Science.gov

Sample records for 6 degrees head-down

  1. Exercise thermoregulation in men after 1 and 24-hours of 6 degrees head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, A. C.; Dearborn, A. S.; Weidhofer, A. R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise thermoregulation is dependent on heat loss by increased skin blood flow (convective and conductive heat loss) and through enhanced sweating (evaporative heat loss). Reduction of plasma volume (PV), increased plasma osmolality, physical deconditioning, and duration of exposure to simulated and actual microgravity reduces the ability to thermoregulate during exercise. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that 24 h of head down tilt (HDT24) would alter thermoregulatory responses to a submaximal exercise test and result in a higher exercise rectal temperature (Tre) when compared with exercise Tre after 1 h of head down tilt (HDT1). METHODS: Seven men (31+/-SD 6 yr, peak oxygen uptake (VpO2peak) of 44+/-6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) were studied during 70 min of supine cycling at 58+/-SE 1.5% VO2peak at 22.0 degrees C Tdb and 47% rh. RESULTS: Relative to pre-tilt sitting chair rest data, HDT1 resulted in a 6.1+/-0.9% increase and HDT24 in a 4.3+/-2.3% decrease in PV (delta = 10.4% between experiments, p<0.05) while plasma osmolality remained unchanged (NS). Pre-exercise Tre was elevated after HDT24 (36.71 degrees C +/-0.06 HDT1 vs. 36.93 degrees C+/-0.11 HDT24, p<0.05). The 70 min of exercise did not alter this relationship (p<0.05) with respective end exercise increases in Tre to 38.01 degrees C and 38.26 degrees C (degrees = 1.30 degrees C (HDT1) and 1.33 degrees C (HDT24)). While there were no pre-exercise differences in mean skin temperature (Tsk), a significant (p<0.05) time x treatment interaction occurred during exercise: after min 30 in HDT24 the Tsk leveled off at 31.1 degrees C, while it continued to increase reaching 31.5 degrees C at min 70 in HDT1. A similar response (NS) occurred in skin blood velocity. Neither local sweating rates nor changes in body weight during exercise of -1.63+/-0.24 kg (HDT1) or - 1.33+/-0.09 kg (HDT24) were different (NS) between experiments. CONCLUSION: While HDT24 resulted in elevated pre-exercise Tre, reduced PV

  2. Height increase, neuromuscular function, and back pain during 6 degrees head-down tilt with traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Fechner, K.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal lengthening and back pain are commonly experienced by astronauts exposed to microgravity. METHODS: To develop a ground-based simulation for spinal adaptation to microgravity, we investigated height increase, neuromuscular function and back pain in 6 subjects all of whom underwent two forms of bed rest for 3 d. One form consisted of 6 degrees of head-down tilt (HDT) with balanced traction, while the other was horizontal bed rest (HBR). Subjects had a 2-week recovery period in between the studies. RESULTS: Total body and spinal length increased significantly more and the subjects had significantly more back pain during HDT with balanced traction compared to HBR. The distance between the lower endplate of L4 and upper endplate of S1, as measured by ultrasonography, increased significantly in both treatments to the same degree. Intramuscular pressures in the erector spinae muscles and ankle torque measurements during plantarflexion and dorsiflexion did not change significantly during either treatment. CONCLUSION: Compared to HBR, HDT with balanced traction may be a better method to simulate changes of total body and spinal lengths, as well as back pain seen in microgravity.

  3. Effect of 6 degrees head-down tilt on cardiopulmonary function: comparison with microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Fine, Janelle M.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head-down tilt (HDT) of 6 degrees is a commonly used model of weightlessness, but there are few comparisons with actual microgravity. HYPOTHESIS: Our study was designed to prove that the changes in cardiopulmonary function seen in HDT would be similar to those seen in microgravity. METHODS: We compared measurements of cardiovascular and pulmonary function from three separate spaceflights of 14 to 17 d duration, with data collected during a 17-d period of HDT. RESULTS: HDT proved a good model of the cardiovascular response to microgravity, resulting in increases in cardiac output and stroke volume of a similar magnitude to those seen in microgravity, with a concomitant reduction in heart rate. By contrast, HDT was a poor model of the effects of microgravity on pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function in HDT approximated the changes seen in the 1-G supine posture, while in microgravity this was much closer to that seen in the 1-G upright position. The differences probably reflect the fact that changes in cardiovascular function result primarily from fluid shifts within the entire body, whereas changes in pulmonary ventilation are primarily a result of mechanical influences on the lung and chest and abdominal wall.

  4. Can daily centrifugation prevent the haematocrit increase elicited by 6-degree, head-down tilt?

    PubMed

    Yajima, K; Iwasaki, K; Sasaki, T; Miyamoto, A; Hirayanagi, K

    2000-01-01

    A measure to counteract the effects of low or zero gravity is required for long-term space flight, such as the manned Mars mission scheduled by the National Aeronautics and Space administration (NASA) for 2014. We conducted a series of centrifugation experiments with humans, using a short-arm centrifuge (radius 1.8 m, made by First Medical Co., Tokyo, Japan). We employed 6-degree, head-down tilt (HDT) for 4 days to simulate space flight. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent 4-day HDT and a 2-G daily centrifuge load for 60 min in the +Gz direction and measurements, such as haematocrit, 24-h urine volume, body weight and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made. There was no significant increase in the haematocrit during the HDT period, although our previous studies had shown a significant increase during HDT. A 60-min daily load of +2 Gz appears to be effective in reversing the haematocrit increase due to 4-day HDT. PMID:11200989

  5. Hoffmann-reflex is delayed during 6 degree head-down tilt with balanced traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haruna, Y.; Styf, J. R.; Kahan, N.; Hargens, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased spinal height due to the lack of of axial compression on spinal structures in microgravity may stretch the spinal cord, cauda equina, nerve roots, and paraspinal tissues. HYPOTHESIS: Exposure to simulated microgravity causes dysfunction of nerve roots so that the synaptic portion of the Achilles tendon reflex is delayed. METHODS: Six healthy male subjects were randomly divided into two groups with three in each group. The subjects in the first group underwent horizontal bed rest (HBR) for three days. After a two week interval they underwent bed rest in a position of head-down tilt with balanced traction (HDT). So that each subject could serve as his own control, the second group was treated identically but in opposite order. Bilateral F waves and H-reflexes were measured daily (18:30-20:30) on all subjects placed in a prone position. RESULTS: By means of ANOVA, differences between HDT and HBR were observed only in M-latency and F-ratio, not in F-latency, central latency, and H-latency. Differences during the course of the bed rest were observed in M-latency and H-latency only. Tibial H latency was significantly lengthened in HDT group on day 2 and 3, although no significant difference between HDT and HBR was observed. CONCLUSION: The monosynaptic reflex assessed by H-reflex was delayed during 6 degree HDT with traction. The exact mechanism of this delay and whether the change was due to lengthening of the lower part of the vertebrae remain to be clarified.

  6. Back pain during 6 degrees head-down tilt approximates that during actual microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, K. J.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Convertino, V. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts often experience back pain during spaceflight. Retrospectively, Wing et al. (14) found that during spaceflight, 14 of 19 Shuttle crewmembers experienced back pain, which they described as dull (62%), localized to the lower back (50%), and with an intensity of 2 on a 5-point scale. Further, the spine lengthens 4-7 cm in microgravity. Our objective was to compare back pain and spinal lengthening (body height increase) during simulated microgravity (6 degrees head-down tilt, HDT) with the same parameters during actual microgravity. Eight male subjects completed a modified McGill pain questionnaire with intensity graded from zero (no pain) to five (intense and incapacitating pain) each day at 7:00 pm during 2 d pre-HDT control, 16 d HDT, and 1 d post-HDT recovery periods. Also, the subjects' heights were measured each day while supine (control and recovery) and during HDT. Back pain increased from zero (pre-tilt control period) to 2.3 +/- 0.4 at days 1 to 3 of HDT, and was categorized as dull and/or burning pain in subjects' lower backs. Only 2 subjects reported any pain after day 9 of HDT and during recovery. Heights increased 2.1 +/- 0.5 cm by day 3 of HDT and remained at that level until the end of the HDT period. Although spinal lengthening in space is greater than that during HDT, the HDT model approximates the level, type, distribution, and time course of back pain associated with actual microgravity. In the HDT model, pain subsides in intensity when spinal lengthening stops.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  7. Isokinetic and isometric strength-endurance after 6 hours of immersion and 6 degrees head-down tilt in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine weight (water) loss levels for onset of muscular strength and endurance changes during deconditioning. METHODS: Seven men (27-40 yr) performed maximal shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint isometric (0 degree.s(-1) load) and isokinetic (60 degrees, 120 degrees, 180 degrees.s(-1) velocity) exercise tests during ambulatory control (AC), after 6 h of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT; dry-bulb temp. = 23.2 +/- SD 0.6 degrees C, relative humidity = 31.1+/- 11.1%) and after 6 h of 80 degrees foot-down head-out water immersion (WI; water temp. = 35.0 +/- SD 0.1 degree C) treatments. RESULTS: Weight (water) loss after HDT (1.10 +/- SE 0.14 kg, 1.4 +/- 0.2% body wt) and WI (1.54+/- 0.19 kg, 2.0 +/- 0.2% body wt) were not different, but urinary excretion with WI (1,354 +/- 142 ml.6 h(-1)) was 28% greater (p < 0.05) than that of 975 +/- 139 ml.6 h(-1) with HDT. Muscular endurance (total work; maximal flexion-extension of the non-dominant knee at 180 degrees.s(-1) for 30 s) was not different between AC and the WI or HDT treatments. Shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint strength was unchanged except for three knee-joint peak torques: AC torque (120 degrees.s(-1), 285 +/- 20 Nm) decreased to 268 +/- 21 Nm (delta = -6%, p < 0.05) with WI; and AC torques (180 degrees.s(-1), 260 +/- 19 Nm) decreased to 236 +/- 15 Nm (delta = -9%, p < 0.01) with HDT, and to 235 +/- 19 Nm (delta = -10%, p < 0.01) with WI. CONCLUSION: Thus, the total body hypohydration threshold level for shoulder- and ankle-joint strength and endurance decrements is more than 2% body weight (water) loss, while significant reduction in knee-joint muscular strength-endurance occurred only at moderate (120 degrees.s(-1) and lighter (180 degrees.s(-1)) loads with body weight loss of 1.4-2.0% following WI or HDT, respectively. These weight (water) losses and knee-joint strength decrements are somewhat less than the mean weight loss of 2.6% and knee-joint strength decrements of 6-20% of American astronauts after

  8. Gender differences in endocrine responses to posture and 7 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Keil, L. C.; O'Hara, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine regulation of fluids and electrolytes during 7 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest (HDBR) was compared in male (n = 8) and, for the first time, female (n = 8) volunteers. The subjects' responses to quiet standing for 2 h before and after HDBR were also tested. In both sexes, diuresis and natriuresis were evident during the first 2-3 days of HDBR, resulting in a marked increase in the urinary Na(+)-to-K+ ratio and significant Na+ retention on re-ambulation. After the 1st day of HDBR, plasma renin activity (PRA) was increased relative to aldosterone (Aldo), plasma volume was decreased, and the renal response to Aldo appeared to be appropriate. Circulating levels of arginine vasopressin, cortisol, and ACTH were unchanged during HDBR. Plasma testosterone decreased slightly on day 2 of HDBR in males. The ratio of early morning ACTH to cortisol was lower in females than in males because ACTH was lower in females. Urinary cortisol increased and remained elevated throughout the HDBR in males only. There were no gender differences in the responses to 7 days of HDBR, except those in the pituitary-adrenal system; those differences appeared unrelated to the postural change. The provocative cardiovascular test of quiet standing before and after HDBR revealed both sex differences and effects of HDBR. There were significant sex differences in cardiovascular responses to standing before and after HDBR. Females had greater PRA and Aldo responses to standing before HDBR and larger Aldo responses to standing after HDBR than males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Leg muscle volume during 30-day 6-degree head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Lee, P. L.; Ellis, S.; Selzer, R. H.; Ortendahl, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to compare the effect of two modes of lower-extremity exercise training on the mass (volume) of posterior leg group (PLG) muscles (soleus, flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and flexor digitorum longus) on 19 men (ages 32-42 years) subjected to intense dynamic-isotonic (ITE, cycle ergometer, number of subjects (N) = 7), isokinetic (IKE, torque egrometer, N = 7), and no exercise (NOE, N = 5) training for 60 min/day during head-down bed rest (HDBR). Total volume of the PLG muscles decreased (p less than 0.05) similarly: ITE = 4.3 +/- SE 1.6%, IKE = 7.7 +/- 1.6%, and NOE = 6.3 +/- 0.8%; combined volume (N = 19) loss was 6.1 +/- 0.9%. Ranges of volume changes were 2.6% to -9.0% (ITE), -2.1% to -14.9% (IKE), and -3.4% to -8/1% (NOE). Correlation coefficients (r) of muscle volume versus thickness measured with ultrasonography were: ITE r + 0.79 (p less than 0.05), IKE r = 0.27 (not significant (NS)), and NOE r = 0.63 (NS). Leg-muscle volume and thickness were highly correlated (r = 0.79) when plasma volume was maintained during HDBR with ITE. Thus, neither intensive lower extremity ITE nor IKE training influence the normal non-exercised posterior leg muscle atrophy during HDBR. The relationship of muscle volume and thickness may depend on the mode of exercise training associated with the maintenance of plasma volume.

  10. Exercise thermoregulation after 6 h of chair rest, 6 degrees head-down bed-rest, and water immersion deconditioning in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T.; Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Looft-Wilson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the mechanism for the excessive exercise hyperthermia following deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness). Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (Tsk) temperatures and thermoregulatory responses were measured in six men [mean (SD) age, 32 (6) years; mass, 78.26 (5.80) kg; surface area, 1.95 (0.11) m2; maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), 48 (6) ml.min-1.kg-1; whilst supine in air at dry bulb temperature 23.2 (0.6) degree C, relative humidity 31.1 (11.1)% and air speed 5.6 (0.1) m.min-1] during 70 min of leg cycle exercise [51 (4)% VO2max] in ambulatory control (AC), or following 6 h of chair rest (CR), 6 degree head-down bed rest (BR), and 20 degree (WI20) and 80 degree (WI80) foot-down water immersion [water temperature, 35.0 (0.1) degree C]. Compared with the AC exercise delta Tre [mean (SD) 0.77 (0.13) degree C (*P < 0.05), after WI80 0.96 (0.13) degree C*, and after WI20 1.03 (0.09) degree C*. All Tsk responded similarly to exercise: they decreased (NS) by 0.5-0.7 degree C in minutes 4-8 and equilibrated at +0.1 to +0.5 degree C at 60-70. Skin heat conductance was not different among the five conditions (range = 147-159 kJ.m-2.h-1.degree C-1). Results from an intercorrelation matrix suggested that total body sweat rate was more closely related to Tre at 70 min (Tre70) than limb sweat rate or blood flow. Only 36% of the variability in Tre70 could be accounted for by total sweating, and less than 10% from total body dehydration. It would appear that multiple factors are involved which may include change in sensitivity of thermo- and osmoreceptors.

  11. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p < 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9* +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.5%, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  12. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men (32-42 yr) confined to bed rest (BR). One group (n = 5) had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise for 60 min/day (ITE; n = 7), and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise for 60 min/day (IKE; n = 7). Caloric intake was 2,678-2,840 kcal/day; mean body weight (n = 19) decreased by 0.58 +/- 0.35 (SE) kg during BR due to a negative fluid balance (diuresis) on day 1. Mean energy costs for the NOE, and IKE, and ITE regimens were 83 (3.6 +/- 0.2 ml O2.min-1.kg-1), 214 (8.9 +/- 0.5 ml.min-1.kg-1), and 446 kcal/h (18.8 +/- 1.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), respectively. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes (1,752-1,846 ml/day) between groups were unchanged during BR. Resting changes in plasma volume (ml/kg) after BR were -1.5 +/- 2.3% (NS) in ITE, -14.7 +/- 2.8% (P less than 0.05) in NOE, and -16.8 +/- 2.9% (P less than 0.05) in IKE, and mean water balances during BR were +295, -106, and +169 ml/24 h, respectively. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. The significant chronic decreases in plasma volume in the IKE and NOE groups and its maintenance in the ITE group could not be accounted for by water balance or by responses of the plasma osmotic, protein, vasopressin, or aldosterone concentrations or plasma renin activity. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Lower Extremity Muscle Thickness During 30-Day 6 degrees Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Kirby, L. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Muscle thickness was measured in 19 Bed-Rested (BR) men (32-42 year) subjected to IsoTonic (ITE, cycle orgometer) and IsoKi- netic (IKE, torque orgometer) lower extremity exercise training, and NO Exercise (NOE) training. Thickness was measured with ultrasonography in anterior thigh-Rectus Femoris (RF) and Vastus Intermadius (VI), and combined posterior log-soleus, flexor ballucis longus, and tibialis posterior (S + FHL +TP) - muscles. Compared with ambulatory control values, thickness of the (S + FHL + TP) decreased by 90%-12% (p less than 0.05) In all three test groups. The (RF) thickness was unchanged in the two exercise groups, but decreased by 10% (p less than 0.05) in the NOE. The (VI) thickness was unchanged In the ITE group, but decreased by 12%-l6% (p less than 0.05) in the IKE and NOE groups. Thus, intensive, alternating, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise training is as effective as intensive, intermittent, isokinetic exercise training for maintaining thicknesses of rectus femoris and vastus lntermedius anterior thigh muscles, but not posterior log muscles, during prolonged BR deconditioning.

  14. Effects of 10 days 6 degrees head-down tilt on the responses to fluid loading and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisch, F.; Heer, M.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kropp, J.; Schulz, H.; Hillebrecht, A.; Meyer, M.

    1991-01-01

    In an international collaborative project six normal male subjects were studied before, during and after 10 days 6 degrees HDT. Fluid intake was controlled at 40 ml/(kgbw day). Urine volume and body weight were determined daily. Fluid loading and LBNP were performed in all three phases of the study. Body weight diminished by 2.6% because of fluid loss. Blood volume diminished by 13%. The responses to fluid loading were similar in the three phases of the study. Sixty minutes after end of infusion only 5.5% of the infused saline remained in the intravascular compartment. Excess interstitial fluid was eliminated in the next 24 hs but a negative balance was recorded also in the following day. The compliance of the lower limbs expressed as the rate of limb volume change/unit LBNP change was increased at the end of the HDT phase and during the post HDT phase. The set point of intravascular volume was defended, as shown by the response to FL. HDT increased the compliance of the lower limbs.

  15. Submaximal exercise VO2 and Qc during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Ertl, A. C.; Bernauer, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintaining intermediary metabolism is necessary for the health and well-being of astronauts on long-duration spaceflights. While peak oxygen uptake (VO2) is consistently decreased during prolonged bed rest, submaximal VO2 is either unchanged or decreased. METHODS: Submaximal exercise metabolism (61 +/- 3% peak VO2) was measured during ambulation (AMB day-2) and on bed rest days 4, 11, and 25 in 19 healthy men (32-42 yr) allocated into no exercise (NOE, N = 5) control, and isotonic exercise (ITE, N = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, N = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted supine for two 30-min periods per day for 6 d per week: ITE training was intermittent at 60-90% peak VO2; IKE training was 10 sets of 5 repetitions of peak knee flexion-extension force at a velocity of 100 degrees s-1. Cardiac output was measured with the indirect Fick CO2 method, and plasma volume with Evans blue dye dilution. RESULTS: Supine submaximal exercise VO2 decreased significantly (*p < 0.05) by 10.3%* with ITE and by 7.3%* with IKE; similar to the submaximal cardiac output decrease of 14.5%* (ITE) and 20.3%* (IKE), but different from change in peak VO2 (+1.4% with ITE and -10.2%* with IKE) and decrease in plasma volume of -3.7% (ITE) and -18.0%* (IKE). Reduction of submaximal VO2 during bed rest correlated 0.79 (p < 0.01) with submaximal Qc, but was not related to change in peak VO2 or plasma volume. CONCLUSION: Reduction in submaximal oxygen uptake during prolonged bed rest is related to decrease in exercise but not resting cardiac output; perturbations in active skeletal muscle metabolism may be involved.

  16. Submaximal Exercise VO2 and Q During 30-Day 6 degree Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Erti, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Submaximal exercise (61+3% peak VO2) metabolism was measured before (AC day-2) and on bed rest day 4, 11, and 25 in 19 healthy men (32-42 yr) allocated into no exercise (NOE, N=5) control, and isotonic exercise (ITE, N=7)and isokinetic exercise (IKE, N=7) training groups. Training was conducting supine for two 30-min periods/d for 6 d/wk: ITE was 60-90% peak VO2: IKE was peak knee flexion-extension at 100 deg/s. Supine submaximal exercise 102 decreased significantly (*p<0.05) by 10.3%, with ITE and by 7.3%* with IKE; similar to the submaximal cardiac output (Q) change of -14.5%* (ITE) and -203%* (IKE), but different from change in peak VO2 (+1.4% with ITE and - 10.2%, with IKE) and plasma volume of -3.7% (ITE) and - 18.0% * (IKE). Thus, reduction of submaximal V02 during prolonged bed rest appears to respond to submaximal Q but is not related to change in peak VO2 or plasma volume.

  17. The influence on individual working memory during 15 days -6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, YiXue; Zhou, RenLai; Wang, LinJie; Tan, Cheng

    2011-12-01

    The research evaluated the changes of verbal and spatial working memory with females during 15 days -6° head-down bed rest. We used 2-back task to evaluate the working memory ability on four time points: the fifth day before the rest, the fifth day and the tenth day in the rest and the fifth day after the rest, as well as record the participants' depression and anxiety feelings using Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) simultaneously. The results demonstrated that the trends of verbal and spatial working memory performance were consistent with that of the control group during the rest. Moreover, in the -6° head-down bed rest conditions, the participants have performed no damage on the working memory ability, and any clinically salient anxiety and depression. The research considered that, compared to the real space environment, individuals' undamaged cognitive functions probably have something to do with the failure of evoking clinical anxiety and depression in the stimulated weightless environment.

  18. Six-Degree Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest: Forty Years of Development as a Physiological Analog for Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Charles, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Early on, bed rest was recognized as a method for inducing many of the physiological changes experienced by spaceflight. Head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest was first introduced as an analog for spaceflight by a Soviet team led by Genin and Kakurin. Their study was performed in 1970 (at -4 degrees) and lasted for 30 days; results were reported in the Russian Journal of Space Biology (Kosmicheskaya Biol. 1972; 6(4): 26-28 & 45-109). The goal was to test physiological countermeasures for cosmonauts who would soon begin month-long missions to the Salyut space station. HDT was chosen to produce a similar sensation of blood flow to the head reported by Soyuz cosmonauts. Over the next decade, other tilt angles were studied and comparisons with spaceflight were made, showing that HDT greater than 4 degrees was superior to horizontal bed rest for modeling acute physiological changes observed in space; but, at higher angles, subjects experienced greater discomfort without clearly improving the physiological comparison to spaceflight. A joint study performed by US and Soviet investigators, in 1979, set the goal of standardization of baseline conditions and chose 6-degrees HDT. This effectively established 6-degree HDT bed rest as the internationally-preferred analog for weightlessness and, since 1990, nearly all further studies have been conducted at 6-degrees HDT. A thorough literature review (1970-2010) revealed 534 primary scientific journal articles which reported results from using HDT as a physiological analog for spaceflight. These studies have ranged from as little as 10 minutes to the longest duration of 370 days. Long-term studies lasting four weeks or more have resulted in over 170 primary research articles. Today, the 6-degree HDT model provides a consistent, thoroughly-tested, ground-based analog for spaceflight and allows the proper scientific controls for rigorous testing of physiological countermeasures; however, all models have their strengths and limits. The 6

  19. Plasma volume shifts and exercise thermoregulation with water immersion and six-degree head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew Carl

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesized fluid shifts and resultant responses that occur during spaceflight are simulated by six-degree head down tilt (HDT) and water immersion (WI). The purpose of this study was to compare exercise thermoregulation before and after physiologic mechanisms reduce plasma volume (PV) in response to 24-hr HDT (HDT24). A secondary study utilized WI to reproduce the PV reduction of HDT24. Seven males were studied in two conditions: during 70 minutes of supine cycling ergometry at 58 percent of peak oxygen consumption following 1-hr HDT (HDT1) and HDT24; and up to 6 hr WI at 34.5 C. Plasma volume was reduced by 10.4 percent in HDT24 when compared to HDT1. Pre-exercise rectal temperature, T(sub re), was an average 0.22 C higher after HDT24. Rectal temperature increased during exercise with no interaction between time and treatment. The reduced PV and elevated pre-exercise T(sub re) had offsetting effects on thermoregulatory mechanisms, suggesting no alteration in the response at a given T(sub re). Plasma volume was reduced by 4.3 +/- 2.3 percent and 1.1 +/- 1.8 percent following HDT24 and WI, respectively, compared to upright chair rest. Although the reductions in PV were not significantly different, great intra-individual variability was evident. The ability to reproduce PV changes consistently with HDT and WI is limited by this variability.

  20. The Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Cardiovascular Responses to Microgravity as Simulated by six Degrees Head Down Tilt (HDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nangalia, Vishal; Ernsting, John

    Background: To determine the effect of ambient temperature on the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses to microgravity as simulated by six degrees head down tilt (HDT). Hypothesis: The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses to 6°HDT are unaffected by ambient temperatures between 12° and 32°C. Method: Each of five volunteer subjects (18-24 y.) underwent three separate 6 h exposures in a climatic chamber whilst lying supine with 6°HDT. The ambient temperatures for the first 5 h of the exposure were 12°, 22° and 32°C. At the beginning of the sixth hour, the ambient temperature was either increased or decreased by 10°C depending on the initial temperature. Heart rate, blood pressure, forearm bloodflow, core and skin temperatures, urine output and body weight were measured before, during and after each exposure. Results: Mean arterial pressure was increased in all exposures, though the increase varied with the ambient temperature. Pulse pressure after 5 h HDT increased in the 32°C exposure, remained unchanged at 22°C and decreased at 12°C. The threshold for thermoregulatory increases in forearm vascular conductance was lowered. Core temperature of the body increased in the exposures to 32°C and 22°C. The reduction in body weight (mean 1 kg.) was identical in all exposures whilst the urine output varied with ambient temperature. No significant changes occurred in any variable when the ambient temperature was changed by 10°C at the end of the fifth hour. Conclusions: The cardiovascular responses to 6 h exposure to 6° HDT, are affected by the ambient temperature.

  1. Changes in prevalence of subjective fatigue during 14-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayanagi, Kaname; Natsuno, Toyoki; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the prevalence of subjective fatigue in young healthy males during 14 days of 6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) by using a multidimensional questionnaire. Forty-one subjects completed the Subjective Fatigue Scale questionnaire to assess the fatigue-related complaints and symptoms. The questionnaire is composed of three sections, with 10 items each. The sections measured drowsiness and dullness (Section 1), difficulty in concentration (Section 2), and the projection of physical disintegration (Section 3). The subjects answered simple questions between 1400 and 1700 on 6 measurement days before and during the HDBR period. The prevalence rate of low back pain was markedly high (80.5%) on the second day and more than 50% in the first half of the HDBR period, and any complaints related to either a lack of sleep or a deterioration in the quality of sleep continued until the end of the HDBR period. Our findings may be useful in developing preventive strategies against physical and mental fatigue associated with prolonged HDBR, horizontal bed rest, and microgravity environments.

  2. Back Pain During 6 deg Head-Down Tilt Approximates That During Actual Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Karen J.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Murthy, Gita; Convertino, Victor A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts often experience back pain during spaceflight. It was found that during spaceflight, 14 of 19 Shuttle crewmembers experienced back pain, which they described as dull (62%), localized to the lower back (500/6), and with an intensity of 2 on a 5-point scale. Further, the spine lengthens 4-7 cm in microgravity. Our objective was to compare back pain and spinal lengthening (body height increase) during simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt, HDT) with the some parameters during actual microgravity. Eight male subjects completed a modified McGill pain questionnaire with intensity graded from zero (no pain) to five (intense and incapacitating gain) each day at 7.-OO pm during 2 d pre-HDT control, 16 d HDT, and I d post-HDT recovery periods. Only 2 subjects reported any pain after day 9 of HDT and during recov- ery. Heights increased 2.1 t 0.5 cm by day 3 of HDT and re- mained at that level until the end of the HDT period. Although spinal lengthening in space is greater than that during HDT, the HDT model approximates the level, type, distribution, and time course of back pain associated with actual microgrovity. In the HDT model, pain subsides in intensity when spinal lengthening stops. Therefore, back pain in actual and simulated microgravity may result from stretching of spinal andlor paraspinal tissues until a new spinal length is reached.

  3. Caloric restriction decreases orthostatic tolerance independently from 6° head-down bedrest.

    PubMed

    Florian, John P; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Heer, Martina; Pawelczyk, James A

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts consume fewer calories during spaceflight and return to earth with an increased risk of orthostatic intolerance. Whether a caloric deficiency modifies orthostatic responses is not understood. Thus, we determined the effects of a hypocaloric diet (25% caloric restriction) during 6° head down bedrest (an analog of spaceflight) on autonomic neural control during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Nine healthy young men completed a randomized crossover bedrest study, consisting of four (2 weeks each) interventions (normocaloric bedrest, normocaloric ambulatory, hypocaloric bedrest, hypocaloric ambulatory), each separated by 5 months. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded at baseline following normocaloric and hypocaloric interventions. Heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure were recorded before, during, and after 3 consecutive stages (7 min each) of LBNP (-15, -30, -45 mmHg). Caloric and posture effects during LBNP were compared using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. There was a strong trend toward reduced basal MSNA following caloric restriction alone (normcaloric vs. hypocaloric: 22±3 vs. 14±4 burst/min, p = 0.06). Compared to the normocaloric ambulatory, both bedrest and caloric restriction were associated with lower systolic blood pressure during LBNP (p<0.01); however, HR responses were directionally opposite (i.e., increase with bedrest, decrease with caloric restriction). Survival analysis revealed a significant reduction in orthostatic tolerance following caloric restriction (normocaloric finishers: 12/16; hypocaloric finishers: 6/16; χ2, p = 0.03). Caloric restriction modifies autonomic responses to LBNP, which may decrease orthostatic tolerance after spaceflight. PMID:25915488

  4. Caloric Restriction Decreases Orthostatic Tolerance Independently from 6° Head-Down Bedrest

    PubMed Central

    Florian, John P.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Heer, Martina; Pawelczyk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts consume fewer calories during spaceflight and return to earth with an increased risk of orthostatic intolerance. Whether a caloric deficiency modifies orthostatic responses is not understood. Thus, we determined the effects of a hypocaloric diet (25% caloric restriction) during 6° head down bedrest (an analog of spaceflight) on autonomic neural control during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Nine healthy young men completed a randomized crossover bedrest study, consisting of four (2 weeks each) interventions (normocaloric bedrest, normocaloric ambulatory, hypocaloric bedrest, hypocaloric ambulatory), each separated by 5 months. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded at baseline following normocaloric and hypocaloric interventions. Heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure were recorded before, during, and after 3 consecutive stages (7 min each) of LBNP (-15, -30, -45 mmHg). Caloric and posture effects during LBNP were compared using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. There was a strong trend toward reduced basal MSNA following caloric restriction alone (normcaloric vs. hypocaloric: 22±3 vs. 14±4 burst/min, p = 0.06). Compared to the normocaloric ambulatory, both bedrest and caloric restriction were associated with lower systolic blood pressure during LBNP (p<0.01); however, HR responses were directionally opposite (i.e., increase with bedrest, decrease with caloric restriction). Survival analysis revealed a significant reduction in orthostatic tolerance following caloric restriction (normocaloric finishers: 12/16; hypocaloric finishers: 6/16; χ2, p = 0.03). Caloric restriction modifies autonomic responses to LBNP, which may decrease orthostatic tolerance after spaceflight. PMID:25915488

  5. Orthostatic Intolerance Is Independent of the Degree of Autonomic Cardiovascular Adaptation after 60 Days of Head-Down Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiexin; Li, Yongzhi; Verheyden, Bart; Chen, Zhanghuang; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yinghui; Aubert, André E; Yuan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and head-down bed rest (HDBR) can induce the orthostatic intolerance (OI); the mechanisms remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not OI after HDBR relates to the degree of autonomic cardiovascular adaptation. Fourteen volunteers were enrolled for 60 days of HDBR. A head-up tilt test (HUTT) was performed before and after HDBR. Our data revealed that, in all nonfainters, there was a progressive increase in heart rate over the course of HDBR, which remained higher until 12 days of recovery. The mean arterial pressure gradually increased until day 56 of HDBR and returned to baseline after 12 days of recovery. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during HDBR and remained suppressed until 12 days of recovery. Low-frequency power of systolic arterial pressure increased during HDBR and remained elevated during recovery. Three subjects fainted during the HUTT after HDBR, in which systemic vascular resistance did not increase and remained lower until syncope. None of the circulatory patterns significantly differed between the fainters and the nonfainters at any time point. In conclusion, our data indicate that the impaired orthostatic tolerance after HDBR could not be distinguished by estimation of normal hemodynamic and/or neurocardiac data. PMID:26425559

  6. Orthostatic Intolerance Is Independent of the Degree of Autonomic Cardiovascular Adaptation after 60 Days of Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiexin; Li, Yongzhi; Verheyden, Bart; Chen, Zhanghuang; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yinghui; Aubert, André E.; Yuan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and head-down bed rest (HDBR) can induce the orthostatic intolerance (OI); the mechanisms remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not OI after HDBR relates to the degree of autonomic cardiovascular adaptation. Fourteen volunteers were enrolled for 60 days of HDBR. A head-up tilt test (HUTT) was performed before and after HDBR. Our data revealed that, in all nonfainters, there was a progressive increase in heart rate over the course of HDBR, which remained higher until 12 days of recovery. The mean arterial pressure gradually increased until day 56 of HDBR and returned to baseline after 12 days of recovery. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during HDBR and remained suppressed until 12 days of recovery. Low-frequency power of systolic arterial pressure increased during HDBR and remained elevated during recovery. Three subjects fainted during the HUTT after HDBR, in which systemic vascular resistance did not increase and remained lower until syncope. None of the circulatory patterns significantly differed between the fainters and the nonfainters at any time point. In conclusion, our data indicate that the impaired orthostatic tolerance after HDBR could not be distinguished by estimation of normal hemodynamic and/or neurocardiac data. PMID:26425559

  7. Leg venous hemodynamics and leg volumes during a 42-day-6 ° head-down bedrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louisy, F.; Schroiff, P.; Guezennec, C.-Y.; Güell, A.

    Seven healthy subjects were submitted to a 42-day head down bedrest, where leg venous compliance (venous distensibity index VDI) and leg volumes were assessed by mercury strain gauge plethysmography with venous occlusion and optoelectronic plethysmography, respectively. Plethysmographic and volometric measurements were made, before, during (at days 1, 4, 7, 14, 21, 26, 34 and 41), and after bedrest (days 1, 4, 7, 11 and 30 of the recovery period). Results showed a continuous decrease in leg volumes throughout bedrest, when VDI increased until day 26 of bedrest, and then decreased afterwards. The recovery period was characterized by a rapid return of VDI to prebedrest levels while leg volumes progressively normalised. These results showed that leg venous compliance changes are not always dependant upon skeletal muscle changes, and that factors other than size of muscle compartment are able to determine increases in leg venous compliance during long-term bedrest.

  8. Clinical effects of thigh cuffs during a 7-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Maillet, Alain; Vasseur Clausen, Pascale; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Alferova, Irina; Gharib, Claude; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2001-08-01

    Thigh cuffs are used by Russian cosmonauts to limit the fluid shift induced by space flight. A ground simulation using the head-down bed rest (HDBR) model was performed to assess the effects of thigh cuffs on clinical tolerance and orthostatic adaptation. 8 male healthy volunteers (32.4±1.9 years) participated twice in a 7-day HDBR — one time with thigh cuffs (worm daily from 9 am to 7 pm) (TC) and one time without (WTC). Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a 10 minute stand test and by a LBNP test (5 min at -15, -30, -45 mmHg) before (BDC-1) and at the end of the HDBR period (R+1). Plasma volume was measured before and at the end of HDBR by the Evans blue dye dilution technique. Thigh cuffs limits headache due to fluid shift, as well as the loss in plasma volume (TC: -5.85±0.95%; WTC: -9.09±0.82%, p<0.05). The mean duration of the stand test (R+1) did not differ in the two group (TC 7.1±1.3 min; WTC 7.0±1.0 min). The increase in HR and decrease in diastolic blood pressure were slightly but significantly larger without thigh cuffs. Duration of the LBNP tests did not differ with thigh cuffs. Thigh cuffs limit the symptoms due to fluid shift and the loss in plasma volume. They partly reduced the increase in HR during orthostatic stress but had no effect on duration of orthostatic stress tests.

  9. Sex differences in blood pressure control during 6° head-down tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Platts, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced orthostatic intolerance has been studied for decades. Although ∼22% of the astronaut corps are women, most mechanistic studies use mostly male subjects, despite known sex differences in autonomic control and postflight orthostatic intolerance. We studied adrenergic, baroreflex, and autonomic indexes during continuous infusions of vasoactive drugs in men and women during a 60-day head-down bed rest. Volunteers were tested before bed rest (20 men and 10 women) and around day 30 (20 men and 10 women) and day 60 (16 men and 8 women) of bed rest. Three increasing doses of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside were infused for 10 min after an infusion of normal saline. A 20-min rest period separated the phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside infusions. Autonomic activity was approximated by spectral indexes of heart rate and blood pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity was measured by the spontaneous baroreflex slope. Parasympathetic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity decreased with bed rest, with women experiencing a larger decrease in baroreflex sensitivity by day 30 than men. The sympathetic activation of men and parasympathetic responsiveness of women in blood pressure control during physiological stress were preserved throughout bed rest. During PE infusions, women experienced saturation of the R-R interval at high frequency, whereas men did not, revealing a sex difference in the parabolic relationship between high-frequency R-R interval, a measurement of respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and R-R interval. These sex differences in blood pressure control during simulated microgravity reveal the need to study sex differences in long-duration spaceflight to ensure the health and safety of the entire astronaut corps. PMID:23396455

  10. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 deg head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 d of 6-deg head-down bed rest, plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men confined to bed rest (BR). One group had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise (ITE) for 60 min/d, and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) for 60 min/d. Mean energy costs for the NOE, IKE, and ITE regimens were determined. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes between groups were unchanged during BR. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content. It is argued that the ITE training protocol is better than the IKE protocol for maintaining plasma volume during prolonged exposure to BR.

  11. Effects of 45-day -6° head-down bed rest on the time-based prospective memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, SiYi; Zhou, RenLai; Xiu, LiChao; Chen, ShanGuang; Chen, XiaoPing; Tan, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The research explored the effects of 45-day -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) simulation of microgravity on the time-based prospective memory (PM) with 16 males. The time-based prospective memory task was performed on the 2nd day before HDBR, on the 11th, 20th, 32nd, and 40th days during HDBR, and on the 8th day after HDBR, and subjects' anxiety and depression feelings were recorded simultaneously using Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The results demonstrated that it showed decreased accuracy of PM responses and frequency of clock checks during and after bed rest; long term bed rest did not induce significant emotional changes. The deficit of prospective memory performance induced by long term HDBR may result from a lack of aerobic physical activity or changes in the prefrontal cortex, but it remains to be determined.

  12. Gender differences in endocrine responses to posture and 7 days of 6 deg head down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Keil, L. C.; Ohara, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine regulation of fluids and electrolytes during seven days of 6 deg head down bed rest (HDBR) was compared in male (n = 8) and, for the first time, female (n = 8) volunteers. The subjects' responses to quiet standing for 2 hr before and after HDBR were also tested. In both sexes, diuresis and natriuresis were evident during the first 2-3 days of HDBR, resulting in a marked increase in the urinary Na/K ratio and significant Na retention on reambulation. After the first day of HDBR, plasma renin activity (PRA) was increased relative to aldosterone, plasma volume was decreased, and the renal response to aldosterone appeared to be appropriate. Circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP), cortisol, and ACTH were unchanged during HDBR. Plasma testosterone decreased slightly on day 2 of HDBR in males. The ratio of AM ACTH to cortisol was lower in females than in males because ACTH was lower in females. Urinary cortisol increased and remained elevated throughout the HDBR in males only. There were no gender differences in the responses to 7 day HDBR, except those in the pituitary-adrenal system; those differences appeared unrelated to the postural change. The provocative cardiovascular test of quiet standing before and after bed rest revealed both sex differences and effects of HDBR. There were significant sex differences in cardiovascular responses to standing, before and after HDBR. Females had greater PRA and aldosterone responses to standing before bedrest and larger aldosterone responses to standing after HDBR than males. Cardiovascular responses to standing before and after bedrest differed markedly: arterial pressure and heart rates increased with standing before HDBR, by contrast, arterial pressure decreased, with greater increases in heart rates after HDBR. In both sexes, all hormonal responses to standing were greater after HDBR. The results show clearly that similar responses to standing as well as to HDBR occur in both sexes, but that females exhibit

  13. Spectral components of human cardiovascular responses to step changes in Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) before and after 22 hour of 6 deg head down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, C. F.; Evans, J. M.; Grande, K. J.; Murphy, C. D.; Patwardhan, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in autonomic outflow to peripheral organs during the development of bedrest induced orthostatic intolerance have not been determined. Recent studies have indicated that spectral analysis provides an indirect assessment of these changes. Eight male subjects were studied before and after 22 hours of 6 degree head down bedrest plus Lasix (40 mg. P.P.). Cardiovascular spectra (using an autoregressive technique) were determined for heart rate (HR, ECG), arterial pressure (AP, Finapres), radial artery flow (RF, Hokansen) and respiration rate (RR, BoMed). Spectra were obtained from 2.5 minute segments during control, lower body negative pressure (minus 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mmHg) and recovery. Bedrest increased HR spectra power in the low frequency (.001 to .041 Hz) range, increased RF power in the low and mid (.04 to .18 Hz) range and increased AP power in the high (.18 to .50 Hz) frequency range. Increasing levels of lower body negative pressure decreased HR power and increased RF power in the high frequency range and decreased AP power in the low frequency range. Since spectral power of HR in the high frequency range has been shown to indicate parasympathetically mediated regulation and power in the low and mid frequency ranges indicates a sympathetic / parasympathetic mixture, then both bedrest and lower body negative pressure appeared to shift sympathetic / parasympathetic balance toward sympathetic regulation of HR. The interpretation of the spectral content of AP and RF with respect to their autonomic origins remains unclear.

  14. 15 degrees head-down tilt attenuates the postexercise reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance and sweating and decreases esophageal temperature recovery time.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Natalie H; Journeay, W Shane; Jay, Ollie; Leclair, Emily; Kenny, Glen P

    2006-09-01

    The following study examined the effect of 15 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) on postexercise heat loss and hemodynamic responses. We tested the hypothesis that recovery from dynamic exercise in the HDT position would attenuate the reduction in the heat loss responses of cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweating relative to upright seated (URS) recovery in association with an augmented hemodynamic response and an increased rate of core temperature decay. Seven male subjects performed the following three experimental protocols: 1) 60 min in the URS posture followed by 60 min in the 15 degrees HDT position; 2) 15 min of cycle ergometry at 75% of their predetermined V(O2 peak) followed by 60 min of recovery in the URS posture; or 3) 15 min of cycle ergometry at 75% of their predetermined V(O2 peak) followed by 60 min of recovery in the 15 degrees HDT position. Mean skin temperature, esophageal temperature (T(es)), skin blood flow, sweat rate, cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded at baseline, end exercise, 2, 5, 8, 12, 15, and 20 min, and every 5 min until end of recovery (60 min). Without preceding exercise, HDT decreased HR and increased SV (P < or = 0.05). During recovery after exercise, a significantly greater MAP, SV, CVC, and sweat rate and a significantly lower HR were found with HDT compared with URS posture (P < or = 0.05). Subsequently, a significantly lower T(es) was observed with HDT after 15 min of recovery onward (P < or = 0.05). At the end of 60 min of recovery, T(es) remained significantly elevated above baseline with URS (P < or = 0.05); however, T(es) returned to baseline with HDT. In conclusion, extended recovery from dynamic exercise in the 15 degrees HDT position attenuates the reduction in CVC and sweating, thereby significantly increasing the rate of T(es) decay compared with recovery in the URS posture. PMID:16741261

  15. Exercise Thermoregulation in Men after One and 24-hours of 6 Degree Head-Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, A. C.; Dearborn, A. S.; Weldhofer, A. R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Exercise thermoregulation exercise is dependent on heat loss by increased skin blood flow (convective and conductive heat loss) and through enhanced sweating (evaporative heat loss). Reduction of plasma volume (PV), increased plasma osmolality, physical deconditioning, and duration of exposure to simulated and actual microgravity reduces the ability to thermoregulate during exercise.

  16. Exercise Thermoregulation After 6 hours of Chair Rest, 6 deg Head-Down Bed-Rest, and Water Immersion Deconditioning in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T.; Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Looft-Wilson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the mechanism for the excessive exercise hyperthermia following deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness). Rectal (T(sub re)) and mean skin (T(bar)(sub sk)) temperatures and thermoregulatory responses were measured in six men [mean (SD) age, 32 (6) years; mass, 78.26 (5.80) kg; surface area, 1.95 (0.11) sq m; maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), 48 (6) ml/min/kg; whilst supine in air at dry bulb temperature 23.2 (0.6)C, relative humidity 31.1 (11.1)% and air speed 5.6 (0.1) m/min] during 70 min of leg cycle exercise [51 (4)% VO2max] in ambulatory control (AC), or following 6 h of chair rest (CR), 6deg head-down bed rest (BR), and 20deg (W120) and 80deg (W180) foot-down water immersion [water temperature, 35.0 (0.1) C]. Compared with the AC exercise (Delta)T(sub re) [mean (SD) 0.77 (0.13)C], (Delta)T(sub re), after CR was 0.83 (0.08)C (NS), after BR 0.92 (0.13)C (*P <0.05), after W180 0.96 (0.13)C*, and after W120 1.03 (0.09)C*. All T(sub sk) responded similarly to exercise: they decreased (NS) by 0.5-0.7 C in minutes 4-8 and equilibrated at +0.1 to +0.5 C at 60-70. Skin heat conductance was not different among the five conditions (range = 147-159 kJ/sq/C. Results from an intercorrelation matrix suggested that total body sweat rate was more closely related to T(sub re) at 70 min (T(sub re70)) than limb sweat rate or blood flow. Only 36% of the variability in T(sub re70) could be accounted for by total sweating, and less than 10% from total body dehydration. It would appear that multiple factors are involved which may include change in sensitivity of thermo- and osmoreceptors.

  17. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  18. Sympathetic responses to head-down rotations in humans.

    PubMed

    Hume, K M; Ray, C A

    1999-06-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) increases with head-down neck flexion (HDNF). The present study had three aims: 1) to examine sympathetic and vascular responses to two different magnitudes of HDNF; 2) to examine these same responses during prolonged HDNF; and 3) to determine the influence of nonspecific pressure receptors in the head on MSNA. The first experiment tested responses to two static head positions in the vertical axis [HDNF and intermediate HDNF (I-HDNF; approximately 50% of HDNF)]. MSNA increased above baseline during both I-HDNF and HDNF (from 219 +/- 36 to 301 +/- 47 and from 238 +/- 42 to 356 +/- 59 units/min, respectively; P < 0.01). Calf blood flow (CBF) decreased and calf vascular resistance increased during both I-HDNF and HDNF (P < 0.01). Both the increase in MSNA and the decrease in CBF were linearly related to the magnitude of the downward head rotations (P < 0.01). The second experiment tested responses during prolonged HDNF. MSNA increased (from 223 +/- 63 to 315 +/- 79 units/min; P < 0.01) and CBF decreased (from 3.2 +/- 0.4 to 2.6 +/- 0.04 ml. 100 ml-1. min-1; P < 0.01) at the onset of HDNF. These responses were maintained throughout the 30-min period. Mean arterial blood pressure gradually increased during the 30 min of HDNF (from 94 +/- 4 to 105 +/- 3 mmHg; P < 0.01). In a third experiment, head-down neck extension was performed with subjects in the supine position. Unlike HDNF, head-down neck extension did not affect MSNA. The results from these studies demonstrate that MSNA: 1) increases in magnitude as the degree of HDNF increases; 2) remains elevated above baseline during prolonged HDNF; and 3) responses during HDNF are not associated with nonspecific receptors in the head activated by increases in cerebral pressure. PMID:10368363

  19. Association Between Cardiovascular and Intraocular Pressure Changes in a 14-Day 6 deg Head Down Tilt (HDT) Bed Rest Study: Possible Implications in Retinal Anatomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita; Zanello, Susana; Yarbough, Patrice; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2013-01-01

    Visual symptoms and intracranial pressure increase reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth-orbit are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, studies conducted in head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest are being monitored for potential changes in ocular health. These measures will also serve to determine whether HDT is a suitable ground-based analog to model subclinical cardiovascular and ocular changes that could shed light on the etiology of the VIIP syndrome observed in spaceflight. Sixteen healthy normotensive (12M, 4F, age range 29-54 years), non-smoker and normal weight subjects, volunteered to participate in a 14 day 6 deg head HDT study conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU). This facility provides standard bed rest conditions (diet, wake/sleep time, time allowed in sunlight) during the time that the subjects stay at the FARU. Cardiovascular parameters were obtained in supine posture at BR-5, BR+0, and BR+3 and ocular monitoring was performed weekly. Intraocular pressure (IOP) increased from pre-bed rest BR-3) to the third day into bed rest (BR+3). Values reached a plateau towards the end of the bed rest phase (BR10) and decreased within the first three days of recovery (BR+2) returning to levels comparable to baseline at BR-3. As expected, most cardiovascular parameters were affected by 14 days of HDT bed rest. Plasma volume decreased as a result of bed rest but recovered to baseline levels by BR+3. Indications of cardiovascular deconditioning included increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate, and a decrease in stroke volume and cardiac output between BR-5 and BR+3. Due to the experimental design of this study, we were not able to test the hypothesis that fluid shifts might be involved in the IOP increase during the bed rest phase, since cardiovascular measures were not available for those

  20. Performance and mood-state parameters during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRoshia, C. W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine if performance and mood impairments occur in bed-rested subjects, and if different exercise-training regimens modify or prevent them. Eighteen normal, healthy men were divided on the basis of age, peak oxygen uptake, and maximal isometric knee extension strength into three similar groups: no exercise (NOE), isotonic exercise (ITE), and isokinetic exercise (IKE). A 15-min battery of 10 performance tests and 8 mood and 2 sleep scales were administered daily during ambulatory control, 30 d of absolute bed rest (BR), and 4 d of ambulatory recovery. Performance test proficiency increased (p < 0.05) for all three groups during BR in 7 of 10 tests and there were no consistent significant differences between the three groups. However, during BR, the ITE group was distinguished from the other groups by a decline (p < 0.05) in the activation mood dimension and in two of its constituent scales (motivation and concentration), and by improvement (p < 0.05) in the trouble-falling-asleep and psychological-tension scales. Since few deleterious changes in performance and mood occurred in the three groups and did not exceed baseline ambulatory levels, we conclude that mood and performance did not deteriorate in response to prolonged BR and were not altered by exercise training. However, the decline in activation mood scales in the ITE group may reflect overtraining or excess total workload in this group.

  1. Isokinetic strength and endurance during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Bulbulian, R.; Bond, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine if an intensive, intermittent, isokinetic, lower extremity exercise training program would attenuate or eliminate the decrease of muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bed rest (BR). The 19 male subjects (36 +/- 1 yr, 178 +/- 2 cm, 76.5 +/- 1.7 kg) were allocated into a no exercise (NOE) training group (N = 5), an isotonic (lower extremity cycle ergometer) exercise (ITE) training group (N = 7), and an isokinetic (isokinetic knee flexion-extension) exercise (IKE) training group (N = 7). Peak knee (flexion and extension) and shoulder (abduction-adduction) functions were measured weekly in all groups with one 5-repetition set. After BR, average knee extension total work decreased by 16% with NOE, increased by 27% with IKE, and was unchanged with ITE. Average knee flexion total work and peak torque (strength) responses were unchanged in all groups. Force production increased by 20% with IKE and was unchanged with NOE and ITE. Shoulder total work was unchanged in all groups, while gross average peak torque increased by 27% with ITE and by 22% with IKE, and was unchanged with NOE. Thus, while ITE training can maintain some isokinetic functions during BR, maximal intermittent IKE training can increase other functions above pre-BR control levels.

  2. Rat Cardiovascular Responses to Whole Body Suspension: Head-down and Non-Head-Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, Joseph M.; Dombrowski, Judy

    1992-01-01

    The rat whole body suspension technique mimics responses seen during exposure to microgravity and was evaluated as a model for cardiovascular responses with two series of experiments. In one series, changes were monitored in chronically catheterized rats during 7 days of Head-Down Tilt (HDT) or Non-Head-Down Tilt (N-HDT) and after several hours of recovery. Elevations of mean arterial (MAP), systolic, and diastolic pressures of approx. 20 % (P less than 0.05) in HDT rats began as early as day 1 and were maintained for the duration of suspension. Pulse pressures were relatively unaffected, but heart rates were elevated approx. 10 %. During postsuspension (2-7 h), most cardiovascular parameters returned to presuspension levels. N-HDT rats exhibited elevations chiefly on days 3 and 7. In the second series, blood pressure was monitored in 1- and 3-day HDT and N-HDT rats to evaluate responses to rapid head-up tilt. MAP, systolic and diastolic pressures, and HR were elevated (P less than 0.05) in HDT and N-HDT rats during head-up tilt after 1 day of suspension, while pulse pressures remained un changed. HDT rats exhibited elevated pretilt MAP and failed to respond to rapid head-up tilt with further increase of MAP on day 3, indicating some degree of deconditioning. The whole body suspended rat may be useful as a model to better understand responses of rats exposed to microgravity.

  3. Ultrasound measurement of transcranial distance during head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torikoshi, S.; Wilson, M. H.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Yost, W. T.; Cantrell, J. H.; Chang, D. S.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity elevates blood pressure and flow in the head, which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Rhesus monkeys exposed to simulated microgravity in the form of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) experience elevated ICP. With humans, twenty-four hours of 6 degree HDT bed rest increases cerebral blood flow velocity relative to pre-HDT upright posture. Humans exposed to acute 6 degree HDT experiments increased ICP, measured with the tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) technique. Other studies suggest that increased ICP in humans and cats causes measurable cranial bone movement across the sagittal suture. Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranium, elevation of the ICP will increase ICV and transcranial distance. Currently, several non-invasive approaches to monitor ICP are being investigated. Such techniques include TMD and modal analysis of the skull. TMD may not be reliable over a large range of ICP and neither method is capable of measuring the small changes in pressure. Ultrasound, however, may reliably measure small distance changes that accompany ICP fluctuations. The purpose of our study was to develop and evaluate an ultrasound technique to measure transcranial distance changes during HDT.

  4. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  5. Association Between Cardiovascular and Intraocular Pressure Changes in a 14-day 6 deg Head Down Tilt (HDT) Bed Rest Study: Possible Implications in Retinal Anatomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Taibbi, G.; Brewer, J. L.; Vizzeri, G.

    2013-01-01

    Mean IOP significantly increased while at 6deg HDT and returned towards pre-bed rest values upon leaving bed rest. While mean IOP increased during bed rest, it remained within the normal limits for subject safety. A diuretic shift and cardiovascular deconditioning occurs during in-bed rest, as expected. There was no demonstrable correlation between the largest change in IOP (pre/post) and cardiovascular measure changes (pre/post). Additional mixed effects linear regression modeling may reveal some subclinical physiological changes that might assist in describing the VIIP syndrome pathophysiology.

  6. Effects of 10 days 6° head-down tilt on the responses to fluid loading and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisch, F.; Heer, M.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kropp, J.; Schulz, H.; Hillebrecht, A.; Meyer, M.

    In an international collaborative project six normal male subjects were studied before, during and after 10 days 6° HDT. Fluid intake was controlled at 40 ml/(kg bw·day). Urine volume and body weight were determined daily. Fluid loading and LBNP were performed in all three phases of the study. Body weight diminished by 2.6% because of fluid loss. Blood volume diminished by 13%. The responses to fluid loading were similar in the three phases of the study. Sixty minutes after end of infusion only 5.5% of the infused saline remained in the intravascular compartment. Excess interstitial fluid was eliminated in the next 24 hs but a negative balance was recorded also in the following day. The compliance of the lower limbs expressed as the rate of limb volume change/unit LBNP change was increased at the end of the HDT phase and during the post HDT phase. The set point of intravascular volume was defended, as shown by the response to FL. HDT increased the compliance of the lower limbs.

  7. Cognitive Functioning in Long Duration Head-down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, Kimberly A.; Slack, Kelley J.; Sipes, Walter A.; Bowie, Kendra

    2008-01-01

    The Space Flight Cognitive Assessment Tool for Windows (WinSCAT) is a self-administered battery of tests used on the International Space Station for evaluating cognitive functioning. Here, WinSCAT was used to assess cognitive functioning during extended head-down bed rest. Thirteen subjects who participated in 60 or 90 days of 6 deg head-down bed rest took WinSCAT during the pre-bed rest phase, the in-bed rest phase, and the post-bed rest (reconditioning) phase of study participation. After adjusting for individual baseline performance, 12 off-nominal scores were observed out of 351 total observations during bed rest and 7 of 180 during reconditioning. No evidence was found for systematic changes in off-nominal incidence as time in bed rest progressed, or during the reconditioning period. Cognitive functioning does not appear to be adversely affected by long duration head-down bed rest. Individual differences in underlying cognitive ability and motivation level are likely explanations for the current findings.

  8. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Meck, Janice V.; Martin, David S.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra A.; Riberio, Christine; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Waters, Wendy W.

    2007-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a recognized risk for crewmembers returning from space. Numerous cardiovascular mechanisms have been proposed to account for this problem including vascular and cardiac dysfunction. We studied arterial and cardiac function in 6-degree head-down tilt bed rest, which is the most widely accepted ground-based analog of spaceflight. Eleven subjects are included in this study (8 men and 3 women). Data analysis was limited to the first 49 days, and compared to pre-bed rest baseline data. Using ultrasound, data was collected on arterial diameters and flows at baseline and during reactive hyperemia and following administration of nitroglycerin. Echocardiography was used to acquire information regarding systolic and diastolic function as well as ventricular mass and diameter. Plasma volumes were significantly decreased by 7 days of bed rest and stayed down through 49 days. There were no differences in reactive hyperemic response in the arm at any time point. However, the hyperemic response in the leg was significantly increased at day 49. Arterial responses to nitroglycerin did not change over the duration of bed rest (day effect) in either the arm or leg, but there was a significant difference between the arm and the leg responses. There was a marked decrease in anterior tibial intimal-medial thickness at days 21, 35 and 49. Several cardiac functional parameters including IVRT, Mitral e-wave, ejection time, velocity of circumferential shortening and myocardial performance index were significantly changed following 49 days of bed rest. These data show that some cardiovascular measures change during bed rest, while others do not. Further study is needed to determine if these measures can provide any insight into the effects of bed rest, or spaceflight, on human cardiovascular performance.

  9. Pulmonary responses to lower body negative pressure and fluid loading during head-down tilt bedrest.

    PubMed

    Hillebrecht, A; Schulz, H; Meyer, M; Baisch, F; Beck, L; Blomqvist, C G

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity redistributes body fluids with important secondary effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypothesis that the fluid shifts also affect pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity was simulated in six male volunteers by a 10-day period of bedrest at 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT). Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and intravenous saline loading superimposed acute changes in fluid distribution on the prolonged effects of HDT. HDT produced relative dehydration and hypovolemia with decreased pulmonary blood flow and diffusing capacity. Before bedrest, pulmonary blood flow decreased by 24% during LBNP and diffusing capacity by 7%, while functional residual capacity increased by 14% (p less than 0.05). Intravenous saline loading caused a 24% increase in pulmonary blood-flow (p less than 0.05). Functional residual capacity decreased by 10% and diffusing capacity by 6% (p less than 0.05). Lung tissue volume did not change significantly. Head-down tilt had only minor effects on the responses to LBNP and saline loading. We conclude that LBNP and intravenous saline loading produce major changes in pulmonary blood-flow and minor effects on pulmonary gas exchange, and that the response to acute changes in fluid distribution is not significantly altered during simulated microgravity. PMID:1509892

  10. Cardiopulmonary function during 10 days of head-down tilt bedrest.

    PubMed

    Schulz, H; Hillebrecht, A; Karemaker, J M; ten Harkel, A D; Beck, L; Baisch, F; Meyer, M

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary and cardiovascular responses to simulated weightlessness, i. e. 6 degrees head-down tilt bedrest (HDT) were investigated in six healthy male volunteers (mean age 26 yrs). Pulmonary diffusing capacity, functional residual capacity, pulmonary capillary blood flow, and lung tissue volume were measured by inert gas rebreathing. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were obtained from finger blood pressure readings using a plethysmographic technique (Finapres). The short-term (20 min) response to HDT consisted of a 22% increase in pulmonary blood flow, and 13% and 31% falls in blood pressure and heart rate relative to standing. Functional residual capacity fell by 33%, while lung tissue volume increased insignificantly. Subsequent measurements during 10 days of HDT and 5 days of recovery revealed no further changes in lung volume, lung tissue volume, or blood pressure. However, diffusing capacity fell gradually and remained 4%-5% below baseline values after the 7th day of bedrest and during recovery (p less than 0.05). Pulmonary blood flow decreased by 16% during head-down bedrest and recovered partially within the following 5 days (p less than 0.05). We conclude that during and after simulated weightlessness marked alterations in cardiovascular function and marginal affections of gas exchange can be demonstrated already at rest. They may be considered as contributing factors to orthostatic and exercise intolerance observed after space flight. PMID:1509891

  11. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  12. Acute effects of head-down tilt and hypoxia on modulators of fluid homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Cintron, N. M.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Scotto, P.; Loeppky, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to understand the interaction between acute postural fluid shifts and hypoxia on hormonal regulation of fluid homeostasis, the authors measured the responses to head-down tilt with and without acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), plasma aldosterone (ALD), and plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured in six healthy male volunteers who were exposed to a head-down tilt protocol during normoxia and hypoxia. The tilt protocol consisted of a 17 degrees head-up phase (30 minutes), a 28 degrees head-down phase (1 hour), and a 17 degrees head-up recovery period (2 hours, with the last hour normoxic in both experiments). Altitude equivalent to 14,828 ft was simulated by having the subjects breathe an inspired gas mixture with 13.9% oxygen. The results indicate that the postural fluid redistribution associated with a 60-minute head-down tilt induces the release of ANP and cGMP during both hypoxia and normoxia. Hypoxia increased cGMP, cAMP, ALD, and PRA throughout the protocol and significantly potentiated the increase in cGMP during head-down tilt. Hypoxia had no overall effect on the release of ANP, but appeared to attenuate the increase with head-down tilt. This study describes the acute effects of hypoxia on the endocrine response during fluid redistribution and suggests that the magnitude, but not the direction, of these changes with posture is affected by hypoxia.

  13. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  14. Periodic upright posture negates the suppression of neuroendocrine response to head down bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Vernikos, J.; Evans, J.; Ohara, D.

    1992-01-01

    Head down bedrest (HDT) decreases plasma neurohormone levels, attaining a nadir within four hours. The present study evaluates the effect of periodic standing or exercises (+G(z)) on this acute suppression of plasma neurohormones. Methods: Nine male subjects (mean plus or minus SE age 37 plus or minus 2 yr; height 182 plus or minus 2 cm; weight 83 plus or minus 3 kg) were admitted to the Human Research Facility on three occasions separated by one month. Subjects were assigned to head down tilt (minus 6 degrees) or 15-minutes of standing or moderate exercise at the end of each hour. Initially during an ambulatory period, subjects were placed in a supine position for 45-min and a control blood sample obtained. The next day following 4 hours of HDT with or without standing or exercise a blood sample was taken 45-min (3 3/4 hours into HDT) after the preceding stand or exercise. Blood was withdrawn and all plasma samples frozen for determination of neurohormone levels within the same assay. Plasma aldosterone, Plasma Renin Activity (PRA) vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) levels were measured by electrochemical detection following HPLC. Values were compared by ANOVA, P less than 0.05. Results: Control levels following 45-min supine were not different between treatments. HDT suppressed plasma aldosterone (13.9 plus or minus 3.7 to 6.6 plus or minus 0.7 ng/dl) and NE levels (299 plus or minus 35 to 217 plus or minus 23 pg/dl), E (69 plus or minus 15 to 65 plus or minus 21 pg/ml), and PRA (0.64 plus or minus 0.13 to 0.58 plus or minus 0.17 ngAl/m/hr) were not significantly altered. Standing or exercise negated the decrease in aldosterone and NE levels due to HDT. Conclusions: Periodic upright posture (+G(z)) with or without exercise for 15-min out of each hour negates the acute suppression of aldosterone and NE associated with HDT.

  15. Analysis of head-down tilt as an analog of weightlessness using a methematical simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    Antiorthostasis or head down tilt of a moderate degree was used as a ground based analog of weightless space flight to study headward fluid shifts, decreased plasma volume, orthostatic intolerance and muscular skeletal degradation. A mathematical model was used to help interpret these observations. The model proved most valuable for these studies was originally developed as a description of the major circulatory, fluid and electrolyte control systems. Two different experimental studies are employed to validate the model. The first is a 24 hour head down tilt study and the second is a 7 day head down bed rest study. The major issues addressed include the reduction in plasma volume, the dynamic changes of venous pressure and cardiac output, the extent of central hypervolemia during long term zero g exposure, the existence of an early diuresis, the mechanisms which alter the renal regulating hormones during the short term and long term periods, the significance of potassium loss on other zero g responses, and the role of transcapillary filtration in adjusting fluid shifts. The use of mathematical models as an interpretive and analysis technique for experimental research for space life science is illustrated.

  16. Effect of intermittent standing and walking on physiological changes induced by head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Ludwig, D. A.; Ertl, A. C.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L.; OHara, D.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous exposure to gravity may not be necessary to prevent compromised physiological function resulting from exposure to microgravity. However, minimum gravity (G) exposure requirements, effectiveness of passive Gz versus activity in a G field, and optimal G stimulus amplitude, duration, and frequency are unknown. To partially address these questions, a 4-day, 6 degree head-down bed rest (HDBR) study (one ambulatory control day, 4 full HDBR days, one recovery day) was conducted. Nine males, 30-50 yr, were subjected to four different +1 Gz (head-foot) exposure protocols (periodic standing or controlled walking for 2 or 4 h/day in 15 min doses), plus a continuous HDBR (0 Gz) control. Standing 4 h completely prevented and standing 2 h partially prevented post-HDBR orthostatic intolerance. Both walking conditions (2 h and 4 h) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 and prevented the increased urinary Ca2+ excretion associated with HDBR. Both 4 h conditions (standing and walking) attenuated plasma volume loss during HDBR. It was concluded that various physiological systems benefit differentially from passive +1 Gz or activity in +1 Gz and the duration (2 h vs. 4 h) of the stimulus may be an important moderating factor.

  17. Effects of Head-Down Bed Rest on the Executive Functions and Emotional Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Chen, Shanguang; Tan, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest may cause changes in the autonomic nervous system that are related to cognition and emotion. This study adopted an emotional flanker task to evaluate the effect of 45 days -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) on executive functioning in 16 healthy young men at each of six time points: the second-to-last day before the bed rest period, the eleventh, twentieth, thirty-second and fortieth day during the bed rest period, and the eighth day after the bed rest period. In addition, self-report inventories (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, PANAS) were conducted to record emotional changes, and the participants’ galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed as measures of physiological activity. The results showed that the participants’ reaction time on the flanker task increased significantly relative to their responses on the second-to-last day before the period of bed rest, their galvanic skin response weakened and their degrees of positive affect declined during the bed rest period. Our results provide some evidence for a detrimental effect of prolonged bed rest on executive functioning and positive affect. Whether this stems from a lack of aerobic physical activity and/or the effect of HDBR itself remains to be determined. PMID:23284916

  18. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on physiological responses to moderate hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Greene, E. R.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on physiological responses to simulated zero-gravity cardiopulmonary and fluid balance measurements were made in 6 subjects before and during 5-degree head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft and a second time at this altitude as controls (CON). The V-dot(O2)(max) increased by 9 percent after CON, but fell 3 percent after HDBR. This reduction in work capacity during HDBR could be accounted for by inactivity. The heart rate response to a head-up tilt was greatly enhanced following HDBR, while mean blood pressure was lower. No significant negative impact of HDBR was noted on the ability to acclimatize to hypoxia in terms of pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, circulatory or mental function measurements. No evidence of pulmonary interstitial edema or congestion was noted during HDBR at the lower PIO2 and blood rheology properties were not negatively altered. Symptoms of altitude illness were more prevalent, but not marked, during HDBR and arterial blood gases and oxygenation were not seriously effected by simulated microgravity. Declines in base excess with altitude were similar in both conditions. The study demonstrated a minimal effect of HDBR on the ability to adjust to this level of hypoxia.

  19. Head-down bed rest impairs vagal baroreflex responses and provokes orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Vernikos-Danellis, Joan

    1990-01-01

    The hypothesis that baroreflex malfunction contributes to orthostatic hypotension in microgravity was tested by studying vagally mediated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes in healthy human subjects before, during, and after 30 days of 6-deg head-down bed rest. The baroreflex response relationships were provoked with ramped neck pressure-suction sequences comprising pressure elevations to 40 mm Hg followed by serial R-wave-triggered 15-mm Hg reductions to -65 mm0 Hg; each R-R interval was plotted as a function of systolic pressure minus the neck chamber pressure applied during the interval. It is shown that head-down bed rest led to an impairment of vagal baroreflex function and that it was associated with an impairment of hemodynamic adjustments to standing, indicating that baroreflex impairment may contribute to orthostatic hypotension observed in spacecrews after a flight.

  20. Pathway Concepts Experiment for Head-Down Synthetic Vision Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2004-01-01

    Eight 757 commercial airline captains flew 22 approaches using the Reno Sparks 16R Visual Arrival under simulated Category I conditions. Approaches were flown using a head-down synthetic vision display to evaluate four tunnel ("minimal", "box", "dynamic pathway", "dynamic crow s feet") and three guidance ("ball", "tadpole", "follow-me aircraft") concepts and compare their efficacy to a baseline condition (i.e., no tunnel, ball guidance). The results showed that the tunnel concepts significantly improved pilot performance and situation awareness and lowered workload compared to the baseline condition. The dynamic crow s feet tunnel and follow-me aircraft guidance concepts were found to be the best candidates for future synthetic vision head-down displays. These results are discussed with implications for synthetic vision display design and future research.

  1. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on working memory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Zhao, Xin; Oei, Tian Po S

    2015-01-01

    Background The weightlessness caused by prolonged bed rest results in changes in cerebral circulation and thus, brain functions, which is of interest. Methods We investigated the effects of 45-day, −6° head-down bed rest, which stimulated microgravity, on working memory in 16 healthy male participants. The 2-back task was used to test the working memory variations on the 2nd day before bed rest (R−2); on the 11th (R11), 20th (R20), 32nd (R32), and 40th (R40) days of bed rest; and on the eighth day after bed rest (R+8). The cognitive response and the physiological reactivity (such as galvanic skin response, heart rate, and heart rate variability) under the 2-back task were recorded simultaneously. Results The results showed that compared with R−2, on the R+8, the participants’ galvanic skin response increased significantly, and the high frequency of heart rate variability (HF), low frequency of heart rate variability (LF), and reaction time in the 2-back task decreased significantly. There were positive correlations between the participants’ reaction time of working memory and the LF/HF under head-down bed rest (at R11, R20, and R32). Conclusion The results suggested that the prolonged head-down bed rest may have a detrimental effect on individual physiology and working memory. Physiology indices, such as galvanic skin response and heart rate variability, were sensitive to the prolonged bed rest. PMID:25848281

  2. Head-Down Tilt with Balanced Traction as a Model for Simulating Spinal Acclimation to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, R. E.; Styf, J. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Fechner, K.; Haruna, Y.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts experience total body height increases of 4 to 7 cm in microgravity. Thus, stretching of the spinal cord, nerve roots, and muscular and ligamentous tissues may be responsible for the hyperreflexia, back pain, and muscular atrophy associated with exposure to microgravity. Axial compression of the spine makes 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT) an unsuitable model for spinal acclimation to microgravity. However, this axial compression may be counteracted by balanced traction consisting of 10% body weight (sin 6 deg. = 0.1) applied to the legs. Six healthy male subjects underwent 3 days each of 60 HDT with balanced traction and horizontal bed rest (HBR), with a 2 week recovery period between treatments. Total body and spine length, lumbar disc height, back pain, erector spinae intramuscular pressure, and ankle joint torque were measured before, during and after each treatment. Total body and spine (processes of L5 - C7) lengths increased significantly more during HDT with balanced traction (22 +/- 8 mm and 25 +/- 8 mm, respectively) than during HBR (16 +/- 4 mm and 14 +/- 9 mm, respectively). Back and leg pain were significantly greater during HDT with balanced traction than during HBR. The distance between the lower end plate of L4 and the upper endplate of S1, as measured by sonography, increased significantly in both treatments to the same degree (2.9 +/- 1.9 mm, HDT with balanced traction; 3.3 +/- 1.5 mm, HBR). Intramuscular pressure of the erector spinae muscles and maximal ankle joint torque were unaltered with both models. While neither model increased height to the magnitude observed in microgravity, HDT with balanced traction may be a better model for simulating the body lengthening and back pain experienced in microgravity.

  3. Three dimensional audio versus head down TCAS displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Pittman, Marc T.

    1994-01-01

    The advantage of a head up auditory display was evaluated in an experiment designed to measure and compare the acquisition time for capturing visual targets under two conditions: Standard head down traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS) display, and three-dimensional (3-D) audio TCAS presentation. Ten commercial airline crews were tested under full mission simulation conditions at the NASA Ames Crew-Vehicle Systems Research Facility Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. Scenario software generated targets corresponding to aircraft which activated a 3-D aural advisory or a TCAS advisory. Results showed a significant difference in target acquisition time between the two conditions, favoring the 3-D audio TCAS condition by 500 ms.

  4. Effects of head-down-tilt bed rest on cerebral hemodynamics during orthostatic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the adaptation to simulated microgravity (microG) impairs regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) during orthostatic stress and contributes to orthostatic intolerance. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 24 +/- 5 yr) underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest to simulate hemodynamic changes that occur when humans are exposed to microG. CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure, cardiac output (acetylene rebreathing), and forearm blood flow were measured at each level of a ramped protocol of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15, -30, and -40 mmHg x 5 min, -50 mmHg x 3 min, then -10 mmHg every 3 min to presyncope) before and after bed rest. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by using the cumulative stress index (CSI; mmHg x minutes) for the LBNP protocol. After bed rest, each individual's orthostatic tolerance was reduced, with the group CSI decreased by 24% associated with greater decreases in cardiac output and greater increases in systemic vascular resistance at each level of LBNP. Before bed rest, mean CBF velocity decreased by 14, 10, and 45% at -40 mmHg, -50 mmHg, and maximal LBNP, respectively. After bed rest, mean velocity decreased by 16% at -30 mmHg and by 21, 35, and 39% at -40 mmHg, -50 mmHg, and maximal LBNP, respectively. Compared with pre-bed rest, post-bed-rest mean velocity was less by 11, 10, and 21% at -30, -40, and -50 mmHg, respectively. However, there was no significant difference at maximal LBNP. We conclude that cerebral autoregulation during orthostatic stress is impaired by adaptation to simulated microG as evidenced by an earlier and greater fall in CBF velocity during LBNP. We speculate that impairment of cerebral autoregulation may contribute to the reduced orthostatic tolerance after bed rest.

  5. Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest Studies: Safety Considerations Regarding Vision Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Visual symptoms reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth orbit, including hyperopic shift, choroidal folds, globe flattening and papilledema, are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, safety considerations have been raised regarding the ocular health of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest subjects. HDT is a widely used ground ]based analog that simulates physiological changes of spaceflight, including fluid shifts. Thus, vision monitoring has been performed in bed rest subjects in order to evaluate the safety of HDT with respect to vision health. Here we report ocular outcomes in 9 healthy subjects (age range: 27-48 years; Male/Female ratio: 8/1) completing bed rest Campaign 11, an integrated, multidisciplinary 70-day 6 degrees HDT bed rest study. Vision examinations were performed on a weekly basis, and consisted of office-based (2 pre- and 2 post-bed rest) and in-bed testing. The experimental design was a repeated measures design, with measurements for both eyes taken for each subject at each planned time point. Findings for the following tests were all reported as normal in each testing session for every subject: modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual fields, color vision and fundus photography. Overall, no statistically significant differences were observed for any of the measures, except for both near and far visual acuity, which increased during the course of the study. This difference is not considered clinically relevant as may result from the effect of learning. Intraocular pressure results suggest a small increase at the beginning of the bed rest phase (p=0.059) and lesser increase at post-bed rest with respect to baseline (p=0.046). These preliminary results provide the basis for further analyses that will include correlations between intraocular pressure change pre- and post-bed rest, and optical coherence

  6. Cerebral blood velocity and other cardiovascular responses to 2 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary A. B.; Mader, Thomas H.; Bagian, James P.; Charles, John B.; Meehan, Richard T.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body, and space motion sickness, which is a problem during the first few days of space flight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system. To evaluate possible changes in cerebral blood flow during simulated weightlessness, we measured blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) along with retinal vascular diameters, intraocular pressure, impedance cardiography, and sphygmomanometry on nine men (26.2 +/- 6.6 yr) morning and evening for 2 days during continuous 10 deg head-down tilt (HDT). When subjects went from seated to head-down bed rest, their heart rate and retinal diameters decreased, and intraocular pressures increased. After 48 h of HDT, blood flow velocity in the MCA was decreased and thoracic impedance was increased, indicating less fluid in the thorax. Percent changes in blood flow velocities in the MCA after 48 h of HDT were inversely correlated with percent changes in retinal vascular diameters. Blood flow velocities in the MCA were inversely correlated (intersubject) with arterial pressures and retinal vascular diameters. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic arterial pressure, and at times pulse pressure and blood flow velocities in the MCA were greater in the evening. Total peripheral resistance was higher in the morning. Although cerebral blood velocity is reduced after subjects are head down for 2 days, the inverse relationship with retinal vessel diameters, which have control analogous to that of cerebral vessels, indicates cerebral blood flow is not reduced.

  7. Measurement of Transcranial Distance During Head-Down Tilt Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torikoshi, Shigeyo; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Bowley, S.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity probably elevates blood pressure and flow in the head which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and pressure (ICP). Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranium, any increase of ICP will increase ICV and transcranial distance. We used a noninvasive ultrasound technique to measure transcranial distance (frontal to occipital) during head-down tilt. Seven subjects (ages 26-53) underwent the following tilt angles: 90 deg. upright, 30 deg., 0 deg., -6 deg., -10 deg., -6 deg., 0 deg., 30 deg., and 90 deg. Each angle was maintained for 1 min. Ultrasound wave frequency was collected continuously and transcranial distance was calculated (Delta(x) = x(Delta)f/f, where x is path length and f is frequency of the wave) for each tilt angle. Frequency decreased from 503.687 kHz (90 deg. upright) to 502.619 kHz (-10 deg.). These frequencies translated to an increased transcranial distance of 0.403 mm. Although our data suggest a significant increase in transcranial distance during head-down tilt, this apparent increase may result, in part, from head-down tilt-induced subcutaneous edema or cutaneous blood volume elevation. In three subjects, when the above protocol was repeated with an ace bandage wrapped around the head to minimize such edema, the increased transcranial distance from 90 deg. to -10 deg. was reduced by 0.174 mm. Further development of the technique to quantify bone-to-bone expansion unconfounded by cutaneous fluid is necessary. Therefore, this ultrasound technique may provide measurements of changes in cranial dimensions during microgravity.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  9. Use of an Android application “clinometer” for measurement of head down tilt given during subarachnoid block

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, RB; Neema, MM

    2016-01-01

    Context: Head down tilt is given to patients after sub arachnoid block for adjustment of height of block. However, the amount of tilt given is subjective and cannot be documented. Aims: We used an android application named “clinometer” to measure exact degree of tilt given by anesthesiologists as their routine practice. Settings and Design: This observational study, at a medical college hospital, was done in 130 patients given sub arachnoid block for lower abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: We observed and documented vital data of patients and measured tilt given by application “clinometer.” Results: We observed that the application was easy to use and measured tilt each time. The result obtained can be documented, digitally saved and transferred. In 130 patients studied, we observed incidence of degree of tilt as follows: 6-8° tilt in 38 patients (29.23%), 8-10 in 36 patients (27.69%), 10-12 in 30 patients (23.08%), 12-14 in 12 patients (9.23%) and 14-16° tilt in 14 patients (10.77%). Use of application was received with enthusiasm by practicing anesthesiologists. Various possible uses of this application are discussed. PMID:26955307

  10. Joint US/USSR study: Comparison of effects of horizontal and head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold; Grigoriev, Anatoli I.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of the results of the first joint U.S./U.S.S.R. bed rest study. The study was accomplished in two parts: A soviet part (May to June 1979) and an American part (July to August 1979). Both studies were conducted under identical conditions and provided a basis for comparison of physiologic reactions and standardizing procedures and methods. Each experiment consisted of three periods: 14 days of pre-bed rest control, 7 days of bed rest, and a 10 to 14 day recovery period. Ten males participated in each study, with five subjects experiencing horizontal bed rest and five subjects a -6 deg head-down body position. Biochemical and hormonal measurements were made of blood and urine, with particular attention to electrolyte metabolism and kidney function; cardio-pulmonary changes at rest and exercise; influence of Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP); and incremental exercise using a bicyle ergometer while supine and sitting. Expected moderate changes were noted to occur for various physiologic parameters. Clinical evidence pointed to the fact that head-down bed rest when compared to horizontal conditions more closely matched the conditions seen after manned spaceflight. For the most part, statistically significant differences between the two body positions were not observed.

  11. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  12. Effect of head-down bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to orthostatic stress in physically fit men.

    PubMed

    Koska, J; Ksinantová, L; Kvetnanský, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2003-01-01

    The role of neuroendocrine responsiveness in the development of orthostatic intolerance after bed rest was studied in physically fit subjects. Head-down bed-rest (HDBR, -6 degrees, 4 days) was performed in 15 men after 6 weeks of aerobic training. The standing test was performed before, after training and on day 4 of the HDBR. Orthostatic intolerance was observed in one subject before and after training. The blood pressure response after training was enhanced (mean BP increments 18+/-2 vs. 13+/- 2 mm Hg, p<0.05, means +/- S.E.M.), although noradrenaline response was diminished (1.38+/-0.18 vs. 2.76+/-0.25 mol.l(-1), p<0.01). Orthostatic intolerance after HDBR was observed in 10 subjects, the BP response was blunted, and noradrenaline as well as plasma renin activity (PRA) responses were augmented (NA 3.10+/-0.33 mol.l(-1), p<0.001; PRA 2.98+/-1.12 vs. 0.85+/-0.15 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05). Plasma noradrenaline, adrenaline and aldosterone responses in orthostatic intolerant subjects were similar to the tolerant group. We conclude that six weeks of training attenuated the sympathetic response to standing and had no effect on the orthostatic tolerance. In orthostatic intolerance the BP response induced by subsequent HDBR was absent despite an enhanced sympathetic response. PMID:12790765

  13. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Takallu, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and preliminary qualitative results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. In this experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels

  14. Catecholaminergic effects of prolonged head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, D. S.; Vernikos, J.; Holmes, C.; Convertino, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    Prolonged head-down bed rest (HDBR) provides a model for examining responses to chronic weightlessness in humans. Eight healthy volunteers underwent HDBR for 2 wk. Antecubital venous blood was sampled for plasma levels of catechols [norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, dihydroxyphenylglycol, and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid] after supine rest on a control (C) day and after 4 h and 7 and 14 days of HDBR. Urine was collected after 2 h of supine rest during day C, 2 h before HDBR, and during the intervals 1-4, 4-24, 144-168 (day 7), and 312-336 h (day 14) of HDBR. All subjects had decreased plasma and blood volumes (mean 16%), atriopeptin levels (31%), and peripheral venous pressure (26%) after HDBR. NE excretion on day 14 of HDBR was decreased by 35% from that on day C, without further trends as HDBR continued, whereas plasma levels were only variably and nonsignificantly decreased. Excretion rates of dihydroxyphenylglycol and dihydroxyphenylalanine decreased slightly during HDBR; excretion rates of epinephrine, dopamine, and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and plasma levels of catechols were unchanged. The results suggest that HDBR produces sustained inhibition of sympathoneural release, turnover, and synthesis of NE without affecting adrenomedullary secretion or renal dopamine production. Concurrent hypovolemia probably interferes with detection of sympathoinhibition by plasma levels of NE and other catechols in this setting. Sympathoinhibition, despite decreased blood volume, may help to explain orthostatic intolerance in astronauts returning from spaceflights.

  15. Consideration of technologies for head-down displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.

    1998-09-01

    The market for military avionics head down displays for which Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCD) has been specified is both well established and substantial. Typical major programs such as F-22, V-22 and Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) amount to over 15,000 displays. Nevertheless there is an insecurity about the situation because of the dependency upon Japanese and Korean manufacturers and the vagaries of the commercial market. The U.S. has only 7% of the world's manufacturing capability in AMLCD and is seeking alternative technologies to regain a hold in this lucrative business. The U.S. military manufacturers of AMLCD are capable, but can never achieve the benefits of scale that Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) equipment can offer. In addition to the commercial and political concerns, there are still performance issues related to AMLCD and there is a view that emissive displays in particular can offer advantages over AMLCD. However, it is beneficial to be able to tailor display sizes and there are doubts about the ability of current flat panel technologies to achieve custom, or indeed large area panels either economically, or reliably. It is in this arena that projection displays may be the optimum solution.

  16. Analogs of microgravity: head-down tilt and water immersion.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2016-04-15

    This article briefly reviews the fidelity of ground-based methods used to simulate human existence in weightlessness (spaceflight). These methods include horizontal bed rest (BR), head-down tilt bed rest (HDT), head-out water immersion (WI), and head-out dry immersion (DI; immersion with an impermeable elastic cloth barrier between subject and water). Among these, HDT has become by far the most commonly used method, especially for longer studies. DI is less common but well accepted for long-duration studies. Very few studies exist that attempt to validate a specific simulation mode against actual microgravity. Many fundamental physical, and thus physiological, differences exist between microgravity and our methods to simulate it, and between the different methods. Also, although weightlessness is the salient feature of spaceflight, several ancillary factors of space travel complicate Earth-based simulation. In spite of these discrepancies and complications, the analogs duplicate many responses to 0 G reasonably well. As we learn more about responses to microgravity and spaceflight, investigators will continue to fine-tune simulation methods to optimize accuracy and applicability. PMID:26869710

  17. Hormonal changes during 17 days of head-down bed-rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Arnaud, Sara B.; Monk, Timothy H.; Claustrat, Bruno; Gharib, Claude; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2003-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of 17 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the daily rhythms of the hormones involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic a real space flight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of Growth Hormone (GH), Cortisol, 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin, Normetadrenaline (NMN) and Metadrenaline (NM) was determined. A decrease in urinary cortisol excretion during the night of HDBR was noted. For GH, a rhythm was found before and during HDBR. The rhythm of melatonin, evaluated with the urine excretion of 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S), the main hepatic metabolite, persisted throughout the experiment without any modification to the level of phase. A decrease during the night was noted for normetadrenaline urinary derivates, but only during the HDBR.

  18. Restoration of plasma volume after 16 days of head-down tilt induced by a single bout of maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Engelke, K. A.; Ludwig, D. A.; Doerr, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Seven healthy men performed maximal exercise 24 h before the end of 16 days exposure to 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) to test the hypothesis that such an exercise technique could restore plasma volume (PV) at the end of a simulated space mission. Exercise consisted of supine cycling with graded work rates increasing by 16 W/min to volitional fatigue and required an average of 16 min. The experimental protocol was a standard cross-over design in which the order of treatment (exercise or control) was counterbalanced across all seven subjects. PV, fluid intake (ad libitum), urine output, renal function, and hormones associated with fluid homeostasis were measured before HDT, 24 h before the end of HDT just prior to exercise, and at the end of HDT 24 h after exercise. HDT reduced PV by 16% in both control and exercise conditions. Maximal exercise completely restored plasma volume within 24 h to 3.9 +/- 3.2% of pre-HDT levels despite continued HDT. Compared with control, exercise induced a 660-ml larger positive fluid balance because of greater fluid intake and reduced urine volume during the 24 h after exercise. These results suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise before return from 16 days of spaceflight may be completely effective in stimulating thirst and restoring plasma volume to preflight levels.

  19. Immune response to 60-day head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinping; Guo, Aihua; Zhong, Ping; Zhang, Hongyu; Wu, Feng; Wan, Yumin; Bai, Yanqiang; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    Introduction: Exposure of humans to spaceflight has resulted in disregulation of the immune system. Head-down bed rest (HDBR) has been extensively used as an earth-bound analog to study physiologic effects mimicking those occurring in weightlessness during spaceflight. It is uncertain how a prolonged period of bed rest affect human immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 60-day HDBR on immune function and EB virus reactivation in seven male volunteers. Methods: There were seven healthy male volunteers who were subjected to HDBR for 60d. Immunological parameters including leukocyte subset distribution, lymphocyte proliferation to mitogens, secreted cytokine profiles and EB virus reactivation were monitored. Results: Total WBC conunts increased significantly 10d post-HDBR as compared with pre-HDBR. At the same time, the relative percentage of neutrophils was also higher than pre-HDBR but not significant. MFI of CD11b in neutrophils was reduced obviously at thd end of HDBR. T Lymphocyte proliferations to PHA reduced at HDBR 30, HDBR 60 and 10d post-HDBR while IL-2 production decreased significantly at the same time. IFN-and IL-4 production trended to decrease at HDBR 30 and HDBR 60. The relative percentage of T lymphocyte subset, B lymphocyte and NK cells were not altered. EBV EA (early antigen) were negative and EBV VCA titers had no changes through HDBR. Conclusion: The results indicate that several immunological parameters (mainly cellular immunity) are altered significantly by prolonged HDBR, and these changes were similar to those happened in spaceflight.

  20. Metabolic responses to head-down suspension in hypophysectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Tipton, C. M.; Evans, J.; Linderman, J. K.; Gosselink, K.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Rats exposed to head-down suspension (HDS) exhibit reductions in maximal O2 consumption (VO2max) and atrophy of select hindlimb muscles. This study tested the hypothesis that an endocrine-deficient rat exposed to HDS would not exhibit reductions in VO2max or hindlimb muscle mass. Hypophysectomized (HYPX) and sham-operated (SHAM) rats were tested for VO2max before and after 28 days of HDS or cage control (CC) conditions. No significant reductions in VO2max were observed in HYPX rats. In contrast, SHAM-HDS rats exhibited a significant reduction in absolute (-16%) and relative (-29%) measures of aerobic capacity. Time course experiments revealed a reduction in VO2max in SHAM-HDS rats within 7 days, suggesting that cardiovascular adjustments to HDS occurred in the 1st wk. HDS was associated with atrophy of the soleus (-42%) in SHAM rats, whereas HYPX rats exhibited atrophy of the soleus (-36%) and plantaris (-13%). SHAM-HDS rats had significantly lower (-38%) soleus citrate synthase activities per gram muscle mass than SHAM-CC, but no significant differences existed between HYPX-HDS and -CC rats. HDS rats had an impaired ability to thermoregulate, as indicated by significantly greater temperature increases per unit run time, compared with their CC counterparts. Pretreatment plasma epinephrine levels were significantly lower in HYPX than in SHAM rats. Norepinephrine concentration was similar for all groups except HYPX-HDS, in which it was significantly higher. HDS had no significant effect on thyroxine or triiodothyronine. SHAM-HDS rats had significantly lower concentrations of testosterone and growth hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Fluid/electrolyte balance and cardiovascular responses - Head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Deavers, D. R.; Meininger, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on cardiovascular and fluid/electrolyte balance responses of rats to a 7-day-long whole-body suspension (WBS) with about 20-deg head-down tilt (HDT), followed by 7 days of recovery. Compared with horizontally positioned (N-HDT) rats serving as controls, the Na intake of HDT rats was significantly reduced during the first 3 days of HDT, and urinary and fecal Na loss exceeded the Na intake during days 5 and 6. Changes during the days of recovery showed adjustments and reestablishment of Na balance. Urinary K losses increased progressively during the 7 days of HDT, but, with the exception of days 1-3 of HDT, when the K intake was significantly reduced, the K balance was retained. Changes in cardiac responses (including elevations in mean, diastolic, and systolic arterial pressures) paralleled changes in fluid and electrolyte balance during the HDT period.

  2. The NASA performance assessment workstation: Cognitive performance during head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehab, Randa L.; Schlegel, Robert E.; Schiflett, Samuel G.; Eddy, Douglas R.

    The NASA Performance Assessment Workstation was used to assess cognitive performance changes in eight males subjected to seventeen days of 6 ° head-down bed rest. PAWS uses six performance tasks to assess directed and divided attention, spatial, mathematical, and memory skills, and tracking ability. Subjective scales assess overall fatigue and mood state. Subjects completed training trials, practice trials, bed rest trials, and recovery trials. The last eight practice trials and all bed rest trials were performed with subjects lying face-down on a gurney. In general, there was no apparent cumulative effect of bed rest. Following a short period of performance stabilization, a slight but steady trend of performance improvement was observed across all trials. For most tasks, this trend of performance improvement was enhanced during recovery. No statistically significant differences in performance were observed when comparing bed rest with the control period. Additionally, fatigue scores showed little change across all periods.

  3. Five days of head-down-tilt bed rest induces noninflammatory shedding of L-selectin.

    PubMed

    Feuerecker, M; Feuerecker, B; Matzel, S; Long, M; Strewe, C; Kaufmann, I; Hoerl, M; Schelling, G; Rehm, M; Choukèr, A

    2013-07-15

    Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDTBR) is a popular model, simulating alterations of gravitation during space missions. The aim of this study was to obtain a better insight into the complexly orchestrated regulations of HDTBR-induced immunological responses, hypothesizing that artificial gravity can mitigate these HDTBR-related physiological effects. This crossover-designed 5 days of HDTBR study included three protocols with no, or daily 30 min of centrifugation or 6 × 5 min of centrifugation. Twelve healthy, male participants donated blood pre-HDTBR, post-HDTBR, and twice during HDTBR. Cellular immune changes were assessed either by enumerative and immune cell phenotyping assays or by functional testing of responses to either recall antigens or receptor-dependent activation by chemotactic agents N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and with TNF-α. The expression of the adhesion molecule L-selectin (CD62L) on the surface of granulocytes and its shedding into plasma samples were measured. In parallel, other humoral factor, such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, parameters of endothelial damage (glycocalyx) were determined. Hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly increased during HDTBR. Although immune functional tests did not indicate a change in the immune performance, the expression of CD62L on resting granulocytes was significantly shed by 50% during HDTBR. Although the latter is normally associated to an activation of inflammatory innate immune responses and during interaction of granulocytes with the endothelium, CD62L shedding was, however, not related either to a systemic inflammatory alteration or to shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx during bed rest. This suggests a noninflammatory or "mechanical" shedding related to fluid shifts during head-down intervention and not to an acute inflammatory process. PMID:23681910

  4. Psychoneuroendocrine alterations during 5 days of head-down tilt bed rest and artificial gravity interventions.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, A; Feuerecker, B; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Hoerl, M; Schelling, G; Feuerecker, M

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate psychological stress and endocrine responses during 5 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) with or without the impact of artificial gravity (AG). Participants were assigned to one of three bed-rest-protocols either with (i) no centrifugation, (ii) continuous 30 min (AG1) or (iii) discontinuous 6 × 5 min (AG2) centrifugation periods at 1G in the center of mass periods. Centrifugations were performed daily in one session. Questionnaires for assessing psychological stress and the corresponding biological sample collection were performed before, during and after HDTBR or centrifugation. Overall, questionnaires showed no significant changes of anxiety or emotional stress during HDTBR. In the AG1-group, salivary cortisol levels were significantly higher after centrifugation irrespective of the progress of the HDTBR and day of intervention. The AG2-group showed higher cortisol concentrations after centrifugation only on the first days of head-down tilt but no more on day 5 of HDTBR. During bed rest, urine epinephrine excretion increased in all groups, but showed the highest day concentrations in the AG1-group, which were also significantly higher when compared with AG2. These results indicate that 5 days of HDT alone is not a major stressor and accordingly resulted only in moderate changes of neuroendocrine responses over time. However, daily centrifugation for a continuous duration of 30 min induced a significant neuroendocrine response, which was not subject to a habituation as compared with daily but intermittent centrifugation for 6 × 5 min. Discontinuous centrifugation is better tolerated and associated with lower adrenocortical stress responses during HDTBR. PMID:23579361

  5. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The Synthetic Vision Systems General Aviation (SVS-GA) element of NASA's Aviation Safety Program is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents through the application of synthetic vision techniques. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT), as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control (LVLOC) accidents. In addition to substantial safety benefits, SVS displays have many potential operational benefits that can lead to flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) resembling those conducted in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Potential benefits could include lower landing minimums, more approach options, reduced training time, etc. SVS conducted research will develop display concepts providing the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. The relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance has been largely undefined. Comprised of coordinated simulation and flight test efforts, the terrain portrayal for head-down displays (TP-HDD) test series examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal: variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec/2,953ft) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec/98 ft). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay. The TP-HDD test series was designed to provide comprehensive data to enable design trades to optimize all SVS applications, as

  6. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; De Dios, Yiri E; Gadd, Nichole E; Wood, Scott J; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  7. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Gadd, Nichole E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  8. Mean 24-hours sympathetic nervous system activity decreases during head-down tilted bed rest but not during microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nj; Heer, M.; Ivanova, K.; Norsk, P.

    Sympathetic nervous system activity is closely related to gravitational stress in ground based experiments. Thus a high activity is present in the standing-up position and a very low activity is observed during acute head-out water immersion. Adjustments in sympathetic activity are necessary to maintain a constant blood pressure during variations in venous return. Head-down tilted bed rest is applied as a model to simulate changes observed during microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that mean 24-hours sympathetic activity was low and similar during space flight and in ground based observation obtained during long-term head-down tilted bed rest. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline was measured by a radioenzymatic technique as an index of muscle sympathetic activity and thrombocyte noradrenaline and adrenaline were measured as indices of mean 24-hours sympathoadrenal activity. Previous results have indicated that thrombocyte noradrenaline level has a half-time of 2 days. Thus to reflect sympathetic activity during a specific experiment the study period must last for at least 6 days and a sample must be obtained within 12 hours after the experiment has ended. Ten normal healthy subjects were studied before and during a 14 days head-down tilted bed rest as well as during an ambulatory study period of a similar length. The whole experiment was repeated while the subjects were on a low calorie diet. Thrombocyte noradrenaline levels were studied in 4 cosmonauts before and within 12 hours after landing after more than 7 days in flight. Thrombocyte noradrenaline decreased markedly during the head-down tilted bed rest (p<0.001), whereas there were no significant changes in the ambulatory study. Plasma noradrenaline decreased in the adaptation period but not during the intervention. During microgravity thrombocyte noradrenaline increased in four cosmonauts and the percentage changes were significantly different in cosmonauts and in subjects

  9. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Head-Down Contact and Spearing in Tackle Football

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jonathan F.; Clarke, Kenneth S.; Peterson, Thomas R.; Torg, Joseph S.; Weis, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations that decrease the risk of cervical spine fractures and dislocations in football players. Background: Axial loading of the cervical spine resulting from head-down contact is the primary cause of spinal cord injuries. Keeping the head up and initiating contact with the shoulder or chest decreases the risk of these injuries. The 1976 rule changes resulted in a dramatic decrease in catastrophic cervical spine injuries. However, the helmet-contact rules are rarely enforced and head-down contact still occurs frequently. Our recommendations are directed toward decreasing the incidence of head-down contact. Recommendations: Educate players, coaches, and officials that unintentional and intentional head-down contact can result in catastrophic injuries. Increase the time tacklers, ball carriers, and blockers spend practicing correct contact techniques. Improve the enforcement and understanding of the existing helmet-contact penalties. PMID:15085218

  10. An evaluation of flight path formats head-up and head-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, George A.; Moody, Laura E.; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    Flight path primary flight display formats were incorporated on head-up and head-down electronic displays and integrated into an Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. Objective and subjective data were collected while ten airline pilots evaluated the formats by flying an approach and landing task under various ceiling, visibility and wind conditions. Deviations from referenced/commanded airspeed, horizontal track, vertical track and touchdown point were smaller using the head-up display (HUD) format than the head-down display (HDD) format, but not significantly smaller. Subjectively, the pilots overwhelmingly preferred (1) flight path formats over attitude formats used in current aircraft, and (2) the head-up presentation over the head-down, primarily because it eliminated the head-down to head-up transition during low visibility landing approaches. This report describes the simulator, the flight displays, the format evaluation, and the results of the objective and subjective data.

  11. Effects of 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest on cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Shibasaki, Manabu; Cui, Jian; Levine, Benjamin D.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2003-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) reduces adrenergic and nonadrenergic cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness. Additionally, an exercise countermeasure group was included to identify whether exercise during bed rest might counteract any vasoconstrictor deficits that arose during HDBR. Twenty-two subjects underwent 14 days of strict 6 degrees HDBR. Eight of these 22 subjects did not exercise during HDBR, while 14 of these subjects exercised on a supine cycle ergometer for 90 min a day at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum. To assess alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness, intradermal microdialysis was used to locally administer norepinephrine (NE), while forearm skin blood flow (SkBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) was monitored over microdialysis membranes. Nonlinear regression modeling was used to identify the effective drug concentration that caused 50% of the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response (EC(50)) and minimum values from the SkBF-NE dose-response curves. In addition, the effects of HDBR on nonadrenergic cutaneous vasoconstriction were assessed via the venoarteriolar response of the forearm and leg. HDBR did not alter EC(50) or the magnitude of cutaneous vasoconstriction to exogenous NE administration regardless of whether the subjects exercised during HDBR. Moreover, HDBR did not alter the forearm venoarteriolar response in either the control or exercise groups during HDBR. However, HDBR significantly reduced the magnitude of cutaneous vasoconstriction due to the venoarteriolar response in the leg, and this response was similarly reduced in the exercise group. These data suggest that HDBR does not alter cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous NE administration, whereas cutaneous vasoconstriction of the leg due to the venoarteriolar response is reduced after HDBR. It remains unclear whether attenuated venoarteriolar responses in the lower limbs contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance after bed rest and

  12. Effect of space flight and head-down bedrest on neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Ksinantová, L; Koska, J; Noskov, V B; Vigas, M; Grigoriev, A I; Macho, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the 5th day of SF, on the 2nd and 16th days after the landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the 5th day of prolonged subsequent head-down (-6 degrees) bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots. Blood samples during the test were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Insulin hypoglycemia was induced by i.v. administration of 0.1 IU/kg BW insulin (Actrapid HM) in bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in pre-flight, in-flight conditions and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in pre-flight studies. However, an evidently reduced EPI response was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent than at conditions of the Earth gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE levels did not significantly differ from those of pre-flight since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth gravitation was fast. It seems, that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of deconditioning effect of 5 days bed rest on stress response. Thus, the data indicate that catecholamine responses to ITT are reduced after exposure to real as well as simulated microgravity. PMID:16231455

  13. A single bout of exhaustive exercise affects integrated baroreflex function after 16 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed 24 h before reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) could increase integrated baroreflex sensitivity. Isolated carotid-cardiac and integrated baroreflex function was assessed in seven subjects before and after two periods of HDT separated by 11 mo. On the last day of one HDT period, subjects performed a single bout of maximal cycle ergometry (exercise). Subjects did not exercise after the other HDT period (control). Carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated using a neck collar device. Integrated baroreflex function was assessed by recording heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (MAP) during a 15-s Valsalva maneuver (VM) at a controlled expiratory pressure of 30 mmHg. The ratio of change in HR to change in MAP (delta HR/ delta MAP) during phases II and IV of the VM was used as an index of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Baroreflex-mediated vasoconstriction was assessed by measuring the late phase II rise in MAP. Following HDT, carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was reduced (2.8 to 2.0 ms/mmHg; P = 0.05) as was delta HR/ delta MAP during phase II (-1.5 to -0.8 beats/mmHg; P = 0.002). After exercise, isolated carotid baroreflex activity and phase II delta HR/ delta MAP returned to pre-HDT levels but remained attenuated in the control condition. Phase IV delta HR/ delta MAP was not altered by HDT or exercise. The late phase II increase of MAP was 71% greater after exercise compared with control (7 vs. 2 mmHg; P = 0.041).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  15. Influence of head-down and lateral decubitus neck flexion on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Wood, R H; Welsch, M A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the response of heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive index of autonomic control, to head-down neck flexion (HDNF), which engages both otoliths and neck muscle afferents, and to lateral decubitus neck flexion (LNF), in which neck afferents are activated, whereas otolith afferent input is not. HRV and forearm blood flow were evaluated in participants lying prone, during HDNF, lying in the lateral decubitus position, and during LNF. Compared with the prone position, HDNF resulted in lower high-frequency (46.9 +/- 7.1 vs. 62.3 +/- 6.2) and higher low-frequency (53.1 +/- 7.1 vs. 37.7 +/- 6.2) power, expressed as normalized units, along with higher low-frequency-to-high-frequency ratio (1.65 +/- 0.3 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.2), whereas LNF resulted in no alterations in HRV indexes. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in forearm blood flow or vascular resistance among any of the positions. Our data suggest that otolith organs influence autonomic modulation of the heart, supporting previous studies reporting that HDNF elicits increased sympathetic outflow. These data further suggest that HDNF results in a parasympathetic withdrawal from the heart in addition to sympathetic activation. PMID:11133902

  16. The effect of head-down tilt and water immersion on intracranial pressure in nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Lanny C.; Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Hines, John; Severs, Walter B.

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is investigated in primates during and after -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) and immersion in water to examine the effects of the headward fluid shift related to spaceflight. Following the HDT the primates are subjected to head-out thermoneutral water immersion, and the ICP is subsequently measured. ICP is found to increase from 3.8 +/- 1.1 to 5.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg during the horizontal control period. ICP stabilizes at -6.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg and then increases to -2.2 +/- 1.9 mm Hg during partial immersion, and ICP subsequently returns to preimmersion levels after immersion. These data indicate that exposure to HDT or water immersion lead to an early sharp increase in ICP, and water immersion alone leads to higher ICP levels. A significant conclusion of the work is that the ICP did not approach pathological levels, and this finding is relevant to human spaceflight research.

  17. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Martin, David S.; Perez, Sondar A.; Ribeiro, Christine; Stenger, Michael B.; Summers, Richard; Meck, Janice V.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Orthostatic hypotension is a serious risk for crewmembers returning from spaceflight. Numerous cardiovascular mechanisms have been proposed to account for this problem, including vascular and cardiac dysfunction, which we studied during bed rest. METHODS: Thirteen subjects were studied before and during bed rest. Statistical analysis was limited to the first 49-60 days of bed rest, and compared to pre-bed rest data. Ultrasound data were collected on vascular and cardiac structure and function. Tilt testing was conducted for 30 minutes or until presyncopal symptoms intervened. RESULTS: Plasma volume was significantly reduced by day 7 of bed rest. Flow-mediated dilation in the leg was significantly increased at bed rest day 49. Arterial responses to nitroglycerin differed in the arm and leg, but did not change as a result of bed rest. Intimal-medial thickness markedly decreased at bed rest days 21, 35 and 49. Several cardiac functional parameters including isovolumic relaxation time, ejection time and myocardial performance index were significantly increased (indicating a decrease in cardiac function) during bed rest. There was a trend for decreased orthostatic tolerance following 60 days of bed rest. DISCUSSION: These data suggest that 6 head-down tilt bed rest alters cardiovascular structure and function in a pattern similar to short duration spaceflight. Additionally, the vascular alterations are primarily seen in the lower body, while vessels of the upper body are unaffected. KEY WORDS: spaceflight, orthostatic intolerance, hypotension, fluid-shift, plasma volume

  18. Changes in the Diurnal Rhythms during a 45-Day Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Yu, Xinyang; Guo, Yiming; Chen, Xiaoping; Tan, Cheng; Huang, Tianle; Shen, Hanjie; Chen, Xianyun; Li, Hongying; Lv, Ke; Sun, Fei; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of −6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR). In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms. PMID:23110150

  19. Altered thermoregulatory responses after 15 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Johnson, John M.; Convertino, Victor A.; Raven, Peter B.; Engelke, Keith A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine whether extended exposure to a simulation of microgravity alters thermoregulatory reflex control of skin blood flow, six adult males were exposed to 15 days of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT). On an ambulatory control day before HDT exposure and on HDT day 15 the core temperature of each subject was increased by 0.5 - 1.0 C by whole body heating with a water-perfused suit. Mean skin temperature, oral temperature (T (sub or)), mean arterial pressure, and forearm blood flow were measured throughout the protocol. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated from the ratio of forearm blood flow to mean arterial pressure. After HDT exposure, the T(sub or) threshold at which reflex thermally induced increases in FVC began was elevated, whereas the slope of the T(sub or)-FVC relationship after this threshold was reduced. Moreover, normothermic FVC and FVC at the highest common T(sub or) between pre- and post-HDT trials were reduced after HDT. These data suggest that HDT exposure reduces thermoregulatory responses to heat stress. The mechanisms resulting in such an impaired thermoregulatory response are unknown but are likely related to the relative dehydration that accompanies this exposure.

  20. Changes in the diurnal rhythms during a 45-day head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Yu, Xinyang; Guo, Yiming; Chen, Xiaoping; Tan, Cheng; Huang, Tianle; Shen, Hanjie; Chen, Xianyun; Li, Hongying; Lv, Ke; Sun, Fei; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of -6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR). In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms. PMID:23110150

  1. Behavioral and Psychological Issues in Long Duration Head-down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, Kimberly A.; Bowie, Kendra; Sipes, Walter A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral health services, similar to those offered to the U.S. astronauts who complete six-month missions on board the International Space Station, were provided to 13 long-duration head-down bed rest participants. Issues in psychological screening, selection, and support are discussed as they relate to other isolated and confined environments. Psychological services offered to participants are described, and challenges in subject selection and retention are discussed. Psychological support and training provided to both subjects and study personnel have successfully improved the well-being of study participants. Behavioral health services are indispensable to long-duration head-down tilt bed rest studies.

  2. Effect on the cardiac function of repeated LBNP during a 1-month head down tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeille, Ph.; Lebouard, D.; Massabuau, M.; Pottier, J. M.; Patat, F.; Pourcelot, L.; Guell, A.

    Cardiovascular assessment by ultrasound methods was performed during two long duration (1 month) Head Down Tilt (HDT) on 6 healthy volunteers. On a first 1 month HDT session, 3 of the 6 subjects (A, B, C) had daily several lower body negative pressure tests (LBNP), whereas the 3 subjects remaining (D, E, F) rested without LBNP. On a second 1 month HDT session subjects D, E, and F had daily LBNP tests and the A, B and C subjects did not. The cardiac function was assessed by Echocardiography (B mode, TM mode). On all the "6 non LBNP" subjects the left ventricule diastolic volume (LVDV), the stroke volume (SV) and the cardiac output (CO) increase (+10%, -15%) after HDT then decrease and remain inferior (-5%, -5%) or equal to the basal value during the HDT. Immediately after the end of the HDT the heart rate (HR) increase (+10%, +30%) whereas the cardiac parameters decrease weakly (-5%, -10%) and normalize after 3 days of recovery. On the "6 LBNP" subjects the LVDV, SV and CO increase (+10%, +15%) after 1 h HDT as in the previous group then decrease but remain superior (+5%, +15%) or equal to the basal value. After the HDT session, the HR is markedly increased (+20%, +40%) the LVDV and SV decrease (-15%, -20%) whereas the CO increases or decreases depending on the amplitude of the HR variations. These parameters do not completely normalize after 3 days recovery. Repeated LBNP sessions have a significant effect on the cardiovascular function as it maintains all cardiac parameters above the basal value. The LBNP manoeuvre can be considered as an efficient countermeasure to prevent cardiac disadaptation induced by HDT position and probably microgravity.

  3. Prior head-down tilt does not impair the cerebrovascular response to head-up tilt

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changbin; Gao, Yuan; Greaves, Danielle K.; Villar, Rodrigo; Beltrame, Thomas; Fraser, Katelyn S.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that cerebrovascular autoregulation was not impaired during head-up tilt (HUT) that followed brief exposures to varying degrees of prior head-down tilt (HDT) was tested in 10 healthy young men and women. Cerebral mean flow velocity (MFV) and cardiovascular responses were measured in transitions to a 60-s period of 75° HUT that followed supine rest (control) or 15 s HDT at −10°, −25°, and −55°. During HDT, heart rate (HR) was reduced for −25° and −55°, and cardiac output was lower at −55° HDT. MFV increased during −10° HDT, but not in the other conditions even though blood pressure at the middle cerebral artery (BPMCA) increased. On the transition to HUT, HR increased only for −55° condition, but stroke volume and cardiac output transiently increased for −25° and −55°. Total peripheral resistance index decreased in proportion to the magnitude of HDT and recovered over the first 20 s of HUT. MFV was significantly less in all HDT conditions compared with the control in the first 5-s period of HUT, but it recovered quickly. An autoregulation correction index derived from MFV recovery relative to BPMCA decline revealed a delay in the first 5 s for prior HDT compared with control but then a rapid increase to briefly exceed control after −55° HDT. This study showed that cerebrovascular autoregulation is modified by but not impaired by brief HDT prior to HUT and that cerebral MFV recovered quickly and more rapidly than arterial blood pressure to protect against cerebral hypoperfusion and potential syncope. PMID:25749443

  4. Ocular Outcomes Evaluation in a 14-Day Head-Down Bed Rest Study

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, Susana B.; Yarbough, Patrice O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Godley, Bernard F.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated ocular outcomes in a 14-day head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR) study designed to simulate the effects of microgravity on the human body. Methods Healthy subjects were selected using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA BR conditions were implemented (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, 24-hour-a-day BR, continuous video monitoring). Subjects maintained a 6° HDT position for 14 consecutive days. Weekly ophthalmological examinations were performed in the sitting (pre/post-BR) and HDT (in-bed phase) positions. Equivalency tests with optimal-alpha techniques evaluated pre/post-BR differences in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), spherical equivalent, intraocular pressure (IOP), Spectral-domain OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), optic disc and macular parameters. Results 16 subjects (12 men and 4 women) were enrolled. Nearly all ocular outcomes were within our predefined clinically relevant thresholds following HDTBR, except near BCVA (pre/post-BR mean difference: −0.06 logMAR), spherical equivalent (−0.30 D), Tonopen XL IOP (+3.03 mmHg) and Spectralis OCT average (+1.14 μm), temporal-inferior (+1.58 μm) and nasal-inferior RNFLT (+3.48 μm). Modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual field and color vision were within normal limits throughout. No changes were detected on stereoscopic color fundus photography. Discussion A few functional and structural changes were detected after 14-day HDTBR, notably an improved BCVA possibly due to learning effect and RNFL thickening without signs of optic disc edema. In general, 6° HDTBR determined a small non-progressive IOP elevation, which returned to baseline levels post-BR. Further studies with different BR duration and/or tilt angle are warranted to investigate microgravity-induced ophthalmological changes. PMID:25245897

  5. Ocular Outcomes Comparison Between 14- and 70-day Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R.L.; Taibbi, G.; Zanello, S.B.; Yarbough, P.O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.J.; Vizzen, G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ophthalmological changes, including optic disc edema with optic nerve sheath distension, posterior globe flattening with hyperopic shift, choroidal folds and cotton wool spots have been detected in some astronauts involved in long-duration spaceflights. (sup 1) It is hypothesized that elevated intracranial pressure resulting from microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts may be responsible for most of these findings. Head-down tilt bed rest (HTDBR) is a ground-based microgravity analog which also produces cephalad fluid shifts. It is conceivable that prolonged HDTBR exposure may induce ocular changes similar to those experienced in microgravity. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to compare structural and functional ocular outcomes between 14- and 70-day HDTBR in healthy human subjects. It is hypothesized that 70-d HDTBR induced ocular changes of greater magnitude as compared to 14-d HDTBR. METHODS: Two HDTBR studies were conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit, located at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX. Identical NASA standard screening procedures and BR conditions (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, continuous video monitoring) were implemented in both studies. Participants spent 14 and/or 70 consecutive days in a 6deg HDT position and did not engage in exercise. Subjects received weekly ocular examinations before, during, and after HDTBR. Ocular testing included: distance and near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), cycloplegic refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, color vision, red dot test, modified Amsler grid test, confrontational visual field, color fundus photography and Spectral-domain OCT scans of the macula and the optic disc. Pre/post HDTBR differences between the two studies will be evaluated for BCVA, spherical equivalent, IOP, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular OCT parameters. RESULTS: 16 (12 males and 4 females) and 6 (5 males and 1

  6. Left ventricular remodeling during and after 60 days of sedentary head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Westby, Christian M; Martin, David S; Lee, Stuart M C; Stenger, Michael B; Platts, Steven H

    2016-04-15

    Short periods of weightlessness are associated with reduced stroke volume and left ventricular (LV) mass that appear rapidly and are thought to be largely dependent on plasma volume. The magnitude of these cardiac adaptations are even greater after prolonged periods of simulated weightlessness, but the time course during and the recovery from bed rest has not been previously described. We collected serial measures of plasma volume (PV, carbon monoxide rebreathing) and LV structure and function [tissue Doppler imaging, three-dimensional (3-D) and 2-D echocardiography] before, during, and up to 2 wk after 60 days of 6° head down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) in seven healthy subjects (four men, three women). By 60 days of HDTBR, PV was markedly reduced (2.7 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3 liters,P< 0.001). Resting measures of LV volume and mass were ∼15% (P< 0.001) and ∼14% lower (P< 0.001), respectively, compared with pre-HDTBR values. After 3 days of reambulation, both PV and LV volumes were not different than pre-HDTBR values. However, LV mass did not recover with normalization of PV and remained 12 ± 4% lower than pre-bed rest values (P< 0.001). As previously reported, decreased PV and LV volume precede and likely contribute to cardiac atrophy during prolonged LV unloading. Although PV and LV volume recover rapidly after HDTBR, there is no concomitant normalization of LV mass. These results demonstrate that reduced LV mass in response to prolonged simulated weightlessness is not a simple effect of tissue dehydration, but rather true LV muscle atrophy that persists well into recovery. PMID:26494448

  7. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25–49 yr) who participated in a 30-day −6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ∼20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ∼25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ∼20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = −0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  8. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  9. Computer simulation of the effect of dDAVP with saline loading on fluid balance after 24-hour head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. S.; Simanonok, K. E.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading (FL) before Shuttle reentry is a countermeasure currently in use by NASA to improve the orthostatic tolerance of astronauts during reentry and postflight. The fluid load consists of water and salt tablets equivalent to 32 oz (946 ml) of isotonic saline. However, the effectiveness of this countermeasure has been observed to decrease with the duration of spaceflight. The countermeasure's effectiveness may be improved by enhancing fluid retention using analogs of vasopressin such as lypressin (LVP) and desmopressin (dDAVP). In a computer simulation study reported previously, we attempted to assess the improvement in fluid retention obtained by the use of LVP administered before FL. The present study is concerned with the use of dDAVP. In a recent 24-hour, 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) study involving seven men, dDAVP was found to improve orthostatic tolerance as assessed by both lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and stand tests. The treatment restored Luft's cumulative stress index (cumulative product of magnitude and duration of LBNP) to nearly pre-bedrest level. The heart rate was lower and stroke volume was marginally higher at the same LBNP levels with administration of dDAVP compared to placebo. Lower heart rates were also observed with dDAVP during stand test, despite the lower level of cardiovascular stress. These improvements were seen with only a small but significant increase in plasma volume of approximately 3 percent. This paper presents a computer simulation analysis of some of the results of this HDT study.

  10. The implementation of game in a 20-day head-down tilting bed rest experiment upon mood status and neurotic levels of rest subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Yuko; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Hidetaka; Ishitobi, Hiromi

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the implementation of game on mental health among participants in a bed rest (BR) experiment. Subjects were 12 healthy males aged 20-26, who participated in a 20-day 6-degrees head-down tilting BR experiment. The participants were asked to complete psychometrical questionnaires before, during, and after the experiment. We entrusted the participants to manage their leisure time and they intended a game in which all of them could take part over the experiment period. The general conversation and light-hearted mood among the subjects continued during the experimental period. Longitudinal data analysis showed that levels of neurosis and mood status did not deteriorate during the experiment, while our previous experiments, which were performed under the same protocol as this study except for the implementation of the game showed a distinct deterioration in psychosocial status. We consider that the implementation of game autonomously contributes to the positive effects on the mental health among the participants.

  11. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  12. Effects of 30-Day Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures and Visual Function in a Healthy Subject

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Kaplowitz, Kevin; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Godley, Bernard F.; Zanello, Susana B.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We report ocular changes occurring in a healthy human subject enrolled in a bed rest (BR) study designed to replicate the effects of a low-gravity environment. Case report A 25-year-old Caucasian male spent 30 consecutive days in a 6° head-down-tilt position at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit. Comprehensive ophthalmologic exams, optic disc stereo-photography, Standard Automated Perimetry (SAP) and optic disc Spectralis OCT scans were performed at baseline, immediately post-BR (BR+0) and 6 months post-BR. Main outcome measures: changes in best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), cycloplegic refraction, SAP and Spectralis OCT measures. At BR+0 IOP was 11 and 10 mmHg in the right (OD) and left eye (OS), respectively (a bilateral 4 mmHg decrease compared to baseline); SAP documented a possible bilateral symmetrical inferior scotoma; Spectralis OCT showed an average 19.4 μm (+5.2%) increase in peripapillary retinal thickness, and an average 0.03 mm3 (+5.0%) increase in peripapillary retinal volume bilaterally. However, there were no clinically detectable signs of optic disc edema. 6 months post-BR, IOP was 13 and 14 mmHg in OD and OS, respectively, and the scotoma had resolved. Spectralis OCT measurements matched the ones recorded at baseline. Discussion In this subject, a reduction in IOP associated with subtle structural and functional changes compared to baseline were documented after prolonged head-down BR. These changes may be related to cephalad fluid shifts in response to tilt. Further studies should clarify whether decreased translaminar pressure (i.e., the difference between IOP and intracranial pressure) may be responsible for these findings. PMID:23447853

  13. Cardiovascular dynamics during the initial period of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaselli, Clare Marie; Kenney, Richard A.; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1987-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to 1 h of 60-deg head-down tilt was studied in 12 male subjects, ages 30-39 years, to simulate the early effects of weightlessness. Fluid shifts, hemodynamic variables, and indices of myocardial contractility were evaluated by utilizing electrocardiography, systolic time intervals, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. Most cardiovascular variables remained stable throughout the initial 30 min of the protocol, even though translocation of fluid from the legs to the thorax commenced immediately with the onset of head-down tilt. In contrast, minutes 30-60 were characterized by reduced stroke volume, cardiac output, mean stroke ejection rate, and Heather index concomitant with an elevation in mean arterial pressure. Intrathoracic fluid volume continued to increase, while leg volume continued to decrease. This latter physiological response suggests intrathoracic sequestration of fluid volume; blood was apparently redistributed to the pulmonary circulation rather than being retained in the great veins.

  14. [Positional asphyxia--death in a head-down position after falling down stairs].

    PubMed

    Doberentz, Elke; Madea, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of a body in an unusual position such as a head-down position requires thorough investigation. In this article, such a death is reported. A 64-year-old man was found in a head-down position at the bottom of a narrow staircase after obviously falling down the stairs. His head was wedged between the last step and a closed sliding door. Autopsy revealed craniofacial blunt force injuries, a non-dislocated fracture of the 4th cervical vertebral body (with intact ligaments of the spine and cervical cord) and massive cerebral and pulmonary oedema. Although the heart was significantly enlarged (610 g), the coronary arteries showed only minor arteriosclerotic changes. The alcohol concentration measured was 2.06 per mil in blood and 2.67 per mil in urine. The alcohol intoxication increased the risk to fall and together with the trauma of the cervical spine made it impossible for the man to free himself so that he ultimately died in a head-down position. PMID:23136702

  15. Ocular Outcomes Comparison Between 14- and 70-Day Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, Susana B.; Yarbough, Patrice O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Godley, Bernard F.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare ocular outcomes in healthy subjects undergoing 14- and/or 70-day head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR). Methods Participants were selected by using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA BR conditions were implemented. Subjects maintained a 6° HDT position for 14 and/or 70 consecutive days. Weekly ophthalmologic examinations were performed in the sitting (pre/post-BR only) and HDT positions. Mixed-effects linear models compared pre- and post-HDT BR observations between 14- and 70-day HDT BR in best-corrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent, intraocular pressure (IOP), Spectralis OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, peripapillary and macular retinal thicknesses. Results Sixteen and six subjects completed the 14- and 70-day HDT BR studies, respectively. The magnitude of HDT BR–induced changes was not significantly different between the two studies for all outcomes, except the superior (mean pre/post difference of 14- vs. 70-day HDT BR: +4.69 μm versus +11.50 μm), nasal (+4.63 μm versus +11.46 μm), and inferior (+4.34 μm versus +10.08 μm) peripapillary retinal thickness. A +1.42 mm Hg and a +1.79 mm Hg iCare IOP increase from baseline occurred during 14- and 70-day HDT BR, respectively. Modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual field, color vision, and stereoscopic fundus photography were unremarkable. Conclusions Seventy-day HDT BR induced greater peripapillary retinal thickening than 14-day HDT BR, suggesting that time may affect the amount of optic disc swelling. Spectralis OCT detected retinal nerve fiber layer thickening post BR, without clinical signs of optic disc edema. A small IOP increase during BR subsided post HDT BR. Such changes may have resulted from BR-induced cephalad fluids shift. The HDT BR duration may be critical for replicating microgravity-related ophthalmologic changes observed in astronauts on ≥6-month spaceflights. PMID:26868753

  16. Sympathetic and vascular responses to head-down neck flexion in humans.

    PubMed

    Shortt, T L; Ray, C A

    1997-04-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated increases in sympathetic nerve outflow with vestibular stimulation. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether vestibulosympathetic reflexes are engaged in humans. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, arterial pressure, calf blood flow (CBF), and calculated calf vascular resistance (CVR; mean arterial pressure/CBF) were determined during 10 min of baseline (laying prone with chin supported) and 10 min of head-down neck flexion (HDNF). MSNA responses were measured in nine subjects, and calf vascular responses were determined in seven of these subjects. Heart rate increased during the first minute of HDNF (71 +/- 2 to 76 +/- 3 beats/min; P < 0.05) and remained slightly elevated (71 +/- 2 to 74 +/- 3 beats/min; P < 0.05) for the duration of HDNF. Diastolic and mean arterial pressures also increased slightly with HDNF (80 +/- 3 to 82 +/- 3 and 96 +/- 3 to 98 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Systolic arterial pressure did not change significantly during HDNF. CBF decreased 14% (4.63 +/- 0.78 to 3.97 +/- 0.60 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1); P < 0.05), and CVR increased 12% (24.0 +/- 4.3 to 27.4 +/- 4.7 units; P < 0.05) during HDNF. These changes corresponded with significant increases in MSNA during HDNF. MSNA, expressed as burst frequency, increased from 14 +/- 2 to 20 +/- 2 bursts/min (P < 0.05) and increased 63 +/- 23% (P < 0.05) when expressed as the percent change in total activity. All variables returned to baseline during recovery. Thoracic impedance measured in five subjects did not change during HDNF (19.6 +/- 1.2 to 19.7 +/- 1.5 omega), suggesting no major change in central blood volume. The results indicate that HDNF elicits increases in CVR that are mediated by the augmentation of MSNA. Arterial pressure responses and thoracic impedance data suggest that high and low pressure baroreflexes were not the mechanism for sympathetic activation. The immediate increase in MSNA with HDNF suggests a role

  17. 21 CFR 888.6 - Degree of constraint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES General Provisions § 888.6 Degree of constraint. Certain joint prostheses provide more... affecting the safety and effectiveness of orthopedic prostheses. FDA is defining the following standard terms for categorizing the degree of constraint. (a) A “constrained” joint prosthesis is used for...

  18. System requirements for head down and helmet mounted displays in the military avionics environment

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, M.F.; Kalmanash, M.; Sethna, V.

    1996-12-31

    The introduction of flat panel display technologies into the military avionics cockpit is a challenging proposition, due to the very difficult system level requirements which must be met. These relate to environmental extremes (temperature and vibrational), sever ambient lighting conditions (10,000 fL to nighttime viewing), night vision system compatibility, and wide viewing angle. At the same time, the display system must be packaged in minimal space and use minimal power. The authors will present details on the display system requirements for both head down and helmet mounted systems, as well as information on how these challenges may be overcome.

  19. Head-up and head-down displays integration in automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, J. Alejandro; Osorio-Gómez, Gilberto; Agudelo, J. David

    2014-06-01

    In automotive industry, the dashboard has been ergonomically developed in order to keep the driver focused on the horizon while driving, but the possibility to access external electronic devices constraints the driver to turn away his face, generating dangerous situations in spite of the short periods of time. Therefore, this work explores the integration of Head-Up Displays and Head-Down Displays in automobiles, proposing configurations that give to drivers the facility to driving focused. In this way, some of the main ergonomic comments about those configurations are proposed; and also, some technical comments regarding the implemented arrangements are given.

  20. Hormonal and metabolic responses of hypophysectomized rats with head-down suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, C. M.; Grindeland, R. E.; Woodman, C. R.; Gosselink, K.; Linderman, J. K.; Mukku, V. R.; Gooselink, K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to secure select anatomical and physiological measurements from hypophysectomized rats and their sham-operated control to determine how various endocrine influences could be modified by conditions of simulated microgravity. The focal point of the study was the exercise responses after head-down suspension; however, we were also interested in obtaining insights on nonexercise-related mechanisms. Since more details and information concerning this study will be published elsewhere, we will highlight those findings which warrant further research.

  1. Effect on real-world depth perception from exposure to heads-down stereoscopic flight displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Williams, Steven P.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A stereoacuity test was used as part of the experimental protocol of a study in which eight transport pilots flew repeated simulated landing approaches using both stereo and nonstereo three-dimensional heads-down 'pathway in the sky' displays. At the decisionmaking crux of each approach, the pilots transitioned to a stereoacuity test employing real objects rather than a two-dimensional target apparatus. A statistical analysis of stereoacuity measures which compared a controlled condition of no exposure to any electronic flight display with the transition data from nonstereo and stereopsis displays indicated no significant differences for any of the conditions.

  2. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, Morgan; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Arterial health may be affected by microgravity or ground based analogs of spaceflight, as shown by an increase in thoracic aorta stiffness1. Head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) is often used as a ground-based simulation of spaceflight because it induces physiological changes similar to those that occur in space2, 3. This abstract details an analysis of arterial stiffness (a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis), the distensibility coefficient (DC), and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (PSE) of the arterial walls during HDTBR. This project may help determine how spaceflight differentially affects arterial function in the upper vs. lower body.

  3. 21 CFR 888.6 - Degree of constraint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degree of constraint. 888.6 Section 888.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... a single, flexible, across-the-joint component or more than one component linked together or...

  4. 21 CFR 888.6 - Degree of constraint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degree of constraint. 888.6 Section 888.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... a single, flexible, across-the-joint component or more than one component linked together or...

  5. 21 CFR 888.6 - Degree of constraint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degree of constraint. 888.6 Section 888.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... a single, flexible, across-the-joint component or more than one component linked together or...

  6. Bone Resorption Increases as Early as the Second Day in Head- Down Bed Rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heer, M.; Kamps, N.; Mika, C.; Boese, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Long-term bed rest and space mission studies have shown that immobilization as well as microgravity induce increased bone resorption while bone formation tends to decrease. In order to analyze the kinetics of short-term changes in bone turnover we studied in a randomized, strictly controlled crossover design the effects of 6 days 6° head-down tilt bed rest (HDT) in 8 male healthy subjects (mean body weight (BW): 70.1 +/- 1.88 kg; mean age: 25.5 +/- 1.04 years) in our metabolic ward. Two days before arriving in the metabolic ward the subjects started with a diet consisting of an energy content of 10 MJ/d, 2000 mg Calcium/d, 400 i.U. Vitamin D, 200 mEq Na+ and 50 ml water/kg BW/d. The diet was continued in the metabolic ward. The metabolic ward period (11days) was divided into 3 parts: 4 ambulatory days, 6 days either HDT or control and 1 recovery day. Continuous urine collection started on the first day in the metabolic ward to analyze calcium excretion and bone resorption markers, namely C-telopeptide (CTX) and N-telopeptide (NTX). On the 2nd ambulatory day in the metabolic ward and on the 5th day in HDT or control blood was drawn to analyze serum calcium, parathyroid hormone, and bone formation markers (bone Alkaline Phosphatase (bAP), Procollagen-I-Propeptide (P-I-CP). Both study phases were identical with respect to environmental conditions, study protocol and diet. Urinary calcium excretion was as early as the first day in immobilization increased (p<0.01). CTX- and NTX-excretion stayed unchanged the first 24 hours in HDT compared to the control. But, already on the 2nd day of immobilization both bone resorption markers significantly increased. NTX-excretion was increased by 28.7 +/- 14.0% (p<0.05), while CTX-excretion rose by 17.8 +/- 8.3% (p<0.01). Both, the CTX- excretion as well as the calcium excretion keep the significantly higher level during the HDT period, and even continued through the first day of recovery. However, NTX excretion, descended from day

  7. Terrain Portrayal for Synthetic Vision Systems Head-Down Displays Evaluation Results: Compilation of Pilot Transcripts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    The Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) simulation experiment addressed multiple objectives involving twelve display concepts (two baseline concepts without terrain and ten synthetic vision system (SVS) variations), four evaluation maneuvers (two en route and one approach maneuver, plus a rare-event scenario), and three pilot group classifications. The TP-HDD SVS simulation was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) General Aviation WorkStation (GAWS) facility. The results from this simulation establish the relationship between terrain portrayal fidelity and pilot situation awareness, workload, stress, and performance and are published in the NASA TP entitled Terrain Portrayal for Synthetic Vision Systems Head-Down Displays Evaluation Results. This is a collection of pilot comments during each run of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. These comments are not the full transcripts, but a condensed version where only the salient remarks that applied to the scenario, the maneuver, or the actual research itself were compiled.

  8. Effects of encouraged water drinking on thermoregulatory responses after 20 days of head-down bed rest in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2009-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that encouraged water drinking according to urine output for 20 days could ameliorate impaired thermoregulatory function under microgravity conditions. Twelve healthy men, aged 24 ± 1.5 years (mean ± SE), underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 20 days. During bed rest, subjects were encouraged to drink the same amount of water as the 24-h urine output volume of the previous day. A heat exposure test consisting of water immersion up to the knees at 42°C for 45 min after a 10 min rest (baseline) in the sitting position was performed 2 days before the 20-day HDBR (PRE), and 2 days after the 20-day HDBR (POST). Core temperature (tympanic), skin temperature, skin blood flow and sweat rate were recorded continuously. We found that the -6° HDBR did not increase the threshold temperature for onset of sweating under the encouraged water drinking regime. We conclude that encouraged water drinking could prevent impaired thermoregulatory responses after HDBR.

  9. Psychomotor performance during a 28 day head-down tilt with and without lower body negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traon, A. Pavy-le; de Feneyrols, A. Rous; Cornac, A.; Abdeseelam, R.; N'uygen, D.; Lazerges, M.; Güell, A.; Bes, A.

    Several factors may affect psychomotor performance in space: sensory-motor changes, sleep disturbances, psychological modifications induced by the social isolation and confinement. However, psychomotor performance is difficult to assess. A battery of standardized and computerized tests, so-called "Automated Portable Test System" (APTS) was devised to ascertain the cognitive, perceptive and motor abilities and their possible fluctuations according to environmental effects. Antiorthostatic bedrest, often used to simulate weightlessness, (particularly cardiovascular modifications) also constitutes a situation of social confinement and isolation. During two bedrest experiments (with head-down tilt of -6°) of 28 days each, we intended to assess psychomotor performance of 6 males so as to determine whether: —on the one hand, it could be altered by remaining in decubitus; —on the other, the Lower Body Negative Pressure sessions, designed to prevent orthostatic intolerance back on Earth, could improve the performance. To accomplish this, part of the APTS tests as well as an automated perceptive attention test were performed. No downgrading of psychomotor performance was observed. On the contrary, the tasks were more accurately performed over time. In order to assess the experimental conditions on the acquisition phase, the learning curves were modelled. A beneficial effect of the LBNP sessions on simple tests involving the visual-motor coordination and attention faculties can only be regarded as a mere trend. Methods used in this experiment are also discussed.

  10. Effect of artificial gravity with exercise training on lung function during head-down bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinghua; Guo, Na; Liu, Changting; Wang, Delong; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Xiqing; Fan, Shangchun; Wang, Changyong; Yang, Changbin; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Dongyuan; Yao, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that microgravity/weightlessness can induce changes in lung physiology/function. We hypothesized that microgravity, induced by head-down bed rest (HDBR), would induce changes in lung function and that exercise training with artificial gravity (AG) would prevent these changes from occurring. Twelve participants were randomly assigned to a control or AG exercise countermeasure (CM) group (n = 6 per group) and 96 h of 6° HDBR. Participants in the CM group were exposed to AG (alternating 2 min intervals of +1·0 and +2·0 G) for 30 min, twice daily, during which time ergometric exercise (40 W intensity) was performed. Pulse rate, oxygen saturation (SO(2) ) and lung function were measured and compared between groups. The CM and control groups were similar in mean age, height and weight. There were no significant within or between group differences over time in pulse rate, SO(2) , vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, tidal volume, expiratory reserve volume, inspiratory reserve volume, minute ventilation, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow in 25%, 50% and 75% vital capacity, forced inspiratory vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and maximal voluntary ventilation. Microgravity induced by 96 h of HDBR does not appear to affect lung function in humans. Further, AG with exercise training does not change lung function during 96 h of HDBR in humans. PMID:23216762

  11. Low-magnitude whole body vibration with resistive exercise as a countermeasure against cardiovascular deconditioning after 60 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Mickael; Yuan, Ming; Demiot, Claire; Bai, Yanqiang Q; Jiang, Shizhong Z; Li, Yongzhi Z; Arbeille, Philippe; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Levrard, Thibaud; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Li, Yinghui H

    2011-12-01

    Whole body vibration with resistive exercise is a promising countermeasure against some weightlessness-induced dysfunctions. Our objective was to study whether the combination of low-magnitude whole body vibration with a resistive exercise can prevent the cardiovascular deconditioning induced by a nonstrict 60-day head-down bed rest (Earth Star International Bed Rest Experiment Project). Fourteen healthy men participated in this study. We recorded electrocardiograms and blood pressure waves by means of a noninvasive beat-by-beat measurement system (Cardiospace, integrated by Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and Astronaut Center of China) during an orthostatic test (20 min of 75-degree head-up tilt test) before and immediately after bed rest. We estimated heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, baroreflex sensitivity, and heart rate variability. Low-magnitude whole body vibration with resistive exercise prevented an increase of the sympathetic index (reflecting the sympathovagal balance of cardiac autonomic control) and limited the decrease of the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity induced by 60 days of head-down bed rest. However, this countermeasure had very little effect on cardiac hemodynamics and did not improve the orthostatic tolerance. This combined countermeasure did not efficiently prevent orthostatic intolerance but prevents changes in the autonomic nervous system associated with cardiovascular deconditioning. The underlying mechanisms remain hypothetical but might involve cutaneous and muscular mechanoreceptors. PMID:21900640

  12. Cardiopulmonary responses to acute hypoxia, head-down tilt and fluid loading in anesthetized dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Scotto, P.; Riedel, C.; Avasthi, P.; Koshukosky, V.; Chick, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary responses to acute hypoxia (HY), fluid loading by saline infusion (FL), and head-down tilt (HD) of mechanically ventilated anesthetized dogs were investigated by measuring thermodynamics and pulmonary gas exchange. It was found that HD decreased the total respiratory compliance both during HY and normoxia (NO) and that the reduction in compliance by FL was twice as large as by HD. Superimposing HD on HY doubled the increase in vascular resistance due to HY alone. In the systemic circulation, HD lowered the resistance to below NO levels. There was a significant positive correlation between the changes in blood volume and in pulmonary artery pressure for experimental transitions, suggesting that a shift in blood volume from systemic to pulmonary circulations and changes in the total blood volume may contribute substantially to these apparent changes in resistance.

  13. Terrain Portrayal for Synthetic Vision Systems Head-Down Displays Evaluation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. At the time of this study, the relationship between the complexity of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance had been largely undefined. The terrain portrayal for SVS head-down displays (TP-HDD) simulation examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal on the primary flight display (PFD): variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay.

  14. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  15. Positional Asphyxia: Death Due to Unusual Head-Down Position in a Narrow Space.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Vinod Ashok; Ghodake, Dattatray G; Kharat, Rajesh D

    2016-06-01

    Death due to a head-down position with hyperflexion of the neck is a rare event. A person accidentally falling into a narrow space and remaining in an upside-down position with no timely recovery may experience positional or postural asphyxia. It is a critical condition arising out of particular body positions, leading to mechanical obstruction of respiration. The precipitating factors are intoxication due to alcohol, drugs, obesity, psychiatric illnesses, and injuries. A 30-year-old unmarried woman, weighing 82 kg and with a body mass index of 31.24, was found in a narrow space between the bed and the wall in a naked state and in a head-down position with hyperflexion of the neck. The distribution of lividity was consistent with the position of the body at the scene. Blood was oozing from the mouth and nostrils, and signs of asphyxia were present. The toxicological analyses of viscera, blood, and urine were negative for alcohol, drugs, and poisons. Glucose levels in the blood (86 mg/dL) as well as urine and vitreous humor levels (68 mg/dL) were within normal limits. On microscopic examination, there were no findings of coronary atherosclerosis, whereas the brain and lung were edematous. After meticulous examination, we ruled out sexual assault, autoerotic asphyxia, epilepsy, psychiatric illness, diabetes, toxicity, and coronary artery disease. Death was attributed to the accidental fall of the obese individual being stuck in a narrow space, resulting in positional asphyxia. It is imperative to recognize the precipitating or risk factors before labeling positional asphyxia as a cause of death. PMID:26840099

  16. Effects of saline loading during head down tilt on ANP and cyclic GMP levels and on urinary fluid excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, C.; Lang, R. E.; Baisch, F.; Blomqvist, G.; Heer, M.; Gerzer, R.

    In the present study the renal and humoral effects of acute saline infusions were investigated in six healthy male volunteers before, during and after a ten day period of -6° head-down-tilt (HDT). During the whole 23-day study period the subjects received a standardized diet including 40 ml water and 125 mg NaCl per kg body weight per day. After the infusion of 0.9% saline (22 ml/kg within 20 minutes) plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were only slightly increased (not significant) at the end of the infusion, while plasma cyclic GMP levels were significantly increased by about 40% (p<0.05) one hour later. No difference was observed in the plasma ANP and cyclic GMP changes between the pre-HDT, the HDT and the post-HDT infusion experiment. Urine flow, sodium excretion and urinary cyclic GMP excretion were significantly increased (p<0.05 and below) by 100 to 300% during the second and third hour after each saline infusion. However, during these short-term periods only 20% of the infused water and less than 20% of the infused sodium were excreted. Furthermore, a significantly increased volume, sodium and cyclic GMP excretion was observed for over 48 hours after each fluid load experiment. These data suggest that HDT does not induce major alterations in the regulation of an acute saline infusion and plasma ANP does not play a major role in the diuretic/natriuretic effects of volume loading.

  17. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  18. A Proposed Study Examining Individual Differences in Temporal Profiles of Cardiovascular Responses to Head Down Tilt During Fluid Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Winther, Sean; Martinez, Jacqueline; Dominguez, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility of healthy astronauts to orthostatic hypotension and presyncope is exacerbated upon return from spaceflight. The effect of altered gravity during space flight and planetary transition on human cardiovascular function is of critical importance to maintenance of astronaut health and safety. Hypovolemia, reduced plasma volume, is suspected to play an important role in cardiovascular deconditioning following exposure to spaceflight, which may lead to increased peripheral resistance, attenuated arterial baroreflex, and changes in cardiac function. A promising countermeasure for post-flight orthostatic intolerance is fluid loading used to restore lost plasma volume by giving crew salt tablets and water prior to re-entry. The main purpose of the proposed study is to define the temporal profile of cardiac responses to simulated 0-G conditions before and following a fluid loading countermeasure. 8 men and 8 women will be tested during 4 hour exposures at 6o head down tilt (HDT). Each subject will be given two exposures to HDT on separate days, one with and one without fluid loading (one liter of 0.9% saline solution). Stand tests (orthostatic stress) will be done before and after each HDT. Cardiac measures will be obtained with both impedance cardiography and echo ultrasound

  19. Interpersonal relationships in isolation and confinement: Long-term bed rest in head-down tilt position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karine, Weiss; Gabriel, Moser

    The long-term bed-rest was organized by ESA and CNES, in order to simulate the physiological effects of weightlessness: eight volunteers had to stay 42 days in bed, in a head down tilt position (-6 °). There were two subjects in a room, they could not be alone and it was difficult for them to have their own personal space and intimacy. In these circumstances, as in outer space, interpersonal relationships were of prime importance. This situation enabled us, through systematic observation, to analyze the evolution of the relational behavior in dyads, and to quote some social indicators of adaptation. Results show significant withdrawal, and the time spent alone was marked by the emergence, during the experiment, of specific preferential activities. Behavioral contagion was observed in each dyad (people engaged in the same activities at the same time), except in the one case of abandon. Moreover, the highest rates of inactivity and withdrawal were noted in this case. Verbal indicators were useful to comment these results and showed that, for all the dyads, one of the two subjects always played a regulating role by expressing a very positive perception of the situation. These results emphasize the importance of psycho-sociological factors in isolation and confinement. Thus, it appears that different modalities of interpersonal relationships, and not only verbal interactions, play a significant role in adaptation to stress situations.

  20. No effect of artificial gravity on lung function with exercise training during head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Longxiang; Guo, Yinghua; Wang, Yajuan; Wang, Delong; Liu, Changting

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of microgravity simulated by head-down bed rest (HDBR) and artificial gravity (AG) with exercise on lung function. Twenty-four volunteers were randomly divided into control and exercise countermeasure (CM) groups for 96 h of 6° HDBR. Comparisons of pulse rate, pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) and lung function were made between these two groups at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96 h. Compared with the sitting position, inspiratory capacity and respiratory reserve volume were significantly higher than before HDBR (0° position) (P < 0.05). Vital capacity, expiratory reserve volume, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced inspiratory vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s, forced expiratory flow at 25, 50, and 75%, maximal mid-expiratory flow and peak expiratory flow were all significantly lower than those before HDBR (P < 0.05). Neither control nor CM groups showed significant differences in pulse rate, SpO2, pulmonary volume and pulmonary ventilation function over the HDBR observation time. Postural changes can lead to variation in lung volume and ventilation function, but a HDBR model induced no changes in pulmonary function and therefore should not be used to study AG countermeasures.

  1. Blood volume regulating hormones response during two space related simulation protocols: Four-week confinement and head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, A.; Gauquelin, G.; Gunga, H. C.; Fortrat, J. O.; Kirsch, K.; Guell, A.; Bizollon, Ch. A.; Gharib, C.

    1995-04-01

    The volume of regulating hormones (renin, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin and atrial natriuretic factor), electrolytes and creatinine concentrations, and blood pressure were measured in two different four-week experimental protocols: respectively -6 ° head-down bed-rest (5 subjects) and confinement (6 subjects). We observed a significant increase ( P < 0.01 at D2 vs D-5) of systolic blood pressure during confinement and a different level of response for some hormones, especially for arginine vasopressin (300% increase during confinement instead of 50% during bed-rest). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was enhanced during confinement and head-down bed-rest. In both conditions, we obtained a similar pattern of response for blood volume regulating hormones. During confinement, two main factors were inactivity and stress activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In the bed-rest study the response is principally due to the fluid shift and blood volume adaptation but it is not possible to exclude the role of inactivity and stress.

  2. Quaternary geologic map of the Sudbury 4 degree by 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Sado, Edward V., (compiler); Baker, C.L.; Farrand, William R.

    2004-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Sudbury 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  3. Quaternary geologic map of the Ottawa 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Gadd, N. R., (compiler); Veillette, J.J.; Wagner, P.W.; Chapman, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Ottawa 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  4. Quaternary geologic map of the Chicago 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Lineback, Jerry A.; Bleuer, Ned K.; Mickelson, David M.; Farrand, William R.; Goldthwait, Richard P.; Edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald M.; Fullerton, David S.

    1983-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Chicago 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  5. Early processing variations in selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli during 30 days head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; He, Si-Yang; Niu, Dong-Bin; Guo, Jian-Ping; Xu, Yun-Long; Wang, De-Sheng; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Li, Zhi-Li; Tang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yin-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic variations in early selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli were explored during a 30 days period of head-down bed rest. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded at F5, F6, P5, P6 scalp locations in seven male subjects who attended to pairs of bicolored light emitting diodes that flashed sequentially to produce a perception of movement. Subjects were required to attend selectively to a critical feature of the moving target, e.g., color or direction. The tasks included: a no response task, a color selective response task, a moving direction selective response task, and a combined color-direction selective response task. Subjects were asked to perform these four tasks on: the 3rd day before bed rest; the 3rd, 15th and 30th day during the bed rest; and the 5th day after bed rest. Subjects responded quickly to the color than moving direction and combined color-direction response. And they had a longer reaction time during bed rest on the 15th and 30th day during bed rest after a relatively quicker response on the 3rd day. Using brain event-related potentials technique, we found that in the color selective response task, the mean amplitudes of P1 and N1 for target ERPs decreased in the 3rd day during bed rest and 5th day after bed rest in comparison with pre-bed rest, 15th day and 30th day during bed rest. In the combined color-direction selective response task, the P1 latencies for target ERPs on the 3rd and 30th day during bed rest were longer than on the 15th day during bed rest. As 3rd day during bed rest was in the acute adaptation period and 30th day during bed rest was in the relatively adaptation stage of head-down bed rest, the results help to clarify the effects of bed rest on different task loads and patterns of attention. It was suggested that subjects expended more time to give correct decision in the head-down tilt bed rest state. A difficulty in the recruitment of brain resources was found in feature selection task

  6. Effects of leg strength and bicycle ergometry exercise on cardiovascular deconditioning after 30-day head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Liu, Yusheng; Sun, Hongyi; Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Ni, Chengzhi

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the intermittent leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could attenuate cardiovascular deconditioning induced by prolonged -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR). Fifteen male subjects were randomly allocated into group A ( n=5, 30 days HDBR without exercise), group B ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with leg muscular strength exercise) and group C ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with bicycle ergometry exercise). The orthostatic tolerance (OT) was determined by +75°/20 min head-up tilt (HUT) test and the submaximal exercise capacity was determined by bicycle ergometry before and after HDBR. The results were as follows: (1) Compared with that before HDBR, OT time decreased dramatically by 57.6% ( p<0.001) after HDBR in group A, while it decreased by 36.4% ( p=0.084) in group B and by 34.7% ( p=0.062) in group C. (2) Compared with that before HDBR, the submaximal exercise time decreased significantly by 17.7% ( p<0.05) and 21.1% ( p<0.05) in groups A and B, respectively, after HDBR. However, it had no change (+1.3%, p>0.77) in group C. (3) compared with that before HDBR, the changes of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were slightly improved in group B and C, while deteriorated in group A during orthostatic test and exercise test after HDBR. The results indicate that leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could partially attenuate the cardiovascular deconditioning induced by 30 d HDBR, and the latter exercise training could fully provide the protection for the loss of exercise capacity.

  7. Three-dimensional audio versus head-down traffic alert and collision avoidance system displays.

    PubMed

    Begault, D R; Pittman, M T

    1996-01-01

    The advantage of a head-up auditory display for situational awareness was evaluated in an experiment designed to measure and compare the acquisition time for capturing visual targets under two conditions: standard head-down Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System display and three-dimensional (3-D) audio Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System presentation. (The technology used for 3-D audio presentation allows a stereo headphone user to potentially localize a sound at any externalized position in 3-D auditory space). Ten commercial airline crews were tested under full-mission simulation conditions at the NASA-Ames Crew-Vehicle Systems Research Facility Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. Scenario software generated targets corresponding to aircraft that activated a 3-D aural advisory (the head-up auditory condition) or a standard, visual-audio TCAS advisory (map display with monaural audio alert). Results showed a significant difference in target acquisition time between the two conditions, favoring the 3-D audio Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System condition by 500 ms. PMID:11539173

  8. Skin sympathetic outflow during head-down neck flexion in humans.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A; Hume, K M; Shortt, T L

    1997-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity during head-down neck flexion (HDNF). The purpose of the present study was to determine if HDNF also activates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). SSNA, heart rate, arterial pressure, skin blood flow, calf blood flow, and calculated calf vascular resistance (mean arterial pressure/calf blood flow) were determined in 12 subjects during 3 min of baseline (lying prone with chin supported) and 3 min of HDNF. There were no significant changes in heart rate and arterial pressures during HDNF; however, diastolic and mean arterial pressure tended to increase slightly. Calf blood flow decreased 22% and calf vascular resistance increased 46% during HDNF. SSNA did not significantly change during HDNF. In three subjects we measured both muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activity during HDNF. In these trials, muscle sympathetic nerve activity consistently increased, but SSNA did not. The results indicate that HDNF in humans activates muscle sympathetic nerve activity, but does not activate SSNA. Thus vestibular stimulation may elicit differential activation of sympathetic outflow in humans. PMID:9321897

  9. Acute and chronic head-down tail suspension diminishes cerebral perfusion in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, M. Keith; Colleran, Patrick N.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regional brain blood flow and vascular resistance are altered by acute and chronic head-down tail suspension (HDT). Regional cerebral blood flow, arterial pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance were measured in a group of control rats during normal standing and following 10 min of HDT and in two other groups of rats after 7 and 28 days of HDT. Heart rate was not different among conditions, whereas mean arterial pressure was elevated at 10 min of HDT relative to the other conditions. Total brain blood flow was reduced from that during standing by 48, 24, and 27% following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively. Regional blood flows to all cerebral tissues and the eyes were reduced with 10 min of HDT and remained lower in the eye, olfactory bulbs, left and right cerebrum, thalamic region, and the midbrain with 7 and 28 days of HDT. Total brain vascular resistance was 116, 44, and 38% greater following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively, relative to that during control standing. Vascular resistance was elevated in all cerebral regions with 10 min of HDT and remained higher than control levels in most brain regions. These results demonstrate that HDT results in chronic elevations in total and regional cerebral vascular resistance, and this may be the underlying stimulus for the HDT-induced smooth muscle hypertrophy of cerebral resistance arteries.

  10. Body fluid alterations during head-down bed rest in men at moderate altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Luft, F. C.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on fluid balance responses to simulated zero-gravity, measurements were made in six subjects before and during -5 deg continuous head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft. The same subjects were studied again at this altitude without HDBR as a control (CON) using a cross-over design. During this time, they maintained normal upright day-time activities, sleeping in the horizontal position at night. Fluid balance changes during HDBR in hypoxia were more pronounced than similar measurements previously reported from HDBR studies at sea level. Plasma volume loss was slightly greater and the diuresis and natriuresis were doubled in magnitude as compared to previous studies in normoxia and sustained for 4 d during hypoxia. These changes were associated with an immediate but transient rise in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to day 4 of 140 percent in HDBR and 41 percent in CON (p less than 0.005), followed by a decline towards baseline. Differences were less striking between HDBR and CON for plasma antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone, which were transiently reduced by HDBR. Plasma catecholamines showed a similar pattern to ANP in both HDBR and CON, suggesting that elevated ANP and catecholamines together accounted for the enhanced fluid shifts with HDBR during hypoxia.

  11. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Erdeniz, Burak; DeDios, Yiri; Wood, Scott; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, increased intracranial pressure that by itself has been related to microgravity-induced bodily fluid shifts: [1] has been associated with white matter microstructural damage, [2] Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system, [3] Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure, and [4] Here we present results of the first eight subjects.

  12. Renal Function of Rats in Response to 37 Days of Head-Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tommy J.; Wade, Charles E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spaceflight induces changes in human renal function, suggesting similar changes may occur in rats. Since rats continue to be the prime mammalian model for study in space, the effects of chronic microgravity on rat renal function should be clarified. Acute studies in rats using the ground-based microgravity simulation model, head-down tilt (HDT), have shown increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), electrolyte excretion, and a diuresis. However, long term effects of HDT have not been studied extensively. This study was performed to elucidate rat renal function following long-term simulated microgravity. Chronic exposure to HDT will cause an increase in GFR and electrolyte excretion in rats, similar to acute exposures, and lead to a decrease in the fractional excretion of filtered electrolytes. Experimental animals (HDT, n=10) were tail-suspended for 37 days and renal function compared to ambulatory controls (AMB, n=10). On day 37 of HDT, GFR, osmolal clearance, and electrolyte excretion were decreased, while plasma osmolality and free water clearance were increased. Urine output remained similar between groups. The fractional excretion of the filtered electrolytes was unchanged except for a decrease in the percentage of filtered calcium excreted. Chronic exposure to HDT results in decreased GFR and electrolyte excretion, but the fractional excretion of filtered electrolytes remained primarily unaffected.

  13. Head-down-tilt bed rest alters forearm vasodilator and vasoconstrictor responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Silber, D. H.; Gray, K.; Herr, M.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days alters vascular reactivity to vasodilatory and vasoconstrictor stimuli, the reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RHBF, measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) and mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres) responses after 10 min of circulatory arrest were measured in a control trial (n = 20) and when sympathetic discharge was increased by a cold pressor test (RHBF + cold pressor test; n = 10). Vascular conductance (VC) was calculated (VC = RHBF/MAP). In the control trial, peak RHBF at 5 s after circulatory arrest (34.1 +/- 2.5 vs. 48.9 +/- 4.3 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1) and VC (0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.53 +/- 0.05 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1 . mmHg-1) were reduced in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR tests (P < 0. 05). Total excess RHBF over 3 min was diminished in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR trial (84.8 vs. 117 ml/100 ml, P < 0.002). The ability of the cold pressor test to lower forearm blood flow was less in the post- than in the pre-HDBR test (P < 0.05), despite similar increases in MAP. These data suggest that regulation of vascular dilation and the interaction between dilatory and constrictor influences were altered with bed rest.

  14. Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R F.; Wood, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted preflight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. In this presentation I will provide an overview of changes in behavior, brain structure, and brain function that we are observing in our bed rest participants in comparison to normative control subjects.

  15. Effects of acute hypoxia on cardiopulmonary responses to head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Luft, U. C.; Scotto, P.; Chick, T. W.

    1990-01-01

    Six male subjects were exposed on two separate occasions to simulated microgravity with 28 deg head-down tilt (HD) for 1 h with baseline followed by recovery at + 17 deg head-up. Pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, spirometry, and central and cerebral blood flow characteristics were compared while breathing ambient air and reduced F(I)O2 equivalent to 14,828 ft. With hypoxia (HY), the increased tidal volume served to attenuate the drop in arterial saturation by reducing deadspace ventilation. Arterial and mixed venous PO2, values, estimated from peripheral venous samples and cardiac output (CO), were both maintained during HD in HY. Mixed venous PO2 was elevated by an increase in CO associated with a reduction in systemic resistance. Changes in spirometric indices during HD were not accentuated by HY, making the presence of interstitial edema unlikely. Cerebral flow and resistance showed minor reductions with HD. Tissue oxygenation and cardiopulmonary function were not notably effected by HD during HY, but a combination of these two stressors may predispose subjects to subsequent orthostatic intolerance during initial recovery.

  16. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Platte River 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swinehart, James B., (compiler); Dreeszen, Vincent H.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; Tipton, Merlin J.; Bretz, Richard F.; Steece, Fred V.; Hallberg, George R.; Goebel, Joseph E.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Platte River 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1994. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files.

  17. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Des Moines 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hallberg, George R., (compiler); Lineback, Jerry A.; Mickelson, David M.; Knox, James C.; Goebel, Joseph E.; Hobbs, Howard C.; Whitfield, John W.; Ward, Ronald A.; Boellstorff, John D.; Swinehart, James B.; Dreeszen, Vincent H.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Ann Coe

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Des Moines 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1994. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files.

  18. Quaternary geologic map of the Mobile 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Copeland, Charles W., Jr.; Rheams, K.F.; Neathery, T.L.; Gilliland, W.A.; Schmidt, Walter; Clark, W.C., Jr.; Pope, D.E.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.; Weide, David L.; Digital database by Bush, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1988. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Mobile 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map

  19. Quaternary geologic map of the Jacksonville 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Scott, Thomas M.; Knapp, M.S.; Friddell, M.S.; Weide, David L.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.

    1986-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1986. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Jacksonville 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map is evident.

  20. Quaternary geologic map of the Monterrey 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, David W., (compiler); Wermund, E.G., Jr.; edited and integrated by Moore, David W.; Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1993-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1993. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Monterrey 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map is evident.

  1. Quaternary geologic map of the Florida Keys 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compilations: Scott, Thomas M.; Knapp, Michael S.; Weide, David L.; Edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald M.; Fullerton, David S.; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1986. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Florida Keys 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map is evident.

  2. Arterial Pressure Gradients during Upright Posture and 30 deg Head Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, E. R; William, J. M.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gravity alters local blood pressure within the body so that arterial pressures in the head and foot are lower and higher, respectively, than that at heart level. Furthermore, vascular responses to local alterations of arterial pressure are probably important to maintain orthostatic tolerance upon return to the Earth after space flight. However, it has been difficult to evaluate the body's arterial pressure gradient due to the lack of noninvasive technology. This study was therefore designed to investigate whether finger arterial pressure (FAP), measured noninvasively, follows a normal hydrostatic pressure gradient above and below heart level during upright posture and 30 deg head down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy subjects gave informed consent and were 19 to 52 years old with a height range of 158 to 181 cm. A Finapres device measured arterial pressure at different levels of the body by moving the hand from 36 cm below heart level (BH) to 72 cm above heart level (AH) in upright posture and from 36 cm BH to 48 cm AH during HDT in increments of 12 cm. Mean FAP creased by 85 mmHg transitioning from BH to AH in upright posture, and the pressure gradient calculated from hydrostatic pressure difference (rho(gh)) was 84 mmHg. In HDT, mean FAP decreased by 65 mmHg from BH to AH, and the calculated pressure gradient was also 65 mmHg. There was no significant difference between the measured FAP gradient and the calculated pressure gradient, although a significant (p = 0.023) offset was seen for absolute arterial pressure in upright posture. These results indicate that arterial pressure at various levels can be obtained from the blood pressure at heart level by calculating rho(gh) + an offset. The offset equals the difference between heart level and the site of measurement. In summary, we conclude that local blood pressure gradients can be measured by noninvasive studies of FAP.

  3. An evaluation of the lower coverage anti-G suit without an abdominal bladder after 3 days of 7 deg head down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegmann, B. J.; Krutz, R. W.; Burton, R. R.; Sawin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    Twelve healthy male subjects were initially deconditioned by 3 days of 7 deg head down tilt bed rest followed by donning the reentry anti-G suit and being centrifuged using a simulated Shuttle reentry profile. For 6 of the 12 subjects, anti-G suit pressure was increased in 0.5 psig increments if eye level blood pressure dropped below 70 mmHg. The second half of the subjects had their G-suits inflated in 0.5 psig increments if they reported 50 percent peripheral light dimming. Results show that the maximum allowable pressure for either exposure was 2.5 psig, which is the operational limit of the Shuttle anti-G suit controller.

  4. Effect of Head-Down Bed Rest and Artificial Gravity Countermeasure on Cardiac Autonomic and Advanced Electrocardiographic Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Platts, S.; Stenger, M.; Ribeiro, C.; Natapoff, A.; Howarth, M.; Evans, J.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 21 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR), with versus without an artificial gravity (AG) countermeasure, on cardiac autonomic and advanced electrocardiographic function. Fourteen healthy men participated in the study: seven experienced 21 days of HDBR alone ("HDBR controls") and seven the same degree and duration of HDBR but with approximately 1hr daily short-arm centrifugation as an AG countermeasure ("AG-treated"). Five minute supine high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs were obtained in all subjects: 1) 4 days before HDBR; 2) on the last day of HDBR; and 3) 7 days after HDBR. Besides conventional 12-lead ECG intervals and voltages, all of the following advanced ECG parameters were studied: 1) both stochastic (time and frequency domain) and deterministic heart rate variability (HRV); 2) beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV); 3) T-wave morphology, including signal-averaged T-wave residua (TWR) and principal component analysis ratios; 4) other SAECG-related parameters including high frequency QRS ECG and late potentials; and 5) several advanced ECG estimates of left ventricular (LV) mass. The most important results by repeated measures ANOVA were that: 1) Heart rates, Bazett-corrected QTc intervals, TWR, LF/HF power and the alpha 1 of HRV were significantly increased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but with no relevant HDBR*group differences; 2) All purely "vagally-mediated" parameters of HRV (e.g., RMSSD, HF power, Poincare SD1, etc.), PR intervals, and also several parameters of LV mass (Cornell and Sokolow-Lyon voltages, spatial ventricular activation times, ventricular gradients) were all significantly decreased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but again with no relevant HDBR*group differences); 3) All "generalized" or "vagal plus sympathetic" parameters of stochastic HRV (i.e., SDNN, total power, LF power) were significantly more decreased in the AG-treated group than in the HDBR-only group (i.e., here there was a relevant HDBR*group difference

  5. The effect of intermittent standing or walking during head down tilt bedrest on peak O2 consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, A. C.; Dearborn, A. S.; Vernikos, J.

    1992-01-01

    The cardiovascular aspect of bedrest deconditioning is manifested by decreases in peak O2 uptake (VO(sub 2 peak)) during minimal exercise. The effect of intermittent standing (+G(z)) or walking (+G(z)W) during 4 days of 7 degree Head Down Tilt bedrest (HDT) on VO(sub 2 peak) was evaluated. Methods: Five protocols were performed by eight male subjects; control (C) consisting of complete bedrest, and 15 minute periods to total 2 or 4 hours daily of standing (+G(z)(exp 2) and +G(z)(exp 4) respectively) or walking at 3.0 MPH (+G(z)W2 and +G(z)W4 respectively). Subjects performed VO(sub 2 peak) tests prior to and on the final day of HDT. VO(sub 2 peak) was determined using open circuit indirect calorimetry during supine leg cycling ergometry. After a 5 minute warmup, three 2 minute incremental loads of 33 W previously determined to elicit VO(sub 2 peak) were given and the subject cycled to volitional fatigue. Results: The C protocol VO(sub 2 peak) decreased by 16 percent (2.71 plus or minus 0.16 to 2.27 plus or minus 0.14 L/min) and 11 percent in +G(z)(exp 4) (2.72 plus or minus 0.15 to 2.43 plus or minus 0.14 L/min). With +G(z)W2 VO(sub 2 peak) decreased by 9 percent (2.71 plus or minus 0.17 to 2.46 plus or minus 0.14 L/min) and with +G(z)W4, VO(sub 2 peak) decreased by 10 percent (2.71 plus or minus 0.14 to 2.43 plus or minus 0.14 L/min). VO(sub 2 peak) in all protocols decreased with HDT (P less than 0.05). The decrease in C VO(sub 2 peak) was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) than the decreases in either +G(z) or +G(z)W protocols. Conclusion: The deconditioning that occurs after only 4 days of HDT was demonstrated by decreases in VO(sub 2 peak). Intermittent +G(z) or +G(z)W attenuated, but did not prevent, the decrease in VO(sub 2 peak) with HDT.

  6. Use of bed rest and head-down tilt to simulate spaceflight-induce immune system changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D. A.; Schaffar, L.; Taylor, G. R.; Loftin, K. C.; Schneider, V. S.; Koebel, A.; Abbal, M.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Lewis, D. E.; Reuben, J. R.; Ferebee, R.

    1996-01-01

    Bed rest, both with and without head-down tilt, has been extensively used as an earth-bound analog to study physiologic effects mimicking those occurring in weightlessness during spaceflight. We have been able to show in six subjects that 4 weeks of head-down tilt bed rest induces a significant decrease in interleukin-2 secretion by PHA-stimulated T lymphocytes. Another study, lasting 113 days, with two subjects showed a decreased interleukin-2 receptor expression in PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells but a decreased interleukin-2 production in one subject only. Under the same conditions, interleukin-1 production was largely increased in both subjects. Several other immune parameters were also analyzed. Increased interleukin-1 production could contribute to bone mineral loss encountered during bed rest and decreased interleukin-2 secretion could play a role in the appearance of infectious diseases often observed during bed red.

  7. Influence of long-term head-down body position on innervation density in extremity blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorant, M.; Raffai, G.; Nadasy, G.; Feher, E.; Monos, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitate and compare the density of nerve terminals (NTD), as well as of their synaptic vesicle population (SyVD) in saphenous and brachial vein and artery, obtained from rats maintained in the horizontal or head-down tilted (HDT) position for two weeks. The same technique was applied as that for the head-up tilt study.

  8. Head-Down Suspension Alters Stress-Responsiveness and Feedback Efficacy of 9a-Fludrocortisone in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsley, C. J.; Evans, J.; Scribner, K. A.; Keil, L. C.; Dallman, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    9a-Fludrocortisone (9aFF) has been used to decrease orthostatic hypotension in astronauts whorl they return to earth after space flight. An earth-based model for weightlessness in space is head-down posture in man and rats. In these studies male rats were suspended head-down or not for 7 days and treated 14 and 2 hours prior to ether stress in the AM with 9aFF (20 micrograms i.u.) at -14 and -2 h or at -2 h with steroid and at -14 h with oil; controls were treated 2x with oil. Rats were decapitated 10 min after ether and ACTH and corticosterone (B) were measured. Both ACTH and B responses were greater in suspended than control rats under all three steroid conditions, and the percentage inhibition of ACTH by 9aFF was similar. Basal activity in the HPA over the 7 d suspension period was probably not elevated since adrenal and thymus weights did not differ in the ambulatory and head down groups. We conclude that headdown suspension facilitates acute stress-induced activity in the HPA axis, but that HPA axis sensitivity to corticosteroid feedback does not change.

  9. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., > or = 22 days) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, experimental studies revealed changes in the gray matter (GM) of the brain after simulated microgravity. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning and motor behavior. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on the brain. VBM analysis revealed a progressive decrease from pre- to in- bed rest in GM volume in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate. Over the same time period, there was a progressive increase in GM volume in the cerebellum, occipital-, and parietal cortex, including the precuneus. The majority of these changes did not fully recover during the post-bed rest period. Analysis of lobular GM volumes obtained with BRAINS showed significantly increased volume from pre-bed rest to in-bed rest in GM of the parietal lobe and the third ventricle. Temporal GM volume at 70 days in bed rest was smaller than that at the first pre-bed rest measurement. Trend analysis showed significant positive linear and negative quadratic relationships between parietal GM and time, a positive linear relationship between third ventricle volume and time, and a negative linear

  10. The metabolic reactions in men and women during long-term head-down tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markin, Andrey

    We have demonstrated that dynamics of alterations of some biochemical blood indices during ling-term space flights and at a long duration head-down tilt (HDT) features that same directionality [Andrei Markin, Lubov Strogonova, Oleg Balashov et al, 1998]. A comparison between biochemical blood parameters at 120-day HDT was provided for groups consisting of nine men (MG1),six men (MG2) and four women (WG). All examined persons aged were exposed to "pure" HDT without resort to any prophylactic agents. Under investigations were concentrations of urea, uric acid, total cholesterol [CHO], HDL-cholesterol [HDL], triglycerides (TG), primary lipid peroxidation (LPO) products, final LPO products, tocopherol (TP) as well as activity of alanin aminotransferase (ALT), total creatin kinase (CK). For all the groups the investigated indices values were expressed as a percentage to background ones. ALT activity for the WG group had a tendency to decrease by 2-15 Women presented a moderate urea concentration lowering which ranged from 99 to 86 CHO level in WG was also elevated, and the extent to which elevated, for the most part, exceeded that of men, but beginning with the 72-nd - 84-th days of HDT an increase in MG1 become more pronounced with its retaining up to the RP. In all groups the tendency for decrease in HDL content was observed, however, it was more pronounced with men. In the RP the parameter value was increased in MG1 and MG2, but in WG it remained at the level which was observed at HDT. TG concentration women presented in the course of HDT increased, but beginning with the 49-th - 50-th day of experiment an increased in MG1 and MG2 became more pronounced. LPO products content dynamics in WG manifested as alternating increases and decreases relative to the background values (65 to 24 Comparative results of biochemical value dynamics investigation obtained in the course of a 120- day HDT demonstrated that women feature slower and less pronounced formation of metabolic

  11. Effects of Resistive Vibration Exercise Combined with Whey Protein and KHCO3 on Bone Tturnover Markers in Head-down Tilt Bed Rest (MTBR-MNX Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Sonja; Baecker, Natalie; Buehlmeier, Judith; Fischer, Annelie; Smith, Scott M.; Heer, Martina

    2014-01-01

    High protein intake further increases bone resorption markers in head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR), most likely induced by low-grade metabolic acidosis. Adding an alkaline salt to a diet with high protein content prevents this additional rise of bone resorption markers in HDBR. In addition, high protein intake, specifically whey protein, increases muscle protein synthesis and improves glucose tolerance, which both are affected by HDBR. Resistive vibration exercise (RVE) training counteracts the inactivity-induced bone resorption during HDBR. To test the hypothesis that WP plus alkaline salt (KHCO3) together with RVE during HDBR will improve bone turnover markers, we conducted a randomized, three-campaign crossover design study with 12 healthy, moderately fit male subjects (age 34+/-8 y, body mass [BM] 70 +/- 8 kg). All study campaigns consisted of a 7-d ambulatory period, 21days of -6 deg. head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR), and a 6-d recovery period. Diet was standardized and identical across phases. In the control (CON) campaign, subjects received no supplement or RVE. In the intervention campaigns, subjects received either RVE alone or combined with WP and KHCO3 (NEX). WP was applied in 3 doses per day of 0.6 g WP/kg BM together with 6 doses of 15 mmol KHCO3 per day. Eleven subjects completed the RVE and CON campaign, 8 subjects completed all three campaigns. On day 21 of HDBR excretion of the bone resorption marker C-telopeptide (CTX) was 80+/-28% (p<0.001) higher than baseline, serum calcium concentrations increased by 12 +/- 29% (p<0.001) and serum osteocalcin concentrations decreased by 6+/-12% (p=0.001). Urinary CTX excretion was 11+/- 25% (p=0.02) lower on day 21 of HDBR in the RVE- and tended to decrease by 3+/- 22% (p=0.06) in the NEX campaign compared to CON. Urinary calcium excretion was higher on day 21 in HDBR in the RVE and NEX (24+/- 43% p=0.01; 25+/- 37% p=0.03) compared to the CON campaign. We conclude that combination of RVE with WP/KHCO3 was not

  12. Quaternary geologic map of the Winnipeg 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, D. S., (compiler); Ringrose, S.M.; Clayton, Lee; Schreiner, B.T.; Goebel, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Winnipeg 4? ? 6? Quadrangle, United States and Canada, is a component of the U.S. Geological Survey Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States map series (Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1420), an effort to produce 4? ? 6? Quaternary geologic maps, at 1:1 million scale, of the entire conterminous United States and adjacent Canada. The map and the accompanying text and supplemental illustrations provide a regional overview of the areal distributions and characteristics of surficial deposits and materials of Quaternary age (~1.8 Ma to present) in parts of North Dakota, Minnesota, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. The map is not a map of soils as soils are recognized in agriculture. Rather, it is a map of soils as recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which agricultural soils are formed. The map units are distinguished chiefly on the basis of (1)genesis (processes of origin) or environments of deposition: for example, sediments deposited primarily by glacial ice (glacial deposits or till), sediments deposited in lakes (lacustrine deposits), or sediments deposited by wind (eolian deposits); (2) age: for example, how long ago the deposits accumulated; (3) texture (grain size)of the deposits or materials; (4) composition (particle lithology) of the deposits or materials; (5) thickness; and (6) other physical, chemical, and engineering properties. Supplemental illustrations show (1) temporal correlation of the map units, (2) the areal relationships of late Wisconsin glacial ice lobes and sublobes, (3) temporal and spatial correlation of late Wisconsin glacial phases, readvance limits, and ice margin stillstands, (4) temporal and stratigraphic correlation of surface and subsurface glacial deposits in the Winnipeg quadrangle and in adjacent 4? ? 6? quadrangles, and (5) responsibility for state and province compilations. The database provides information related to geologic hazards (for example

  13. Quaternary geologic map of the Chesapeake Bay 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Cleaves, Emery T.; Glaser, John D.; Howard, Alan D.; Johnson, Gerald H.; Wheeler, Walter H.; Sevon, William D.; Judson, Sheldon; Owens, James P.; Peebles, Pamela C.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.; Weide, David L.

    1987-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Chesapeake Bay 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  14. Quaternary geologic map of the Quebec 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Borns, H. W., Jr.; Gadd, N.R.; LaSalle, Pierre; Martineau, Ghismond; Chauvin, Luc; Fulton, R.J.; Chapman, W.F.; Wagner, W.P.; Grant, D.R.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Quebec 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  15. Quaternary geologic map of the Boston 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Hartshorn, Joseph H.; Thompson, W.B.; Chapman, W.F.; Black, R.F.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; Grant, D.R.; Fullerton, David S.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1991-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Boston 4 deg x 6 deg Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  16. Quaternary geologic map of the Blue Ridge 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Howard, Alan D.; Behling, Robert E.; Wheeler, Walter H.; Daniels, Raymond B.; Swadley, W.C.; Richmond, Gerald M.; Goldthwait, Richard P.; Sevon, William D.; Miller, Robert A.; Edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald M.; Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Ann Coe; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1986. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Blue Ridge 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the "ground" on which we walk, the "dirt" in which we dig foundations, and the "soil" in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  17. Quaternary geologic map of the Wichita 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Denne, Jane E.; Luza, V.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Fishman, W.D.; Wermund, E.G., Jr.; Richmond, Gerald Martin, (Edited By); Christiansen, Ann Coe; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1993. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Wichita 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the "ground" on which we walk, the "dirt" in which we dig foundations, and the "soil" in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map is evident.

  18. Changes of loading tensile force-stretch relationships of rabbit mesenteric vein after 21 days of head-down rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Jie; Sun, Hui-Pin; Yue, Yong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Wu, Xing-Yu

    Changes of venous compliance may contribute to postflight orthostatic intolerance; however, direct animal studies to address the changes of venous compliance to microgravity have been rare. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance changes of mesenteric veins of rabbits after 21 days of head-down rest (HDR). Twenty-four healthy male New Zealand Rabbits were randomly divided into 21 days of HDR group, horizontal immobilization group (HIG) and control group (Ctrl), with eight in each. Loading tensile force-stretch relationships of mesenteric vein segments were constructed after 21 d HDR. With the increase of loading tensile force, both longitudinal and circumferential stretches of vein samples increased significantly. Under the same loading tensile force, mesenteric vein of the HDR showed significant increase both in circumferential stretch and longitudinal stretches compared to those of Ctrl group and HIG group. These results indicate that, a 21-day simulated weightlessness leads to increase of mesenteric venous compliance.

  19. [Evaluation of effectiveness of short-term orthostatic positioning of head-down tilted primates on the liquid body sectors].

    PubMed

    Lobachik, V I; Gordeev, Iu V; Krotov, V P

    2008-01-01

    Head-down tilting (HDT) of primates is a well-recognized model for studying the hypokinetic syndrome effects on the body functions. Benefits for the body liquids distribution of periodic transition of primates (rhesus macaques) into the vertical position without support loading were evaluated in a 30-d HDT experiment. Brief (30 to 120 minutes long, 4-5 times a week) transition from tilting into the vertical position had no influence on primates' hydration homeostasis and its infrastructure. However, the orthostatic test at the end of the HDT experiment showed a less increase in blood content of the lower extremities as compared with tilted primates that had not been periodically turned up into the vertical position. PMID:18714731

  20. Effects of 17 days of head-down bed rest on hydro-electrolytic regulation in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged periods of head-down bed rest (HDBR) are commonly used to mimic the effects of microgravity. HDBR has been shown to produce, as in space, a cephalad redistribution of circulating blood volume with an increase in central blood volume which induces the early adaptations in blood volume regulating hormones. Changes in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), arginine vasopressin (AVP), renin activity and aldosterone have been observed. Many reports describe these endocrine adaptations but few investigations of rhythms are in the literature. We proposed to evaluate the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in the hydro-electrolytic regulation during a HDBR study which was designed to simulate a 17-day spaceflight (Life and Microgravity Spacelab experiment, LMS, NASA).

  1. 16 CFR 254.6 - Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or... GUIDES FOR PRIVATE VOCATIONAL AND DISTANCE EDUCATION SCHOOLS § 254.6 Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or certificates. (a) It is deceptive for an industry member to issue a degree, diploma,...

  2. Effects of Mild Hypercapnia During Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, aud Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Taibbi, G.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Zanello, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Hu, X.; Stenger, M. B.; Vizzeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to cause an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, as experienced by some astronauts during long-duration space flight. Elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on ISS may also raise ICP and contribute to VIIP development. We seek to determine if the combination of mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the International Space Station, with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt, will induce ophthalmic and cerebral blood flow changes similar to those described in the VIIP syndrome. We hypothesize that mild hypercapnia in the head-down tilt position will increase choroidal blood volume and cerebral blood flow, raise intraocular pressure (IOP), and transiently reduce visual acuity as compared to the seated or the head-down tilt position without elevated CO2, respectively.

  3. Effects of long-term head-down-tilt bed rest and different training regimes on the coagulation system of healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Thomas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Matteucci-Gothe, Raffaella; Sottara, Elke; Griesmacher, Andrea; Belavý, Daniel L; Felsenberg, Dieter; Werner, Andreas; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Immobility plus preexisting chronic disease or acute trauma can activate the coagulation system, thus increasing the risk for thromboembolic events. The effects of long-term bed-rest immobility and microgravity on the coagulation system of healthy persons (e.g., during crewed Mars missions) have not yet been studied. The main objective of the second Berlin BedRest Study (BBR2-2) “Coagulation Part” was to investigate adaptations of the hemostatic system during long-term bed rest (60 days) under simulated microgravity (6° head-down-tilt [6°HDT]) and after mobilization in three different volunteer groups (randomly assigned to CTR= inactive control group; RE= resistive exercise only group; and RVE= resistive exercise with whole-body vibration group). In 24 males (aged 21–45 years), before, during, and after long-term bed rest, key parameters of coagulation were measured from venous blood samples: D-dimer (DD), thrombin–antithrombin III complex (TAT), and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 (PT-F1 + 2). Additionally, modified rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM®) analysis was performed. Times of exploratory analyses were as follows: baseline data collection 2 days before bed rest (BDC-2); eight different days of 6°HDT bed rest (HDT1–HDT60), and two different days after reambulation (R + 3 and R + 6). We found significant changes in DD, TAT, and PT-F1 + 2 over the total time course, but no consistent effect of physical interventions (RE, RVE) on these parameters. Notably, no parameter reached levels indicative of intravascular thrombin formation. All ROTEM® parameters remained within the normal range and no pathological traces were found. Sixty days of 6°HDT bed rest are not associated with pronounced activation of the coagulation system indicative of intravascular thrombus formation in healthy volunteers independent of the training type during the bed rest. PMID:24400137

  4. Efficacy of periodic centrifugation of primates during 4-week head-down tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, V. I.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kotovskaya, A. R.; Krotov, V. P.; Vil-Viliams, I. F.; Lobachik, V. I.

    2001-08-01

    Creation of artificial force of gravity (AFG) to counteract the negative consequences of microgravity in manned space missions of extended duration is one of the high-priority problems of space biology and medicine. However, there are a number of especial effects of AFG (namely, structural changes in muscles and bones, and some other system) which need implantation of electrodes and sensors and are possible only with animals. That is why it is of particular interest to make studies with monkeys whose reactions to changed gravity bear much resemblance with human (1). The purpose of the investigation was development of a protocol of periodic gravity loads as a countermeasure against the hypokinetic syndrome in Macaca mulatta. Two series of experiments were performed. In the series, animals were split into two groups of 6 species each who were motor restrained with the head end tilted downward at 5° (HDT) for 28 days. Monkeys of group-2 were periodically subjected to centrifugation (HDT+G). During the first series of experiments rotation was conducted in the +Gz direction at g-loads from 1.2 to 1.6 units for 30-40 minutes 4-5 times a week. In the second series, g-load was equal to 1.2 units and the animals were rotated 30 min. 2-3 time a week. The criterion of g-training protocol efficacy was a test +Gz run at 3 units for 30 s. during which functioning of the cardiovascular systems and its controls was evaluated. The test run was performed prior to and after HDT. Following HDT the animals of group HDT+G were more resistant to the test than their counterparts who had not been trained on the centrifuge. Data of the investigation imply that following HDT and HDT+G alike reduced the amount of total bodily fluids (by approximately 5%), the intracellular component (approximately 4%), and plasma volume (by 6-7%). Yet, there are radical differences between the groups in the levels of reduction in extracellular fluids (by 11% and 6.5%, respectively, P<0,05) and the

  5. Countermeasures and Functional Testing in Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest (CFT 70)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2013-01-01

    This 70-day bed rest campaign was comprised of 6 integrated studies and conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU). The FARU is located at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas and is a satellite unit of the Institute for Translational Sciences - Clinical Research Center. This presentation will describe the FARU, discuss the utility of the bed rest platform for use in these studies, and introduce the studies that participated in the CFT 70 bed rest campaign. Information in this presentation will serve as the background for subsequent talks from each individual study. Individual study presentations will discuss preliminary results from completed subjects. Studies included in CFT70 were: ? Physiological Factors Contributing to Post Flight Changes in Functional Performance. J. Bloomberg, NASA ? Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study. L. Ploutz-Snyder, USRA ? Testosterone Supplementation as a Countermeasure Against Musculoskeletal losses during Space Exploration. R. Urban, University of Texas Medical Branch ? Effects of Retronasal Smelling, Variety and Choice on Appetite & Satiety. J. Hunter, Cornell University ? AD ASTRA: Automated Detection of Attitudes and States through Transaction Recordings Analysis. C. Miller, Smart Information Flow Technologies, LLC ? Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analog to Study Neuro-cognitive Changes: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases. R. Seidler, University of Michigan

  6. Performance and mood-state parameters during 30-day 6 deg head-down bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroshia, Charles W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    A study aimed at determining if the performance and mood impairments occur in bed-rested subjects, and if different exercise-training regimens modify or prevent them is presented. Eighteen healthy men were divided into three groups performing no exercise, isotonic exercise, and isokinetic exercise. Few deleterious changes occurred in performance and mood of the three groups which did not exceed baseline ambulatory levels. It is concluded that mood and performance did not deteriorate in response to prolonged bedrest and were not altered by exercise training.

  7. Isokinetic Strength and Endurance During 30-day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Bond, M.; Bulbulian, R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine if an intensive, intermittent, isokinetic, lower extremity exercise training program would attenuate or eliminate the decrease of muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bed rest (BR). The 19 male subjects (36 +/- 1 yr, 178 +/- 2 cm, 76.5 +/- 1.7 kg) were allocated into a no exercise (NOE) training group (N = 5), an isotonic (lower extremity cycle orgometer) exercise (ITE) training group (N = 7), and an isokinetic (isokinetic knee flexion-extension) exercise (IKE) training group (N = 7). Peak knee (flexion and extension) and shoulder (abduction-adduction) functions were measured weekly in all groups with one 5-repetition set. After BR, average knee extension total work decreased by 16% with NOE, increased by 27% with IKE, and was unchanged with ITE. Average knee flexion total work and peak torque (strength) responses were unchanged in all groups. Force production increased by 20% with IKE and was unchanged with NOE and ITE. Shoulder total work was unchanged in all groups, while gross average peak torque increased by 27% with ITE and by 22% with IKE, and was unchanged with NOE. Thus, while ITE training can maintain some isokinetic functions during BR, maximal intermittent IKE training can increase other functions above pre-BR control levels.

  8. High dietary sodium chloride causes further protein loss during head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Baecker, Natalie; Stehle, Peter; Heer, Martina

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein most likely caused by muscle degradation. Additionally astronauts tend towards a high dietary intake of sodium chloride (NaCl), which has recently been shown to induce low grade metabolic acidosis (Frings-Meuthen et al. JBMR, Epub 2007). In several patterns, e.g. chronical renal failure, metabolic acidosis is associated with protein catabolism. We therefore hypothesized that high dietary intake of NaCl enforces protein losses in HDBR, a model for physiological changes in microgravity (µG). Eight healthy male subjects (mean age 26.25 ± 3.5; mean body weight: 78.5 ± 4.1 kg) participated in a 14-day bed rest study in the metabolic ward of the DLR - Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne, Germany. The study was carried out in a cross over design, consisting of two phases, each lasting 22 days (5 days adaptation, 14 days 6° HDBR and 3 days recovery). Both study phases were identical with respect to environmental conditions and study protocol. Subjects received an individually tailored, weight-maintaining diet containing 1.3 g protein/kg/day. The diet was identical in both study phases with the exception of NaClintake: Every subject received a low NaCl diet (0.7 mmol/kg/day) in one phase and a high NaCl diet (7.7 mmol/kg/day) in another one. Blood gas for analysis of acid-base balance was implemented at days 4 and 5 of adaptation, days 2, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14 of HDBR and days 2, 3 of recovery. Continuous urine collection started on the first day in the metabolic ward to analyze nitrogen excretion. Nitrogen balance was calculated from the difference between protein intake and urinary nitrogen excretion, determined by use of chemiluminescence (Grimble et al. JPEN, 1988). Plasma pH did not change significantly (p=0.285), but plasma bicarbonate and base excess decreased (p=0.0175; p=0.0093) with high NaCl intake in HDBR compared to the low NaCl diet. Nitrogen balance in HDBR was negative, as expected in

  9. Clinical Evaluation of a Robotic 6-Degree of Freedom Treatment Couch for Frameless Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gevaert, Thierry; Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Depuydt, Tom; Heuninckx, Karina; Tournel, Koen; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of 6-degree of freedom (DOF) patient positioning with a robotic couch compared with 4DOF positioning for intracranial lesions and to estimate the immobilization characteristics of the BrainLAB frameless mask (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), more specifically, the setup errors and intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 40 patients with 66 brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and a 6DOF robotic couch. Patient positioning was performed with the BrainLAB ExacTrac stereoscopic X-ray system. Positioning results were collected before and after treatment to assess patient setup error and intrafraction motion. Existing treatment planning data were loaded and simulated for 4DOF positioning and compared with the 6DOF positioning. The clinical relevance was analyzed by means of the Paddick conformity index and the ratio of prescribed isodose volume covered with 4DOF to that obtained with the 6DOF positioning. Results: The mean three-dimensional setup error before 6DOF correction was 1.91 mm (SD, 1.25 mm). The rotational errors were larger in the longitudinal (mean, 0.23 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.82 Degree-Sign ) direction compared with the lateral (mean, -0.09 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.72 Degree-Sign ) and vertical (mean, -0.10 Degree-Sign ; SD, 1.03 Degree-Sign ) directions (p < 0.05). The mean three-dimensional intrafraction shift was 0.58 mm (SD, 0.42 mm). The mean intrafractional rotational errors were comparable for the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions: 0.01 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.35 Degree-Sign ), 0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.31 Degree-Sign ), and -0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.33 Degree-Sign ), respectively. The mean conformity index decreased from 0.68 (SD, 0.08) (6DOF) to 0.59 (SD, 0.12) (4DOF) (p < 0.05). A loss of prescribed isodose coverage of 5% (SD, 0.08) was found with the 4DOF positioning (p < 0.05). Half a degree for longitudinal and lateral rotations can be identified as a threshold

  10. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  11. Fluid compartment and renal function alterations in the rat during 7 and 14 day head down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to conditions of microgravity for any extended duration can modify the distribution of fluid within the vascular and interstitial spaces, and eventually intracellular volume. Whether the redistribution of fluid and resetting of volume homeostasis mechanisms is appropriate for the long term environmental requirements of the body in microgravity remains to be fully defined. The event that initiates the change in fluid volume homeostasis is the cephalad movement of fluid which potentially triggers volume sensors and stretch receptors (atrial stretch with the resulting release of atrial natriuretic peptide) and suppresses adrenergic activity via the carotid and aortic arch baroreceptors. All these events act in concert to reset blood and interstitial volume to new levels, which in turn modify the renin-angiotensin system. All these factors have an influence on the kidney, the end organ for fluid volume control. How the fluid compartment volume changes interrelate with alterations in renal functions under conditions of simulated microgravity is the focus of the present investigation which utilizes 25-30 deg head-down tilt in the rat.

  12. 16 CFR 254.6 - Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... GUIDES FOR PRIVATE VOCATIONAL AND DISTANCE EDUCATION SCHOOLS § 254.6 Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees... control the recognition that will be accorded the diploma by institutions of higher education,...

  13. 16 CFR 254.6 - Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... GUIDES FOR PRIVATE VOCATIONAL AND DISTANCE EDUCATION SCHOOLS § 254.6 Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees... control the recognition that will be accorded the diploma by institutions of higher education,...

  14. 16 CFR 254.6 - Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees, or certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... GUIDES FOR PRIVATE VOCATIONAL AND DISTANCE EDUCATION SCHOOLS § 254.6 Deceptive use of diplomas, degrees... control the recognition that will be accorded the diploma by institutions of higher education,...

  15. Lower Limb Venous Compliance is Different Between Men and Women Following 60 Days of Head-Down Bedrest but Is Not Associated with Venoconstriction Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Space flight-induced orthostatic intolerance (OI) is more prevalent in female (F) than male (M) astronauts. The mechanisms explaining the higher incidence of OI in F are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that venous compliance would be higher in F more than M following 6 deg head-down bed rest (BR) and would be associated with constrictor dysfunction. Using 2-D ultrasound, dorsal hand (DHV) and dorsal foot (DFV) vein compliances were determined in 24 subjects (10 F, 14 M; 35 +/- 1 yr) by measuring mean diameter response to increasing congestion pressure (0, 20, 30, and 40 mmHg) before and after 60 d of BR. Constrictor function was assessed by intravenous infusions of Ketorolac (KE; 1.5 ig/min) Phenylephrine (PE; 3160 ng/min), and L-NMMA (50 ig/min). The effects of BR between F vs. M and hand vs. foot were determined using mixed-effects linear regression. DFV but not DHV compliance changed in response to BR (p=0.012). Mean DFV increased significantly (0.903 mm to 1.191mm) in F but decreased in M (1.353 mm to 1.154 mm). DFV constrictor response was not different between sexes in response to BR (KE; p=0.647, PE; p=0.717, and L-NMMA; p=0.825). These BR data suggest that the higher incidence of OI in F astronauts may be related to increased lower limb venous compliance, contributing to blood pooling upon standing. Notably, changes to DFV compliance was not accompanied by impaired constrictor function.

  16. Effects of short-term exposure to head-down tilt on cerebral hemodynamics: a prospective evaluation of a spaceflight analog using phase-contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Marshall-Goebel, Karina; Ambarki, Khalid; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan; Mulder, Edwin; Gerlach, Darius; Bershad, Eric; Rittweger, Jörn

    2016-06-15

    Alterations in cerebral hemodynamics in microgravity are hypothesized to occur during spaceflight and could be linked to the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure syndrome. Head-down tilt (HDT) is frequently used as a ground-based analog to simulate cephalad fluid shifts in microgravity; however, its effects on cerebral hemodynamics have not been well studied with MRI techniques. Here, we evaluate the effects of 1) various HDT angles on cerebral arterial and venous hemodynamics; and 2) exposure to 1% CO2 during an intermediate HDT angle (-12°) as an additional space-related environmental factor. Blood flow, cross-sectional area (CSA), and blood flow velocity were measured with phase-contrast MRI in the internal jugular veins, as well as the vertebral and internal carotid arteries. Nine healthy male subjects were measured at baseline (supine, 0°) and after 4.5 h of HDT at -6°, -12° (with and without 1% CO2), and -18°. We found a decrease in total arterial blood flow from baseline during all angles of HDT. On the venous side, CSA increased with HDT, and outflow decreased during -12° HDT (P = 0.039). Moreover, the addition of 1% CO2 to -12° HDT caused an increase in total arterial blood flow (P = 0.016) and jugular venous outflow (P < 0.001) compared with -12° HDT with ambient atmosphere. Overall, the results indicate decreased cerebral blood flow during HDT, which may have implications for microgravity-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes. PMID:27013606

  17. Effects of short-term exposure to head-down tilt on cerebral hemodynamics: a prospective evaluation of a spaceflight analog using phase-contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ambarki, Khalid; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan; Mulder, Edwin; Gerlach, Darius; Rittweger, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in cerebral hemodynamics in microgravity are hypothesized to occur during spaceflight and could be linked to the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure syndrome. Head-down tilt (HDT) is frequently used as a ground-based analog to simulate cephalad fluid shifts in microgravity; however, its effects on cerebral hemodynamics have not been well studied with MRI techniques. Here, we evaluate the effects of 1) various HDT angles on cerebral arterial and venous hemodynamics; and 2) exposure to 1% CO2 during an intermediate HDT angle (−12°) as an additional space-related environmental factor. Blood flow, cross-sectional area (CSA), and blood flow velocity were measured with phase-contrast MRI in the internal jugular veins, as well as the vertebral and internal carotid arteries. Nine healthy male subjects were measured at baseline (supine, 0°) and after 4.5 h of HDT at −6°, −12° (with and without 1% CO2), and −18°. We found a decrease in total arterial blood flow from baseline during all angles of HDT. On the venous side, CSA increased with HDT, and outflow decreased during −12° HDT (P = 0.039). Moreover, the addition of 1% CO2 to −12° HDT caused an increase in total arterial blood flow (P = 0.016) and jugular venous outflow (P < 0.001) compared with −12° HDT with ambient atmosphere. Overall, the results indicate decreased cerebral blood flow during HDT, which may have implications for microgravity-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes. PMID:27013606

  18. The Effects of Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest on Neurocognitive Performance: The Effects of Exercise Interventions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz. B.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. Our ongoing bed rest participants are also engaging in exercise studies directed by Dr. Lori Ploutz Snyder. In this presentation, I will briefly highlight the existing literature linking exercise and fitness to brain and behavioral functions. I will also overview the metrics from my study that could be investigated in relation to the exercise and control subgroups.

  19. Lower-body negative pressure restores leg bone microvascular flow to supine levels during head-down tilt.

    PubMed

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Lee, Paul C; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R

    2015-07-15

    Skeletal unloading and cephalic fluid shifts in microgravity may alter the bone microvascular flow and may be associated with the 1-2% bone loss per month during spaceflight. The purpose of this study was to determine if lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) can prevent microgravity-induced alterations of tibial microvascular flow. Head-down tilt (HDT) simulates the cephalad fluid shift and microvascular flow responses that may occur in microgravity. We hypothesized that LBNP prevents HDT-induced increases in tibial microvascular flow. Tibial bone microvascular flow, oxygenation, and calf circumference were measured during 5 min sitting, 5 min supine, 5 min 15° HDT, and 10 min 15° HDT with 25 mmHg LBNP using photoplethysmography (PPG), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and strain-gauge plethysmography (SGP). Measurements were made simultaneously. Tibial microvascular flow increased by 36% with 5 min 15° HDT [2.2 ± 1.1 V; repeated-measures ANOVA (RMANOVA) P < 0.0001] from supine (1.4 ± 0.8 V). After 10 min of LBNP in the 15° HDT position, tibial microvascular flow returned to supine levels (1.1 ± 0.5 V; RMANOVA P < 0.001). Tibial oxygenation did not change significantly during sitting, supine, HDT, or HDT with LBNP. However, calf circumference decreased with 5 min 15° HDT (-0.7 ± 0.4 V; RMANOVA P < 0.0001) from supine (-0.5 ± 0.4 V). However, with LBNP calf circumference returned to supine levels (-0.4 ± 0.1 V; RMANOVA P = 0.002). These data establish that simulated microgravity increases tibial microvascular flow and LBNP prevents these increases. The results suggest that LBNP may provide a suitable countermeasure to normalize the bone microvascular flow during spaceflight. PMID:25930022

  20. Artificial gravity with ergometric exercise preserves the cardiac, but not cerebrovascular, functions during 4 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Bin; Wang, Yong-Chun; Gao, Yuan; Geng, Jie; Wu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Fei; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning occurring in long-term spaceflight requires new strategies to counteract these adverse effects. We previously reported that a short-arm centrifuge produced artificial gravity (AG), together with ergometer, has an approving effect on promoting cardiovascular function. The current study sought to investigate whether the cardiac and cerebrovascular functions were maintained and improved using a strategy of AG combined with exercise training on cardiovascular function during 4-day head-down bed rest (HDBR). Twelve healthy male subjects were assigned to a control group (CONT, n=6) and an AG combined with ergometric exercise training group (CM, n=6). Simultaneously, cardiac pumping and systolic functions, cerebral blood flow were measured before, during, and after HDBR. The results showed that AG combined with ergometric exercise caused an increase trend of number of tolerance, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups. After 4-day HDBR in the CONT group, heart rate increased significantly (59±6 vs 66±7 beats/min), while stroke volume (98±12 vs 68±13 mL) and cardiac output (6±1 vs 4±1 L/min) decreased significantly (p<0.05). All subjects had similar drops on cerebral vascular function. Volume regulating hormone aldosterone increased in both groups (by 119.9% in CONT group and 112.8% in the CM group), but only in the CONT group there were a significant changes (p<0.05). Angiotensin II was significantly increased by 140.5% after 4-day HDBR in the CONT group (p<0.05), while no significant changes were observed in the CM group. These results indicated that artificial gravity with ergometric exercise successfully eliminated changes induced by simulated weightlessness in heart rate, volume regulating hormones, and cardiac pumping function and partially maintained cardiac systolic function. Hence, a daily 1h alternating +1.0 and +2.0 Gz with 40 W exercise training appear to be an effective

  1. Plasma volume and water/sodium balance differences due to sex and menstrual phase after 4 hours of head-down bed rest (HDBR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Heather; Grinberg, Anna; Beavers, Keith; Gagne, Nathalie; Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia; Greaves, Danielle; Hughson, Richard L.

    In both sexes, orthostatic responses are impaired by spaceflight or head-down bed-rest (HDBR), with a greater impact in women. Decreased plasma volume (PV) could contribute to reductions in cardiac output and blood pressure upon an orthostatic challenge. We hypothesized that a greater decrease in PV in women might lead to poorer orthostatic responses. We further hypothesized that the responses in women would differ throughout the menstrual cycle. We studied the responses of men (n=6) and women (n= 6) to 4-hr HDBR and 4-hr seated control (SEAT). Furthermore, we studied women in both the follicular (Day 8-11) and luteal (Day 18-24) phases of menstruation in a repeated measures design. After 4-hr HDBR, PV decreased in men (-175.1 ± 56.8 mL; vs. SEAT: P=0.076) and in the follicular phase, but did not change in the luteal phase (Luteal: -55.0 ± 54.6 mL; Follicular: -226.4 ± 88.2 mL (Interaction effect: P=0.01)). After 4-hr HDBR, only men appear to exhibit increased urine volume (Men, difference from SEAT: +298.3 ± 105.5 mL; Luteal, difference from SEAT: +59.4 ± 34.3 mL; Follicular, difference from SEAT: +43.7 ± 190.0 mL; P=0.16). No changes in urinary sodium after 4-hr HDBR were observed in any group (Men, difference from SEAT: -16.5 ± 13.5 µmol; Luteal, difference from SEAT: -8.0 ± 8.8 µmol; Follicular, difference from SEAT: +28.2 ± 29.5 µmol; P=0.264). No changes in urinary osmolarity were observed after 4-hr HDBR in any group (Men, difference from SEAT: -38.8 ± 126.2 mmol/kg; Luteal, difference from SEAT: -85.1 ± 66.9 mmol/kg; Follicular, difference from SEAT: -99.1 ± 98.5 mmol/kg; P=0.906). The changes in plasma volume do not appear to be a result of urinary water and sodium loss. Perhaps actions of atrial natriuretic peptide, urodilatin, the RAAS pathway, and/or capillary filtration are involved. From these observed changes in plasma volume, we surmise that women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle may exhibit lower cardiac output and thus

  2. Space Station Freedom assembly and operation at a 51.6 degree inclination orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Brewer, Laura M.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the implications of assembling and operating Space Station Freedom at a 51.6 degree inclination orbit utilizing an enhanced lift Space Shuttle. Freedom assembly is currently baselined at a 220 nautical mile high, 28.5 degree inclination orbit. Some of the reasons for increasing the orbital inclination are (1) increased ground coverage for Earth observations, (2) greater accessibility from Russian and other international launch sites, and (3) increased number of Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) landing sites. Previous studies have looked at assembling Freedom at a higher inclination using both medium and heavy lift expendable launch vehicles (such as Shuttle-C and Energia). The study assumes that the shuttle is used exclusively for delivering the station to orbit and that it can gain additional payload capability from design changes such as a lighter external tank that somewhat offsets the performance decrease that occurs when the shuttle is launched to a 51.6 degree inclination orbit.

  3. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Nipigon 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sado, Edward V., (compiler); Fullerton, David S.; Farrand, William R.; Edited and Integrated by Fullerton, David S.

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Nipigon 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is a product of collaboration of the Ontario Geological Survey, the University of Michigan, and the U.S. Geological Survey, and is designed for both scientific and practical purposes. It was prepared in two stages. First, separate maps and map explanations were prepared by the compilers. Second, the maps were combined, integrated, and supplemented by the editor. Map unit symbols were revised to a uniform system of classification and the map unit descriptions were prepared by the editor from information received from the compilers and from additional sources listed under Sources of Information. Diagrams accompanying the map were prepared by the editor. For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relationships, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and indicated in the map unit descriptions. Deposits of some constructional landforms, such as kame moraine deposits, are distinguished as map units. Deposits of

  4. Assessment of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Glycosaminoglycan Content by Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI before and after 21-Days of Head-Down-Tilt Bedrest

    PubMed Central

    Koy, Timmo; Zange, Jochen; Rittweger, Jörn; Pohle-Fröhlich, Regina; Hackenbroch, Matthias; Eysel, Peer; Ganse, Bergita

    2014-01-01

    During spaceflight, it has been shown that intervertebral discs (IVDs) increase in height, causing elongation of the spine up to several centimeters. Astronauts frequently report dull lower back pain that is most likely of discogenic origin and may result from IVD expansion. It is unknown whether disc volume solely increases by water influx, or if the content of glycosaminoglycans also changes in microgravity. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of the spaceflight analog of bedrest on the glycosaminoglycan content of human lumbar IVDs. Five healthy, non-smoking, male human subjects of European descent were immobilized in 6° head-down-tilt bedrest for 21 days. Subjects remained in bed 24 h a day with at least one shoulder on the mattress. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were taken according to the delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) protocol before and after bedrest. The outcome measures were T1 and ΔT1. Scans were performed before and after administration of the contrast agent Gd-DOTA, and differences between T1-values of both scans (ΔT1) were computed. ΔT1 is the longitudinal relaxation time in the tissue and inversely related to the glycosaminoglycan-content. For data analysis, IVDs L1/2 to L4/5 were semi-automatically segmented. Zones were defined and analyzed separately. Results show a highly significant decrease in ΔT1 (p<0.001) after bedrest in all IVDs, and in all areas of the IVDs. The ΔT1-decrease was most prominent in the nucleus pulposus and in L4/5, and was expressed slightly more in the posterior than anterior IVD. Unexpected negative ΔT1-values were found in Pfirrmann-grade 2-discs after bedrest. Significantly lower T1 before contrast agent application was found after bedrest compared to before bedrest. According to the dGEMRIC-literature, the decrease in ΔT1 may be interpreted as an increase in glycosaminoglycans in healthy IVDs during bedrest. This interpretation seems contradictory to

  5. 60 Days of Head-down Bedrest Differentially Alters Venous Function in Lower and Upper Body Between Healthy Men and Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Platts, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of orthostatic intolerance after space flight is disproportionally higher in female compared to male crewmembers (83% vs. 20%). Experimental and human data suggest that the loss of orthostatic tolerance is due, at least in part, to microgravity-induced changes in venous compliance and that these changes are specific to the lower body. It is unknown however, whether the changes in venous compliance are different between males and females after space flight, and whether this is related to the disparity in orthostatic intolerance between the sexes. Using 6deg head-down bed rest (BR) as a model of space flight, we tested the following hypotheses; 1) females, compared to males, would experience a greater increase in venous compliance in dorsal foot veins as an effect of BR and 2) no differences in venous compliance would be found in dorsal hand veins between sexes and across BR days. Using 2-D ultrasound, dorsal hand (DHV) and foot vein (DFV) responses (diameter; expressed as sq mm) to 40 mmHg of congestion pressure (compliance) and to intravenous infusion of phenylephrine (PE; 3160ng/min) were determined in 10 females and 16 males before and after 60 days of BR. The relation between changes in vein diameter (in response to pressure and PE), sex, limb, and BR days were determined using a mixed-effect linear regression. It was found that after 60 days of BR, DFV dilator response to pressure was significantly greater in females and significantly less in males compared to pre-BR. As expected, there were no differences in DHV dilator response between sexes nor was there a significant difference between pre and post measures within groups. Notably, the venoconstrictor response to infusions of PE in the DHV and DFV where similar between sexes and across BR days. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that after 60 days of BR, dorsal foot veins are more compliant in women and less compliant in men. Moreover, the changes in lower body vein compliance in females do

  6. The design concept of the 6-degree-of-freedom hydraulic shaker at ESTEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkman, P. W.; Kretz, D.

    1992-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has decided to extend its test facilities at the European Space and Technology Center (ESTEC) at Noordwijk, The Netherlands, by implementing a 6-degree-of-freedom hydraulic shaker. This shaker will permit vibration testing of large payloads in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. Conventional single axis sine and random vibration modes can be applied without the need for a configuration change of the test set-up for vertical and lateral excitations. Transients occurring during launch and/or landing of space vehicles can be accurately simulated in 6-degrees-of-freedom. The performance requirements of the shaker are outlined and the results of the various trade-offs, which are investigated during the initial phase of the design and engineering program are provided. Finally, the resulting baseline concept and the anticipated implementation plan of the new test facility are presented.

  7. Zinc Single Crystal Deformation Experiments using a "6 Degrees of Freedom" Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N

    2006-05-11

    A new experimental technique to study crystallographic slip system activity in metallic single crystals deformed under a condition of uniaxial stress is applied to study the behavior of Zn single crystals. The experimental apparatus allows essentially unconstrained shape change of inherently anisotropic materials under a condition of uniaxial stress by allowing 3 translational and 3 rotational degrees of freedom during compression; hence we have named the experiment 6 degrees of freedom (6DOF). The experiments also utilize a 3-D digital image correlation system to measure full-field displacement fields, which are used to calculate strain and make direct observations of slip system activity. We show that the experimental results associated with a pristine zinc single crystal are precisely consistent with the theoretical predicted shape change (sample distortion) assuming that the most favored slip system on the basal plane is the only one that is active. Another experiment was performed on a processed and annealed Zn single crystal to investigate slip that is inconsistent with the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) theory. These experiments on zinc illustrate the ability of the 6DOF experiment, together with image correlation (IC) data, to measure slip system activity with a high degree of fidelity.

  8. Effect of 1% Inspired CO2 During Head-Down Tilt on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, and Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Hu, X.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Phillips, T. R.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Taibbi, G.; Zwart, S. R.; Vizzeri, G.

    2016-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome experienced by many astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. In addition, elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has also been hypothesized to contribute to the development of VIIP. We seek to determine if an acute, mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the ISS, combined with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt will induce ophthalmic and ICP changes consistent with the VIIP syndrome.

  9. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head Down Tilted Bed Rest: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes are solely related to peripheral changes from reduced vestibular stimulation, body unloading, body fluid shifts or that they may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, a recent study reported associations between microgravity and flattening of the posterior eye globe and protrusion of the optic nerve [1] possibly as the result of increased intracranial pressure due to microgravity induced bodily fluid shifts [3]. Moreover, elevated intracranial pressure has been related to white matter microstructural damage [2]. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system [4]. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure [5]. Here we present results of the first six subjects. Six subjects were assessed at 12 and 7 days before-, at 7, 30, and 70 days in-, and at 8 and 12 days post 70 days of bed rest at the NASA bed rest facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA. At each time point structural MRI scans (i.e., high resolution T1-weighted imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)) were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in gray matter density were assessed using the voxel based morphometry 8 (VBM8) toolbox under SPM

  10. 360 degree decompresion and stabilisation of the C6-C7 cervical spine luxation - case study.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Robert; Godlewski, Bartosz; Klauz, Grzegorz; Janeczko, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    We present the operative technique employed in a young man with cervical spine luxation at the level of C6-C7 with clinical signs of damage to the spinal cord at the level of C5. In order to achieve an optimal therapeutic effect (decompression of neural structures and spinal stabilisation) during one surgical procedure, the positioning of the patient was changed twice during the procedure. Considering the positioning of the patient at the beginning of the procedure, the body position was changed by 360 degrees. The first part of the procedure was performed from an anterior approach with the patient in the supine position. It involved a C6-C7 discectomy and removal of the upper surface of the body of C7, which was protruding into the vertebral canal and compressing the spinal cord. Intraoperative inspection showed that a posterior approach was necessary to reduce the luxation. Therefore, for the second part of the operation, the patient was turned by 180 degrees and placed in the prone position. For the last (third) part of the surgical procedure, the patient was again turned by 180 degrees and placed in the supine position in order to insert an anterior spine fixator. We believe that a procedure utilising different surgical approaches and different positioning of the patient in order to achieve optimal therapeutic effect may be used in selected cases in everyday clinical practice. PMID:23382285

  11. Photographer : JPL Range : 6 million kilometers (3.7 million miles) Central Longitude 120 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 6 million kilometers (3.7 million miles) Central Longitude 120 degrees west, North is up. and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water). Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon. Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are. It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost. Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice.

  12. Quaternary geologic map of the Hudson River 4 degree x 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State and province compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Sevon, William D.; Muller, Ernest H.; Judson, Sheldon; Black, Robert F.; Wagner, Phillip W.; Hartshorn, Joseph H.; Chapman, William F.; Cowan, William D.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.

    1992-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Hudson River 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  13. Quaternary geologic map of the Lake Superior 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Gerald M., (Edited By); Fullerton, David S.; state compilations by Farrand, William R.; Mickelson, D.M.; Cowan, W.R.; Goebel, J.E.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1984-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Superior 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  14. Quaternary geologic map of the Lake Erie 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Richmond, Gerald M.; state compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Cowan, W.R.; Sevon, W.D.; Goldthwait, R.P.; Farrand, W.R.; Muller, E.H.; Behling, R.E.; Stravers, J.A.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.; Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1991-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake Erie 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  15. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake of the Woods 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sado, Edward V., (compiler); Fullerton, David S.; Goebel, Joseph E.; Ringrose, Susan M.; Edited and Integrated by Fullerton, David S.

    1995-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lake of the Woods 4 deg x 6 deg Quadrangle, United States and Canada, was mapped as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States map series (Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1420, NM-15). The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is a product of collaboration of the Ontario Geological Survey, the Minnesota Geological Survey, the Manitoba Department of Energy and Mines, and the U.S. Geological Survey, and is designed for both scientific and practical purposes. It was prepared in two stages. First, separate maps and map explanations were prepared by the compilers. Second, the maps were combined, integrated, and supplemented by the editor. Map unit symbols were revised to a uniform system of classification and the map unit descriptions were prepared by the editor from information received from the compilers and from additional sources listed under Sources of Information. Diagrams accompanying the map were prepared by the editor. For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relationships, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and

  16. Comparison of susceptibility to motion sickness during rotation at 30 rpm in the earth-horizontal, 10 deg head-up, and 10 deg head-down positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Normal persons rotated about an earth-horizontal axis vary in their susceptibility to motion sickness. An experimental study was conducted to measure intraindividual differences in susceptibility in 12 subjects when rotated 10 deg head up and 10 deg head down as well as in the horizontal position. Subjects assumed the test-position 60 min prior to rotation, thus providing an opportunity for translocation of body fluids. Physiological and psychological measurements were conducted throughout the experiment. There were no intraindividual differences in susceptibility to motion sickness in the three positions tested, although there were significant differences in vital capacity, demonstrating the expected fluid shifts. It was concluded that, in the sample of subjects tested, short-term effects of fluid shifts greater than those that would be manifested in zero gravity had no definite effect on motion sickness susceptibility.

  17. Performance of a 6-Degree-of-Freedom Active Microsurgical Manipulator in Handheld Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; Wells, Trent S.; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental results from human users of a new 6-degree-of-freedom handheld micromanipulator. This is the latest prototype of a fully-handheld system, known as “Micron,” which performs active compensation of hand tremor for microsurgery. The manipulator is a miniature Gough-Stewart platform incorporating linear ultrasonic motors that provide a cylindrical workspace 4 mm long and 4 mm wide. In addition, the platform allows the possibility of imposing a remote center of motion for controlling motion not only at the tip but also at the entry point in the sclera of the eye. We demonstrate hand tremor reduction in both static and dynamic micromanipulation tasks on a rubber pad. The handheld performance is also evaluated in an artificial eye model while imposing a remote center of motion. In all cases, hand tremor is significantly reduced. PMID:24111024

  18. Check-Cases for Verification of 6-Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Shelton, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of innovative unmanned aeronautical systems and the emergence of commercial space activities have resulted in a number of relatively new aerospace organizations that are designing innovative systems and solutions. These organizations use a variety of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house-developed simulation and analysis tools including 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) flight simulation tools. The increased affordability of computing capability has made highfidelity flight simulation practical for all participants. Verification of the tools' equations-of-motion and environment models (e.g., atmosphere, gravitation, and geodesy) is desirable to assure accuracy of results. However, aside from simple textbook examples, minimal verification data exists in open literature for 6-DOF flight simulation problems. This assessment compared multiple solution trajectories to a set of verification check-cases that covered atmospheric and exo-atmospheric (i.e., orbital) flight. Each scenario consisted of predefined flight vehicles, initial conditions, and maneuvers. These scenarios were implemented and executed in a variety of analytical and real-time simulation tools. This tool-set included simulation tools in a variety of programming languages based on modified flat-Earth, round- Earth, and rotating oblate spheroidal Earth geodesy and gravitation models, and independently derived equations-of-motion and propagation techniques. The resulting simulated parameter trajectories were compared by over-plotting and difference-plotting to yield a family of solutions. In total, seven simulation tools were exercised.

  19. Effects of 5 days of head-down bed rest, with and without short-arm centrifugation as countermeasure, on cardiac function in males (BR-AG1 study).

    PubMed

    Caiani, E G; Massabuau, P; Weinert, L; Vaïda, P; Lang, R M

    2014-09-15

    This study examined cardiac remodeling and functional changes induced by 5 days of head-down (-6°) bed rest (HDBR) and the effectiveness of short-arm centrifugation (SAC) in preventing them in males. Twelve healthy men (mean age: 33 ± 7) were enrolled in a crossover design study (BR-AG1, European Space Agency), including one sedentary (CTRL) and two daily SAC countermeasures (SAC1, 30 min continuously; SAC2, 30 min intermittently) groups. Measurements included plasma and blood volume and left ventricular (LV) and atrial (LA) dimensions by transthoracic echocardiography (2- and 3-dimensional) and Doppler inflows. Results showed that 5 days of HDBR had a major impact on both the geometry and cardiac function in males. LV mass and volume decreased by 16 and 14%, respectively; LA volume was reduced by 36%; Doppler flow and tissue Doppler velocities were reduced during early filling by 18 and 12%, respectively; and aortic flow velocity time integral was decreased by 18% with a 3% shortening of LV ejection time. These modifications were presumably due to decreased physiological loading and dehydration, resulting in reduced plasma and blood volume. All these changes were fully reversed 3 days after termination of HDBR. Moreover, SAC was not able to counteract these changes, either when applied continuously or intermittently. PMID:25080927

  20. First discoveries of z ˜ 6 quasars with the Kilo-Degree Survey and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venemans, B. P.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Mwebaze, J.; Valentijn, E. A.; Bañados, E.; Decarli, R.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Findlay, J. R.; Kuijken, K. H.; Barbera, F. La; McFarland, J. P.; McMahon, R. G.; Napolitano, N.; Sikkema, G.; Sutherland, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of our first year of quasar search in the ongoing ESO public Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) surveys. These surveys are among the deeper wide-field surveys that can be used to uncover large numbers of z ˜ 6 quasars. This allows us to probe a more common population of z ˜ 6 quasars that is fainter than the well-studied quasars from the main Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From this first set of combined survey catalogues covering ˜250 deg2 we selected point sources down to ZAB = 22 that had a very red i - Z (i - Z > 2.2) colour. After follow-up imaging and spectroscopy, we discovered four new quasars in the redshift range 5.8 < z < 6.0. The absolute magnitudes at a rest-frame wavelength of 1450 Å are between -26.6 < M1450 < -24.4, confirming that we can find quasars fainter than M*, which at z = 6 has been estimated to be between M* = -25.1 and M* = -27.6. The discovery of four quasars in 250 deg2 of survey data is consistent with predictions based on the z ˜ 6 quasar luminosity function. We discuss various ways to push the candidate selection to fainter magnitudes and we expect to find about 30 new quasars down to an absolute magnitude of M1450 = -24. Studying this homogeneously selected faint quasar population will be important to gain insight into the onset of the co-evolution of the black holes and their stellar hosts.

  1. Computing Dynamics Of A Robot Of 6+n Degrees Of Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiocho, Leslie J.; Bailey, Robert W.

    1995-01-01

    Improved formulation speeds and simplifies computation of dynamics of robot arm of n rotational degrees of freedom mounted on platform having three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. Intended for use in dynamical modeling of robotic manipulators attached to such moving bases as spacecraft, aircraft, vessel, or land vehicle. Such modeling important part of simulation and control of robotic motions.

  2. WISE 2005-2006: 60-days of Head-Down Bed Rest Increases the Incidence of Menstrual Cycle Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Charles

    post bed rest (day 0-day 60;EPBR) and late post bed rest (day 60-day 367;LPBR). Plasma PRG was significantly higher (p¡0.02) in the N group before BR and continued throughout the BR period. A significant difference in E2 was observed in the N group between PB and BR, BR and EPBR, and EPBR and LPBR (p¡0.01). E2 was significantly different between N and O during BR (p¡0.02). No differences were observed in the other plasma measurements. Daily urine samples demonstrated no changes in C or Aldo over the course of the study. At 6 and 12 months following completion of the study all subjects reported normal MC. Conclusion: The lengthening of menstrual cycle during bed rest is a result of a delay in ovulation due to the absence of a LH surge (ovulation) associated with lower PRG and E2 levels. In females, changes in menstrual cycles may be a contributing factor to the adverse responses to bed rest such as loss of bone mass, reductions in blood volume and decreased work performance.

  3. Functional evidence of paraventricular nucleus involvement in cardiovascular and autonomic modulation in response to acute microgravity (head-down tilt) in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Eric Diego Turossi; Peras, Vivian Rossi; de Andrade, Ozahyr; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to microgravity induces autonomic and vestibular disorders such as alterations in cardiovascular function. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is known to be an important center for integrating autonomic and cardiovascular responses as blood volume reflexes. The acute effects promoted by microgravity and PVN involvement in cardiovascular and autonomic parameters have not yet been evaluated. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized to facilitate cannulae implantation in the PVN. After 3 days of surgical recovery, femoral artery and vein catheters were implanted for direct recording of blood pressure and heart rate (HR) in conscious animals to evaluate cardiovascular and autonomic changes in an acute protocol of head-down tilt (HDT) in nonanesthetized rats. During HDT, there was an increase in mean arterial pressure (11 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05) and a decrease in HR (-28 ± 5 bpm, P < 0.05). Spectral analysis of systolic arterial pressure showed an increase in the low-frequency (LF) component. In addition, HDT induced a reduction in the LF component and an increase in the high-frequency (HF) component of the pulse interval (PI). PVN inhibition with muscimol reversed bradycardia and blocked the reduction of the LF and HF increases in PI during HDT. These results suggest that the PVN participates in the cardiovascular compensation during HDT, especially modulating cardiac responses. PMID:25821104

  4. The relative class numbers of imaginary cyclic fields of degrees 4, 6, 8, and 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girstmair, Kurt

    1993-10-01

    We express the relative class number of an imaginary abelian number field K of prime power conductor as a sort of Maillet determinant. Thereby we obtain explicit relative class number formulas for fields K of conductor p, p ≥ 3 prime, and degree 2d = [K:Q] ≤ 10 , in terms of sums of 2d-power residues. In particular, tables are given for p ≤ 10000 .

  5. Results of a 4-week head-down tilt with and without LBNP countermeasure: II. Cardiac and peripheral hemodynamics--comparison with a 25-day spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P; Gauquelin, G; Pottier, J M; Pourcelot, L; Güell, A; Gharib, C

    1992-01-01

    Cardiovascular hemodynamics were assessed by ultrasound echography and Doppler during a 28-d head-down tilt "CNES HDT: 87-88," and during the 25-d French-Soviet spaceflight "Aragatz 88." For both studies we used the same ultrasound methodology. The main hemodynamic parameters of the left heart function and of the peripheral arterial system (cerebral, renal, femoral arteries) were measured four times during the HDT (day 7, 14, 21, 28) and twice post-HDT. The same measurements were performed six times during the flight (day 4, 5, 15, 18, 20, 24) and five times postflight. During the HDT, two groups were studied: six subjects no countermeasures and six subjects with repeated lower body negative pressure (LBNP). In the first group the cardiac volumes and the cardiac output were significantly decreased, whereas in the group with LBNP these parameters were superior to the basal value. In the group without LBNP the cerebral flow was maintained because of a decrease of the brain vascular resistance. In this group the renal vascular resistance was decreased as inflight. In the lower limbs we observed a loss of the vasomotor control. The vascular resistance was decreased after the end of the HDT and the subjects suffered orthostatic intolerance. In the population with LBNP, we did not observe the same decrease of vascular resistance during the HDT, and after the HDT no sign of orthostatic intolerance was observed. During the flight, the left ventricular volume was significantly decreased. The carotid flow was maintained owing to a decrease of the cerebral vascular resistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1550542

  6. Cardiovascular responses to lower body negative pressure before and after 4 h of head-down bed rest and seated control in men and women.

    PubMed

    Edgell, H; Grinberg, A; Gagné, N; Beavers, K R; Hughson, R L

    2012-11-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning after a 4-h head-down bed rest (HDBR) might be a consequence of the time of day relative to pre-HDBR testing, or simply 4 h of confinement and inactivity rather than the posture change. Ten men and 11 women were studied during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) before and after 4-h HDBR and 4-h seated posture (SEAT) as a control for time of day and physical inactivity effects to test the hypotheses that cardiovascular deconditioning was a consequence of the HDBR posture, and that women would have a greater deconditioning response. Following HDBR, men and women had lower blood volume, higher heart rate with a greater increase during LBNP, a greater decrease of stroke volume during LBNP, lower central venous pressure, smaller inferior vena cava diameter, higher portal vein resistance index with a greater increase during LBNP, but lower forearm vascular resistance, lower norepinephrine, and lower renin. Women had lower vasopressin and men had higher vasopressin after HDBR, and women had lower pelvic impedance and men higher pelvic impedance. Following SEAT, brachial vascular resistance was reduced, thoracic impedance was elevated, the reduction of central venous pressure during LBNP was changed, women had higher angiotensin II whereas men had lower levels, and pelvic impedance increased in women and decreased in men. Cardiovascular deconditioning was greater after 4-h HDBR than after SEAT. Women and men had similar responses for most cardiovascular variables in the present study that tested the responses to LBNP after short-duration HDBR compared with a control condition. PMID:22984250

  7. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: effects of −6° head-down tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Li-Lin; Zhou, Yuan; Liang, Zhu-Yuan; Rao, Henyi; Zheng, Rui; Sun, Yan; Tan, Cheng; Xiao, Yi; Tian, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chun-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang; Chen, Shan-Guang; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals' risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants' risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning. PMID:24904338

  8. A 6 degree-of-freedom Lorentz force vibration isolator with nonlinear controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, Ralph; Johnson, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    This program demonstrated the technical feasibility of constructing large-stroke magnetic suspensions that can meet the active vibration isolation requirements of Space Station. These requirements include: (1) strokes over 1 cm in all directions, (2) actuator bandwidths over 100 Hz, (3) isolator roll-off frequencies below 10(exp -2) Hertz, and (4) force capability over 1 Newton in all axes. The 100 Hz actuator bandwidth allows the suspension to reject any direct force disturbances that act on the microgravity experiment, for example forces created by cable connections. The low isolator roll-off frequency and large stroke allow the magnetic suspension to isolate the microgravity experiment from Space Station vibrations above the roll-off frequency. The capability to meet these requirements was demonstrated by designing, constructing and testing a six-degree-of-freedom, prototype magnetic suspension system that featured high-performance, Lorentz-force actuators and full multi-input, multi-output control. This prototype suspension is designed to isolate large orbiter locker experiments under typical spacecraft constraints of size, weight, and power. Suspension in the full six-degrees-of-freedom was successfully demonstrated in this program while using a gravity-force unload mechanism to simulate a space environment. The prototype isolator is capable of space-based isolation service with relatively minor modification. The use of advanced, nonlinear control algorithms were investigated on a specially designed single-degree-of-freedom testbed. This low acceleration test facility simulates the Space Station vibration isolation problem in a single horizontal axis with low-friction, air-slide support. This allowed testing at the desired microgravity levels, without the gravity bias effects that are seen in a full six-degrees-of-freedom suspension. Precision components were used to reduce residual accelerations to microgravity levels so that the effects of sensor, actuator

  9. Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, R.C.

    1995-09-22

    Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

  10. Experimental validation of a newly designed 6 degrees of freedom scanning laser head: Application to three-dimensional beam structure

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maio, D.; Copertaro, E.

    2013-12-15

    A new scanning laser head is designed to use single Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) for performing measurements up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) at a target. The scanning head is supported by a rotating hollow shaft, which allows the laser beam to travel up to the scanning head from an opposite direction where an LDV is set up. The scanning head is made of a set of two mirrors, which deflects the laser beam with an angle so that the rotation of the scanning head produces a conical scan. When measurements are performed at the focal point of the conical scan then three translational vibration components can be measured, otherwise the very small circle scan, before and after the focal point, can measure up to 6 degrees of freedom, including three translations and three rotations. This paper presents the 6DOF scanning head and the measurements of 3D operational deflection shapes of a test structure.

  11. PHF6 Degrees of Separation: The Multifaceted Roles of a Chromatin Adaptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Matthew A.M.; Ivanochko, Danton; Picketts, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of chromatin regulation to human disease is highlighted by the growing number of mutations identified in genes encoding chromatin remodeling proteins. While such mutations were first identified in severe developmental disorders, or in specific cancers, several genes have been implicated in both, including the plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) gene. Indeed, germline mutations in PHF6 are the cause of the Börjeson–Forssman–Lehmann X-linked intellectual disability syndrome (BFLS), while somatic PHF6 mutations have been identified in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies from different groups over the last few years have made a significant impact towards a functional understanding of PHF6 protein function. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of PHF6 with particular emphasis on how it interfaces with a distinct set of interacting partners and its functional roles in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. Overall, PHF6 is emerging as a key chromatin adaptor protein critical to the regulation of neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:26103525

  12. Implementation issues for a compact 6 degree of freedom force reflecting handcontroller with cueing of modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobus, Heidi; Riggs, Alan J.; Jacobus, Charles; Weinstein, Yechiel

    1991-01-01

    Teleoperated control requires a master human interface device that can provide haptic input and output which reflect the responses of a slave robotic system. The effort reported in this paper addresses the design and prototyping of a six degree-of-freedom (DOF) Cartesian coordinate hand controller for this purpose. The device design recommended is an XYZ stage attached to a three-roll wrist which positions a flight-type handgrip. Six degrees of freedom are transduced and control brushless DC motor servo electronics similar in design to those used in computer controlled robotic manipulators. This general approach supports scaled force, velocity, and position feedback to aid an operator in achieving telepresence. The generality of the device and control system characteristics allow the use of inverse dynamics robotic control methodology to project slave robot system forces and inertias to the operator (in scaled form) and at the same time to reduce the apparent inertia of the robotic handcontroller itself. The current control design, which is not multiple fault tolerant, can be extended to make flight control or space use possible. The proposed handcontroller will have advantages in space-based applications where an operator must control several robot arms in a simultaneous and coordinated fashion. It will also have applications in intravehicular activities (within the Space Station) such as microgravity experiments in metallurgy and biological experiments that require isolation from the astronauts' environment. For ground applications, the handcontroller will be useful in underwater activities where the generality of the proposed handcontroller becomes an asset for operation of many different manipulator types. Also applications will emerge in the Military, Construction, and Maintenance/Manufacturing areas including ordnance handling, mine removal, NBC (Nuclear, Chemical, Biological) operations, control of vehicles, and operating strength and agility enhanced

  13. Six-degree-of-freedom program to optimize simulated trajectories (6D POST). Volume 1: Formulation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauer, G. L.; Habeger, A. R.; Stevenson, R.

    1974-01-01

    The basic equations and models used in a computer program (6D POST) to optimize simulated trajectories with six degrees of freedom were documented. The 6D POST program was conceived as a direct extension of the program POST, which dealt with point masses, and considers the general motion of a rigid body with six degrees of freedom. It may be used to solve a wide variety of atmospheric flight mechanics and orbital transfer problems for powered or unpowered vehicles operating near a rotating oblate planet. Its principal features are: an easy to use NAMELIST type input procedure, an integrated set of Flight Control System (FCS) modules, and a general-purpose discrete parameter targeting and optimization capability. It was written in FORTRAN 4 for the CDC 6000 series computers.

  14. Discovery of three z > 6.5 quasars in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy (VIKING) survey

    SciTech Connect

    Venemans, B. P.; Findlay, J. R.; Sutherland, W. J.; De Rosa, G.; McMahon, R. G.; González-Solares, E. A.; Lewis, J. R.; Simcoe, R.; Kuijken, K.

    2013-12-10

    Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 quasars up to z ≅ 6.4, a limit set by the use of the z-band and CCD detectors. Only one z ≳ 6.4 quasar has been discovered, namely the z = 7.08 quasar ULAS J1120+0641, using near-infrared imaging. Here we report the discovery of three new z ≳ 6.4 quasars in 332 deg{sup 2} of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey, thus extending the number from 1 to 4. The newly discovered quasars have redshifts of z = 6.60, 6.75, and 6.89. The absolute magnitudes are between –26.0 and –25.5, 0.6-1.1 mag fainter than ULAS J1120+0641. Near-infrared spectroscopy revealed the Mg II emission line in all three objects. The quasars are powered by black holes with masses of ∼(1-2) × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. In our probed redshift range of 6.44 < z < 7.44 we can set a lower limit on the space density of supermassive black holes of ρ(M {sub BH} > 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) > 1.1 × 10{sup –9} Mpc{sup –3}. The discovery of three quasars in our survey area is consistent with the z = 6 quasar luminosity function when extrapolated to z ∼ 7. We do not find evidence for a steeper decline in the space density of quasars with increasing redshift from z = 6 to z = 7.

  15. In-vivo 6 degrees-of-freedom kinematics of metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty during gait.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Wang, Shaobai; Scarborough, Donna; Kwon, Young-Min

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of accurate in-vivo 6 degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) kinematics of total hip arthroplasty (THA) during daily activities is critical for improvement of longevity of the components. Previous studies assessed in-vivo THA kinematics using skin marker-based motion analysis. However, skin markers are prone to move with respect to the underlying bones. A non-invasive dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS) based tracking technique has been used to avoid skin artifacts and provide accurate 6-DOF kinematic measurement. This study aimed to quantify in-vivo 6-DOF THA kinematics during gait using DFIS. Twenty eight well-functioning THAs were evaluated during treadmill gait under DFIS surveillance. The maximum translations of the femoral head were 0.46±0.10mm and 0.45±0.10mm during the stance and swing phases (p=0.57), respectively. The range of hip flexion was from 8.7° to 47.6°, adduction from 3.0° to 12.5° and external rotation from 19.2° to 29.7°. The THA was flexed, externally rotated and adducted throughout the gait. The magnitudes of the femoral head translations were found to be within the manufacture tolerance of the components, suggesting that in-vivo hip "pistoning" during gait cycle may be minimal in well-functioning THAs. The 6-DOF kinematics could be used as the baseline knowledge for further improvement of wear-testing of hip implant, implants manufacturing and implant positioning during surgery. PMID:24704170

  16. Modified Iterative Sandwich Experiments (MISE) for determination of small-degree partial melt compositions: An example for carbonated peridotite at 6.6 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Dasgupta, R.

    2006-12-01

    Small degree partial melts may play a significant role in the geochemical and geodynamical evolution of the mantle at a spectrum of depths ranging from the source regions of erupted basalts down to the lower mantle. However, because small-degree partial melts reside in small pockets along grain edges or triple junctions, they are not easily analyzed and so direct experimental determination of their compositions is challenging. Melt trap methods overcome some of these problems, but for various reasons such methods are best employed chiefly at modest pressures (<3 GPa). Sandwich experiments, in which a layer of melt is added to a whole-rock to produce large melt pools, have significant promise. Applied iteratively, with the melt composition resulting from one experiment added as the "meat" of the subsequent experimental sandwich, the method converges to the composition of the partial melt at the solidus (melt fraction approaching zero) of the "bread" composition. However, iterative sandwich experiments converge very slowly, possibly requiring dozens of iterations to yield a meaningful result for some elements. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a modified iterative sandwich experiment (MISE) technique that employs measured partition coefficients, D, and mass balance to estimate the equilibrium solidus melt composition. Monte Carlo simulations show that the method is robust and converges rapidly even when estimates of D have considerable random and systematic uncertainties. The MISE method can also be adapted to investigate small finite (0-10%) melt fractions above the solidus. We applied the MISE method to determine the composition of near-solidus partial melt of carbonated peridotite at 6.6 GPa and 1200°-1260° C using a Walker-style multi-anvil apparatus. We performed 6 iterations, but melt compositions changed little after the third iteration, demonstrating that rapid convergence can be achieved with this method. The near solidus liquid, estimated from

  17. Sulfation of chondroitin. Specificity, degree of sulfation, and detergent effects with 4-sulfating and 6-sulfating microsomal systems.

    PubMed

    Sugumaran, G; Silbert, J E

    1988-04-01

    Microsomal preparations from chondroitin 6-sulfate-producing chick embryo epiphyseal cartilage, and from chondroitin 4-sulfate-producing mouse mastocytoma cells, were incubated with UDP-[14C]glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine to form non-sulfated proteo[14C]chondroitin. Aliquots of the incubations were then incubated with 3'-phosphoadenylylphosphosulfate (PAPS) in the presence or absence of various detergents. In the absence of detergents, there was good sulfation of this endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin by the original microsomes from both sources. Detergents, with the exception of Triton X-100, markedly inhibited sulfation in the mast cell system but not in the chick cartilage system. These results indicate that sulfation and polymerization are closely linked on cell membranes and that in some cases this organization can be disrupted by detergents. When aliquots of the original incubation were heat inactivated, and then reincubated with new microsomes from chick cartilage and/or mouse mastocytoma cells plus PAPS, there was no significant sulfation of this exogenous proteo[14C] chondroitin with either system unless Triton X-100 was added. Sulfation of exogenous chondroitin and chondroitin hexasaccharide was compared with sulfation of endogenous and exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Sulfate incorporation into hexasaccharide and chondroitin decreased as their concentrations (based on uronic acid) approached that of the proteo[14C]chondroitin. At the same time, the degree of sulfation in percent of substituted hexosamine increased. However, the degree of sulfation did not reach that of the endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Hexasaccharide and chondroitin sulfation were stimulated by the presence of Triton X-100. However, in contrast to the exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin, there was some sulfation of hexasaccharide and chondroitin in the absence of this detergent. These results indicate that the intact microsomal system was not accessible to the larger

  18. Estimating the Composition and the Degree of Space Weathering of Asteroids 6 Hebe, 433 Eros, and 25143 Itokawa by Reflectance Spectroscopy Using a New Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimura, T.; Abe, M.; Hiroi, T.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-03-01

    We have estimated the mineral assemblage, chemical compositions of the component minerals, grain-size, and degree of space weathering of asteroids 6 Hebe, 433 Eros, and 25143 Itokawa from their visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra.

  19. Effects of 36.6 GHz and static magnetic field on degree of endoreduplication in Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Dyka, Liliia D; Shakina, Lyubov A; Strashnyuk, Volodymyr Yu; Shckorbatov, Yuriy G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of microwave (MW) irradiation and consistent action of microwaves and static magnetic field (MF) on the giant chromosomes endoreduplication in Drosophila melanogaster Meig. Materials and methods Experiments were carried out on inbred wild type Canton-S strain. Exposure to microwaves (frequency - 36.64 GHz, power density - 1 W/m(2), exposure time - 30 sec) and static magnetic field (intensity - 25 mT, exposure time - 5 min) applied at the egg stage after a 2-h oviposition. Giant chromosomes were investigated in squashed preparations of the salivary glands stained by acetoorcein by the cytomorphometric method. Preparations were obtained from Drosophila larvae at the 0 h prepupae stage. Results Exposure to microwaves increased the degree of polyteny in chromosomes (DPC) by 7.5%, and the statistical power of the impact was: h(2) = 35.3%. A similar effect occurred after the sequential action of microwaves and static magnetic field: The polyteny level of chromosomes increased by 7.4%, statistical power was: h(2) = 30.6%. Conclusions Exposure to microwaves on the stage of embryogenesis has a stimulating effect on endoreduplication in Drosophila development. The effect of microwaves was not modified by the action of the static magnetic field. PMID:26882320

  20. SU-D-18A-07: Towards 6-Degree-Of-Freedom Real-Time Motion Management in Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.Y.; Keall, P; Nasehi Tehrani, J; Booth, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lung tumor motion has been identified as a major issue that deteriorates treatment efficacy for radiotherapy, especially for SBRT. As tighter PTV margins are applied due to translational compensation, tumor rotation will become the dominant factor limiting tumor targeting accuracy. This is the world-first study quantifies lung tumor rotation by utilizing kV images with fiducial markers and a step towards 6-degree-of-freedom real-time cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three or four gold coils were implanted as tumor surrogates in 3 lung cancer patients. 50 fractions of 8- minute, 10 Hz 4D CBCT projections were acquired for the patients immediately prior or after radiotherapy. The fiducial marker positions are segmented, reconstructed and used to determine tumour rotation by the iterative closest point algorithm. Different data acceptance and filtering methods were applied to accept data or smooth the marker trajectory. Results: The average rotation angles around the left/ right (LR), superior/inferior (SI), anterior/posterior (AP) rotations were found to be 0.8±4.2, -0.8±4.5 and 1.7±3.1 degrees respectively. For 28% of the treatment time, the lung tumors rotated more than 5° around the SI axis. Respiration-induced rotational motion was detected in 2 of the 3 lung patients. This can be explained by the patient developed atelectasis during the treatment period. Interestingly, no heart beating component of rotation was observed in the power spectrum. Different rotational types were observed within the patient cohort with large variations in the magnitude of the rotation between patients. Conclusions: For the first time, continuous tumor rotation has been measured for lung patients with gold fiducial markers. Tumors were found to undergo rotations of more than 5° for almost a third of the total treatment time. The study also demonstrated the feasibility of using continuously kV images for real-time lung tumour motion adaptive radiotherapy which can potentially

  1. Tenth value layers for 60Co gamma rays and for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays in concrete for beams of cone angles between 0 degrees and 14 degrees calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Adnan K; Biggs, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    The calculation of shielding barrier thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities according to the NCRP formalism is based on the use of broad beams (that is, the maximum possible field sizes). However, in practice, treatment fields used in radiation therapy are, on average, less than half the maximum size. Indeed, many contemporary treatment techniques call for reduced field sizes to reduce co-morbidity and the risk of second cancers. Therefore, published tenth value layers (TVLs) for shielding materials do not apply to these very small fields. There is, hence, a need to determine the TVLs for various beam modalities as a function of field size. The attenuation of (60)Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV bremsstrahlung x ray beams by concrete has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for beams of half-opening angles of 0 degrees , 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees , 12 degrees , and 14 degrees . The distance between the x-ray source and the distal surface of the shielding wall was fixed at 600 cm, a distance that is typical for modern radiation therapy rooms. The maximum concrete thickness varied between 76.5 cm and 151.5 cm for (60)Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Detectors were placed at 630 cm, 700 cm, and 800 cm from the source. TVLs have been determined down to the third TVL. Energy spectra for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays for 10 x 10 cm(2) and 40 x 40 cm(2) field sizes were used to generate depth dose curves in water that were compared with experimentally measured values. PMID:17429304

  2. Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics at Low Speed of 45 Degree Sweptback-midwing Models Having Wings with an Aspect Ratio of 2, 4, or 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David F , Jr; Wolhart, Walter D

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented of tests conducted in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effects of various components and combinations of components on the static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics at low speed of a series of 45 degree sweptback-midwing-airplane configurations having wings with an aspect ratio of 2, 4, or 6. The tests were made at a dynamic pressure of 24.9 pounds per square foot which corresponds to a Mach number of 0.13 and Reynolds numbers of 1.00 x 10(exp 6), 0.71 x 10 (exp 6), and 0.58 x 10 (exp 6) based on the respective wing mean aerodynamic chords. The angle-of-attack range covered was from -4 degrees to 32 degrees and the sideslip angles used for the lateral-derivative tests were 5 degrees and -5 degrees. An increasing loss in tail contribution to directional stability both with increasing wing aspect ratio and increasing angle of attack was found to be a principal cause of all the complete models becoming directionally unstable in the high angle-of-attack range.

  3. The Tech Prep Associate Degree Challenge: A Report of the Tech Prep Roundtable. AACC Special Reports No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcone, Lisa, Ed.; Mundhenk, Robert, Ed.

    In fall 1993, a roundtable was held with leading Tech Prep practitioners to discuss the direction Tech Prep has taken since 1990 and emerging issues related to the implementation of Tech Prep Associate Degree (TPAD) programs. Stemming from the roundtable, this monograph describes Tech Prep, provides recommendations for implementation, and…

  4. Analog Simulation of a Single Degree of Freedom System with Nonlinear Damping. COED Transactions, Vol. VIII, No. 6, June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Richard A.

    A computer project in the area of equivalent viscous damping is described. The concept of equivalent viscous damping is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system with velocity-squared damping. Comparison of the analytical results with an analog computer solution shows that the concept gives accurate results for the amplitude and phase of the…

  5. Individual Differences in the Temporal Profile of Cardiovascular Responses to Head Down Tilt and Orthostatic Stress with and Without Fluid Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Kanis, Dionisios; Gebreyesus, Fiyore

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility of healthy astronauts to orthostatic hypotension and presyncope is exacerbated upon return from spaceflight. Hypo-volemia is suspected to play an important role in cardiovascular deconditioning following exposure to spaceflight, which may lead to increased peripheral resistance, attenuated arterial baroreflex, and changes in cardiac function. The effect of altered gravity during space flight and planetary transition on human cardiovascular function is of critical importance to maintenance of astronaut health and safety. A promising countermeasure for post-flight orthostatic intolerance is fluid loading used to restore loss fluid volume by giving crew salt tablets and water prior to re-entry. Eight men and eight women will be tested during two, 6-hour exposures to 6o HDT: 1) fluid loading, 2) no fluid loading. Before and immediately after each HDT, subjects will perform a stand test to assess their orthostatic tolerance. Physiological measures (e.g., ECG, blood pressure, peripheral blood volume) will be continuously monitored while echocardiography measures are recorded at 30-minute intervals during HDT and stand tests. Preliminary results (N=4) clearly show individual differences in responses to this countermeasure and the time course of physiological changes induced by HDT.

  6. NCLB Heads Down Alice's Rabbit Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Bobby Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article describes one unconventional elementary school teacher's frustrations with colleagues doubting her competence, intelligence, and sense of purpose as a teacher. In her classroom, she never used textbooks or had a teacher's desk. There were no contests, gold stars, or redbird reading groups. There were no school-supply decorations,…

  7. Effect of Ground Interference on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of a 42 Degree Sweptback Wing at Reynolds Numbers up to 6.8 x 10(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, G Chester; Bollech, Thomas V

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of ground interference on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 42 degree sweptback wing at distances 0.68 and 0.92 of the mean aerodynamic chord from the simulated ground to the 0.25-chord point of the mean aerodynamic chord. Survey data behind the wing, both with and without the simulated ground, are presented in the form of contour charts of downwash, sidewash, and dynamic-pressure ratio at longitudinal stations of 2.0 and 2.8 mean aerodynamic chords behind the wing.

  8. Global Phase Portraits of Kukles Differential Systems with Homogeneous Polynomial Nonlinearities of Degree 6 Having a Center and Their Small Limit Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llibre, Jaume; da Silva, Maurício Fronza

    We provide the nine topological global phase portraits in the Poincaré disk of the family of the centers of Kukles polynomial differential systems of the form ẋ = ‑y, ẏ = x + ax5y + bx3y3 + cxy5, where x,y ∈ ℝ and a,b,c are real parameters satisfying a2 + b2 + c2≠0. Using averaging theory up to sixth order we determine the number of limit cycles which bifurcate from the origin when we perturb this system first inside the class of all homogeneous polynomial differential systems of degree 6, and second inside the class of all polynomial differential systems of degree 6.

  9. Evolution of SF[sub 6] pressure at constant volume versus temperature between liquefaction point and +20[degree]C

    SciTech Connect

    Thuries, E.; Girodet, A.; Collet, M. . Research Center)

    1994-07-01

    Switchgear must be able to operate within a temperature range anywhere from [minus]50 C to +55 C. The practical problem of how to perform significant tests at +20 C then presents itself. It becomes mandatory to know the equivalent of the density at the lowest temperature to which the switchgear will be subjected. A perfect mathematical knowledge of SF[sub 6] evolution at constant volume versus temperature between the liquefaction point and +20 C is then very important. There exists today three main state equations used by SF[sub 6] switchgear users and manufacturers and they do not truly agree between themselves. The authors evaluate them and also describe a simple experiment as defined by E. Thuries to check these state equations. The last part of the paper describes various experimental data that drive one to establish a state equation using the new notion of fugacity. The last part of the paper compares this state equation based on fugacity and the other equations as used today against the results of the new SF[sub 6] Thuries experiment.

  10. Mach 6 experimental and theoretical stability and performance of a cruciform missile at angles of attack up to 65 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edward R.; Johnston, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control of an axisymmetric cruciform-finned missile has been conducted at Mach 6. The angle-of-attack range extended from 20 to 65 deg to encompass maximum lift. Longitudinal stability, performance, and trim could be accurately predicted with the fins at a fin roll angle of 0 deg but not when the fins were at a fin roll angle of 45 deg. At this roll angle, windward fin choking occurred at angles of attack above 50 deg and reduced the effectiveness of the fins and caused pitch-up.

  11. Attachment-Line Transition Due to Roughness on a 76 Degree Swept Cylinder at Mach 1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Colin P.; Poll, D. I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 76 deg. swept cylinder to establish the conditions for the attachment-line transition process with, and without, surface roughness in a low-disturbance ("quiet"), Mach number 1.6 flow. Local flow parameters were estimated from pressure measurements. These were in good agreement with predictions from an Euler code (CFL3D) and a boundary layer code (BL3D). Hot-wires and Schlieren photography were used to determine the state of the boundary layer. It was found that, for a near-adiabatic wall condition and a smooth surface, the attachment-line, boundary-layer remained laminar up to the highest attainable Reynolds number (R-bar of 790). Transition under the influence of trip wires was found to depend on wind-tunnel disturbance levels and the onset conditions have been established. Results suggest that current design practice, which is based upon data from conventional ("noisy") tunnels, may be highly conservative.

  12. Effects of chronic pH 6.6 on growth, intracellular pH, and response to 42.0 degrees C hyperthermia of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Fox, M H

    1988-05-01

    Culturing Chinese hamster ovary cells in low pH (6.6) medium for several months altered the reproductive survival of these cells to combined low pH treatments and 42.0 degrees C heating. We isolated new pH-resistant cells (identified as pHV-2) with enhanced ability to grow and divide under a low pH (6.6) environment. Their growth characteristics include (a) a plating efficiency of 70%, (b) a doubling time of 16 to 17 h, and (c) a steady state intracellular pH 0.12 pH units higher than for cells grown at a normal pH of 7.3. The pHV-2 cells had 100- to 200-fold increases in survival after 5 h of heating compared to cells incubated at low pH (6.6) for 4 h prior to and during the heat treatments. In addition, they developed a significant degree of thermotolerance. We measured a progressive decline in the intracellular pH as a function of time at 42.0 degrees C. However, the decrease in the intracellular pH did not seem to be correlated with the increased heat sensitivity. The ability to select for low pH variants may have important implications in the extrapolation of in vitro hyperthermic data to the in vivo situation. PMID:3356006

  13. Online Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolezalek, Holly

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the trend of trainers who are getting degrees through online courses delivered via the Internet. Addresses accreditation issues and what to ask before enrolling in online degree programs. (JOW)

  14. Dishonorary Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2008-01-01

    If an honorary degree lacks values to begin with, does withdrawing it deliver a rebuke to the recipient? Is whatever honor that comes with the distinction embedded in the fancy paper, or is it wholly in the eye of the degree holder? Are honorary degrees really such silly things that individuals should mock their bestowal or withdrawal? The case of…

  15. Estimation of 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DOF) Rigid-Body Patient Motion From Projection Data by the Principal-Axes Method in Iterative Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; King, Michael A

    2006-11-01

    We developed a unique method for estimating and compensating rigid-body translations and rotations from scatter and-attenuation-compensated projection data in iterative reconstruction when multiple projection angles are acquired at the same time. During reconstruction, both the non-attenuated and attenuated line-integrals are calculated. Their ratios are then multiplied to the scatter-corrected projection data to estimate scatter-and-attenuation- compensated projection data. At the end of each iteration, the sets of compensated projection data for the angles acquired at the same time are employed to calculate the center-of mass and the inertia tensor, which are used to estimate the location and orientation of the imaging object by the principle-axes method. The estimated motion is applied in the next iteration to reposition the estimated slices and attenuation map in the projector and back-projector to match the pose of the patient at time the projections were acquired. To evaluate our method, we simulated an acquisition of the MCAT phantom with a 3-head SPECT system and imaged the Data Spectrum anthropomorphic phantom on a 3-head IRIX SPECT system. In simulations the phantom translated and rotated by the same amount 9 times. A numerical projector modeling the motion, attenuation, and distance-dependent blurring was used to generate the projection data. Poisson noise was added and 30 noise-realizations were generated. In the experiment with the anthropomorphic phantom, four 360-degree acquisitions were performed with the phantom translated or rotated beforehand. A motion-present dataset was made by mixing the 4 acquisitions. For both the MCAT phantom simulations and anthropomorphic phantom experiment, the motion-present data were reconstructed with 10 iterations of the OSEM which estimates and corrects the motion as described above. Our method obtained visually artifact-free reconstructions, while the reconstruction with no motion correction showed severe artifacts

  16. Reduced resuscitation fluid volume for second-degree experimental burns with delayed initiation of vitamin C therapy (beginning 6 h after injury).

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Tanaka, H; Matsuda, T; Goya, T; Shimazaki, S; Matsuda, H

    1997-11-01

    We studied the hemodynamic effects of delayed initiation (6 h postburn) of antioxidant therapy with high-dose vitamin C in second-degree thermal injuries. Seventy percent body surface area burns were produced by subxiphoid immersion of 12 guinea pigs into 100 degrees C water for 3 s. The animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate solution (R/L) according to the Parkland formula (4 ml/kg/% burn during the first 24 h) from 6 h postburn, after which the resuscitation fluid volume was reduced to 25% of the Parkland formula volume. Animals were divided into two groups. The vitamin C group (n = 6) received R/L to which vitamin C (340 mg/kg/24 h) was added after 6 h postburn. The control group (n = 6) received R/L only. Both groups received identical resuscitation volumes. Heart rates, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, hematocrit level, and water content of burned and unburned tissue were measured before injury and at intervals thereafter. No animals died. There were no significant differences in heart rates or blood pressures between the two groups throughout the 24-h study period. The vitamin C group showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower hematocrits 8 and 24 h postburn, and higher cardiac outputs after 7 h postburn. At 24 h postburn, the burned skin in the vitamin C group had a significantly (P < 0.05) lower water content (73.1 +/- 1.1) than that of the control group (76.0 +/- 0.8). In conclusion, delayed initiation of high-dose vitamin C therapy beginning 6 h postburn with 25% of the Parkland formula volume significantly reduced edema formation in burned tissue, while maintaining stable hemodynamics. PMID:9441788

  17. Fertilization of C57BL/6 mouse sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C using laser-microdissected oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Fukumoto, Kiyoko; Haruguchi, Yukie; Kondo, Tomoko; Machida, Hiromi; Koga, Mika; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Tsuchiyama, Shuuji; Saiki, Kiyora; Noshiba, Shiho; Nakagata, Naomi

    2009-08-01

    The C57BL/6 mouse is commonly used to produce transgenic and knockout strains for biomedical research. However, the motility and fertility of its sperm decrease markedly with freezing. Short-term preservation of sperm without freezing can avoid this. Furthermore, such samples can be transported safety without the special skills or equipment needed for the transportation of live animals or frozen products. We evaluated the motility and fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C. Oocytes with the zona pellucida subjected to laser-microdissection were used to assist fertilization in vitro. Although the motility of sperm gradually decreased with storage (P<0.05), no disruption of the sperm plasma membrane was seen. The proportion of zona-intact oocytes fertilized with sperm preserved for 0, 24, 48 and 72h were 70, 14, 5 and 1%, respectively. On the other hand, 45, 20 and 14% of laser-microdissected oocytes were fertilized by sperm preserved for 24, 48 and 72h, respectively (P<0.05). The fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides of two transgenic strains after transportation at 4 degrees C were also significantly increased using laser-microdissected oocytes rather than zona-intact oocytes (57 and 68% vs. 5%, P<0.05). Efficient production of offspring from sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C was achieved using laser-microdissected oocytes. Thus the fertility of sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C could be maintained, although motility gradually decreased with storage. Laser-microdissected oocytes will contribute to the efficient production of embryos and offspring using such preserved sperm samples. PMID:19394323

  18. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF 6.4 MM (0.25 INCH) ARC-CAST MOLOBDENUM AND MOLYBDENUM-TZM PLATE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND 300 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. SHIELDS, JR.; P. LIPETZKY; A. J. MUELLER

    2001-04-11

    THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF 6.4 mm (0.25 INCH) LOW CARBON ARC-CAST (LCAC) MOLYBDENUM AND ARC-CAST MOLYBDENUM-TZM ALLOY PLATE WERE MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND 300 DEGREES C USING COMPACT TNESION SPECIMENTS. THE EFFECT OF CRACK PLANE ORIENTATION (LONGITUDINAL VS. TRANSVERSE) AND ANNEALING PRACTICE (STRESS-RELIEVED VS. RECRYSTALLIZED) WERE EVALUATED. DEPENDING UPON THE TEST TEMPERATURE EITHER A STANDARD K[SUB]IC OR A J-INTEGRAL ANALYSIS WAS USED TO OBTAIN THE TOUGHNESS VALUE. AT ROOM TEMPERATURE, REGARDLESS OF ALLOY, ORIENTATION, OR MICROSTURECTURE, FRACTURE TOUGHNESS VALUES BETWEEN 15 AND 22 MPa m{sup 1/2} (14 AND 20 KSI IN{sup 1/2}) WERE MEASURED. THESE K[SUB]IC VALUES WERE CONSISTENT WITH MEASUREMENTS BY THE AUTHORS. INCREASING TEMPERATURE IMPROVES THE TOUGHNESS, DUE TO THE FACT THAT ONE TAKES ADVANTAGE OF THE DUCTIVE-BRITTLE TRANSITION BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM. AT 300 DEGREES C, THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF RECRYSTALLIZED LCAC AND ARC-CAST TZM MOLYBDENUM WERE ALSO SIMILAR AT APPROXI MATELY 64 MPa m{sup 1/2} (58 KSI IN{sup 1/2}). IN THE STRESS-RELIEVED CONDITION, HOWEVER, THE TOUGHNESS OF ARC-CAST TZM (91 MPa m{sup 1/2}/83 KSI IN{sup 1/2}) WAS HIGHER THAN THAT OF THE LCAC MOLYBDENUM (74 MPa m{sup 1/2}/67 KSI IN{sup 1/2}).

  19. Design improvement of the three-beam detector towards a precise long-range 6-degree of freedom motion sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo Kim, Soohyun; Jang, In Gwun

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents performance enhancement of the three beam detector through design improvement based on the error analysis. The three-beam detector is a novel sensor system that measures six motions (i.e., 3 translations and 3 rotations) of a remote object with high accuracy by implementing three laser distance sensors and a vision sensor. In this paper, finite element analysis and parameter analysis are applied to the three-beam detector to analyze its structural frames and sensor configuration, respectively, in terms of sensing error. By virtue of such a systematic, quantitative error analysis, this research has successfully improved the performance of the three-beam detector and thoroughly validated through field tests that it can detect the 6-degree of freedom motions of a remote target at 30 m with an accuracy of 1.51 mm and 0.18° and precision of 0.38 mm and 0.13°.

  20. Dissolution kinetics of granular calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solution at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiangui; Li, Zuohu

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the factors controlling calcite dissolution is important for modeling geochemical cycles and impacts of greenhouse gases on climate, diagenesis of sediments, and sedimentary rocks. It also has practical significance in the investigation of behavior of carbonates in petroleum and natural gas reservoirs and in the preservation of buildings and monuments constructed from limestone and marble. A large number of papers have been published on dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions. But few involved the near-equilibrium region, especially at elevated temperatures and in concentrated solutions. In this paper, the dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solutions at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C were studied in a 2-L autoclave. The results indicate that the dissolution reaction is mix-controlled, with surface reaction as the prevailing factor. The concentration of calcium ions in solution hardly affects the dissolution rate, but carbon dioxide in the vapor phase inhibits the dissolution reaction. The dissolution rate can be expressed by R = k(1)a(2)(H+) + k(2), and the apparent activation energy is 55-84 kJ mol(-1). PMID:15567388

  1. Polarization degrees of 3p 2P3/2-3s 2S1/2 transition in O5+(1s 23p) produced in collisions of O6+ with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Q.; Liu, L.; Xue, P.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2010-09-01

    Electron capture processes in collisions of O6+ with ground state He and H2 are investigated using the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling method. Total and state-selective one-electron capture cross sections are obtained for collision energies between 0.5 and 300 keV/u. The comparison with the available experimental state-selective capture data in the overlapping energy range (0.5-100 keV/u for O6++He and 0.5-8 keV/u for O6++H2) shows a good overall agreement. The polarization degrees of 3p 2P3/2-3s 2S1/2 radiation from O5+(3p 2P3/2) produced in O6++He and O6++H2 collisions are calculated from the magnetic substate-selective cross sections with inclusion of cascade contributions from higher n = 4 and n = 5 states. Good agreement is obtained with the experimental data available in the energy range 3-8 keV/u. Below ~10 keV/u, the polarization degrees of O5+(3p 2P3/2) in both collision systems exhibit an oscillatory structure and above this energy they steadily increase with the increase of collision energy, reaching the values of about 0.37 at 300 keV/u. The energy behaviour of the polarization degree of O5+(3p 2P3/2) in the O6++He collision system is determined almost exclusively by the direct electron capture to 3p0 and 3p1 states of O5+, while in the case of the O6++H2 collision system in the energy region below ~40 keV/u it is strongly affected by the cascade contributions from the 4l states, which are the dominant capture states in this system.

  2. Psychrophilic (6--15 {degree}C) high-rate anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater in a two-module expanded granular sludge bed system

    SciTech Connect

    Rebac, S.; Lier, J.B. van; Lens, P.; Cappellen, J. van; Vermeulen, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lettinga, G.; Dekkers, F.; Swinkels, K.T.M.

    1998-11-01

    Psychrophilic (6--15 C) anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater was investigated. A two-module expanded granular sludge bed reactor system with a total volume of 140 dm{sup 3} was used to treat malting wastewater having a soluble and total chemical oxygen demand (COD) between 233 and 1778 mg dm{sup {minus}3} and between 317 and 4422 mg dm{sup {minus}3}, respectively. The removal efficiencies at 6 C were 47 and 71% of the soluble and volatile fatty acids (VFA) COD, at organic loading rates (OLR) ranging between 3.3 and 5.8 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The removal efficiencies at 10--15 C were 67--78 and 90--96% of the soluble and VFA COD at an OLR between 2.8 and 12.3 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The specific methanogenic activity of the sludge present in each module increased 2--3-fold during system operation for 400 days. The relatively high concentration of suspended solids in the influent (25% of the total COD) caused a deterioration of the sludge bed in the first reactor module. This was aggravated by excessive growth of acidifying biomass, which persisted in the first module sludge bed and resulted in granular sludge flotation. However, the second module could accommodate the increased OLR, this providing a very high effluent quality (soluble COD < 200 mg dm{sup {minus}3}) of the total system. The stability of module 1 concerning suspended solids could be restored by presettling the wastewater.

  3. Heading down early on? Start of subduction on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Simon; Rushmer, Tracy; Reagan, Mark; Moyen, Jean-Francois

    2014-05-01

    How the Earth's earliest crust was formed and when present day plate tectonics (i.e. subduction) and life commenced, remain fundamental questions in Earth sciences. Whereas the bulk composition of the crust is similar to that of rocks generated in subduction settings, it does not necessarily follow that melting and crust formation require subduction. Indeed, many workers suggest that subduction may have only commenced towards the end of the Archean or later. Here we observe that both the stratigraphy and geochemistry of rocks found in Quebec, that have been variously argued to be 4.4 or 3.8 Ga in age, closely match those from the modern day Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc. We suggest this geochemical stratigraphy might provide a more robust test of ancient tectonic setting than individual chemical or isotopic signatures in rocks or detrital minerals. If correct, the match suggests that at least some form of subduction may have been operating as early as the Hadean or Eoarchean. This could have provided an ideal location for the development of first life.

  4. Top 100 Degree Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Lists institutions of higher education that confer the most postsecondary degrees to students of color. Tables are provided for associate degrees (all minorities); baccalaureate degrees (all minorities); baccalaureate degrees for African Americans, American Indian, Asian American, and Hispanic; and baccalaureate degrees by subject area and…

  5. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  6. Top 100 Degree Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Provides data on bachelor's degrees awarded to minority students in 1999-2000. Tables include total minority degrees and degrees awarded to African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Hispanics by type of school (uses Carnegie classification). Another table presents top disciplines by race/ethnicity. (EV)

  7. Associate Degree Preferred.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale, Ed.

    Designed to encourage dialogue and inform decision making about the associate degree, this book presents perspectives on the role of the associate degree in the nation's two-year colleges. First, "Toward a Greater Degree: A Plan of Action," by Dale Parnell, suggests a plan for preserving and enhancing the value of the education being provided by…

  8. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  9. The External Degree Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. School of Management.

    An external degree is one granted on the basis of academic work undertaken through independent and flexible study and pursued in whole or in part outside of the framework of existing college and university courses. A person's qualifications for an external degree are measured not by a list of accumulated formal courses taken and passed, but by an…

  10. What price a degree?

    PubMed

    Corbett, Kevin

    2016-05-25

    Let's face it, nurse education is big business for British universities. The lobby group of universities offering nursing degrees, the Council of Deans of health (CoDH), argues that the true cost of nursing degrees is subsidised by their members. PMID:27224609

  11. Degree Accreditation in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Dave

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, the meaning and origin of the Canadian university degree was well understood by Canadians and around the world. Degrees were only offered by universities and the use of the label university was controlled by legislation in each of the ten provinces and three territories. Institutional membership in the Association of Universities…

  12. GATEWAYS: Degree program alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, K.R.; Thayer, M.M.

    1991-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is using non-traditional solutions to assist employees in attaining degrees required for essential Laboratory operations. Varieties of distance learning technologies have been implemented to meet some degree needs. While distance learning is not always a perfect solution, it enables the Laboratory to provide education that would otherwise not be practical for full-time employees. The Laboratory has also formed partnerships with local colleges to design programs to fill particular needs. Meeting the challenge of providing cost-effective, viable degree programs in an isolated location requires both patience and innovation.

  13. Degree by Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtis, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student's experience with a research project on the synthesis and reactions of an organo-platinum complex with an organo-Group IV linkage, including the advantages and disadvantages of such a degree by thesis course. (CC)

  14. Latitude 90 Degrees North to 90 Degrees South and Longitude -180 Degrees to 0 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The coordinates of the Lambert azimuthal equal area projection are latitude 90 degrees N. to 90 degrees S. and longitude -180 degrees to 0 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap of the Planum Boreum region, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at top. The upper part is marked by large depression, Isidis basin, which contains light-colored plains. The upper part also includes the light-colored smooth plains of Elysium Planitia and dark plains of Vastitas Borealis. Together, these form a vast expanse of contiguous plains. Toward the bottom, on the other hand, the southern hemisphere is almost entirely made up of heavily cratered highlands. Toward the bottom, a conspicuous, relatively bright circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin.

  15. Latitude 90 Degrees North to 90 Degrees South and Longitude 0 Degrees to 180 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The coordinates of the Lambert azimuthal equal area projection are latitude 90 degrees N. to 90 degrees S. and longitude 0 degree to 180 degrees. Both polar residual ice caps are seen at top and bottom. The central part is dominated by the four largest and youngest volcanoes on Mars--Olympus, Arsia, Pavonis, and Ascraeus Montes--and by a vast system of canyons several thousand kilometers long--Valles Marineris. Directly to the northeast of Valles Marineris, several large outflow channels terminate at a dark depression, Chryse basin. The lower-right corner is marked by the large Argyre basin, defined by an expanse of light-colored plains 800 km across.

  16. Foundation Degree to Honours Degree: The Transition Experiences of Students on an Early Years Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on an exploratory study, undertaken in 2009-2012, which explored student transitions from a foundation degree (level 5) into the third year of a BA honours degree (level 6). Direct entry students and staff from an early years programme at a post-1992 British university and second-year foundation degree students and staff from…

  17. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock.

  18. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-14

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock. PMID:26874491

  19. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  20. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  1. One Degree of Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jean

    2012-01-01

    A 2011 survey of young adults conducted by Public Agenda found that a cluster of obstacles have prevented many of them from competing college. The author describes the opportunity, college awareness, and funding gaps that put a postsecondary degree out of the reach of so many young people. For example, just 3 in 10 non-college-completers are aware…

  2. Charting Journalism Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Data are presented on the numbers of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and total minority group members receiving associate, bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in journalism and mass communication in 1997-98. Colleges and universities graduating the most minorities are also ranked. (MSE)

  3. Feedback at 360 Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatt, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Multirater or 360-degree feedback is a sampling technique that can be used at three levels: for developmental purposes, appraisal, and compensation. It was designed to be small-scale, personalized, and occasional. Implementation tips and pitfalls for districts are described. (MLH)

  4. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  5. Top Hispanic Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy students at the Indiana University Bloomington. For the year 2012, the listings focus on Hispanic students. Data for…

  6. BA Degree Handbook, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    This 1978 Open University BA degree Handbook begins with information about the university organization, correspondence materials, assignments and examinations, television and radio broadcasts, audio-cassette loan service, books and libraries, study centers, the computing service, handicapped students, tutor-counselors and course tutors, tuition,…

  7. A comparison of the spanwise loading calculated by various methods with experimental loadings obtained on a 45 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 8.02 at a Reynolds number of 4.0 x 10(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Willaim C

    1954-01-01

    This report compares the experimental force and moment data obtained by pressure measurements on a wing of aspect ratio 8.02, 45 degree sweptback of the quarter-chord line, taper ratio of 0.45, and NACA 63sub1a012 airfoil sections with the calculated loadings obtained by the standard methods proposed by Weissinger, Falkner, and Multopp, as well as by several variations of these methods.

  8. Core temperature response to immersed bicycle ergometer exercise at water temperatures of 21 degrees, 25 degrees, and 29 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Israel, D J; Heydon, K M; Edlich, R F; Pozos, R S; Wittmers, L E

    1989-01-01

    A bicycle ergometer modified for aquatic exercise was used to determine the effects of immersion on core temperature during submaximal exercise at different water temperatures. An exercise intensity (60% of maximal oxygen consumption) and duration (30 minutes) considered appropriate for cardiovascular conditioning were used. These data will be useful in cardiovascular and leg-strengthening hydrotherapy programs. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, and a rating of thermal comfort were studied in five normal men (14.8% +/- 5.6% fat) during headout immersion at water temperatures of 21.1 degrees, 25.3 degrees, and 29.4 degrees C and exercise in air of 21.1 degrees C. Subjects were immersed for 30 minutes during static and exercise (63% +/- 0.6% maximal oxygen consumption) conditions. Data were collected every 5 minutes and analyzed by repeated measured analysis of variance. At water temperatures, rectal temperature fell from control during static immersion (p less than or equal to 0.05) and was lower than control at the end of the 30-minute recovery period (p less than or equal to 0.05). During exercise there was no change in rectal temperature at water temperatures of 21.1 degrees and 25.3 degrees C; however, rectal temperature rose at water temperatures of 29.4 degrees (p less than or equal to 0.05) and air 21.1 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.05). At the end of recovery rectal temperature was lower than control at water temperatures 21.1 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.05) and greater than control at water temperatures 29.4 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.05). There was no change from control in rectal temperatures at water temperatures 25.3 degrees C and air at 21.1 degrees C. These results indicate that immersion in 25.3 degrees and 21.1 degrees C water effectively attenuates the rise in rectal temperature during exercise at 63% of maximal oxygen consumption, whereas immersion in 29.4 degrees C water does not. In addition, both skin and rectal

  9. When Graduate Degrees Prostitute the Educational Process: Degrees Gone Wild

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate degrees prostitute the educational process when they are sold to consumers by unaccredited degree/diploma mills as being equivalent to legitimate, bona-fide degrees awarded by accredited graduate schools. This article carefully analyzes the serious problems of bogus degrees and their association with the religious higher education…

  10. The densities of halite-saturated WIPP-A and NBT-6 brines and their NaCl contents in weight percent, molal, and molar units from 20 to 100 degrees C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I-Ming; Buizinga, B.; Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of density measurements has been performed at 30?, 50?, 70?, and 90?C for halite-undersaturated WIPP-A and NBT-6 brines with various NaCl contents approaching saturation. The densities of halite-saturated WIPP-A and NBT-6 brines were obtained by extrapolating these measured densities to halite saturation points. The maximum difference between the densities obtained in this Fashion and those calculated from the model of Potter and Haas is 0.015 g/cm3. The NaCl contents in halite-saturated WIPP-A and NBT-6 brines are reported in wt %, molal, and molar units from 20? to 100?C.

  11. Two Universities, Two Degrees: A Dual Degree Program for Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milio, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Describes a dual degree program between Towson University and the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, which allows a student to receive both a B.S. degree in Medicinal Chemistry and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree in a combined 7-year program. It also allows flexibility in pursuing alternate career goals. (EV)

  12. 360-degree Color Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a 'geometrically improved' version of the 360- degree panorama heretofore known as the 'Gallery Pan', the first contiguous, uniform panorama taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) over the course of Sols 8, 9, and 10. Different regions were imaged at different times over the three Martian days to acquire consistent lighting and shadow conditions for all areas of the panorama.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system that, in its fully deployed configuration, stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters. In this geometrically improved version of the panorama, distortion due to a 2.5 degree tilt in the IMP camera mast has been removed, effectively flattening the horizon.

    The IMP has color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye'. Its red, green, and blue filters were used to take this image.

    At left is a Lander petal and a metallic mast which is a portion of the low-gain antenna. Misregistration in the antenna and other Lander features is due to parallax in the extreme foreground. On the horizon the double 'Twin Peaks' are visible, about 1-2 kilometers away. The rock 'Couch' is the dark, curved rock at right of Twin Peaks. Another Lander petal is at left-center, showing the fully deployed forward ramp at far left, and rear ramp at right, which rover Sojourner used to descend to the surface of Mars on July 5. Immediately to the left of the rear ramp is the rock 'Barnacle Bill', which scientists found to be andesitic, possibly indicating that it is a volcanic rock (a true andesite) or a physical mixture of particles. Just beyond Barnacle Bill, rover tracks lead to Sojourner, shown using its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument to study the large rock 'Yogi'. Yogi, low in quartz content, appears to be more primitive than Barnacle Bill, and appears more like the common basalts found on Earth.

    The tracks and circular pattern in the soil

  13. Foundation Degrees: A Risky Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Foundation degrees, the new proposal for sub-degree vocational education in the UK, are characterised by innovation both in their design (curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment) and in the marketplace for which they are designed. This article argues that the development and delivery of foundation degrees carry a high level of risk,…

  14. Top 100--Graduate Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Top 100 degree tables published in this edition of Diverse, and the many more detailed tables included on the Diverse Web site, delineate the institutions that have conferred the most master's, doctoral and first professional degrees to students of color in academic year 2007-2008. Each table shows the number of degrees for a specific minority…

  15. Students' Perceptions of Foundation Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, A.; Burke, L. M.; Marks-Maran, D. J.; Webb, M.; Cooper, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 there were 87,339 people enrolled on foundation degrees (FDs) in the UK (Foundation Degree Forward, 2009), and educational institutions in the UK offered 1700 different foundation degrees in over 25 subjects, with nearly 900 more in development (Action on Access, 2010). In addition, student views are seen to be of importance, as…

  16. Heat-Transfer Measurements in Free Flight at Mach Numbers up to 14.6 on a Flat-Faced Conical Nose with a Total Angle of 29 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Charles B; Lee, Dorothy B

    1958-01-01

    Skin-temperature measurements have been made at several locations on a flat-faced cone-cylinder nose which was flight tested on a fivestage rocket-propeller model to a Mach number of 14.64 and a free-stream Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6), based on flat-face diameter, at an altitude of 66,300 feet. The copper nose had a 29 deg total-angle conical section which was 1.6 flat-face diameters long. The aerodynamic-heating rates determined from the temperature measurements reached 1,440 Btu/( sec) (sq ft) on the flat face. The heating rates near the center of the flat face agreed well at Mach numbers up to 13.6 with those obtained by a theory for laminar stagnation-point heating in equilibrium dissociated air (Avco Res. Rep. 1). At Mach numbers above 13.6, the heating rates at locations near the center of the flat face became progressively lower than stagnation-point theory and. were 29 percent lower at Mach number 14.6 at the end. of the test. The reason for this behavior of the heating on the central part of the flat face was not determined. Excluding the relatively low heating rates that occurred on the central part of the nose at the highest Mach numbers, the distribution of experimental heating along the innermost 0.79 of the flat-face radius, expressed as a percentage of stagnation-point heating, was in fair agreement with the distribution predicted by laminar theory. At a location of 0.71 radii from the stagnation point, the experimental heating was very near 130 percent of the theoretical stagnation-point rate at Mach numbers from 11 to 14.5. The experimental beating rates on the conical section of the nose were in good agreement with laminar-cone theory using the assumption of theoretical sharp-cone static pressure on the conical section.

  17. Graduate Physics Degrees: Largest Departments and Degree Distribution. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    In the 2011-12 academic year there were 751 degree-granting physics departments in the U.S. Of these, 195 offered a PhD and 62 departments offered a master's as the highest physics degree. The remaining 494 departments offered a bachelor's as their highest physics degree. There were six universities that had two doctoral-granting physics…

  18. Kyanite-Andalusite Equilibrium from 700{degrees} to 800{degrees}C.

    PubMed

    Newton, R C

    1966-07-01

    The metastable kyaniteandalusite equilibrium in the Al(2)SiO(5) system has been reversed at 700 degrees , 750 degrees , and 800 degrees C at elevated water pressures, with a variety of natural and synthetic kyanites and andalusites as starting materials. Sillimanite, the stable form of Al(2)SiO(5) under these conditions, did not appear. The value of the transition pressure at 750 degrees C is 6.6 +/- 0.4 kilobars, several kilobars below pressures given by several convergent previous determinations. The Al(2)SiO(5) pressure-temperature triple point now indicated lies far from the points found by others. The revised aluminum silicate phase diagram indicates that many rocks crystallized at lower pressures than formerly thought possible. PMID:17831503

  19. Cr{sup 6+}-containing phases in the system CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-H{sub 2}O at 23 Degree-Sign C

    SciTech Connect

    Poellmann, Herbert

    2012-01-15

    Synthesis and investigation of lamellar calcium aluminium hydroxy salts was performed to study the incorporation of chromate ions in the interlayer of lamellar calcium aluminium hydroxy salts. Different AFm-phases (calcium aluminate hydrate with alumina, ferric oxide, mono-anion phase) containing chromate were synthesized. These AFm-phases belong to the group of layered double hydroxides (LDHs). 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCrO{sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O and C{sub 3}A{center_dot}1/2Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}1/2CaCrO{sub 4}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O were obtained as pure phases and their different distinct interlayer water contents and properties determined. Solid solution of chromate-containing phases and tetracalcium-aluminate-hydrate (TCAH) were studied. The uptake of chromate into TCAH from solutions was proven. Chromate contents in solution decrease to <0.2 mg/l. - Graphical abstract: Chromate can be incorporated in LDH-phases with compositions like: 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2CaCrO{sub 4}{center_dot}1/2Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O, 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCrO{sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O, 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/6CaCrO{sub 4}.{center_dot}5/6Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O, 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0-x)CaCrO{sub 4}(1-x) Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O, (0

  20. Number density distribution of near-infrared sources on a sub-degree scale in the Galactic center: Comparison with the Fe XXV Kα line at 6.7 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kazuki; Nishiyama, Shogo; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagatomo, Schun; Uchiyama, Hideki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sugitani, Koji; Schödel, Rainer; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    The stellar distribution derived from an H- and KS-band survey of the central region of our Galaxy is compared with the Fe XXV Kα (6.7 keV) line intensity observed with the Suzaku satellite. The survey is for the galactic coordinates |l| ≲ 3.0° and |b | ≲ 1.0° (equivalent to 0.8 kpc × 0.3 kpc for R⊙ = 8 kpc), and the number-density distribution N(KS,0; l, b) of stars is derived by using the extinction-corrected magnitude KS,0 = 10.5. This is deep enough to probe the old red-giant population and in turn to estimate the (l, b) distribution of faint X-ray point sources such as coronally active binaries and cataclysmic variables. In the Galactic plane (b = 0°), N(10.5; l, b) increases in the direction of the Galactic center as |l|-0.30±0.03 in the range of - 0.1° ≥ l ≥ - 0.7°, but this increase is significantly slower than the increase (|l|-0.44±0.02) of the Fe XXV Kα line intensity. If normalized with the ratios in the outer region 1.5° ≤ |l| ≤ 2.8°, where faint X-ray point sources are argued to dominate the diffuse Galactic X-ray ridge emission, the excess of the Fe XXV Kα line intensity over the stellar number density is at least a factor of two at |l| = 0.1°. This indicates that a significant part of the Galactic-center diffuse emission arises from a truly diffuse optically thin thermal plasma, and not from an unresolved collection of faint X-ray point sources related to the old stellar population.

  1. NLN: Celebrating Associate Degree Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddick, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Introduces a project celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of associate degree nursing (ADN) education. Reviews the efforts and plans of two national associations to identify and resolve recurring ADN issues and recognize the associate degree nurse's contributions. Describes the forums and publications planned to meet these objectives. Includes…

  2. Degree, Yes--Education, No

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheahan, Sister Dorothy

    1974-01-01

    The external degree program, based solely on test proficiency, offers to its students not an educational opportunity; not a learning situation but a schema for securing a degree, with any kind of socialization into the profession conspicuously missing from the program. (Author/DS)

  3. Top 100 Degree Producers 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Phaedra; Borden, Victor M. H.

    2001-01-01

    Descriptive text and numerous tables provide information on higher education degrees awarded to minority students in 1999-2000. Data are provided on masters, doctoral, and first professional degrees for minorities in 1999-2000 by gender, state, race/ethnicity, school type, individual school, and major. Data for previous years are provided for…

  4. Employers Often Distrust Online Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This article explains why employers are reluctant to accept potential employees with online degrees. The results of several surveys of those who evaluate potential employees and make hiring decisions indicate a bias against online degrees, even as more and more colleges are offering programs online. To those officials, the words "online education"…

  5. Research Degrees as Professional Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing trend within higher education and, more specifically, in higher degrees by research, to treat a professional skills set as a desirable graduate outcome. The increasing value that is being placed on a professional skills set in large part reflects growing interest around the world in the role of research degrees in labour…

  6. Six Degrees of "Visual" Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Whether referring to psychologist Stanley Milgram's intriguing theory, John Guare's successful play and film, or Kevin Bacon's party game, six degrees of separation may also be used as a way to help students make visual connections. The six degrees of separation is the concept that everyone is connected to everyone else in the world by only six…

  7. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Regina 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Earl A.; Schreiner, Bryan T.; Colton, Roger B.; Clayton, Lee; Bush, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits and materials on the basis of clast lithology or composition, matrix texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relations, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and indicated in the 'Description of Map Units'. Deposits of some constructional landforms, such as end moraines, are distinguished as map units. Deposits of erosional landforms, such as outwash terraces, are not distinguished, although glaciofluvial, ice-contact, fluvial, and lacustrine deposits that are mapped may be terraced. Differentiation of sequences of fluvial and glaciofluvial deposits at this scale is not possible. For practical purposes, the map is a surficial materials map. Materials are distinguished on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized and classified in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils as recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. As a materials map, it serves as a base from which a variety of maps for use in planning engineering, land-use planning, or land-management projects can be derived and from which a variety of maps relating to earth surface processes and Quaternary geologic history can be derived.

  8. Degree Options and Requirements in Master's Degree Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of 158 master's degree programs in mass communication disciplines regarding: thesis, project, and coursework-only options; course requirements; and core courses most frequently required. Compares these findings with those from earlier studies. (SR)

  9. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 30 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 30 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at the top. The central part is characterized by a dark depression, Chryse basin, where several large outflow channels terminate. The lower-left corner is marked by a vast system of canyons, Valles Marineris, which extends eastward for several thousand kilometers.

  10. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South., Longitude 330 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 330 degrees. Heavily cratered highlands dominate this view. Toward the lower right, a conspicuous light-colored circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin. Directly northeast of Hellas, several large ancient impacts dot the landscape, including Cassini, Schiaparelli, and Huygens. Several large outflow channels are located in the upper left-hand corner. The permanent, residual south polar ice cap is located near the bottom.

  11. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South, Longitude 210 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 210 degrees. Toward the top, the lowland plains of Elysium and Utopia Planitiae are separated from the darker heavily cratered highlands by a broad escarpment. The far bottom left is marked by the large light-colored ancient Hellas impact basin. The permanent south polar residual ice cap is located near the bottom.

  12. 360-degree physician performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Isser; Jennings, Kelly; Greengarten, Moshe; Brans, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Few jurisdictions have a robust common approach to assessing the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of physician performance. In this article, we examine the need for 360-degree physician performance assessment and review the literature supporting comprehensive physician assessment. An evidence-based, "best practice" approach to the development of a 360-degree physician performance assessment framework is presented, including an overview of a tool kit to support implementation. The focus of the framework is to support physician career planning and to enhance the quality of patient care. Finally, the legal considerations related to implementing 360-degree physician performance assessment are explored. PMID:20357549

  13. Killing Horizons Kill Horizon Degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, L.; Grumiller, D.

    Frequently, it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this essay, we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space, it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  14. 21 CFR 888.6 - Degree of constraint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... replacement and prevents dislocation of the prosthesis in more than one anatomic plane and consists of either... translation and rotation of the prosthesis in one or more planes via the geometry of its articulating surfaces... total joint replacement and restricts minimally prosthesis movement in one or more planes....

  15. On degree-degree correlations in multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Cozzo, Emanuele; Moreno, Yamir; Rodrigues, Francisco A.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a generalization of the concept of assortativity based on the tensorial representation of multilayer networks, covering the definitions given in terms of Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Our approach can also be applied to weighted networks and provides information about correlations considering pairs of layers. By analyzing the multilayer representation of the airport transportation network, we show that contrasting results are obtained when the layers are analyzed independently or as an interconnected system. Finally, we study the impact of the level of assortativity and heterogeneity between layers on the spreading of diseases. Our results highlight the need of studying degree-degree correlations on multilayer systems, instead of on aggregated networks.

  16. Robustness of networks of networks with degree-degree correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Canals, Santiago; Makse, Hernan

    Many real-world complex systems ranging from critical infrastructure and transportation networks to living systems including brain and cellular networks are not formed by an isolated network but by a network of networks. Randomly coupled networks with interdependency between different networks may easily result in abrupt collapse. Here, we seek a possible explanation of stable functioning in natural networks of networks including functional brain networks. Specifically, we analyze the robustness of networks of networks focused on one-to-many interconnections between different networks and degree-degree correlation. Implication of the network robustness on functional brain networks of rats is also discussed.

  17. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South, Longitude 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 90 degrees. The top half is dominated by the Tharsis Montes volcanoes, the large Alba Patera shield volcano, the dark Chryse basin, and a vast canyon system, Valles Marineris. In the central part, a prominent physiographic feature, Thaumasia plateau, includes a complex array of small- and large-scale faults and ridges and ancient volcanoes. The large conspicuous Argyre basin, southeast of the Thaumasia plateau, contains a broad expanse of light-colored plains 800 km across. The permanent south polar ice cap is located near the bottom.

  18. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 150 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 150 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs and surrounded by the dark lowland plains of Vastitas Borealis, is located at the top. The right-central part is dominated by the Tharsis Montes volcanoes. The most prominent of the Tharsis Montes volcanoes is the largest known volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons. The light-colored lowland plains of Amazonis, Elysium, and Arcadia Planitiae lies north and west of Olympus Mons. The heavily cratered highlands dominate the lower one-third.

  19. Top 100 Degree Producers 2003. Part II: Graduate Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue discuss the current status of graduate education in the United States, exploring whether there is or is not a crisis and discussing economic factors that affect participation in graduate study. Featured is the annual list of the top 100 producers of graduate degrees for black students. (SLD)

  20. Life after a Humanities Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masola, Athambile

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of a humanities graduate after leaving the academy. The author considers her own education in light of the historical changes in South Africa's education system. The article is a personal account of the questions and challenges encountered in choosing a humanities degree in a context where a tertiary education…

  1. The Top STEM Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degree producers in the U.S. This list is broken down into seven categories: (1) Total Minority Research/Scholarship and Other Doctoral: Mathematics and Statistics; (2) Total Minority Bachelors: Biological and Biomedical Sciences; (3) Total Minority…

  2. The Top Theological Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" publishes a list of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, for the first time, it has…

  3. Degrees of Success in Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourner, Jill; Bourner, Tom

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of degree awards in Great Britain shows considerable inconsistency across disciplines and poor results in the accounting field. The implications for the labor market and accounting employment prospects are examined, and a reexamination of the application of equivalent standards across subjects is recommended. (MSE)

  4. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 270 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 270 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap of the Planum Boreum region, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at top. The upper part is marked by a large depression, Isidis basin, which contains light-colored plains. The upper part also includes the light-colored smooth plains of Elysium Planitia and dark plains of Vastitas Borealis. Together, these form a vast expanse of contiguous plains. Toward the bottom, on the other hand, the southern hemisphere is almost entirely made up of heavily cratered highlands. At bottom left, a conspicuous, relatively bright circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin.

  5. Model for antiorthostatic hypokinesia - Head-down tilt effects on water and salt excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deavers, D. R.; Musacchia, X. J.; Meininger, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Water and electrolyte excretion was investigated in antiorthostatic hypokinetic and orthostatic hypokinetic and control rats in metabolic cages. Significant (t test, P less than 0.05) diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis occurred in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic subjects but did not occur in either the orthostatic hypokinetic or controls. Recovery from antiorthostatic hypokinesia was characterized by retention of water, sodium, and potassium. Patterns of changes in body weight and food and water consumption were virtually identical in antiorthostatic and orthostatic hypokinetic rats and thus could not account for the differences in renal handling of water and electrolytes. Also, differences in ingestion of food and water in controls could not account for differences in excretion of water and electrolytes between these and antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats. It was concluded that the antiorthostatic position was responsible for the diuresis and natriuresis and that the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rat appears to be a good model for the study of water and elecrolyte excretion during conditions such as bed rest, water immersion, and exposure to weightlessness.

  6. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  7. Telemedicine on the move: health care heads down the information superhighway.

    PubMed

    Berek, B; Canna, M

    1994-01-01

    Telemedicine has drawn increasing attention as one of the emerging new service delivery vehicles that will run on the information superhighway. In reality, remote diagnosis and consultation through the application of telecommunications technology have been practiced for many years. But advances in technology and reform imperatives to extend access beyond traditional boundaries are pushing telemedicine into new applications. This is evidenced by the explosion in the number of pilot projects begun within the last 12 months. While demonstrating telemedicine's growing capabilities--for education and administration, as well as medical practice--these projects also raise a number of legal, clinical, and technical questions that must be answered before government and other payers will routinely reimburse for remote services. Academic and industry consortia are springing up to deal with the most compelling issues, including documenting telemedicine's safety and efficacy, developing uniform data and transmission standards, and determining the minimum resolution needed to maintain the integrity of clinical transmissions. Almost every type of medical specialty has proved amenable to performing evaluations via telemedicine links; however, specialties with less direct patient contact, like radiology and pathology, are generally identified as better candidates for telemedicine interactions. The telemedicine equipment required for these consults ranges from the simple to the ultra-sophisticated, depending on the type of system used and its clinical application. The most common system configuration involves a base station in the main facility where specialists and other consultants are housed and a number of remote referral sites. Consults are performed by interactively sharing voice, video, or image data. Increasingly, systems are being introduced that use easy-to-learn, intuitive displays and controls. Systems also require the use of any number of different communication media including land-based wire networks, high-speed fiberoptics, microwave links, or satellite transponders. Quantum leaps in telemedicine performance are being made constantly, many being swept along as a result of intensified interest in developing similar consumer and business services that are destined for the new information highway. In addition to information infrastructure projects, telemedicine has also recently benefitted from the effects of defense reinvestment, political interest in cost-reducing technologies, increased availability of funding for pilot projects, and the emergence of multifacility, multitiered, integrated delivery systems. Technical, financial, and logistical factors, which had once worked against telemedicine feasibility, are suddenly shifting to rapidly propel telemedicine technologies out of investigational settings and into mainstream clinical practice. PMID:10134202

  8. New Associate Degree Requirements. The Advisor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, Vancouver.

    This document contains a brief history of the development of the associate degree in British Columbia and reviews the degrees presently conferred. A major portion of the document focuses on newly approved (May 30, 2000) requirements for the Associate Degree of Arts (AA) and the Associate Degree of Science (AS). The associate degree formally became…

  9. Degree Attainment. Snapshot™ Report, Winter 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report presents information on student degree attainment in science and engineering disciplines for 2004 and 2014. It offers data on the following: (1) Science and Engineering Degrees as Percentage of All Degrees; (2) Gender Distribution of Science and Engineering Degrees by Level; (3) Gender Distribution of Bachelor's Degrees in…

  10. VO2 kinetics during submaximal exercise following simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sandler, H.

    1982-01-01

    A study is presented of the effects of deconditioning following 7 days of continuous head-down (-6 degrees) bedrest on changes in steady-state VO2, O2, and recovery VO2 during the performance of constant-load exercises. The deconditioning effects of bedrest on the physical working capacity were manifested in the subjects by significant changes in VO2 kinetics following the 7 days of head-down bedrest. While the subjects demonstrated the ability to attain similar steady-state VO2, simulated weightlessness using head-down bedrest resulted in a reduction of total VO2 capacity and an increase in the O2 deficit and VO2 halftime during submaximal constant-load exercise. It is concluded that this change in VO2 kinetics was induced by reexposure of the cardiovascular system to the +1 Gz (upright) environment.

  11. Investing in a master's degree.

    PubMed

    Hodges, L C; Ganchorre, C; Hodges, E A

    1997-10-01

    One of the most important decisions you will ever make is the decision to invest your time and money in a master's degree. It is a big investment and often requires real sacrifice for you and your family. Since this decision is of paramount importance over the life of your career, it should be approached as a major topic to research. The first step in the process is a thorough review of your own goals and career expectations. Once you decide returning to graduate school is right for you, then you must turn your attention to finding the school that meets your goals for specialized study, as well as the location that best suits your lifestyle. A good place to start the search is in the library among a number of up-to-date references on master's nursing programs. A second source is the Internet. To find out more about the school locations, two good sources are the city's chamber of commerce and the Internet. Acquiring a master's degree in nursing will be a challenge, but one that will pay big dividends in your future nursing career. PMID:9384158

  12. The Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Kuijken, K.; Applegate, D.; Begeman, K.; Belikov, A.; Blake, C.; Bout, J.; Boxhoorn, D.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Buddendiek, A.; Cacciato, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Choi, A.; Cordes, O.; Covone, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Edge, A.; Erben, T.; Franse, J.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Harnois-Deraps, J.; Helmich, E.; Herbonnet, R.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; Joachimi, B.; Köhlinger, F.; Kitching, T.; La Barbera, F.; Lacerda, P.; McFarland, J.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; Napolitano, N. R.; Paolillo, M.; Peacock, J.; Pila-Diez, B.; Puddu, E.; Radovich, M.; Rifatto, A.; Schneider, P.; Schrabback, T.; Sifon, C.; Sikkema, G.; Simon, P.; Sutherland, W.; Tudorica, A.; Valentijn, E.; van der Burg, R.; van Uitert, E.; van Waerbeke, L.; Velander, M.; Kleijn, G. V.; Viola, M.; Vriend, W.-J.

    2013-12-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS), a 1500-square-degree optical imaging survey with the recently commissioned OmegaCAM wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), is described. KiDS will image two fields in u-,g-,r- and i-bands and, together with the VIKING survey, produce nine-band (u- to K-band) coverage over two fields. For the foreseeable future the KiDS/VIKING combination of superb image quality with wide wavelength coverage will be unique for surveys of its size and depth. The survey has been designed to tackle some of the most fundamental questions of cosmology and galaxy formation of today. The main science driver is mapping the dark matter distribution in the Universe and putting constraints on the expansion of the Universe and the equation of state of dark energy, all through weak gravitational lensing. However, the deep and wide imaging data will facilitate a wide variety of science cases.

  13. Policy Statements for the Associate Degree, the Associate in Applied Science Degree, and the Associate Degree in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The policy statements contained in this document present the position of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) on the Associate Degree, the Associate in Applied Science Degree (AAS), and the Associate Degree in Nursing. In its statement on the Associate Degree, the AACJC: (1) stresses the responsibility of faculty and…

  14. IS Degrees - Sociotechnical or Technosocial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coady, Jenny; Pooley, Rob

    It is widely agreed that information systems is a field requiring knowledge and competence, spanning business processes, information infrastructure and technical processes, uniting these to deliver information needs of organisations. In designing curricula which will educate new IS professionals appropriately, we are faced with a daunting range and volume of material. Despite attempts to structure and scope this, the problems remain and become worse with time. We revisit such a degree course, noting that many existing courses are based in management and business schools. We, however, are based in a computer science department. We have experience of convincing technologically focused students that understanding organisational and social issues is crucial to successful software engineering and students with an interest in organisations and people that they need technical understanding of information systems. We review some key proposals for IS model curricula and conclude with a proposal suited to the students we recruit.

  15. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  16. Professional Schools Seek Degrees of Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how professional schools, faced with a shortage of students and an increased demand for cross-disciplinary training, are teaming up to offer joint degrees. Examples include joint medical and business degrees, joint social work and law degrees, and joint medical and law degrees. (EV)

  17. Tech-Prep/Associate Degree Program Guide: Tech Prep Associate Degree Program, Business Administration Associate Degree Program, Office Administration Associate Degree Program, Allied Health Associate Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmaras, Judy; Neri, Pat

    The Tech-Prep Associate Degree Program (TPAD) at the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) in Warwick, is a high school/community college partnership providing high school students with an alternative program of study focused on goal setting, basic academic skills development, and the skills needed to pursue a career in a technical, business or…

  18. Diploma Mills. Degrees of Fraud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.; Spille, Henry A.

    Drawing on nearly 6 years of findings by the American Council of Education's Center for Adult Learning and Educational Credentials, this book exposes the techniques that diploma mills (shadowy educational institutions with addresses ranging from shopping malls to post office boxes) use to lure prospective students. Explanations of how many of…

  19. Doctorate nursing degree in Spain

    PubMed Central

    López-Montesinos, Mª José; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and descriptive study of the process of change being experienced in the Spanish university system over the last decade (2005-2014). OBJECTIVE: To describe the structural changes occurring in Nursing Education in Spain, reaching access to doctoral studies from the European Convergence Process and the subsequent legislative development. METHODOLOGY: Bibliographical review of royal decrees and reference literature on the subject of study and descriptive analysis of the situation. RESULTS: Carries various changes suffered in the curricula of nursing education in the last decade, the legislation of the European Higher Education sets the guidelines for current studies of Masters and Doctorates. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of the Master and Doctorate stages after a basic degree, which is now possible with the new legislation. A formal beginning made of scientific nursing in order to generate their own lines of research led by Doctors of nursing who can integrate in research groups under the same condition as other researcher, yet now, from the nursing discipline itself. PMID:26312628

  20. The Complex Case of Positioning the Foundation Degree: Making Sense of a Degree That Is Not a Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadembo, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    The Foundation degree was launched in 2001 and has enjoyed growth but remains a controversial qualification. Foundation Degree Forward, the body charged by the UK government with providing a "national network or expertise to support the development and validation of high-quality Foundation degrees" is championing the marketing of the…

  1. Physics Graduate Degrees: Results from the Enrollments and Degrees & the Degree Recipient Follow-Up Surveys. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2011-01-01

    Each fall the Statistical Research Center conducts its Survey of Enrollments and Degrees, which asks all degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the US and Puerto Rico to provide information concerning the number of students they have enrolled and counts of recent degree recipients. In the academic year 2007-08 there were 252…

  2. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175 degree to 195 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E. ); Stout, R.B. )

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  3. Oxidation of spent fuel in air at 175{degree} to 195{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.; Thomas, L.E.; Stout, R.B.

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation tests in dry air were conducted on four LWR spent fuels at 175{degrees} and 195{degrees}C to determine the effect of the fuel characteristics on the oxidation state likely to exist at the time leaching occurs in a potential repository. Weight changes were measured and samples were examined by XRD, ceramography, TEM, and TGA. Despite local variations in the grain boundary susceptibility to oxidation, all four fuels progressed toward an apparent endpoint at an oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio of 2.4. The sole oxidation product was U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x,} a cubic phase structurally related to UO{sub 2} but with a slightly smaller lattice constant. The growth of the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} from the grain boundaries into the UO{sub 2} grains followed parabolic kinetics and had an activation energy of 26.6 kcal/mol. Based on the kinetics, the time required at 95{degrees}C to completely oxidize LWR spent fuel to U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} would be at least 2000 yr. The next oxidation product to form after the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} phase may be U{sub 3}O{sub 8,} but no U{sub 3}O{sub 8} or other dilatational oxidation product has been detected in these accelerated tests conducted up to 25,000 h.

  4. Sources and Information on Transfer Associate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayon, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an annotated bibliography of articles about the effects of transfer associate degrees and related statewide transfer and articulation policies. It also provides links to transfer degree legislation in several states.

  5. 45 CFR 2400.41 - Degree programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... degree in history or political science (including government or politics), the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in history or political science (including government or politics), or a related...

  6. 45 CFR 2400.41 - Degree programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... degree in history or political science (including government or politics), the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in history or political science (including government or politics), or a related...

  7. 45 CFR 2400.41 - Degree programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... degree in history or political science (including government or politics), the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in history or political science (including government or politics), or a related...

  8. 45 CFR 2400.41 - Degree programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... degree in history or political science (including government or politics), the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in history or political science (including government or politics), or a related...

  9. 45 CFR 2400.41 - Degree programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... degree in history or political science (including government or politics), the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in history or political science (including government or politics), or a related...

  10. First Professional Degree Awards to Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, George H.

    Changes in the percentage representation of women among recipients of first professional degrees are examined between the academic years 1970-71 and 1975-76. The data were collected through the annual Survey of Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred. A first professional degree is one that "signifies completion of the academic requirements for…

  11. The Top 100 Bachelor's Degree Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Each year in the Top 100 series, researchers highlight the institutions that confer the most degrees to students of color. In this edition, they focus on the most prevalent degree conferred: the bachelor's degree. Among the types of colleges and universities that they examine--those that have Title IV status (recognized by the U.S. Department of…

  12. The Top 100: Graduate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2010-01-01

    To advance to the highest level of most professional and technical careers, an individual needs more than a bachelor's degree. The post-baccalaureate degrees recognized in this edition of "Diverse"--master's, doctoral and first professional degrees--are more than just tickets to better-paying jobs. They provide the skills and credentials needed…

  13. How Adult Online Graduates Portray Their Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated how adult graduates of online Bachelor's degree programs describe the online aspect of their degree. Online education is promoted as a method for adult students to access the benefits of a college degree. Therefore, it is important for prospective online students, higher education institutions and…

  14. Profile of the Nontraditional Doctoral Degree Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    What type of individual pursues a nontraditional doctoral degree? Although answering this question is the main purpose of this chapter, there is an underlying story that provides context for how and why these individuals came to pursue a doctoral degree. The tremendous growth in the number of doctoral students and doctoral degree-granting…

  15. A User Guide to 360 Degree Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, David

    1996-01-01

    Describes 360-degree feedback that provides performance data from multiple points of reference. Topics include reasons for performance improvement; what needs improvement; how to improve; choosing a reliable 360-degree instrument; and applications of 360-degree feedback, including personal development, team development, change, and needs…

  16. Engineering and Technology Degrees, 1972-73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, John D.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the 1972-73 degree statistics broken down by curriculum and degree for four levels of engineering and four of technology programs. Included are a summary of degree statistics science 1949 and a list of United States engineering schools with the number of graduates and the control and accreditation status reported. (CC)

  17. Degrees Conferred by Connecticut Institutions of Higher Education Highlights, 2007-08. Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the degrees conferred by Connecticut institutions of higher education in 2007-08. Connecticut colleges and universities awarded 36,634 degrees in 2007-08 (up 1.6% over 2006-07), the state's seventh consecutive year of growth and a 28 percent increase since 1998. Once again, the top five degree-producing disciplines were…

  18. Hardness recovery of 85% cold-worked V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys upon annealing at 180{degrees}C to 1200{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the effect of heat treatment of cold-worked V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys on their resulting microstructures and to correlate the results with the physical and mechanical properties of these alloys. Annealing of 85% cold-worked unalloyed V and V-(1-18)Ti alloys for 1 hr at 180 to 1200{degree}C results in hardness maxima at 180-250{degree}C, 420-600{degree}C, and 1050-1200{degree}C and in hardness minima at 280-360{degree}C and, depending on Ti concentration in the alloy, at 840-1050{degree}C. Annealing of 85% cold-worked V-(4-15)Cr-(3-6)Ti alloys for 1 hr at 180{degree}C to 1200{degree}C results in harness maxima at 180-250{degree}C, 420-800{degree}C, and 1050-1200{degree}C, and in hardness minima at 280-360{degree}C and 920-1050{degree}C.

  19. Depression, mood state, and back pain during microgravity simulated by bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J. R.; Hutchinson, K.; Carlsson, S. G.; Hargens, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop a ground-based model for spinal adaptation to microgravity and to study the effects of spinal adaptation on depression, mood state, and pain intensity. METHODS: We investigated back pain, mood state, and depression in six subjects, all of whom were exposed to microgravity, simulated by two forms of bed rest, for 3 days. One form consisted of bed rest with 6 degrees of head-down tilt and balanced traction, and the other consisted of horizontal bed rest. Subjects had a 2-week period of recovery between the studies. The effects of bed rest on pain intensity in the lower back, depression, and mood state were investigated. RESULTS: Subjects experienced significantly more intense lower back pain, lower hemisphere abdominal pain, headache, and leg pain during head-down tilt bed rest. They had higher scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (ie, were more depressed) and significantly lower scores on the activity scale of the Bond-Lader questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: Bed rest with 6 degrees of head-down tilt may be a better experimental model than horizontal bed rest for inducing the pain and psychosomatic reactions experienced in microgravity. Head-down tilt with balanced traction may be a useful method to induce low back pain, mood changes, and altered self-rated activity level in bed rest studies.

  20. Infinite-degree-corrected stochastic block model.

    PubMed

    Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel N; Mørup, Morten

    2014-09-01

    In stochastic block models, which are among the most prominent statistical models for cluster analysis of complex networks, clusters are defined as groups of nodes with statistically similar link probabilities within and between groups. A recent extension by Karrer and Newman [Karrer and Newman, Phys. Rev. E 83, 016107 (2011)] incorporates a node degree correction to model degree heterogeneity within each group. Although this demonstrably leads to better performance on several networks, it is not obvious whether modeling node degree is always appropriate or necessary. We formulate the degree corrected stochastic block model as a nonparametric Bayesian model, incorporating a parameter to control the amount of degree correction that can then be inferred from data. Additionally, our formulation yields principled ways of inferring the number of groups as well as predicting missing links in the network that can be used to quantify the model's predictive performance. On synthetic data we demonstrate that including the degree correction yields better performance on both recovering the true group structure and predicting missing links when degree heterogeneity is present, whereas performance is on par for data with no degree heterogeneity within clusters. On seven real networks (with no ground truth group structure available) we show that predictive performance is about equal whether or not degree correction is included; however, for some networks significantly fewer clusters are discovered when correcting for degree, indicating that the data can be more compactly explained by clusters of heterogenous degree nodes. PMID:25314493

  1. Predicting Bachelor's Degree Attainment for Developmental Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Hansel; Butner, Bonita; Anderson, Connie Wilson; Siwatu, Kamau Oginga

    2009-01-01

    This study used the National Educational Longitudinal Study: 88 /2000 (NELS 88: /2000) dataset to explore characteristics associated with college degree attainment. The study was informed by Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior. The sample size was 6,832 postsecondary students. The findings revealed that developmental math students were less…

  2. Selected Bibliography on Associate Degree Programs in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Dept. of Associate Degree Programs.

    This annotated bibliography consists of 99 entries, primarily journal articles, most of which were published after 1966. Organization is under the following headings: (1) Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs--What They Are, (2) Planning for ADN Program, (3) Move to Educational Institutions, (4) Administration, (5) Faculty, (6) Teaching Methods,…

  3. Degree landscapes in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Rosvall, Martin; Sneppen, Kim; Trusina, Ala

    2006-09-01

    We generalize the degree-organizational view of real-world networks with broad degree distributions in a landscape analog with mountains (high-degree nodes) and valleys (low-degree nodes). For example, correlated degrees between adjacent nodes correspond to smooth landscapes (social networks), hierarchical networks to one-mountain landscapes (the Internet), and degree-disassortative networks without hierarchical features to rough landscapes with several mountains. To quantify the topology, we here measure the widths of the mountains and the separation between different mountains. We also generate ridge landscapes to model networks organized under constraints imposed by the space the networks are embedded in, associated to spatial or in molecular networks to functional localization.

  4. The Top 100 Associate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Academic year 2009-2010 was a banner year for associate degree conferrals in the United States. In just one year, the total number of degrees awarded increased from slightly less than 790,000 to nearly 850,000, an increase of 8 percent. Minorities receive one-third of all associate degrees conferred in the U.S., with nearly equal numbers going to…

  5. Effective degrees of freedom: a flawed metaphor

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Lucas; Fithian, William; Hastie, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To most applied statisticians, a fitting procedure’s degrees of freedom is synonymous with its model complexity, or its capacity for overfitting to data. In particular, it is often used to parameterize the bias-variance tradeoff in model selection. We argue that, on the contrary, model complexity and degrees of freedom may correspond very poorly. We exhibit and theoretically explore various fitting procedures for which degrees of freedom is not monotonic in the model complexity parameter, and can exceed the total dimension of the ambient space even in very simple settings. We show that the degrees of freedom for any non-convex projection method can be unbounded. PMID:26977114

  6. Assessment of Aliasing Errors in Low-Degree Coefficients Inferred from GPS Data

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Na; Fang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    With sparse and uneven site distribution, Global Positioning System (GPS) data is just barely able to infer low-degree coefficients in the surface mass field. The unresolved higher-degree coefficients turn out to introduce aliasing errors into the estimates of low-degree coefficients. To reduce the aliasing errors, the optimal truncation degree should be employed. Using surface displacements simulated from loading models, we theoretically prove that the optimal truncation degree should be degree 6–7 for a GPS inversion and degree 20 for combing GPS and Ocean Bottom Pressure (OBP) with no additional regularization. The optimal truncation degree should be decreased to degree 4–5 for real GPS data. Additionally, we prove that a Scaled Sensitivity Matrix (SSM) approach can be used to quantify the aliasing errors due to any one or any combination of unresolved higher degrees, which is beneficial to identify the major error source from among all the unresolved higher degrees. Results show that the unresolved higher degrees lower than degree 20 are the major error source for global inversion. We also theoretically prove that the SSM approach can be used to mitigate the aliasing errors in a GPS inversion, if the neglected higher degrees are well known from other sources. PMID:27187392

  7. Assessment of Aliasing Errors in Low-Degree Coefficients Inferred from GPS Data.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Fang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    With sparse and uneven site distribution, Global Positioning System (GPS) data is just barely able to infer low-degree coefficients in the surface mass field. The unresolved higher-degree coefficients turn out to introduce aliasing errors into the estimates of low-degree coefficients. To reduce the aliasing errors, the optimal truncation degree should be employed. Using surface displacements simulated from loading models, we theoretically prove that the optimal truncation degree should be degree 6-7 for a GPS inversion and degree 20 for combing GPS and Ocean Bottom Pressure (OBP) with no additional regularization. The optimal truncation degree should be decreased to degree 4-5 for real GPS data. Additionally, we prove that a Scaled Sensitivity Matrix (SSM) approach can be used to quantify the aliasing errors due to any one or any combination of unresolved higher degrees, which is beneficial to identify the major error source from among all the unresolved higher degrees. Results show that the unresolved higher degrees lower than degree 20 are the major error source for global inversion. We also theoretically prove that the SSM approach can be used to mitigate the aliasing errors in a GPS inversion, if the neglected higher degrees are well known from other sources. PMID:27187392

  8. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on the Filterability of Jet Fuels for Temperatures Between 300 Degrees and 400 Degrees F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, Anderson B; Hibbard, Robert R

    1955-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen in the filter-clogging characteristics of three JP-4 and two JP-5 fuels was studied at 300 degrees to 400 degrees F in a bench- scale rig, employing filter paper as the filter medium. The residence time of the fuel at the high temperature was approximately 6 seconds. For these conditions, the clogging characteristics of the fuels increased with both increasing temperature and increasing concentration of dissolved oxygen. The amount of insoluble material formed at high temperatures necessary to produce clogging of filters was very small, of the order of 1 milligram per gallon of fuel.

  9. Practitioner-Focused Degrees in Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, John

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to explore practitioner-focused degrees in politics. It begins by defining the term and outlining the key features in comparison to other politics degrees. The underlying pedagogical principles that inform the design of teaching, learning, and assessment are then explored, before the article moves on to discuss the development of…

  10. The Top 100: Graduate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.; Hu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Master's and doctoral degrees are required credentials for entry into the professional class. Although they do not guarantee the recipient an intrinsically rewarding career or a position of leadership, it is increasingly difficult to attain those positions without a graduate degree. The representation of persons of color among graduate degree…

  11. The Top 100 Associate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 250,000 students of color received associate degrees in academic year 2008-09. This represents 30 percent of all associate degree recipients, which is just slightly below the 33 percent representation of these racial/ethnic groups in the general U.S. population. In this edition of the Top 100 series, researchers highlight the institutions…

  12. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Deborah H.; And Others

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the number of bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded in academic year 1981-82 from 72 United States institutions offering degree programs in nuclear engineering or nuclear options within other engineering fields. Presented as well are historical data for the last decade…

  13. Experiencing Higher Degree Research Supervision as Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes higher degree research supervisors' experiences of supervision as teaching. While research education is considered central to the higher degree research experience, comparatively little is known to date of the teaching lenses adopted by supervisors as they go about their supervision. We worked with 35 supervisors…

  14. Competency-Based Business Degree. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In January 2015, thirteen Washington community colleges launched an online, competency-based business transfer degree--the first in the state's community and technical college system. This issue brief provides answers to commonly asked questions about the new competency-based degree.

  15. New High in Engineering Degree Production. Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Several of the state's key industry sectors depend heavily on employees with advanced scientific, analytic and technical knowledge. Among the fields closely related to these sectors, engineering degrees have posted the largest gain. This paper presents details on the following facts: (1) 2009 represented a record high for engineering degrees; (2)…

  16. Improving Performance with 360-Degree Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santeusanio, Richard

    1998-01-01

    A Connecticut superintendent convinced his staff to try 360-degree feedback by using it first on himself. Having the collective opinion of several stakeholders made appraisal conference more meaningful. Additionally, 360-degree feedback identified and measured standards, stimulated collegiality and trust among administrators and teachers,…

  17. Master's Degree Studies: Expectations versus Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanepoel, C. H.

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades, higher education in South Africa has been affected drastically by transformation. An issue that has specifically been influenced is master's degrees. A significant increase in the demand for access to course work master's degrees has been experienced, while universities themselves have been confronted with a new…

  18. First Degrees by Part-Time Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styler, W. E.

    Degrees granted for part-time study are minimal in Britain and have been mainly awarded by London University. A small amount of part-time degree work is also carried on by Goldsmiths' College, West Ham College of Technology, and the Universities of Manchester, Durham, and Belfast. The establishment of the National Council for Academic Awards has…

  19. An Evaluation of a Degree Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinero, C. Mar; Portilla, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Employs a sample of 140 graduates from 2 subject areas (economics and accounting/management science) at Southampton University (England) to investigate the university's degree classification system using various statistical analysis techniques. Since students perform best in core subjects, those with little variety in degree courses have…

  20. Adult Degrees and the Learning Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehl, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This overview of the adult degree movement since World War II focuses on factors of creation before 1970, the adult degree revolution of the 1970s, the post-baby boomer enrollments in the 1980s, and globalization and technology-based distance learning in the 1990s.

  1. The Top 100 Bachelor's Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents this year's Top 100 institutions that conferred the most bachelor's degrees to students of color in academic year 2009-2010. It shows the total number of bachelor's degrees for a specific minority group or for total minorities, with subtotals for women and men in that ethnic group. The author also includes the prior year…

  2. The Doctorate: Talking about the Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinham, Steve; Scott, Catherine

    This qualitative study examined experiences of 139 individuals with doctoral degrees to identify factors that inhibit and/or facilitate students' success in doctoral programs. The study used an e-mail survey which asked about personal background, entry/structure of degree, university/other support, supervision of program, the process, and overall…

  3. Virtual displays for 360-degree video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Stephen; Boonsuk, Wutthigrai; Kelly, Jonathan W.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we describe a novel approach for comparing users' spatial cognition when using different depictions of 360- degree video on a traditional 2D display. By using virtual cameras within a game engine and texture mapping of these camera feeds to an arbitrary shape, we were able to offer users a 360-degree interface composed of four 90-degree views, two 180-degree views, or one 360-degree view of the same interactive environment. An example experiment is described using these interfaces. This technique for creating alternative displays of wide-angle video facilitates the exploration of how compressed or fish-eye distortions affect spatial perception of the environment and can benefit the creation of interfaces for surveillance and remote system teleoperation.

  4. Differences in STEM degree attainment by region, ethnicity, and degree type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledoye, Kimberly A.

    Purpose One purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a difference was present in the STEM degree attainment of all students and particularly of URMs between the 2001 and the 2009 academic year. The second purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a difference was present in the attainment of STEM associate degrees and bachelor degrees of all students and particularly of URMs awarded between the 2001 and the 2009 academic year. Another purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a difference existed in STEM associate degree and STEM bachelor degree attainment among geographic regions between the 2001 and the 2009 academic years. The extent to which a difference existed in the STEM bachelor degree and associate degree attainment of URMs among geographic regions between the 2001 to the 2009 academic year was ascertained. The final purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a difference was present in STEM associate degree and bachelor degree attainment of all students and particularly URMs as a function of degree type between the 2001 academic year and the 2009 academic year. Methodology Archival data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System were utilized to compare STEM degree attainment for regions, regions for URMs, STEM degree attainment overall and for URMs, STEM degree attainment classified by associate degrees and bachelor degrees for all students and URMs, and STEM degree attainment of associate degrees and bachelor degrees for all students and URMs by specific degree type between 2001 and 2009. Findings In this non-experimental causal comparative investigation, statistically significant differences were revealed in 95 of the 165 comparisons. Declining associate degree attainment was concerning, particularly in the computer and information sciences and engineering and engineering technologies. Moderate increases were determined in bachelor degree attainment with statistically

  5. Relaxation of vibrational degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohn, A.

    Shock tubes were used to measure relaxation times of the degrees of freedom in inelastic collisions of gas molecules. Design and construction of the experimental setup are described. For relaxation time measurements of vibrational degrees of freedom an initial pressure between 0.1 and 1 mbar is found to be optimal, and for dissociation between 1 and 10 mbar. The density gradients in the shock tube flow are measured with four differential laser interferometers and plotted with a transient recorder. A FORTRAN program was developed to determine the relaxation times. This measurement technique does not in general allow the degrees of freedom to be investigated separately.

  6. Lens positioner with five degrees of freedom

    DOEpatents

    Kobierecki, Marian W.; Rienecker, Jr., Frederick

    1978-01-01

    A device for positioning lenses precisely with five degrees of freedom (three translations and two angular rotations). The unique features of the device are its compact design, large clear aperture, and high degree of positioning accuracy combined with five degrees of freedom in axis motion. Thus, the device provides precision and flexibility in positioning of optical components. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, Contract No. AT(29-1)-1183, with the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

  7. Radiation protection enrollments and degrees, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J R; Shirley, D L; Blair, L M

    1982-05-01

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the degrees awarded in academic year 1980-81 from 61 U.S. universities offering degree programs in radiation protection or related areas that would enable students to work in the health physics field. The report includes historical survey data for the last decade and provides information such as trends by degree level, foreign national student participation, female and minority student participation, and placement of graduates. Also included is a listing of the universities by type of program and number of students.

  8. Correct degree distribution of apollonian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Li; Wang, Li-Na

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we point out that there is a shortcoming of the degree distribution and the analyzing approach of the Apollonian network in [Andrade J S, Herrmann H J, Andrade R F S, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 018702 (2005).]. Because the Apollonian network is a deterministic network, its degree distribution can be directly calculated. We correct the degree distribution of the Apollonian network. We also give a numerical simulation of network evolution. The analytical result agrees with the simulation well. The results show that there is the shortcoming of the results of Herrmann et al.

  9. Recent bed rest results and countermeasure development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Bedrest studies of normal subjects provide opportunities to understand physiologic responses to supine posture and inactivity. Furthermore, head-down tilt has been a valuable procedure to investigate adaptation to microgravity and development of countermeasures to maintain the health and well-being of humans during space-flight. Recent bedrest experiments at NASA have ranged in duration from a few hours to 17 weeks. Acute studies of 6 degrees head-down tilt indicate that elevation of capillary blood pressure from 28 to 34 mm Hg and increased capillary perfusion in tissues of the head cause facial and intracranial edema. Intracranial pressure increases from 2 to 17 mm Hg going from upright posture to 6 degrees head-down tilt. Microvessels of the head have a low capacity to constrict and diminish local perfusion. Elevation of blood and tissue fluid pressures/flow in the head may also explain the higher headward bone density associated with long-term head-down tilt. These mechanistic studies of head-down tilt, along with a better understanding of the relative stresses involved with upright posture and lower body negative pressure, have facilitated development of suitable physiologic countermeasures to maintain astronaut health during microgravity. Presently no exercise hardware is available to provide a blood pressure gradient from head to feet in space. However, recent studies in our laboratory suggest that treadmill exercise using a graded lower-body compression suit and 100 mmHg lower body negative pressure provides equivalent or greater physiologic stress than similar upright exercise on Earth. Therefore, exercise within a lower body negative pressure chamber may provide a cost-effective and simple countermeasure to maintain the cardiovascular and neuro-musculoskeletal systems of astronauts during long-duration flight.

  10. Second-Degree Learners in Associate Degree Nursing Programs: Characteristics and Progression Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Second degree learners are attending associate (ADN), accelerated baccalaureate (BSN), and entry level masters (ELM) degree nursing programs. There is limited data related to the socio-demographic characteristics and graduation success rates of students attending accelerated BSN or ELM programs and no data related to second-degree learners…

  11. Enhancing the Transition from a Foundation Degree to the Third Year of an Undergraduate Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mytton, Graham; Rumbold, Penny

    2011-01-01

    One-day transition to university workshops have been successful in enhancing peer networks. This study aimed to influence the transition from a Foundation Degree to a third year Undergraduate Degree programme through the use of peer led workshops. Two 2-hour workshops were planned and delivered by five previous students of the Foundation Degree,…

  12. Online Graduate Degrees: A Review of Three Internet-Based Master's Degree Offerings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Robert W.; Harmon, E. Glynn

    1997-01-01

    Reviews and compares three offerings of graduate degrees via the Internet--two master's programs in management and one master's program in library and information science. Presents a "Consumer's Guide" to online degree programs; lists questions for evaluating the institution, the degree program and coursework involved, and the program cost. (AEF)

  13. The Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree: A New Curriculum for a New Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Mary Jane K.; Stelzner, Denise; Rodriguez, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    By 2020, all graduates of accredited physical therapy programs will receive the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. Bachelor degrees in physical therapy are no longer granted, and over 83% (N = 176 accredited programs) of the entry-level physical therapy education programs already grant the DPT degree. The purpose of this article is to…

  14. Higher Degree Examination Procedures in Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovas, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    Detailed and wide-ranging suggestions are offered for reforming Australia's higher degree requirements. The author, an Australian PhD, compares them with requirements in other countries and finds them "particularly regressive, unenlightened, intellectually counterproductive, undemocratic, and uncivilized." (JSR)

  15. The Top 100: Associate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Total associate degrees conferred by U.S. institutions increased by 11 percent between academic years 2009-10 and 2010-11 to a record high of close to 950,000. Among students of color, the percentage increase was even higher: 13 percent. Students of color received nearly 300,000 associate degrees or about one-third of the 2010-11 total. Among…

  16. Six-Degree-Of-Freedom Parallel Minimanipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Tsai, Lung-Wen

    1994-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom parallel minimanipulator stiffer and simpler than earlier six-degree-of-freedom manipulators. Includes only three inextensible limbs with universal joints at ends. Limbs have equal lengths and act in parallel as they share load on manipulated platform. Designed to provide high resolution and high stiffness for fine control of position and force in hybrid serial/parallel-manipulator system.

  17. Acyclic colorings of graphs with bounded degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sidorowicz, Elżbieta

    2016-07-01

    A $k$-colouring (not necessarily proper) of vertices of a graph is called {\\it acyclic}, if for every pair of distinct colours $i$ and $j$ the subgraph induced by the edges whose endpoints have colours $i$ and $j$ is acyclic. In the paper we consider some generalised acyclic $k$-colourings, namely, we require that each colour class induces an acyclic or bounded degree graph. Mainly we focus on graphs with maximum degree 5. We prove that any such graph has an acyclic $5$-colouring such that each colour class induces an acyclic graph with maximum degree at most 4. We prove that the problem of deciding whether a graph $G$ has an acyclic 2-colouring in which each colour class induces a graph with maximum degree at most 3 is NP-complete, even for graphs with maximum degree 5. We also give a linear-time algorithm for an acyclic $t$-improper colouring of any graph with maximum degree $d$ assuming that the number of colors is large enough.

  18. Redshift Distribution of Galaxies in the Southern Milky Way Region 210 degrees < L < 360 degrees and B < 15 degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visvanathan, Natarajan; Yamada, Toru

    1996-12-01

    We have carried out a redshift survey of an IRAS flux-limited (f60 > 0.6) galaxy sample behind the southern Milky Way, 210° < l < 360° at |b| < 15°. The survey includes redshifts for 951 galaxies, ˜500 of which are new. Of these 951 galaxies, 462 are in the zone 5° degree of completeness (˜70%) in the zones 5°< b < 15° and -15° < b < -5°. The cone diagrams exhibiting the detailed distribution of IRAS galaxies in the region 210° < 1 < 360°, |b| < 15Xe0 shows two clusters in the Puppis region (l = 240°, b = -7° v = 2400 km s-1; 1 = 245°, b = -5° V = 7500 km s-1), the A3627 cluster (l = 325°, b = -7°; v = 450° km s-1), the S4 cluster (l=280°, b=7° v=5500 km s-1), and a possible void at l=245°, v=3000 km s-1. The region 270° < l < 350° is dominated by overdensity of galaxies representing the extension of the Hydra-Centaurus complex in the positive latitudes and the Pavo-Indus complex in the negative latitudes. A velocity histogram of galaxies in the GA region 2900

  19. Comparison of 45-degree Kelman and 45-degree balanced phaco tip designs in torsional microcoaxial phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Süleyman; Ataş, Mustafa; Göktaş, Emre; Başkan, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the intraoperative performance and postoperative outcome after microcoaxial torsional phacoemulsification using either a Kelman or balanced phaco tip. METHODS Cataracts were treated using 2.2 mm microcoaxial torsional phacoemulsification using either a 45-degree mini-flared Kelman® or a 45-degree Intrepid® Balanced phaco tip. Intraoperative measurements included total ultrasound (US) time, cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), torsional US time, and balanced salt solution (BSS) use. The central endothelial cell density (ECD) and central corneal thickness (CCT) were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively 1, 7, and 30d after surgery using noncontact specular microscopy. RESULTS The 116 enrolled eyes (116 patients) were divided equally between the Kelman and balanced tip groups. Intraoperative measurements showed significantly less total US time, torsional US time, CDE, and BSS use in the balanced group than in Kelman group (P<0.05). The total US time, torsional US time, CDE, and BSS use were 17.45±14.53s, 16.63±13.97s, 6.38±5.26, and 48.21±17.21 mL in the Kelman group and 11.39 ± 9.60s, 10.90 ± 9.25s, 4.04 ± 3.42, and 41.36 ± 12.70 mL in the balanced group, respectively. CONCLUSION Torsional phacoemulsification performed with a balanced tip provided more effective lens removal with less total US time, torsional time, CDE, and BSS use, as well as similar changes in ECD with a Kelman tip in all cataract grades. This special designed phaco tip for torsional phacoemulsification provides an alternative phaco tip for many surgeons' preference with straight phaco tip. PMID:26682167

  20. Effect of a central redistribution of fluid volume on response to lower-body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, C M; Frey, M A; Kenney, R A; Hoffler, G W

    1990-01-01

    We studied cardiovascular responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) following 1 hour (h) of 6 degrees head-down tilt to determine whether a redistribution of blood volume toward the central circulation modifies the subsequent response to orthostatic stress. Responses of 12 men, ages 30-39 years, were evaluated by electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. During the LBNP that followed head-down tilt--as compared with control LBNP (no preceding head-down tilt)--subjects had smaller stroke volume and cardiac output, greater total peripheral resistance, and less calf enlargement. These differences reflect differences in the variables immediately preceding LBNP. Magnitudes of the responses from pre-LBNP to each pressure stage of the LBNP procedure did not differ between protocols. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were slightly elevated after LBNP-control, but they fell slightly during LBNP post-tilt. These cardiovascular responses to simulated gravitational stress following head-down tilt may reflect the manner in which adaptation to microgravity affects subsequent responses to orthostatic stress on return to Earth. PMID:2302125

  1. Introduction of Branching Degrees of Octane Isomers.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The concept of branching degrees is introduced. In the case of octane isomers it is derived from the values of a set of their physicochemical properties, calculating for each isomer the average of the normalized values and these averages are defined as branching degrees of octane isomers. The sequence of these branching degrees of octane isomers does not differ much from the »regular« one defined earlier. 2,2-Dimethylhexane appears to be less branched than 3,4-dimethylhexane and 3-ethyl, 2-methylpentane, whereas 2,3,4-trimethylpentane appears to be less branched than 3-ethyl, 3-methylpentane. While the increasing number of branches gives rise to increasing branching degrees, the peripheral position of branches and the separation between branches decreases the value of the branching degree. The central position of branches increases it. A bigger branch increases it more than a smaller one. The quantification of these structural features and their correlations with few indices is given as well. PMID:27333567

  2. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree

    PubMed Central

    Skatova, Anya; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Different people choose undergraduate degrees to study at university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career), intrinsic interest in the subject (Interest), an opportunity to help others (Helping) and because they are looking for an easy option to get into higher education (Loafing). We investigated whether these motivations apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1) undergraduate (N = 989) and (2) prospective (N = 896) students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC) questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing, and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low Interest in the degree. The choice of arts and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples) and Interest (only in the undergraduate sample) motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in the undergraduate sample) and Loafing (both samples). The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as provide help to improve degree programmes at universities and support better career advice. PMID:25431561

  3. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree.

    PubMed

    Skatova, Anya; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Different people choose undergraduate degrees to study at university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career), intrinsic interest in the subject (Interest), an opportunity to help others (Helping) and because they are looking for an easy option to get into higher education (Loafing). We investigated whether these motivations apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1) undergraduate (N = 989) and (2) prospective (N = 896) students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC) questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing, and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low Interest in the degree. The choice of arts and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples) and Interest (only in the undergraduate sample) motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in the undergraduate sample) and Loafing (both samples). The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as provide help to improve degree programmes at universities and support better career advice. PMID:25431561

  4. Gross efficiency of muscular work during step exercise at -15 degrees C and 21 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Oksa, J; Rintamäki, H; Hassi, J; Rissanen, S

    1993-02-01

    In an effort to assess the effect of ambient temperature on the gross efficiency (Effg) of step exercise 12 subjects performed a modified step test either at -15 degrees C or 21 degrees C ascending to three different heights (corresponding to light, moderate and heavy work), for 20 min each with a frequency of 18 steps min-1. Heart rate (HR), rectal temperature, skin temperatures and heat flux from skin were continuously measured. Oxygen consumption was measured during the last 5 min of each step height and perceptions of thermal sensation were recorded. The results indicate that, while using conventional clothing adequate in these temperatures, Effg is altered in a contradictory manner. At -15 degrees C Effg increased with increasing work load, whereas at 21 degrees C it decreased when the work load increased. The highest Effg (heavy work at -15 degrees C and light work at 21 degrees C) values are reflected as rather similar rectal temperatures. (37.4-37.7 degrees C) and identical mean skin temperatures (32.8 degrees C) as well as the same (slightly warm) thermal sensation of the legs. At -15 degrees C the lowest Effg in light work was probably due to the need to warm up the muscles. At 21 degrees C, on the contrary, the activation of heat dissipation systems was probably responsible for the lowest Effg in heavy work. PMID:8475751

  5. 1999 Initial Employment Report: Follow-Up of 1998 Physics and Astronomy Degree Recipients. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Langer, Casey

    This report is based on an annual survey of physics degree recipients conducted approximately 6 months after the end of the academic year in which they received their degrees. During the 1997-1998 academic year, there were 1,323 physics Ph.D.s conferred at the 183 departments granting physics doctorates in the United States. Departments reported…

  6. Predictive Factors of Premedical Student Retention and Degree Completion within a Private Undergraduate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Frances E.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate retention and eventual graduation is of paramount importance to universities globally. Approximately 58% of students who began their college career at a four-year institution with the intention of receiving a bachelor's degree actually received that degree in a 6-year timeframe, according to the National Center for Education…

  7. Node degree distribution in spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozrikidis, C.

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented for computing the number of spanning trees involving one link or a specified group of links, and excluding another link or a specified group of links, in a network described by a simple graph in terms of derivatives of the spanning-tree generating function defined with respect to the eigenvalues of the Kirchhoff (weighted Laplacian) matrix. The method is applied to deduce the node degree distribution in a complete or randomized set of spanning trees of an arbitrary network. An important feature of the proposed method is that the explicit construction of spanning trees is not required. It is shown that the node degree distribution in the spanning trees of the complete network is described by the binomial distribution. Numerical results are presented for the node degree distribution in square, triangular, and honeycomb lattices.

  8. Generalized Higher Degree Total Variation (HDTV) Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Ongie, Greg; Ramani, Sathish; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a family of novel image regularization penalties called generalized higher degree total variation (HDTV). These penalties further extend our previously introduced HDTV penalties, which generalize the popular total variation (TV) penalty to incorporate higher degree image derivatives. We show that many of the proposed second degree extensions of TV are special cases or are closely approximated by a generalized HDTV penalty. Additionally, we propose a novel fast alternating minimization algorithm for solving image recovery problems with HDTV and generalized HDTV regularization. The new algorithm enjoys a ten-fold speed up compared to the iteratively reweighted majorize minimize algorithm proposed in a previous work. Numerical experiments on 3D magnetic resonance images and 3D microscopy images show that HDTV and generalized HDTV improve the image quality significantly compared with TV. PMID:24710832

  9. Predicting Young Adult Degree Attainment by Late Adolescent Marijuana Use

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Jeremy; Kloska, Deborah D.; Patrick, Megan E.; O’Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess whether infrequent and frequent marijuana use at age 19/20 predicts receipt of educational degrees by the mid 20s, independent of confounding age 18 adolescent risk factors. Methods Data were from the Monitoring the Future study, an annual nationally-representative survey of high school seniors followed into adulthood. Thirteen cohorts (1990 to 2002) of high school seniors were followed longitudinally to their mid 20s (n=4,925; 54% female). We used logistic regression and propensity score matching with successive inclusion of age 18 risk factors and substance use to compare age 19/20 frequent marijuana users (6+ occasions in past 30 days) to non-users, frequent users to infrequent users (1 to 6 occasions), and infrequent users to non-users on their likelihood of degree attainment by the mid 20s. Results Frequent marijuana users were less likely than infrequent users and non-users to earn Bachelor’s degrees, even after controlling for a host of age 18 risk factors (e.g., family socioeconomic background, academic performance, educational expectations, truancy). However, these differences were reduced in magnitude to statistical non-significance when we controlled for age 18 substance use. Across analyses, the proportion reaching this educational milestone did not differ significantly between infrequent users and non-users. Conclusions Results support a growing body of work suggesting that frequent marijuana use predicts a lower likelihood of post-secondary educational attainment, and this difference may originate during secondary school. PMID:26206441

  10. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    PubMed

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  11. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  12. Adolescent obesity and future college degree attainment.

    PubMed

    Fowler-Brown, Angela G; Ngo, Long H; Phillips, Russell S; Wee, Christina C

    2010-06-01

    The current impact of adolescent obesity on educational attainment is not clear. The objectives of our study were to determine whether adolescent obesity is associated with college degree attainment and how this association may have changed over time. We used data from a contemporary national cohort of over 4,000 persons who were adolescents (aged 14-18) in 1997 to assess the relationship between adolescent obesity and education. To assess for changes in this relationship over time, we also analyzed an older, similarly structured cohort of over 3,000 persons who were adolescents (aged 16-18) in 1981. Our primary outcome was college degree completion. We found that in the older cohort (adolescents in 1979), there were no differences in college degree attainment by adolescent weight status before and after adjustment. However, unadjusted analysis of the contemporary cohort (adolescents in 1997) demonstrated that those who were normal weight as adolescents had a higher prevalence of college degree attainment at follow-up compared to obese adolescents (24% vs. 10%). After adjustment for socio-demographic variables (age, sex, race, height, parental income-to-poverty ratio, parental education, aptitude test scores), obese adolescents were less likely to have attained a college degree compared to normal weight peers (adjusted risk ratio 0.61 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.83). Expectations for a future college degree did not vary by weight status and did not explain this observation. In conclusion, adolescent obesity is associated with lower likelihood of college completion. This relationship was not observed in an older cohort of adolescents. PMID:20035280

  13. Multiple perspectives on assault: the 360-degree interview.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Marilyn Lewis; Zeiss, Robert A; Rierdan, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Workplace violence is common in health care settings. The authors review various models of this violence that have developed over time. From a linear model, understanding progressed to an interactional and then to a contextual model of assault that examines interactions of the aggressor, victim, and the environment. To date, there has not been a satisfactory research methodology to explore the complexities of the contextual model. This article proposes the 360-degree evaluation as an appropriate methodology for examination of multiple perspectives on assault. The 360-degree model allows comparison of perspectives of the assailant, victim, victim's peers, and victim's supervisor. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2009; 14(6), 413-420. PMID:21665784

  14. Field measurement of slow metamorphic reaction rates at temperatures of 500 degrees to 600 degrees C

    PubMed

    Baxter; DePaolo

    2000-05-26

    High-temperature metamorphic reaction rates were measured using strontium isotopic ratios of garnet and whole rock from a field site near Simplon Pass, Switzerland. For metamorphic conditions of cooling from 612 degrees +/- 17 degrees C to 505 degrees +/- 15 degrees C at pressures up to 9.1 kilobars, the inferred bulk fluid-rock exchange rate is 1.3(-0.4)(+1.1) x 10(-7) grams of solid reacted per gram of solid per year, several orders of magnitude lower than laboratory-based estimates. The inferred reaction rate suggests that mineral chemistry may lag the evolving conditions in Earth's crust during mountain building. PMID:10827949

  15. Gender-related Changes in Dorsal Hand and Foot Vein Function Following 60 Days of Head Down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Phillips, Tiffany; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that female astronauts are more likely to experience post-flight orthostatic hypotension and presyncope compared to male astronauts. It has been suggested that the disproportionally higher incidence of presyncope (83% of female vs. 20% male crewmembers) may be due to sex-related differences in vascular function between the upper and lower limbs. However, much of this evidence is specific to changes in resistance vessels. Given that more than 70% of the circulating blood volume resides in compliance vessels, it is conceivable that even small changes in venous function may contribute to post-flight orthostatic hypotension. In spite of this, little is currently known regarding the influence of microgravity exposure on venous function between males and females. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of 60 days of HDBR on dorsal foot and hand vein function between healthy males (M) and females (F). METHODS: Using 2-D ultrasound, dorsal hand and foot vein diameter responses to intravenous infusions phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine (ACh), and nitroglycerine (NTG) were determined in 26 adults; 10 females (age:37 +/- 2 yr ) and 16 males (age:34 +/- 2 yr ). Changes in venous function were calculated as the difference between diameter at baseline and following each venoactive drug. Differences in venous function between limb and sexes across HDBR were determined using mixed-effects linear regression. RESULTS: In response to 60 days of HDBR, the change in venousconstrictor response to PE in the dorsal hand veins was not significantly different between M and F. Interestingly, the change in constrictor response in the dorsal foot veins (compared to pre HDBR) was approximately 30% greater in the F, whereas the constrictor response was approximately 45% less in the M (p=0.026). HDBR had no influence on the change in dilator response to ACh, or NTG between M and F and between vascular beds. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that 60 days of HDBR contributes to sex-related differences in venous function. Importantly, the changes are specific to dorsal foot veins and do not appear to be related to changes in endothelial or smooth muscle function. Previous data from our laboratory indicate that females have an impaired sympathetic response following HDBR. However, the results from the current investigation imply that F maintain the ability to respond to sympathetic stimulation but may not be able to adequately activate a proper response following HDBR.

  16. Human cardiovascular response to sympathomimetic agents during head-down bed rest: the effect of dietary sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. J.; Stuart, C. A.; Fortney, S. M.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in sympathoadrenal function and cardiovascular deconditioning have long been recognized as a feature of the physiological adaptation to microgravity. The deconditioning process, coupled with altered hydration status, is thought to significantly contribute to orthostatic intolerance upon return to Earth gravity. The cardiovascular response to stimulation by sympathomimetic agents before, during, and after exposure to simulated microgravity was determined in healthy volunteers equilibrated on normal or high sodium diets in order to further the understanding of the deconditioning process.

  17. Degree Audit Systems: Are They Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    A lot of various degree audit systems are available on the market and most often they have similar features such as the functionality they each provide, the technical platforms upon which they operate, their requirements for interfacing with the local SIS, the ease of use, and the level of effort required to implement and operate. However, the…

  18. A Question of Degrees for Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyss, Paul Alan

    2008-01-01

    Certain colleges and universities require that their academic librarians have an additional advanced subject degree for either being eligible for hire or for continued employment. This paper reviews this topic and examines how using metaphors may help the field of librarianship make sound decisions on this controversial topic.

  19. Developing Learning Cohorts for Postgraduate Research Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Delahaye, Brian L.; Saggers, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Development of researchers through higher degree research studies is a high priority in most universities. Yet, research about supervision as pedagogy and models of supervision is only recently gained increasing attention. Charged with producing good researchers within very limited resources, academics are constantly looking for more efficient…

  20. Lessons from VET Providers Delivering Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Victor J.; Bowman, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    This report is focused on the strategic, capability and operational reasons why traditional vocational education and training (VET) providers move to the delivery of higher education qualifications in their own right, in addition to their vocational qualifications. It is particularly interested in associate and bachelor degrees. By undertaking six…

  1. Strategies for Pursuing a Master's Degree.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cynthia M; McIntosh, Constance E; Mensik, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Health care has become very complex and is in a constant state of change. As a result of the evolving change and increasing complexity, a more educated nursing workforce is needed (Dracup K. Master's nursing programs. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. 2015; Institute of Medicine. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. 2010). It is now becoming necessary for registered nurses to earn an advanced degree to work at the highest level of their practice authority (Dracup K. Master's nursing programs. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. 2015; Institute of Medicine. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. 2010.). Preparing to reenter college may be an overwhelming prospect for some registered nurses seeking an advanced degree. However, there are some simple strategies that may help sort out the many degree options, financial obligations, decisions about brick and mortar versus online learning, commitment to degree completion, and changing career paths. This article will provide the registered nurse valuable information that will assist in the exciting process of returning to college. PMID:27043400

  2. Transfer Associate Degrees in Historical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer education centering on the liberal arts declined relatively beginning in the late 1960s with the expansion of vocational education. But the distinctions blurred as courses that matched university programs in business and health fields grew. By the 1970s more than half all associate degrees awarded were to students from occupational…

  3. Strategies for Evaluating Undergraduate Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating higher education degree programs is an arduous task. This paper suggests innovative strategies for addressing four types of challenges that commonly occur during program evaluation: identifying theoretical models for evaluation, balancing potentially conflicting standards, accommodating faculty differences, and aligning courses.…

  4. Strategies for Maintaining Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilton, Theodore

    As part of the national campaign of the American Nurses Association (ANA) to create two levels of nursing, one for bachelor of science nurses (BSN's) and one for associate degree nurses (ADN's), Illinois has been targeted for a legislative push to change the laws governing nurse licensure, which, if successful, would signal the beginning of the…

  5. The Psychology Degree in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Peter; Rochelle, Kim

    2008-01-01

    In response to the issues raised by Radford a clearer understanding of the psychology degree as part of the liberal education tradition is advocated in line with Newman (1982) and Graham (2005). Such a focus incorporates developments in employability and graduate competencies and reinforces rather than undermines concern with scholarship. Links…

  6. Active Methodology in the Audiovisual Communication Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez-Lopez, J. L.; Royo, T. Magal; Laborda, Jesus Garcia; Dunai, Larisa

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation methods of the active methodologies of the new European higher education area in the new Audiovisual Communication degree under the perspective of subjects related to the area of the interactive communication in Europe. The proposed active methodologies have been experimentally implemented into the new academic…

  7. Innovative Degree Programs Matched to City Strengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhatme, Uday

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, IUPUI has steadily acquired a considerable national reputation as an up-and-coming university. Some of the reasons for this recognition include the RISE Initiative and the large number of innovative degree programs recently started at IUPUI based on campus strengths and the priorities of the city of Indianapolis. Some specific…

  8. Multiple degree of freedom optical pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1987-01-01

    Three general optical approaches to multiple degree of freedom object pattern recognition (where no stable object rest position exists) are advanced. These techniques include: feature extraction, correlation, and artificial intelligence. The details of the various processors are advanced together with initial results.

  9. Teaching Third-Degree Price Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Round, David K.; McIver, Ron P.

    2006-01-01

    Third-degree price discrimination is taught in almost every intermediate microeconomics class. The theory, geometry, and the algebra behind the concept are simple, and the phenomenon is commonly associated with the sale of many of the goods and services used frequently by students. Classroom discussion is usually vibrant as students can relate…

  10. The Top 100: Bachelor's Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Top 100 institutions that conferred the most bachelor's degrees to students of color in academic year 2010-2011. The data for this analysis are collected from all U.S. postsecondary institutions through the completions survey of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) maintained by the National Center…

  11. The Top 100: Graduate Degrees Conferred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, some critics and policymakers have started to question the value of a college education given the increasing costs of attending and the commensurate high debt levels of college graduates. Past and present studies also demonstrate that the average value masks important variation by degree level and field of study. This paper focuses on…

  12. Enrollments and Degrees Report. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    In fall 2002, the American Institute of Physics asked the 735 physics departments, the 34 combined physics and astronomy departments, and the 37 separate astronomy departments in the United States to provide information on both their current student enrollments and the degrees they conferred in the previous academic year. Data were received from…

  13. RN education: beyond the baccalaureate degree.

    PubMed

    Hagemaster, J N

    1990-01-01

    With an emphasis on post-baccalaureate education, the University of Kansas School of Nursing has restructured its program for registered nurse students. The resultant RN-MS track allows completion of both the baccalaureate and master's degrees in nursing in a 2-year time frame. Computer competencies, individualization of instruction, and substitution of classes are integrated into a streamlined curriculum. PMID:2216070

  14. Preparing students for degree-level physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, David; Lloyd, Steve

    2013-11-01

    On behalf of the physics department at Nottingham Trent University (NTU), I would like to reply to the letter from Helen Hare on the need for foundation programmes to prepare students for degree-level physics courses ("Firm foundations", September p23).

  15. An Associate Degree in High Performance Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Arnold

    In order for more individuals to enter higher paying jobs, employers must create a sufficient number of high-performance positions (the demand side), and workers must acquire the skills needed to perform in these restructured workplaces (the supply side). Creating an associate degree in High Performance Manufacturing (HPM) will help address four…

  16. Third-Degree Price Discrimination Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Youngsun

    2006-01-01

    The author derives the probability that price discrimination improves social welfare, using a simple model of third-degree price discrimination assuming two independent linear demands. The probability that price discrimination raises social welfare increases as the preferences or incomes of consumer groups become more heterogeneous. He derives the…

  17. Re-Engineering the Engineering Degree Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Rodney

    Students enrolled to degree programs in 1997 will become the first graduates of the 21st century. Engineering courses in the School of Engineering at Leeds Metropolitan University have changed immensely in the last two years, so as to support new markets. Disciplines such as industrial engineering, electronics and computing have enjoyed their…

  18. Tourism Degree Internships: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Graham

    2003-01-01

    This case study briefly reviews the development of tourism degrees in the United Kingdom before considering the experiences obtained by students on year-long internship programmes over a period of 8 years. Verbatim confidential comments, from students, are provided and specific transferable skills discussed. Whilst some skills can be developed…

  19. The Power of 360-Degree Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Karen M.

    2001-01-01

    Although 360-degree feedback is no panacea for improving schools, it provides educational leaders with data to help them perceive, reflect, articulate, and analyze their own behavior, based on data from a full circle of constituents, including themselves. Face-to-face coaching is a mandatory component. (MLH)

  20. Degrees of Change--Resistance or Resilience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Considers issues involved in the change process within organizational culture. Highlights include adopting an appropriate management style; evaluation of performance; aspects of change; implications of change for people management; degrees of change; resistance to change; and an example of planning and implementing a new information technology…

  1. Validating the Master's Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Sees universal adoption of master's degree in rehabilitation counseling as hiring criterion requiring its validation in relation to job performance. Proposes large-scale validation study involving state-federal vocational rehabilitation agencies that would make use of extensive existing vocational rehabilitation database, and relate type and level…

  2. Environmental Influences on Minority Degree Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Patricia H.

    1992-01-01

    Reports findings to date from a study under the auspices of the National Center for Postsecondary Governance and Finance concerning environmental actors relating to minority degree achievement in predominantly white four-year colleges and universities. Examines whether research results can really be linked to specific suggestions to improve campus…

  3. Researching Research in Master's Degrees in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The research dimension of higher education programmes is usually discussed in association with doctoral studies. Against a background of scarce literature investigating research in a Master's degree, this article aims to analyse the place of research in Master's qualifications, first, as envisaged by official European and national documents acting…

  4. The Value of a College Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Although parents, high school students, and most civic leaders in this country and around the world see a college degree as important, this perspective has been attacked over the last five years. Once the Great Recession began in December 2007, there were far fewer good jobs available for new college graduates. The soaring price of college had…

  5. The Top American Indian Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" publishes lists of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the Indiana University Bloomington. This year, Diverse staff continue…

  6. Elements of Effective Transfer Associate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisker, Carrie B.; Wagoner, Richard L.; Cohen, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a convergence of several forces--increased legislative involvement in higher education, governmental and philanthropic pressure to increase postsecondary degree and certificate production, demands for a highly trained workforce, and fiscal belt-tightening at colleges and universities across America--has resulted in efforts to…

  7. "What Can I Do with This Degree?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartel, Max

    2015-01-01

    As long as the question of what recent graduates can do with their degree is being asked, the need for comprehensive and trustworthy data will exist. Between the White House College Scorecard, the Rubio-Wyden-Warner Student Right to Know Before You Go Act, the USDOE's Title IV Federal Student Aid Programs: Gainful Employment in a Recognized…

  8. Tech Prep/Associate Degree Concept Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Tech Prep Network, Waco, TX.

    The Tech Prep/Associate Degree concept offers an answer to the nationwide mandate to improve the U.S. educational system and thus to enable the country to remain competitive in the world market. Tech Prep is a sequence of study beginning in high school and continuing through at least 2 years of postsecondary occupational education. The Tech Prep…

  9. Degrees of School Democracy: A Holistic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Philip A.; Woods, Glenys J.

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines an analytical framework that enables analysis of degrees of democracy in a school or other organizational setting. It is founded in a holistic conception of democracy, which is a model of working together that aspires to truth, goodness, and meaning and the participation of all. We suggest that the analytical framework can be…

  10. Attrition in Online and Campus Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Belinda; McFadden, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the mode of instructional delivery, campus face-to-face or online, affected dropout relative to students' academic and demographic characteristics. A quantitative study was conducted to analyze the academic and demographic characteristics of newly admitted, matriculated degree-seeking students (N = 640)…

  11. Institutional Grants and Baccalaureate Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Derek V.; Davis, Ryan J.

    2006-01-01

    While the effects of the shift from need- to merit-based grants on student enrollment and receipt of aid have been examined thoroughly by a number of analysts, very few recent reports have examined the effects of these grants on students' persistence towards completing bachelor's degrees. To examine this issue, this report explores the linkages…

  12. Three Degree of Freedom Parallel Mechanical Linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A three degree of freedom parallel mechanism or linkage that couples three degree of freedom translational displacements at an endpoint, such as a handle, a hand grip, or a robot tool, to link rotations about three axes that are fixed with respect to a common base or ground link. The mechanism includes a three degree of freedom spherical linkage formed of two closed loops, and a planar linkage connected to the endpoint. The closed loops are rotatably interconnected, and made of eight rigid links connected by a plurality of single degree of freedom revolute joints. Three of these revolute joints are base joints and are connected to a common ground. such that the axis lines passing through the revolute joints intersect at a common fixed center point K forming the center of a spherical work volume in which the endpoint is capable of moving. 'Me three degrees of freedom correspond to the spatial displacement of the endpoint, for instance. The mechanism provides a new overall spatial kinematic linkage composed of a minimal number of rigid links and rotary joints. The mechanism has improved mechanical stiffness, and conveys mechanical power bidirectionally between the human operator and the electromechanical actuators. It does not require gears, belts. cable, screw or other types of transmission elements, and is useful in applications requiring full backdrivability. Thus, this invention can serve as the mechanical linkage for actively powered devices such as compliant robotic manipulators and force-reflecting hand controllers, and passive devices such as manual input devices for computers and other systems.

  13. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2012: Results from the 2012 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The number of physics degrees earned in the U.S. continues to rise, with bachelor's and PhDs yet again reaching all-time highs. The 6,776 physics bachelor's degrees awarded in the 2011-2012 academic year represent an 8% increase over the previous year and an 86% increase from a recent low in 1999. Similarly, the number of PhDs (1,762) in…

  14. 1-year retention rates and performance ratings: comparing associate degree, baccalaureate, and accelerated baccalaureate degree nurses.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Suzanne M; Raleigh, Edith D Hunt

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 1-year retention and managerial performance ratings of newly licensed RNs (NLRNs) according to nursing education program types (associate degree, traditional baccalaureate, and accelerated 2nd degree baccalaureate). Findings revealed retention and performance differences, suggesting the possibility of tradeoffs related to educational program type when selecting NLRNs for open positions. PMID:23958525

  15. Physics Bachelor's Degrees: Results from the 2010 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2012-01-01

    The Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics conducts an annual census of all degree-granting physics departments in the United States and Puerto Rico. The survey had a 95% response rate from the 751 departments that granted physics bachelor's degrees in the class of 2010. Results show that the number of physics bachelor's…

  16. Physics Undergraduate Degrees: Results from the 2008 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2011-01-01

    The Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics conducts an annual census of all degree-granting physics departments in the United States and Puerto Rico. The survey, collecting data from the 754 departments that granted bachelor's degrees in the class of 2008, had a 97% response rate. Estimates were derived and included in…

  17. The Degree Gap: Are University Graduates Making Full Use of Their Degrees? Report 09-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Mallory; Fuller, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    California's degree gap is a growing concern. According to recent reports and news articles comparing the number of degrees awarded with the jobs expected in the coming decade, California will not have enough university graduates to meet the needs of the labor market. Previous work by the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) showed…

  18. Curriculum Models and Competencies. Associate Degree Nursing and Nursing Education Options: Associate Degree with Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, Vercie M.; Worthington, Roger G.

    Four associate degree nursing curriculums are presented, along with competencies, program guidelines, and job opportunities identified as those appropriate for the associate degree nursing programs offered in the North Carolina community college system. Chapter I introduces North Carolina's curriculum development project and the phases in which…

  19. Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees: Results from the 2012 Survey of Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    Interest in astronomy degrees in the U.S. remains strong, with astronomy enrollments at or near all-time highs for the 2012-13 academic year. The total number of students taking an introductory astronomy course at a degree-granting physics or astronomy department is approaching 200,000. Enrollments in introductory astronomy courses have been…

  20. Separation of Degrees: State-By-State Analysis of Teacher Compensation for Master's Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roza, Marguerite; Miller, Raegen

    2009-01-01

    How much money is tied up in master's degrees? A 2007 study estimated that 2.1 percent of all current expenditures can be attributed to teacher compensation related to master's degrees. Seen another way, the master's bump costs the average school district $174 per pupil. These national figures conceal substantial variation among states in the…

  1. Lessons Learned: Creating an Online Business Degree from a Successful On-Campus Business Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordeiro, William P.; Muraoka, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The horse has left the barn. Distance education is here to stay and the number of degree programs offered online is growing rapidly. California State University Channel Islands (CI) admitted its first students in 2002, and the undergraduate and graduate degrees in business were among its first program offerings. From its inception, the…

  2. The Tides of the Atlantic Ocean, 60 degrees N to 30 degrees S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, D. E.; Spencer, R.; Vassie, J. M.; Woodworth, P. L.

    1988-04-01

    As a sequel to Cartwright et al. (Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A298, 87-139 (1980)) (C.E.S.V.) an extended series of oceanic tidal pressure measurements in the Atlantic Ocean is described and the spatial properties of their spectral components are analysed. The principal linear admittances vary widely across the ocean basins, and clearly indicate the positions of the major amphidromes. Constants for the leading harmonics M2 and S2 are defined everywhere along the parallel of 53.6 degrees N and along a section from Natal (Brazil) and west Africa by interpolation between measurements. From a unique set of seven one-year deep pressure records between 57 degrees N and the Equator, the radiational component of S2 is shown to have similar magnitude and phase anomaly to values previously known only at coastal stations, confirming its intrinsically atmospheric forcing. From the same records, nonlinear terms in the semidiurnal band are found to be irregular and indistinguishable from noise. From the full set of data, the M4 overtide is generally small and erratic, probably affected in some areas by low-stability internal waves. The long-period tides Mm and Mf are clearly identified in the equatorial zone as coherent motions with slight phase variations. Their amplitudes are significantly greater than those deduced from the `self-consistent equilibrium theory' of Agnew & Farrell (Geophys. Jl R. astr. Soc. 55, 171-181 (1978)). The M1 tide, linearly driven from the third-degree harmonic of the potential, has been extracted from multiyear records at 13 representative coastal stations in both hemispheres. It is shown to agree well with a synthesis of normal modes of oscillation computed by Platzman (J. Phys. Oceanogr. 14 (10), 1521-1550 (1984)), provided a general phase adjustment of about 60 degrees is made to the synthesized phases. The other third-degree term M3 is well extracted from most of the pelagic stations but is found to be too finely structured in space for easy

  3. Small, Lightweight Inspection Robot With 12 Degrees Of Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ohm, Timothy R.; Hayati, Samad

    1996-01-01

    Small serpentine robot weighs only 6 lbs. and has link diameter of 1.5 in. Designed to perform inspections. Multiple degrees of freedom enables it to reach around obstacles and through small openings into simple or complexly shaped confined spaces to positions where difficult or impossible to perform inspections by other means. Fiber-optic borescope incorporated into robot arm, with inspection tip of borescope located at tip of arm. Borescope both conveys light along robot arm to illuminate scene inspected at tip and conveys image of scene back along robot arm to external imaging equipment.

  4. Degree correlations in signed social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Valerio; Bianconi, Ginestra; Capocci, Andrea; Colaiori, Francesca; Panzarasa, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    We investigate degree correlations in two online social networks where users are connected through different types of links. We find that, while subnetworks in which links have a positive connotation, such as endorsement and trust, are characterized by assortative mixing by degree, networks in which links have a negative connotation, such as disapproval and distrust, are characterized by disassortative patterns. We introduce a class of simple theoretical models to analyze the interplay between network topology and the superimposed structure based on the sign of links. Results uncover the conditions that underpin the emergence of the patterns observed in the data, namely the assortativity of positive subnetworks and the disassortativity of negative ones. We discuss the implications of our study for the analysis of signed complex networks.

  5. Role Preparation of Associate Degree Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Lillian G.

    The role of associate degree nursing (ADN) programs has changed dramatically in their 30 years of existence. The number of ADN graduates increased from 260 in 1954 to 36,434 in 1980, and 47.8% of all nursing graduates in 1980 came from ADN programs, as compared to 0.9% in 1954. These graduates have the best record of employment five years after…

  6. Spirit 360-Degree View, Sol 388 (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 388th martian day, or sol (Feb. 4, 2005). Spirit had driven about 13 meters (43 feet) uphill toward 'Cumberland Ridge' on this sol. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 102, Position 513. The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  7. Spirit 360-Degree View, Sol 388

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 388th martian day, or sol (Feb. 4, 2005). Spirit had driven about 13 meters (43 feet) uphill toward 'Cumberland Ridge' on this sol. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 102, Position 513. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  8. Spirit 360-Degree View, Sol 388 (polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 388th martian day, or sol (Feb. 4, 2005). Spirit had driven about 13 meters (43 feet) uphill toward 'Cumberland Ridge' on this sol. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 102, Position 513. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  9. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  10. Nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees, 1994: Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This survey is designed to include those programs sponsored by the Department of Energy. The survey is designed to include those programs offering a major in nuclear engineering or course work equivalent to a major in other engineering disciplines that prepare the graduates to perform as nuclear engineers. This survey provides data on nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees for use in labor market analyses, information on education programs for students, and information on new graduates to employers, government agencies, academia and professional societies.

  11. Algebraic aspects of the computably enumerable degrees.

    PubMed Central

    Slaman, T A; Soare, R I

    1995-01-01

    A set A of nonnegative integers is computably enumerable (c.e.), also called recursively enumerable (r.e.), if there is a computable method to list its elements. The class of sets B which contain the same information as A under Turing computability (degree of A, and a degree is c.e. if it contains a c.e. set. The extension of embedding problem for the c.e. degrees R = (R, <, 0, 0') asks, given finite partially ordered sets P is a subset of Q with least and greatest elements, whether every embedding of P into can be extended to an embedding of Q into R. Many of the most significant theorems giving an algebraic insight into R have asserted either extension or nonextension of embeddings. We extend and unify these results and their proofs to produce complete and complementary criteria and techniques to analyze instances of extension and nonextension. We conclude that the full extension of embedding problem is decidable. PMID:11607508

  12. Mechanical design of the WIYN One Degree Imager (ODI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Gary P.; Harbeck, Daniel; Jacoby, George H.; Harmer, Charles; Yeatts, Andrey; Blanco, Dan; Cavin, John; Sawyer, Dave

    2008-07-01

    The WIYN consortium is building the One Degree Imager (ODI) to be mounted to a Nasmyth port of the WIYN 3.5m telescope, located at Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA). ODI will utilize both the excellent image quality and the one-degree field of view that the telescope delivers. To accommodate the large field of view (~0.39m diameter unvignetted field with 0.54m across the diagonal of the one-degree-square, partially vignetted field), 0.6m-class optics are required. The ODI design consists of a two element corrector: one serves as a vacuum barrier to the cryostat, the other is an asphere; two independently rotating bonded prism pairs for atmospheric dispersion compensation (ADC); nine independently deployable filters via a simple pivoting motion; and a 971 mega-pixel focal plane consisting of 64 orthogonal transfer array (OTA) devices. This paper is an overview of the mechanical design of ODI and describes the optical element mounting and alignment strategy, the ADC & filter mechanisms, plus the focal plane. Additionally, the project status will be discussed. In accompanying papers Jacoby1 describes ODI's optical design, Yeatts2 describes the software and control system design, and Harbeck3 gives a general update on the project.

  13. College Degrees in South Carolina: An Employer's Guide, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This Guide provides basic information to South Carolina employers regarding the nature of college degrees. It covers South Carolina law regarding the use of degrees, how to accurately describe degree needs when advertising for a position, how to evaluate a job applicant's claim of a degree, the growing problem of diploma mill degrees, and related…

  14. Double Degrees: Double the Trouble or Twice the Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, A. Wendy; Dolnicar, Sara; Ayoub, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Double degrees (also called joint or combined degrees)--programs of study combining two bachelor degrees--are increasingly popular in Australian universities, particularly among women. A case study using qualitative and quantitative surveys of current and past double degree students is presented. The study indicates that double degrees benefit…

  15. Is That Graduate Degree Worth It? Comparing the Recruitment of Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Job Applicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    One could argue from a business prospective that colleges and universities are not working hard enough to train students for life in the business and civic world, at either the undergraduate or graduate levels. What is it that employers are looking for in students? How different are the skills and attributes employers are looking for between undergraduate and graduate students? How unique are the geosciences in this respect? At the undergraduate level recruiters have spoken loud and clear about what they want. According to the dean of the business school here at the University of Arizona, recruiters at the undergraduate degree level in business base less than half of their hiring decision on specific content knowledge in the discipline, and correspondingly more than half on the so-called soft skills ... ability to apply knowledge in new situations, ability to think critically, ability to communicate with others in both written and oral forms, ability to work in teams, ability to work with a diverse set of employees and customers (especially, but not limited to, the global job market), etc. How true is this at the graduate level, where students have typically spent 4-6 years specializing in a discipline? Is there a set of fundamental knowledge that employers are looking for at the graduate level? Are the so-called soft skills correspondingly less important? I will present results from a survey of graduate programs and industry recruiters addressing these questions, and highlight the areas of overlap and difference between undergraduates and graduates looking for jobs. I will concentrate specifically on jobs in the oil industry and on both masters and Ph.D. programs.

  16. 6 K Cryocooler Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gully, Willy; Herrero, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The report summarizes experimental and theoretical work on an Oxford type Stirling Cycle mechanical precooler operating in the temperature range of 13-20 degrees Kelvin. It includes measurements of the thermal losses of particle regenerators made from lead, and rare earth and rare earth alloys in an operating three stage cryocooler. A 6 K hybrid cooler is designed using the technical information gathered on regenerator performance.

  17. Research Related to Multi Degree of Freedom Magnetic Suspensions. Degree awarded by Old Dominion Univ. Aug. 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin; Yang, Yan

    1997-01-01

    This thesis covers the activities associated with (1) recommissioning of the 6-inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) and (2) enhancing the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). These activities continue the program of research in the multi degree of freedom magnetic suspension program at Old Dominion University. The 6-inch MSBS is a large gap magnetic suspension system used as a model support and balance system in wind tunnels. The first stage of recommissioning of the 6-inch MSBS for the 6-inch subsonic wind tunnel is performed. Experimental data and computational results for the magnetic field distribution of the MSBS are given and compared with the estimated magnetic field strength. The comparison indicates that the magnet system is still operating as designed. The Electromagnetic Position Sensor used in the 6-inch MSBS is analyzed before its find reinstatement. The ASPS is a small gap magnetic suspension system providing orientation, mechanical isolation and fine pointing of space payloads. The control system of the ASPS is improved by designing a new code to realize red time control over the system. The original Proportional-Derivative controller is upgraded to a Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller. This progress leads to a system which is more stable and robust with less noise. This new controller is generic and can be adapted to the 6-inch MSBS. Finally, future work on these two systems is proposed.

  18. Physiologic effects of seatback angles 45degrees (from the vertical) relative to G.

    PubMed

    Burton, R R; Iampietro, P F; Leverett, S D

    1975-07-01

    Eight experimental subjects from the USAF Sschool of Aerospace Medicine (SAM) and four YF-16/17 test pilots were exposed to a simulated aerial combat maneuver (SACM) which included a maximum G exposure of 6 s at 8 G. The following physiologic parameters were examined relative to seatback angles of 23degrees, 28degrees, and 40degrees; heart rate and rhythm; arterial oxygen saturation; performance; intrathoracic (esophageal) pressure; arterial pressure; and subject comfort, effort, and fatigue. Relaxed and straining high sustained G (HSG) tolerances (6 G for 60 s) were also determined using only SAM subjects. The advantages of the 40 degree setback angle during the SACM included increased subject comfort, less fatigue and effort, greater pilot acceptance and a statisically significant reduction in the increased mean heart rate associated with G exposure. On the other hand, a statistically significant reduction in arterial oxygen saturation was obtained during the SACM at 40 degrees compared with the 23 degree back angle. An increase in relaxed G tolerance was found with the 40degree seatback angle--statistically significant only compared with the 28 degree seatback angle. PMID:1156299

  19. A Dual Degree Model for Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargagliotti, L. Antoinette; West-Sands, Leslie; Burchum, Jacqueline; Selbe, James

    2002-01-01

    A model that allows dual enrollment in associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs strengthens associate degree course work with general education and nursing foundation courses. The program results in a baccalaureate nursing degree. (JOW)

  20. Six Degree-of-Freedom Positioner for Optical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Robert; Roberts, Scott C.; Anthony, Andre

    2003-03-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom (6DOF) positioner was developed to position the four off-axis conic mirrors in Altair (Gemini** North's facility adaptive optics system). This positioner takes a unique approach to 6DOF positioning by combining two 3DOF parallel mechanisms in series to create a hybrid mechanism. The mechanism design provides a number of benefits including small size, simple adjustment, position locking, relatively simple kinematics and repeatable removal and replacement of optical components. The 6DOF positioner is capable of positioning optics at the micron level in translation and at the arcsecond level in rotation. It also maintains the position of the optics to a few microns with changing gravity vector. The position of an attached optical component can be adjusted using a computer program to provide precision adjustment about an arbitrary coordinate system. However, the arrangement of the adjustments are such that any desired motion can be made with a single actuator or with a sensible combination of actuators. This is unlike other 6DOF positioning solutions like a Stewart Platform in which all 6DOF are completely coupled making it impossible to move the platform in any desired direction without moving all six actuators. This paper will present the design of the positioner, a kinematic analysis of the mechanism and a discussion about the effectiveness of the positioner in the optical alignment of Altair.

  1. Geologic map of the Dillon 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Idaho and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, E.T.; Lopez, D.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The digital ARC/INFO databases included in this website provide a GIS database for the geologic map of the Dillon 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle of southwest Montana and east-central Idaho. The geologic map was originally published as U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1803-H. This website directory contains ARC/INFO format files that can be used to query or display the geology of USGS Map I-1803-H with GIS software.

  2. Converting between [Degrees]C and [Degrees]F: A Teachable Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Converting between degrees Celsius and degrees Fahrenheit isn't difficult. Remembering when to multiply by 5/9 or 9/5 and whether you have to add 32 or subtract 32 makes it fairly easy. Sometimes, though, fairly easy isn't easy enough. Students have trouble remembering the order of operations: "Do I add or subtract 32, and is that before or after…

  3. Spirit 360-Degree View on Sol 409

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 409th martian day, or sol (Feb. 26, 2005). Spirit had driven 2 meters (7 feet) on this sol to get in position on 'Cumberland Ridge' for looking into 'Tennessee Valley' to the east. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 108. Rover-wheel tracks from climbing the ridge are visible on the right. The summit of 'Husband Hill' is at the center, to the south. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  4. Two degree of freedom camera mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A two degree of freedom camera mount. The camera mount includes a socket, a ball, a first linkage and a second linkage. The socket includes an interior surface and an opening. The ball is positioned within an interior of the socket. The ball includes a coupling point for rotating the ball relative to the socket and an aperture for mounting a camera. The first and second linkages are rotatably connected to the socket and slidably connected to the coupling point of the ball. Rotation of the linkages with respect to the socket causes the ball to rotate with respect to the socket.

  5. Degree of correlation inside a financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario Nunzio

    1997-05-01

    I present an empirical study of the correlations observed between pairs of time series of stock prices in the New York Stock Exchange. I verify that various degrees of correlations or anti-correlations are present inside a financial market and I study the time evolution of these correlations. I briefly discuss how these empirical observations might be consistent with the well accepted hypothesis of absence of arbitrage in an efficient financial market (i.e. that there is no way of extracting money from the market in a continuous way without risk).

  6. Time-dependent degree-degree correlations in epileptic brain networks: from assortative to dissortative mixing

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Christian; Lehnertz, Klaus; Bialonski, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of degree-degree correlations (assortativity) in functional brain networks from epilepsy patients. Functional networks are derived from continuous multi-day, multi-channel electroencephalographic data, which capture a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological activities. In contrast to previous studies which all reported functional brain networks to be assortative on average, even in case of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, we observe large fluctuations in time-resolved degree-degree correlations ranging from assortative to dissortative mixing. Moreover, in some patients these fluctuations exhibit some periodic temporal structure which can be attributed, to a large extent, to daily rhythms. Relevant aspects of the epileptic process, particularly possible pre-seizure alterations, contribute marginally to the observed long-term fluctuations. Our findings suggest that physiological and pathophysiological activity may modify functional brain networks in a different and process-specific way. We evaluate factors that possibly influence the long-term evolution of degree-degree correlations. PMID:26347641

  7. Epidemic Spreading on Preferred Degree Adaptive Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jolad, Shivakumar; Liu, Wenjia; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the standard SIS model of epidemic spreading on networks where individuals have a fluctuating number of connections around a preferred degree . Using very simple rules for forming such preferred degree networks, we find some unusual statistical properties not found in familiar Erdös-Rényi or scale free networks. By letting depend on the fraction of infected individuals, we model the behavioral changes in response to how the extent of the epidemic is perceived. In our models, the behavioral adaptations can be either ‘blind’ or ‘selective’ – depending on whether a node adapts by cutting or adding links to randomly chosen partners or selectively, based on the state of the partner. For a frozen preferred network, we find that the infection threshold follows the heterogeneous mean field result and the phase diagram matches the predictions of the annealed adjacency matrix (AAM) approach. With ‘blind’ adaptations, although the epidemic threshold remains unchanged, the infection level is substantially affected, depending on the details of the adaptation. The ‘selective’ adaptive SIS models are most interesting. Both the threshold and the level of infection changes, controlled not only by how the adaptations are implemented but also how often the nodes cut/add links (compared to the time scales of the epidemic spreading). A simple mean field theory is presented for the selective adaptations which capture the qualitative and some of the quantitative features of the infection phase diagram. PMID:23189133

  8. A 17 degree of freedom anthropomorphic manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vold, Havard I.; Karlen, James P.; Thompson, Jack M., Jr.; Farrell, James D.; Eismann, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    A 17 axis anthropomorphic manipulator, providing coordinated control of two seven degree of freedom arms mounted on a three degree of freedom torso-waist assembly, is presented. This massively redundant telerobot, designated the Robotics Research K/B-2017 Dexterous Manipulator, employs a modular mechanism design with joint-mounted actuators based on brushless motors and harmonic drive gear reducers. Direct joint torque control at the servo level causes these high-output joint drives to behave like direct-drive actuators, facilitating the implementation of an effective impedance control scheme. The redundant, but conservative motion control system models the manipulator as a spring-loaded linkage with viscous damping and rotary inertia at each joint. This approach allows for real time, sensor-driven control of manipulator pose using a hierarchy of competing rules, or objective functions, to avoid unplanned collisions with objects in the workplace, to produce energy-efficient, graceful motion, to increase leverage, to control effective impedance at the tool or to favor overloaded joints.

  9. Sampling networks with prescribed degree correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Genio, Charo; Bassler, Kevin; Erdos, Péter; Miklos, István; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    A feature of a network known to affect its structural and dynamical properties is the presence of correlations amongst the node degrees. Degree correlations are a measure of how much the connectivity of a node influences the connectivity of its neighbours, and they are fundamental in the study of processes such as the spreading of information or epidemics, the cascading failures of damaged systems and the evolution of social relations. We introduce a method, based on novel mathematical results, that allows the exact sampling of networks where the number of connections between nodes of any given connectivity is specified. Our algorithm provides a weight associated to each sample, thereby allowing network observables to be measured according to any desired distribution, and it is guaranteed to always terminate successfully in polynomial time. Thus, our new approach provides a preferred tool for scientists to model complex systems of current relevance, and enables researchers to precisely study correlated networks with broad societal importance. CIDG acknowledges support by the European Commission's FP7 through grant No. 288021. KEB acknowledges support from the NSF through grant DMR?1206839. KEB, PE, IM and ZT acknowledge support from AFSOR and DARPA through grant FA?9550-12-1-0405.

  10. Ionization degree for strong evaporation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gusarov, Andrey V.; Aoki, Kazuo

    2005-08-15

    Kinetic equations for ions and neutrals are numerically solved in the plasma sheath formed at a condensed phase when strong evaporation is taking place. The Boltzmann distribution is assumed for electrons. A weakly ionized vapor with the Debye length much shorter than the mean free path is considered. This is typical for laser evaporation of metals. Under these conditions, the sheath consists of a Knudsen layer and a thin charge separation layer between the Knudsen layer and the condensed phase. The self-consistent electrostatic field in the Knudsen layer is obtained from the quasineutrality condition. The potential barrier in the charge separation layer is determined by the charge balance. Kinetic boundary conditions for neutrals and charges are estimated by the detailed balance principle from the parameters of the saturated vapor. The transport of charges in the sheath is controlled by ions and depends on ion-neutral collisions and the self-consistent electrostatic field. Ionization degree in the vapor formed by strong evaporation increases with the Mach number and can attain values about 30% higher than the ionization degree in the saturated vapor. Two factors contribute to this increase. The first is the drop of the potential barrier in the charge separation layer and the second is the strengthening of the field in the Knudsen layer. The ionization equilibrium may be disturbed by a considerable excess of charges.

  11. High degree-of-freedom dynamic manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael P.; Stephens, Benjamin; Abe, Yeuhi; Rizzi, Alfred A.

    2012-06-01

    The creation of high degree of freedom dynamic mobile manipulation techniques and behaviors will allow robots to accomplish difficult tasks in the field. We are investigating the use of the body and legs of legged robots to improve the strength, velocity, and workspace of an integrated manipulator to accomplish dynamic manipulation. This is an especially challenging task, as all of the degrees of freedom are active at all times, the dynamic forces generated are high, and the legged system must maintain robust balance throughout the duration of the tasks. To accomplish this goal, we are utilizing trajectory optimization techniques to generate feasible open-loop behaviors for our 28 dof quadruped robot (BigDog) by planning the trajectories in a 13 dimensional space. Covariance Matrix Adaptation techniques are utilized to optimize for several criteria such as payload capability and task completion speed while also obeying constraints such as torque and velocity limits, kinematic limits, and center of pressure location. These open-loop behaviors are then used to generate feed-forward terms, which are subsequently used online to improve tracking and maintain low controller gains. Some initial results on one of our existing balancing quadruped robots with an additional human-arm-like manipulator are demonstrated on robot hardware, including dynamic lifting and throwing of heavy objects 16.5kg cinder blocks, using motions that resemble a human athlete more than typical robotic motions. Increased payload capacity is accomplished through coordinated body motion.

  12. Degree of satisfaction among hearing aid users

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Rocha, Andressa Vital; Honório, Heitor Marques

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Hearing loss (HL) is defined as the complete or partial loss of hearing ability. Aims: To characterize (1) the degree of satisfaction among adult and elderly hearing aid (HA) users who were treated by a public hearing health service and (2) the relationship between satisfaction and the variables of gender, age, degree of HL, and type of HA. Method: The clinical and experimental study included the administration of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire to 110 patients who had used HAs for more than 3 months and were 18 years of age or older. Results: Test patients were sex-balanced (48% were women) and had a mean age of 67 years. A relatively high incidence of sensorineural moderate HL was detected in the study patients (66%) and device B was the most commonly used HA type (48%). No significant differences were evident between HA satisfaction and sex. The importance placed on services/costs and personal image varied between age groups. Correlation was evident at all levels between user satisfaction and amplification. Decreased satisfaction was observed in individuals with severe and/or profound HL. The type of HA used yielded statistically significant differences in the positive effects referring. Conclusion: No correlations were evident between the different factors proposed. HA users exhibited high levels of satisfaction in all SADL areas. PMID:25991994

  13. Effects of antiorthostatic bedrest on the cardiorespiratory responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bisson, R.; Bates, R.; Goldwater, D.; Sandler, H.

    1981-01-01

    The cardiorespiratory changes in exercise performance induced by horizontal and antiorthostatic bed rest are compared in order to determine the physiological changes occurring in the antiorthostatic position and their degree of similarity to those observed in weightlessness. Systolic and diastolic pressures, heart rates, maximum oxygen uptake, ventilation volume during and following 5 min of submaximal exercise in the supine position and body weight and composition were determined in subjects before and following 7 days of bed rest in the horizontal or 6-deg head-down positions. Bed rest is found to result in a general decrease in exercise tolerance as indicated by cardiorespiratory parameters in both groups, with the 6-deg head-down treatment causing greater cardiovascular deconditioning. When compared with space flight data, the antiorthostatic position is shown to simulate the effects of weightlessness more effectively than horizontal bed rest

  14. ACCURATE CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-DEGREE MODES USING MDI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Korzennik, S. G.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Schou, J.; Larson, T. P.

    2013-08-01

    We present the first accurate characterization of high-degree modes, derived using the best Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) full-disk full-resolution data set available. A 90 day long time series of full-disk 2 arcsec pixel{sup -1} resolution Dopplergrams was acquired in 2001, thanks to the high rate telemetry provided by the Deep Space Network. These Dopplergrams were spatially decomposed using our best estimate of the image scale and the known components of MDI's image distortion. A multi-taper power spectrum estimator was used to generate power spectra for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, up to l = 1000. We used a large number of tapers to reduce the realization noise, since at high degrees the individual modes blend into ridges and thus there is no reason to preserve a high spectral resolution. These power spectra were fitted for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, between l = 100 and l = 1000, and for all the orders with substantial amplitude. This fitting generated in excess of 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} individual estimates of ridge frequencies, line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries (singlets), corresponding to some 5700 multiplets (l, n). Fitting at high degrees generates ridge characteristics, characteristics that do not correspond to the underlying mode characteristics. We used a sophisticated forward modeling to recover the best possible estimate of the underlying mode characteristics (mode frequencies, as well as line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries). We describe in detail this modeling and its validation. The modeling has been extensively reviewed and refined, by including an iterative process to improve its input parameters to better match the observations. Also, the contribution of the leakage matrix on the accuracy of the procedure has been carefully assessed. We present the derived set of corrected mode characteristics, which includes not only frequencies, but line widths, asymmetries, and amplitudes. We present and discuss

  15. Do angles of obliquity apply to 30 degrees scattered radiation from megavoltage beams?

    PubMed

    Biggs, Peter J; Styczynski, John R

    2008-10-01

    The angle of obliquity is used in radiation shielding calculations to account for the longer path length x rays will see when obliquely incident on the protective barrier. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), use of the angle of obliquity is explicitly assumed for primary radiation, so that an angle of obliquity for secondary radiation is never addressed. However, in the example section of the latest report, it specifically recommends against using an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation. To check this assumption, the existence or not of an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation has been investigated for bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for barriers consisting of concrete, lead, and steel using a Monte Carlo approach. The MCNP Monte Carlo code, v4.2C, has been used to generate scattered radiation at 30 degrees from a water phantom and incident on a secondary barrier at the same angle relative to the normal to the barrier. The barrier thickness was increased from zero to a thickness sufficient to reduce the fluence (f4 tally) to <10(-3). A transmission curve was created for each energy-barrier material combination by normalizing to zero thickness. The results for the first tenth-value layer (TVL) in concrete (5 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 21.7 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 29.7 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees . The results for the first TVL in lead (3 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 27.7 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 20.5 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees . There are no data in the NCRP reports for 30 degrees scattered radiation attenuated by steel with which to make a comparison. PMID:18784515

  16. Happiness, Psychology, and Degrees of Realism

    PubMed Central

    Lavazza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The recent emphasis on a realist ontology that cannot be overshadowed by subjectivist or relativist perspectives seems to have a number of consequences for psychology as well. My attempt here is to analyse the relationship between happiness as a state of the individual and the states of the external world and the brain events related to (or, in some hypotheses, causally responsible for) its occurrence. It can be maintained that different degrees of realism are suitable to describe the states of happiness and this fact might have relevant psychological implications, namely for the so-called positive psychology. This is especially true now that there are methods available to induce subjective states of happiness unrelated to the external conditions usually taken to be linked to such states. PMID:27536261

  17. Northeast View in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This view to the Northeast was imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A deflated airbag is at the bottom of the image.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  18. 'Big Crater' in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The crater dubbed 'Big Crater', approximately 2200 meters (7200 feet)away was imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  19. Forward ramp within 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This portion of the 360-degree gallery panorama shows Pathfinder's forward ramp at center. The metallic object at lower left is a portion of the low-gain antenna. The rocks Wedge, Shark, Flat Top, and Half-Dome are at right. The image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) over sols 8,9 and 10, using the red, green and blue filters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  20. Twin Peaks in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' approximately 1-2 kilometers away were imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A lander petal and deflated airbag are at the bottom of the image.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.