations for A2T thermoelectric transport from an electron-hole band model yield the optimal orientation to achieve maximum transverse figure of merit ZT. The InAs/GaSb type II superlattice is shown to have the appropriate anisotropic band structure, and bandgaps of order kT are calculated to give a competitive δT = 14 K at room temperature. Thermal conductivity of the superlattice is 4 W/m.K at 300 K using 3φ method. Preliminary data on in-plane Seebeck coefficient will also be presented.