Science.gov

Sample records for 6-12 mum wavelength

  1. Continuously tunable fibre attenuator operating in the wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Ol'ga I; Mishakov, Gennadii V; Sokolov, Viktor I; Varlamova, Nina V; Zapadinskii, Boris I

    2004-09-30

    A fibre attenuator is fabricated for the telecommunication wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m in which a single-mode silica fibre with side polishing is used. The fibre surface is covered by a layer of fluorine-containing polymer with a large thermooptic coefficient. The principle of attenuator operation is based on a change in the conditions of total internal reflection for a guided mode in the polished region due to thermally induced variation in the refractive index of the fluoropolymer layer. The attenuator is insensitive to light polarisation, it has a continuously variable attenuation coefficient in the range 0.2-27 dB, and can be easily incorporated into fibreoptic links. (fibre optics)

  2. Broadband carbon monoxide laser system operating in the wavelength range of 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Ionin, Andrei A; Kinyaevsky, I O; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Lanskii, G V; Shaiduko, A V

    2013-02-28

    A two-cascade frequency conversion of CO-laser radiation is demonstrated in a single sample of a nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal. The crystal is pumped by a repetitively pulsed cryogenic lowpressure CO laser operating on {approx}150 vibration - rotational transitions in the wavelength range 5.0 - 7.5 {mu}m, which corresponds to the frequency range of a half octave. In the first conversion cascade, generation of second harmonic and sum frequencies of various pairs of CO-laser radiation give {approx}350 emission lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 3.7 {mu}m. In the second cascade, by mixing the radiation converted in the first cascade with the residual radiation of the CO laser we have obtained {approx}90 lines in the range 4.3 - 5.0 {mu}m and more than 80 lines in the range 7.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. Thus, using a single sample of the nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal pumped by the radiation of a single CO laser we have produced a source of broadband (more than one and a half octaves) laser radiation, simultaneously operating at {approx}670 lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. (lasers)

  3. Polarisation and wavelength division multiplexing at 1.55 mum for bandwidth enhancement of multimode fibre based access networks.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Etienne; Walker, Stuart; Parker, Michael

    2004-05-17

    We demonstrate how a combination of polarisation-division multiplexing (PDM) and wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) applied to graded index 50 mum multimode fibres (MMF) at 1.55 mum can be used to greatly increase the available optical bandwidth. A proof of principle experiment demonstrated error-free data transmission over 3km of MMF, using two 100GHz-spaced wavelengths, each carrying two 2.5Gb/s orthogonal PDM multiplexed channels, resulting in a 10Gb/s data rate. Polarisation and wavelength demultiplexing were simultaneously achieved by use of a grating based monochromator. We also practically implemented this transmission scheme in an all-fibre experiment, replacing the monochromator by a more convenient polarisation-insensitive, 200GHz ITU grid spacing 62.5 mum MMF pigtailed WDM demultiplexer. Using two polarizations each on four wavelengths (2P x 4lambda), we repeatedly achieved error-free data transmission for both circularly and linearly polarisation-wavelength-division-multiplexed channels over a MMF span of 300m, featuring a 20Gb/s data rate. Overall, we have demonstrated a major increase in the MMF bandwidth-distance product up to 30GHz-km.

  4. Radiation resistance of nonlinear crystals at a wavelength of 9.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Voevodin, V G; Badikov, Valerii V; Geiko, L G; Geiko, P P; Ivashchenko, M V; Karapuzikov, A I; Sherstov, I V

    2001-12-31

    The results of radiation resistance measurements for twelve nonlinear crystals are presented. The crystals include the well-known nonlinear CdGeAs{sub 2}, ZnGeP{sub 2}, AgGaSe{sub 2}, GaSe, AgGaS{sub 2}, and Ag{sub 3}AsS{sub 3} crystals operating in the middle IR range, new mixed AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd{sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals, two-phase (orange and yellow) HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal, and the doped GaSe:In crystal. The mixed crystals and the two-phase HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal are transparent in the range from 0.4 - 0.5 to 11.5 - 14.5 {mu}m. The measurements were performed using a pulsed single-mode highly stability TEA CO{sub 2} laser with an output pulse duration of {approx}30 ns. The damage thresholds of new nonlinear AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd {sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals and of the HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal (the orange and yellow phases) were found to be 1.5 - 2.2 times higher than for the crystals operating in the middle IR range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. New CO{sub 2} laser lines in the 11-{mu}m wavelength region: New hot bands

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.C.; Evenson, K.M.; Zink, K.R.; Maki, A.G.; Shy, J.T.

    1995-02-01

    Nineteen new laser lines in the 11-{mu}m wavelength region have been observed in cw oscillation from a CO{sub 2} laser with a high-Q. high-resolution cavity at a higher than usual current density. The frequency of each line has been measured using heterodyne frequency measurement techniques. Analysis of the frequencies shown that 15 lines are rotation-vibration transitions of the 01{sup 1}2-[11{sup 1}1.03{sup 1}1]{sub I} band (the first sequence hot band) of the CO{sub 2} molecule and four lines belong to the rotation-vibration transitions of the 02{sup 2}1-[12{sup 2}0.04{sup 2}0]{sub I} band of CO{sub 2}.

  6. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2009-12-15

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength {approx}22 {mu}m) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  7. Peltier-Cooled and Actively Quenched Operation of InGaAs/InP Avalanche Photodiodes as Photon Counters at a 1.55-mum Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, I

    2001-11-20

    The performance of commercially available InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes as single-photon detectors at a 1.55-mum wavelength has been investigated. A new active quenching and gating circuit, tailored for operation of these diodes at temperatures in the range from room temperature to -60 degrees C and achievable by means of thermoelectrical cooling, has been developed. Careful tuning of the diodes' operating conditions resulted in a significant reduction of afterpulsing effects; it permitted operation of the detectors with high repetition rates. A noise-equivalent power of 7 x 10(-16) W/Hz(1/2) was obtained at a 1.55-mum wavelength.

  8. Photorefractive effect in iron-doped lithium niobate crystals induced by femtosecond pulses of 1.5 {mu}m wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, O.; Breunig, I.; Kalkum, F.; Buse, K.

    2006-01-30

    Illumination of iron-doped lithium crystals (LiNbO{sub 3}:Fe) with femtosecond pulses of 1.5 {mu}m wavelength results in large refractive index changes {delta}n in the order of 10{sup -3}. The sign of the refractive index changes depends on the polarization of the recording light. The results can be very useful for fabrication of tailored holographic components for telecommunication.

  9. Extended wavelength emission to 1.3 {mu}m in nitrided InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, T.; Mori, T.; Seki, H.; Matsushita, M.; Kikuno, M.; Wada, O.; Ebe, H.; Sugawara, M.; Arakawa, Y.; Nakata, Y.

    2005-01-15

    We have studied long-wavelength emission in 1.3-{mu}m optical communication range from nitrided InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). Atomic-layer nitridation just after the growth of InAs QDs realizes a remarkable redshift of the photoluminescence peak by more than 150 nm. Growth temperature plays a key role in achieving room-temperature emission from the QDs. The emission wavelength can be adjusted by controlling the growth conditions of the initial InAs QDs. As compared with conventional QDs grown without nitridizing the QD surface, it is found that the nitridation results in larger dots with a large aspect ratio.

  10. Mapping of cerebro-vascular blood perfusion in mice with skin and skull intact by Optical Micro-AngioGraphy at 1.3 mum wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikang K; Hurst, Sawan

    2007-09-03

    Optical micro-angiography (OMAG) was developed to achieve volumetric imaging of the microstructures and dynamic cerebrovascular blood perfusion in mice with capillary level resolution and high signal-to-background ratio. In this paper, we present a high-speed and high-sensitivity OMAG imaging system by using an InGaAs line scan camera and broadband light source at 1.3 mum wavelength for enhanced imaging depth in tissue. We show that high quality imaging of cerebrovascular blood perfusion down to capillary level resolution with the intact skin and cranium are obtained in vivo with OMAG, without the interference from the blood perfusion in the overlaying skin. The results demonstrate the potential of 1.3 mum OMAG for high-speed and high-sensitivity imaging of blood perfusion in human and small animal studies.

  11. Four-frequency polarizing microscope for recording plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, B. L.; Mal'kova, S. V.; Osipov, M. V.; Puzyrev, V. N.; Saakyan, A. T.; Starodub, A. N.; Fedotov, S. I.; Fronya, A. A.; Shutyak, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The optical scheme and design of a four-frequency polarizing microscope intended for simultaneous recording of plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m with the spatial resolution 12 {mu}m in the entire spectral range are described. The effectiveness of such a microscope in studies of plasmas produced on interaction of laser radiation with a target is demonstrated. The plasma images are obtained at the frequencies {omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, 2{omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0}, where {omega}{sub 0} corresponds to the frequency of heating radiation. The transformation coefficient that characterizes the efficiency of conversion of heating radiation into the 2{omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0} harmonics generated in the plasma is determined.

  12. Longitudinally diode-pumped 1.06-{mu}m Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser without pump-wavelength stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Onishchenko, A M; Romanyuk, V A; Shestakov, A V

    2006-01-31

    The spectral and lasing characteristics of a Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal longitudinally diode-pumped without pump-wavelength stabilisation are studied. A variation in the output power did not exceed 30% when the pump wavelength was changed in the spectral region from 0.794 to 0.811 {mu}m. (lasers)

  13. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE DATA: PANCHROMATIC FAINT OBJECT COUNTS FOR 0.2-2 {mu}m WAVELENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matt; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Seibert, Mark; Ryan, Russell E. Jr; Yan Haojing; Baldry, Ivan K.; Driver, Simon P.; Hill, David T.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Frogel, Jay A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Straughn, Amber N.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Balick, Bruce

    2011-04-01

    We describe the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early Release Science (ERS) observations in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) South field. The new WFC3 ERS data provide calibrated, drizzled mosaics in the UV filters F225W, F275W, and F336W, as well as in the near-IR filters F098M (Y{sub s} ), F125W (J), and F160W (H) with 1-2 HST orbits per filter. Together with the existing HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-South mosaics in the BViz filters, these panchromatic 10-band ERS data cover 40-50 arcmin{sup 2} at 0.2-1.7 {mu}m in wavelength at 0.''07-0.''15 FWHM resolution and 0.''090 Multidrizzled pixels to depths of AB {approx_equal} 26.0-27.0 mag (5{sigma}) for point sources, and AB {approx_equal} 25.5-26.5 mag for compact galaxies. In this paper, we describe (1) the scientific rationale, and the data taking plus reduction procedures of the panchromatic 10-band ERS mosaics, (2) the procedure of generating object catalogs across the 10 different ERS filters, and the specific star-galaxy separation techniques used, and (3) the reliability and completeness of the object catalogs from the WFC3 ERS mosaics. The excellent 0.''07-0.''15 FWHM resolution of HST/WFC3 and ACS makes star-galaxy separation straightforward over a factor of 10 in wavelength to AB {approx_equal} 25-26 mag from the UV to the near-IR, respectively. Our main results are: (1) proper motion of faint ERS stars is detected over 6 years at 3.06 {+-} 0.66 mas year{sup -1} (4.6{sigma}), consistent with Galactic structure models; (2) both the Galactic star counts and the galaxy counts show mild but significant trends of decreasing count slopes from the mid-UV to the near-IR over a factor of 10 in wavelength; (3) combining the 10-band ERS counts with the panchromatic Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey counts at the bright end (10 mag {approx}< AB {approx}< 20 mag) and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field counts in the BVizY{sub s}JH filters at the faint end (24 mag {approx

  14. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Long wavelength (>1.55 {mu}m) room temperature emission and anomalous structural properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, A.; Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Noetzel, R.

    2013-02-18

    We demonstrate that molecular beam epitaxy-grown InAs quantum dots (QDs) on (100) GaAs obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals enable long wavelength emission in the InAs/GaAs material system. At room temperature they exhibit a broad photoluminescence band that extends well beyond 1.55 {mu}m. We correlate this finding with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. They reveal that the QDs are composed of pure InAs which is in agreement with their long-wavelength emission. Additionally, the measurements reveal that the QDs have an anomalously undulated top surface which is very different to that observed for Stranski-Krastanow grown QDs.

  16. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A COMPLETE IRAC 3.6 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXY SAMPLE: A FAIR CENSUS OF RED AND BLUE POPULATIONS AT REDSHIFTS 0.4-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Newman, J.; Shu, C.; Luo, Z.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Wang, T.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Barmby, P.; Coil, A.; Zheng, X. Z.

    2013-03-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 {mu}m selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass >10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun} and redshift 0.4 < z < 1.2. In this redshift range, the Infrared Array Camera 3.6 {mu}m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an artificial neural network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation {approx}0.025(1 + z), and the fraction of redshift failures (>3{sigma} errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame U - B colors, B- and K-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame U - B colors and 24-3.6 {mu}m flux density ratios and derive rest K-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star-forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by z Almost-Equal-To 1, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  17. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-01-10

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus

  18. POLARIMETRY OF DG TAU AT 350 mum

    SciTech Connect

    Krejny, M.; Matthews, T. G.; Novak, G.; Cho, J.; Li, H.; Shinnaga, H.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2009-11-01

    We present the first 350 mum polarization measurement for the disk of the T Tauri star (TTS) DG Tau. The data were obtained using the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measured normalized Stokes parameters q= -0.0086 +- 0.0060 and u = -0.0012 +- 0.0061, which gives a 2sigma upper limit for the percent polarization of 1.7%. We obtain information about the polarization spectrum by comparing our 350 mum measurement with an 850 mum polarization detection previously published for this source. Comparing the two measurements in Stokes space (not in percent polarization) shows that the two data points are not consistent, i.e., either the degree of polarization or the angle of polarization (or both) must change significantly as one moves from 850 mum to 350 mum. This conclusion concerning the polarization spectrum disagrees with the predictions of a recent model for TTS disk polarization. We show that this discrepancy can be explained by optical depth effects. Specifically, we demonstrate that if one were to add more mass to the model disk, one would expect to obtain a model polarization spectrum in which the polarization degree falls sharply with increasing frequency, consistent with the observations at the two wavelengths. We suggest that multiwavelength polarimetry of TTS disk emission may provide a promising method for probing the opacity of TTS disks.

  19. The effects of interdiffusion on the subbands in Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}N{sub 0.04}As{sub 0.96}/GaAs quantum well for 1.3 and 1.55 {mu}m operation wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Michael C. Y.; Surya, Charles; Wai, P. K. A.

    2001-07-01

    The interdiffusion of Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}N{sub 0.04}As{sub 0.96}/GaAs single quantum well (QW) structure with well width of 6 nm is studied theoretically. The as-grown Ga concentration in the QW is chosen to be 0.7 and 0.6 for the operation wavelengths of 1.3 and 1.55 {mu}m, respectively. We studied the effects of interdiffusion on the in-plane strain, confinement potential, and subband energy levels of the QW using Fick{close_quote}s law. The diffusion coefficients of both the well and barrier layers are assumed to be constant. The effects of valence band mixing and strains are included in the calculation of the electron and hole subband structures. We find that the group-III interdiffusion effects can result in blueshifts of 123 and 211 nm in the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}N{sub 0.04}As{sub 0.96}/GaAs QW at operation wavelength of 1.3 {mu}m (x=0.7) and 1.55 {mu}m (x=0.6), respectively. Our results show that interdiffusion technique can be used to tune the operating wavelengths of GaInAsN/GaAs lasers for multiwavelength applications such as in the sources of dense wavelength division multiplexed optical communication systems. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. SURVEY OF NEARBY FGK STARS AT 160 mum WITH SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Bryden, Geoff; Lisse, Carey

    2009-10-10

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has advanced debris disk science tremendously with a wealth of information on debris disks around nearby A, F, G, K, and M stars at 24 and 70 mum with the MIPS photometer and at 8-34 mum with IRS. Here we present 160 mum observations of a small subset of these stars. At this wavelength, the stellar photospheric emission is negligible and any detected emission corresponds to cold dust in extended Kuiper Belt analogs. However, the Spitzer 160 mum observations are limited in sensitivity by the large beam size which results in significant 'noise' due to cirrus and extragalactic confusion. In addition, the 160 mum measurements suffer from the added complication of a light leak next to the star's position whose flux is proportional to the near-infrared flux of the star. We are able to remove the contamination from the leak and report 160 mum measurements or upper limits for 24 stars. Three stars (HD 10647, HD 207129, and HD 115617) have excesses at 160 mum that we use to constrain the properties of the debris disks around them. A more detailed model of the spectral energy distribution of HD 10647 reveals that the 70 and 160 mum emission could be due to small water ice particles at a distance of 100 AU, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of circumstellar material in the system.

  1. Ultra-wideband design of waveguide magneto-optical isolator operating in 1.31mum and 1.55mum band.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2007-01-22

    The design of an ultra-wideband waveguide magneto-optical isolator is described. The isolator is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing nonreciprocal phase shift. The ultra-wideband design is realized by adjusting the wavelength dependence of reciprocal phase difference to compensate for that of nonreciprocal phase difference in the backward direction. We obtained the ultra-wideband design that provides isolation > 35dB from 1.25mum to >1.65mum. This is the proposal of magneto-optical isolator that operates both in 1.31mum band and 1.55mum band.

  2. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 4-5).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  3. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 2-3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    The Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  4. Hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system for generating few-cycle 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}m pulses optically synchronised with high-power pulses near 1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A V; Anashkina, E A; Murav'ev, S V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    This paper presents the concept of fibre laser system design for generating optically synchronised femtosecond pulses at two, greatly differing wavelengths and reports experimental and numerical simulation studies of nonlinear conversion of femtosecond pulses at 1.5 {mu}m wavelength in a dispersion-shifted fibre, with the generation of synchronised pulses in the ranges 1.6 - 2 and 1 - 1.1 {mu}m. We describe a three-stage high-power fibre amplifier of femtosecond pulses at 1 {mu}m and a hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system that has enabled the generation of 12 fs pulses with a centre wavelength of 1.7 {mu}m, synchronised with high-power (microjoule level) 250 fs pulses at 1.03 {mu}m. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  5. Infrared (10.6-mum) scattering and extinction in laboratory water and ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K

    1981-01-15

    Measurements of the angular scattering and extinction of IR (10.6-mum) laser radiation in laboratory water and ice clouds are reported and compared to theoretical predictions for spheres and visible (0.633-mum) light scattering data. Randomly oriented cloud particles with dimensions ranging from several times smaller to larger than the incident wavelength generated phase functions span the Rayleigh and Mie scattering domains and illustrate the effects caused by strong internal energy absorption. Dual-wavelength extinction measurements reveal information on the growth and dissipation of laboratory water clouds and the effects of cloud seeding. The remote sensing significance of the findings is discussed.

  6. Continuously tunable, 6{endash}14 {mu}m silver-gallium selenide optical parametric oscillator pumped at 1.57 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Catella, G.; Utano, R.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    An angle tuned silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe{sub 2}) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by the fixed wavelength 1.57 {mu}m output of a noncritically phase-matched KTiOPO{sub 4} OPO, yielded radiation continuously tunable from 6 to 14 {mu}m. Energies of up to 1.2 mJ/pulse with bandwidths of {approximately}5cm{sup {minus}1} (full width at half-maximum) were obtained using a 6.5{times}6.5{times}35.3mm long, type I AgGaSe{sub 2} crystal. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. THE 15-20 {mu}m EMISSION IN THE REFLECTION NEBULA NGC 2023

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Els; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Wolfire, Mark G. E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: mwolfire@astro.umd.edu

    2012-03-01

    We present 15-20 {mu}m spectral maps toward the reflection nebula NGC 2023 obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph in short-wavelength, high-resolution mode on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These spectra reveal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), C{sub 60}, and H{sub 2} superposed on a dust continuum. These emission components exhibit distinct spatial distributions: with increasing distance from the illuminating star, we observe the PAH emission followed by the dust continuum emission and the H{sub 2} emission. The C{sub 60} emission is located closest to the illuminating star in the south, while in the north it seems to be associated with the H/H{sub 2} transition. Emission from PAHs and PAH-related species produces features at 15.8, 16.4, 17.4, and 17.8 {mu}m and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau. These different PAH features show distinct spatial distributions. The 15.8 {mu}m band and 15-18 {mu}m plateau correlate with the 11.2 {mu}m PAH band and with each other, and are attributed to large, neutral PAHs. Conversely, the 16.4 {mu}m feature correlates with the 12.7 {mu}m PAH band, suggesting that both arise from species that are favored by the same conditions that favor PAH cations. The PAH contribution to the 17.4 {mu}m band is displaced toward the illuminating star with respect to the 11.2 and 12.7 {mu}m emission and is assigned to doubly ionized PAHs and/or a subset of cationic PAHs. The spatial distribution of the 17.8 {mu}m band suggests that it arises from both neutral and cationic PAHs. In contrast to their intensities, the profiles of the PAH bands and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau do not vary spatially. Consequently, we conclude that the carrier of the 15-18 {mu}m plateau is distinct from that of the PAH bands.

  8. A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  9. SPITZER MIPS 24 and 70 {mu}m IMAGING NEAR THE SOUTH ECLIPTIC POLE: MAPS AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Kimberly S.; Stabenau, Hans F.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Valiante, Elisabetta; Borys, Colin; Viero, Marco P.

    2010-12-15

    We have imaged an 11.5 deg{sup 2} region of sky toward the South Ecliptic Pole (R.A. =04{sup h}43{sup m}, decl. =-53{sup 0}40', J2000) at 24 and 70 {mu}m with MIPS, the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. This region is coincident with a field mapped at longer wavelengths by AKARI and BLAST. We discuss our data reduction and source extraction procedures. The median 1{sigma} depths of the maps are 47 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 24 {mu}m and 4.3 mJy beam{sup -1} at 70 {mu}m. At 24 {mu}m, we identify 93,098 point sources with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}5 and an additional 63 resolved galaxies; at 70 {mu}m we identify 891 point sources with S/N {>=}6. From simulations, we determine a false detection rate of 1.8% (1.1%) for the 24 {mu}m (70 {mu}m) catalog. The 24 and 70 {mu}m point-source catalogs are 80% complete at 230 {mu}Jy and 11 mJy, respectively. These mosaic images and source catalogs will be available to the public through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive.

  10. Comparison of laser-induced breakdown spectra of organic compounds with irradiation at 1.5 and 1.064 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Diane M.; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 1.500 {mu}m of residues of six organic compounds (anthracene, caffeine, glucose, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) on aluminum substrates is presented and compared with LIBS at the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m. The overall emission intensities were found to be smaller at 1.500 {mu}m than at 1.064 {mu}m, and the ratios of C2 and CN molecular emissions to the H atomic emissions were observed to be less. Possible reasons for the observed differences in LIBS at 1.064 {mu}m versus 1.500 {mu}m are discussed.

  11. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  12. A WISE Measurement of the 2:4 mum Galaxy Luminosity Function and its Implications for the Extragalactic Background Light at 3:4 mum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Sean Earl

    2017-05-01

    The measurement of the the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) has seen some controversy in recent works, with direct and indirect measures conflicting. Specifi- cally, upper limits based on analyzing the plausible opacity obscuring TeV spectra of blazars suggests that the density of radiation with wavelengths near 3.4 mum is onethirdtoonehalfasintenseasdirectmeasuresofthesame(forexample: Aharonian et al., 2006; Levenson et al., 2007; Matsumoto et al., 2005). The dominant contributor of the EBL at 3.4mum is expected to be ordinary starlight from relatively local, z < 1, galaxies, so an estimate of the amount of light emitted by galaxies based on the galaxy Luminosity Function (LF) should provide a useful lower limit to the EBL. While analyses of this sort have been done by others (Dominguez et al., 2011; Helgason et al., 2012), the full sky coverage of the AllWISE database has made it possible for us to improve the measurement of both the LF at 2.4 mum and the EBL using the large public spectroscopic redshift surveys. In order to do so, we had to develop a mathematical model for the measurement of a generalization of the LF, which is the density of galaxies per unit comoving volume per unit luminosity, to the Spectro-Luminosity Functional (SLF), which replaces the density per unit single luminosity, dL, with the density per luminosi- ii ties at all frequencies, DL nu. Our best combined analysis of the data yields present day Shechter Function LF parameters of: L⋆ = 6.4+/-[0.1 stat, 0.3sys]x1010 L2.4mum [solar mass](M⋆ = -21.67+/-[0.02 stat, 0.05sys] AB mag), φ⋆ = 5.8+/-[0.3stat, 0.3sys]x10 -3 Mpc-3, and alpha = -1.050 +/- [0.004stat, 0.03sys]; this implies a present day density of galaxies of 0.08 Mpc-3 brighter that 106 L2.4mum [solar mass] (10-3 Mpc-3 brighter than L⋆) and a luminosity density equivalent to 3.8 x 108 L2.4mum [solar mass] Mpc-3. The net EBL at 3.4mum that our synthesis model produces from galaxies closer than z = 5 is Inu = 9.0 +/- 0.5 k

  13. Thulium:ZBLAN blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Tohmon, G; Sato, H; Ohya, J; Uno, T

    1997-05-20

    We demonstrate and analyze an upconversion blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths. Lasing at 0.48 mum with very low pump threshold power is obtained from a Tm-doped fluorozirconate fiber that is counterpropagating pumped by 1.21- and 0.649-mum light. We employed a rate-equation analysis using parameters obtained by fitting to the experimental data to predict the 0.48-mum output characteristics as a function of fiber length and output reflectivity.

  14. Parallel Curriculum Units for Science, Grades 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppien, Jann H.; Purcell, Jeanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the best-selling book "The Parallel Curriculum", this professional development resource gives multifaceted examples of rigorous learning opportunities for science students in Grades 6-12. The four sample units revolve around genetics, the convergence of science and society, the integration of language arts and biology, and the periodic…

  15. Parallel Curriculum Units for Science, Grades 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppien, Jann H.; Purcell, Jeanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the best-selling book "The Parallel Curriculum", this professional development resource gives multifaceted examples of rigorous learning opportunities for science students in Grades 6-12. The four sample units revolve around genetics, the convergence of science and society, the integration of language arts and biology, and the periodic…

  16. A Stress Control Workbook for Youth Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of students' lives, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively are covered in this stress booklet. Intended for students in grades 6-12, the booklet is divided into 20 lessons on stress. Each lesson features various activities, role plays, exercises, and checklists…

  17. A Stress Control Workbook for Youth Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of students' lives, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively are covered in this stress booklet. Intended for students in grades 6-12, the booklet is divided into 20 lessons on stress. Each lesson features various activities, role plays, exercises, and checklists…

  18. Home Economics/Health Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA. Teaching and Learning Div.

    Home economics programs are offered to students in grades 6-12 in the Des Moines INdependent Community School District (Iowa). Programs at the middle school level are exploratory, leading to occupational training in family and consumer science, child care, food service, and textile and fashion arts at the high school level. Health education…

  19. Using a Checking Account. Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trey, Frances

    Instructions and exercises on the use of checking accounts are provided for students in grades 6-12. The following topics are included: (1) reasons for opening a checking account; (2) how to open a checking account; (3) how to fill out deposit slips; (4) the elements of a check and how to write a check correctly; (5) checking account rules; (6)…

  20. Career and Technology Education Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA. Teaching and Learning Div.

    Technology education programs are offered in 10 middle schools, 5 area high schools, 1 alternative high school, and at Central Campus in the Des Moines Independent Community School District. Programs in grades 6-12 consist of hands-on instruction using activities and projects as the medium for teaching modern technologies in the various trades.…

  1. Diode-pumped Tm : Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} laser ({lambda} = 1.98 {mu}m)

    SciTech Connect

    Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kalachev, Yu L; Kutovoi, S A; Mikhailov, Viktor A; Podreshetnikov, V V; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2011-05-31

    Lasing at a wavelength of 1.98 {mu}m is obtained for the first time in a diode-pumped ({lambda} = 792 {mu}m) active element made of a Tm{sup 3+}: Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal grown by the Czochralski method. The laser slope efficiency reached 18.7% at the output power up to 520 mW. (lasers)

  2. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry with microbolometer arrays at 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenrijt, Jean-Francois; Georges, Marc P.

    2010-09-20

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry are investigated at long infrared wavelengths. Using such wavelengths allows one to extend the measurement range and decrease the sensitivity of the techniques to external perturbations. We discuss the behavior of reflection by the object surfaces due to the long wavelength. We have developed different experimental configurations associating a CO2 laser emitting at 10.6{mu}m and microbolometer arrays. Phase-shifting in-plane and out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and lensless digital holographic interferometry are demonstrated on rotation measurements of a solid object.

  3. Aquaporins 6-12 in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Bek, Toke; Holm, Lars; la Cour, Morten; Nielsen, Søren; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Rojek, Aleksandra; Hamann, Steffen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2013-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are widely expressed and have diverse distribution patterns in the eye. AQPs 0-5 have been localized at the cellular level in human eyes. We investigated the presence of the more recently discovered AQPs 6-12 in the human eye. RT-PCR was performed on fresh tissue from two human eyes divided into the cornea, corneal limbus, ciliary body and iris, lens, choroid, optic nerve, retina and sclera. Each structure was examined to detect the mRNA of AQPs 6-12. Twenty-one human eyes were examined using immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence techniques to determine the topographical localization of AQPs 6-12. mRNA transcripts of AQP7, AQP9 and AQP11 were found in the ciliary body, corneo-limbal tissue, optic nerve, retina and sclera. AQP9 and AQP11 mRNA was also detected in the choroid. No mRNA of AQP6, AQP8, AQP10 or AQP12 was detected. Anti-AQP7 immunolabelling was detected in the corneal epithelium, corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork endothelium, ciliary epithelia, lens epithelium, the inner and outer limiting membrane of the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium and the capillary endothelium of all parts of the eye. AQP9 immunolabelling was detected in the nonpigmented ciliary epithelium and retinal ganglion cells. AQP11 immunolabelling was detected in the corneo-limbal epithelium, nonpigmented ciliary epithelium and inner limiting membrane of the retina. Selective expression of AQP7, AQP9 and AQP11 was found within various structures of the human eye. The detection of these aquaporins in the eye implies a role that may be related not only to water transport but also to the transport of glycerol, lactate and ammonia, with importance for metabolism, especially in the retina. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  4. Announcement: Sleep Awareness Week - March 6-12, 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-03-04

    Sleep Awareness Week, the National Sleep Foundation's annual campaign to educate the public about the importance of sleep in health and safety, will be observed March 6-12, 2016. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults aged 18-60 years sleep ≥7 hours each night to promote optimal health and well-being. However, 35% of U.S. adults report typically sleeping <7 hours Adults who do not get enough sleep on a regular basis are more likely to suffer from chronic conditions, such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and poor mental health.

  5. Comparing Wavelengths

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-12

    This side-by-side rendering of the Sun at the same time in two different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light helps to visualize the differing features visible in each wavelength (Dec. 10-11, 2015). Most prominently, we can see much finer strands of plasma looping above the surface in the 171 Angstrom wavelength (gold) than in the 304 Angstrom wavelength (red), which captures cooler plasma closer to the Sun's surface. SDO observes the Sun in 10 different wavelengths with each one capturing somewhat different features at various temperatures and elevations above the Sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20214

  6. Short wavelength interferometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, R.T.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1992-04-01

    There is a need for a real time, reliable density measurement compatible with the restricted access and radiation environment on ITER. Due to the large plasma path length, high density and field, refraction and Faraday rotation effects makes the use of contemporary long wavelength (>50{mu}m) interferometers impractical. In this paper we consider the design of a short wavelength vibration compensated interferometer which allows operation without a prohibitively large vibration isolated structure and permits the optics to be conveniently mounted directly in or on the tokamak. A density interferometer design for ITER incorporating a 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} interferometer with vibration compensation provided by a 3. 39 {mu}m HeNe laser is discussed. The proposed interferometer design requires only a small intrusion into the ITER tokamak without a large support structure, refraction and Faraday rotation problems are avoided, and it provides a density resolution of at least 0.5%. Results are presented from an interferometer installed on the DIII-D tokamak incorporating essential elements of the proposed ITER design including 10.6 and 3.39 {mu}m lasers, a retro-reflector mounted on the vacuum wall of the DIII-D tokamak and real-time density feedback control. In this paper we consider a short wavelength interferometer design that incorporates vibration compensation for use on ITER. Our primary concern is to develop a interferometer design that will produce a reliable real time density monitor. We use the ITER conceptual design activity report as the basis of the design.

  7. FREQUENT EXPRESSION OF MUM1/IRF4 IN BURKITT LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Klumb, Claudete E. N.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with endemic, sporadic and immunodeficiency-associated clinical variants composed of monomorphic medium-size B-cells with a high proliferation rate and a translocation involving the C-MYC locus. Classically the immunophenotype of Burkitt lymphoma has been considered to be of germinal center type. In most reports, all cases of BL are reported to be MUM1 negative. MUM1 expression is seen in plasma cells and in a small fraction of B cells located in the light zone of germinal centers corresponding to the final step of intra-germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, and in activated T-cells. Therefore, MUM1 expression may denote the final step of intra-GC B-cell differentiation at centrocyte stage, as well as the subsequent steps of B-cell maturation towards plasma cells. Unlike most normal GC B-cells, in which the expression of MUM1 and bcl-6 are mutually exclusive, the tumor cells in approximately 50% of MUM1 positive DLBCL show co-expression of bcl-6, suggesting that the expression of these proteins may be deregulated. In one of the few studies in the literature, 25 BL-cases, including 19 associated with HIV; two of these cases showed occasional MUM1+ cells, less than the 20% cut-off for positivity. We studied 222 cases of well-characterized Burkitt lymphoma with the classic phenotype and C-MYC translocation, and found 90 cases (40.5%) with MUM1 nuclear expression suggesting a late germinal center stage of differentiation. PMID:19144381

  8. [Oral hygiene customs in 6-12 year old schoolchildren].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, César Tadeo; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Robles-Bermeo, Norma Leticia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Veras-Hernández, Miriam; De la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio; Márquez-Rodríguez, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To characterize utilization of oral hygiene devices and customs in schoolchildren. MATERIAL AND METHODS. We performed a cross-sectional study in 1,404 schoolchildren (6- 12 year olds) from 14 public schools in Pachuca, Hidalgo, México, using a questionnaire for sociodemographic variables and 1) Tooth brushing frequency (<1/d vs. at least 1/d), 2) Use of toothpaste (not always vs. always), 3) Flossing (never, does not know vs. at least 1/week), 4) Use of mouthwash (never, does not know vs. at least 1/week). Analyses were performed with nonparametric tests. RESULTS. Mean age was 8.97 ± 1.99 years; 50.1% were male. Prevalence of utilization of oral hygiene devices and associated customs were 85.5% tooth brushing, 90.9% toothpaste, 19.4% flossing, and 28.2% mouthwash. Only 11.8% of participants reported utilization in all 4 categories. We observed differences (p < 0.05) across sexes only in the use of toothpaste, as women used it more often. Differences across age were observed (p < 0.05) for tooth brushing (younger children brushed more often) and flossing (older children flossed more often). CONCLUSIONS. Tooth brushing was the oral hygiene practice more often performed in this sample, with other frequencies being relatively low. There were differences by age and sex across some variables.

  9. DETECTION OF THE 3.3 {mu}m AROMATIC FEATURE IN THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N49 WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Onaka, Takashi

    2012-01-10

    We present an infrared (IR) study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud with the near-IR (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic observations performed by AKARI. The observations were performed as a coarse spectral mapping to cover most of the bright region in the east, which enables us to compare the distribution of various line emissions and to examine their correlation. We detect the 3.3 {mu}m aromatic feature in the remnant, which is the first time the presence of the 3.3 {mu}m aromatic feature related to an SNR has been reported. In the line maps of the H{sub 2} 1-0 O(3), the 3.3 {mu}m feature, and the Br{alpha}, the distribution of the aromatic feature shows overall correlation with those of other emissions together with regional differences that reflect the local physical conditions. By comparing other archival imaging data at different wavelengths, the association of the aromatic emission with other ionic/molecular emissions is clarified. We examine the archival Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of N49 and find signatures of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 {mu}m corresponding to the 3.3 {mu}m aromatic feature. Based on the band ratios of the PAHs, we find that the PAHs in N49 are not only dominantly neutral, but they are also small in size. We discuss the origin of the PAH emission in N49 and conclude that the emission is either from the PAHs that have survived the shock or from the PAHs in the preshock gas that was heated by the radiative precursor.

  10. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  11. Experiments on ocular tissue ablation at 5.3 and 6.0 {mu}m with the Los Alamos advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Ren, Q.; Hill, R.

    1995-12-31

    We investigated the ablation characteristics of a picosecond free-electron laser and compared its ablation effects on ocular tissues at 5.3 {mu}m and 6.0 {mu}m. The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos, operating in the wavelength range 4-6 {mu}m, was used for this study. The 10-{mu}s macropulse consisted of {approximately}1000 micropulses, each approximately 15 ps in length and separated from one another by 9.2 ns. The FEL beam was passed through a series of attenuator and focused to a 200-{mu}m spot in the sample with a 150-mm f.l. CaF{sub 2} lens. The energy in each macropulse ranged from 5 to 120 mJ. Five transplantable corneal-scleral buttons preserved in corneal storage media were used for this study. The tissue sample was positioned at the focused FEL beam for the ablation, and then fixed for histologic study. Corneal cuts made at 6.0 {mu}m revealed a well-defined ablation boundary. The measured lateral zone of the tissue damage was 11 {+-} 2 {mu}m. The integrity of the adjacent tissue was well maintained. By contrast, the ablation boundary of the corneal cuts made at 5.3 {mu}m appeared to be very disruptive. The collagen fiber near the ablation was thermally denatured and lost its organized structure. The lateral dimension of such effect extended out to 220 {mu}m beyond the intended cut into the surrounding tissues. We concluded that a short-pulsed laser operating at 6 {mu}m may be a potentially effective tool for cutting ocular tissues.

  12. Reflective Praxis through Narrative and Poetry: Performing "Peace Mum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2010-01-01

    In the autumn of 2007 and spring of 2008 the author performed an adapted version of Dario Fo and Franca Rame's one-woman play "Peace Mom" (retitled for Canadian audiences as "Peace Mum") about American mother and peace activist Cindy Sheehan. The play was performed for University of Victoria Applied Theatre students and also in a number of…

  13. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of...

  14. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  15. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  16. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  17. Reflective Praxis through Narrative and Poetry: Performing "Peace Mum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2010-01-01

    In the autumn of 2007 and spring of 2008 the author performed an adapted version of Dario Fo and Franca Rame's one-woman play "Peace Mom" (retitled for Canadian audiences as "Peace Mum") about American mother and peace activist Cindy Sheehan. The play was performed for University of Victoria Applied Theatre students and also in a number of…

  18. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Vriddhachalam K.; Newnam, Brian E.

    1993-01-01

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 .mu.m, and preferably less than 100 .mu.m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 .mu.m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm .times.25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  19. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  20. Thulium:ZBLAN blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Tohmon, G.; Sato, H.; Ohya, J.; Uno, T.

    1997-05-01

    We demonstrate and analyze an upconversion blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths. Lasing at 0.48 {mu}m with very low pump threshold power is obtained from a Tm-doped fluorozirconate fiber that is counterpropagating pumped by 1.21- and 0.649-{mu}m light. We employed a rate-equation analysis using parameters obtained by fitting to the experimental data to predict the 0.48-{mu}m output characteristics as a function of fiber length and output reflectivity. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  1. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a projection reflection optical system having two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have aspherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 {mu}m, and preferably less than 100 {mu}m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05--0.1 {mu}m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm {times} 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  2. THE 5.25 AND 5.7 {mu}m ASTRONOMICAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Mattioda, A. L.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Peeters, E.

    2009-01-10

    Astronomical mid-IR spectra show two minor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m (1905 and 1754 cm{sup -1}) that hitherto have been little studied, but contain information about the astronomical PAH population that complements that of the major emission bands. Here, we report a study involving both laboratory and theoretical analysis of the fundamentals of PAH spectroscopy that produce features in this region and use these to analyze the astronomical spectra. The Infrared Space Observatory Short Wavelength Spectrograph spectra of 15 objects showing these PAH features were considered for this study, however only four (HD 44179; NGC 7027; Orion Bar, two positions) have sufficient signal-to-noise between 5 and 6 {mu}m to allow for an in-depth analysis. All four astronomical spectra show similar peak positions and profiles. The 5.25 {mu}m feature is peaked and asymmetric, with an FWHM of about 0.12 {+-} 0.01 {mu}m ({approx}40 {+-} 6.5 cm{sup -1}), while the 5.7 {mu}m feature is broader and flatter, with an FWHM of about 0.17 {+-} 0.02 {mu}m (50 {+-} 5.6 cm{sup -1}). Detailed analysis of the laboratory spectra and quantum-chemical calculations show that the astronomical 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands are a blend of combination, difference and overtone bands primarily involving CH stretching and CH in-plane and CH out-of-plane bending fundamental vibrations. The experimental and computational spectra show that, of all the hydrogen adjacency classes that are possible on PAHs, solo and duo hydrogens consistently produce prominent bands at the observed positions, whereas quartet hydrogens do not. In all, this study supports the picture that astronomical PAHs are large with compact, regular structures. From the coupling with primarily strong CH out-of-plane bending modes, one might surmise that the 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands track the neutral PAH population. However, theory suggests that the role of charge in these astronomical bands might also be

  3. Wavelength Comparison

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-27

    The difference in features that are visible in different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light can be stunning as we see when we compare very large coronal holes, easily seen in the AIA 171 image (colorized bronze) yet hardly perceptible in the AIA 304 image (colorized red). Both were taken at just about the same time (Oct. 27, 2016). Coronal holes are areas of open magnetic field that carry solar wind out into space. In fact, these holes are currently causing a lot of geomagnetic activity here on Earth. The bronze image wavelength captures material that is much hotter and further up in the corona than the red image. The comparison dramatizes the value of observing the sun in multiple wavelengths of light. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA15377

  4. Dementia in documentary film: mum by Adelheid Roosen.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Aagje

    2013-02-01

    This article draws attention to the fact that documentaries do not simply reproduce the reality that film and audience share but always present a particular view of this reality. This implies that organizations in Alzheimer care, education, and research that often recommend documentaries to inform people about dementia should take into account that these films might reinforce negative stereotypes inducing fear of dementia. An in-depth analysis of the Dutch short documentary Mum (2009), directed by feminist artist Adelheid Roosen, illustrates that the reasoning of the personhood movement in dementia research can be translated into an artistic form. By highlighting instead of veiling its means of production, Mum stimulates viewers to imagine people with dementia as other than lost selves.

  5. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  7. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  8. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  9. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with...

  10. Baseband integrated acousto-optic frequency shifter/modulator module for fiber optic at 1.3 mum.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Cheng, Z Y

    1993-01-01

    A baseband integrated acoustooptic (AO) frequency shifter/modulator module that consists of a pair of titanium-indiffused proton-exchanged (TIPE) waveguide lenses and a pair of cascaded guided-wave AO Bragg cells has been realized in a Y-cut LiNbO(3) waveguide substrate 0.1 cmx1.0 cmx2.0 cm in size. A device module operating at the optical wavelength of 1.3 mum has provided a -3-dB tunable bandwidth of 120 MHz at baseband. The frequency-shifted or -modulated light propagates in a fixed direction, irrespective of the magnitude of frequency shift or modulation, and is focused into a spot (FWHM) of 6.2-mum size on the output edge of the waveguide. Accordingly, this optical frequency shifter/module can be directly interfaced with single-mode optical fibers to facilitate applications in fiber optic systems.

  11. USING THE 1.6 {mu}m BUMP TO STUDY REST-FRAME NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sorba, Robert; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-10-01

    We explore the feasibility and limitations of using the 1.6 {mu}m bump as a photometric redshift indicator and selection technique, and use it to study the rest-frame H-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) at redshift z {approx} 2. We use publicly available Spitzer/IRAC images in the GOODS fields and find that color selection in the IRAC bandpasses alone is comparable in completeness and contamination to BzK selection. We find that the shape of the 1.6 {mu}m bump is robust, and photometric redshifts are not greatly affected by choice of model parameters. Comparison with spectroscopic redshifts shows photometric redshifts to be reliable. We create a rest-frame NIR-selected catalog of galaxies at z {approx} 2 and construct a galaxy SMF. Comparisons with other SMFs at approximately the same redshift but determined using shorter wavelengths show good agreement. This agreement suggests that selection at bluer wavelengths does not miss a significant amount of stellar mass in passive galaxies. Comparison with SMFs at other redshifts shows evidence for the downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution. We conclude by pointing out the potential for using the 1.6 {mu}m bump technique to select high-redshift galaxies with the JWST, whose {lambda}>0.6 {mu}m coverage will not be well suited to selecting galaxies using techniques that require imaging at shorter wavelengths.

  12. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE H{sub 2}O-ICE: 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF H{sub 2}O-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrapa, R. M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.

    2009-08-20

    Using new laboratory spectra, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction of amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice from 20-150 K in the wavelength range 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) and joined these results with previous measurement from 1.25 to 2.5 {mu}m. These optical constants improve on previous measurements by having better temperature and spectral resolution and can be used to create model spectra for comparison to spectra of solar system objects and interstellar materials. In this wavelength range, the infrared band shapes and positions of amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice are strongly dependent on deposition temperature. Amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice have distinctive spectral bands at all wavelengths in this region with bands weakening and shifting to shorter wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice compared to crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice. Some notable exceptions are the band near 6 {mu}m, which is stronger in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice, and the bands near 4.5 {mu}m and 12.5 {mu}m, which shift to longer wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice.

  13. SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED SPITZER 24 {mu}m ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, P. I.; Yan Lin; Helou, G.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Shim, H.; Fadda, D.; Im, M.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) sub-population of a 24 {mu}m flux-limited galaxy sample in the Spitzer Extragalactic First Look Survey. Using deep Keck optical spectroscopy and a series of emission-line diagnostics, we identify AGN-dominated systems over broad redshift 0 < z < 3.5 and luminosity 9 < log (L{sub TIR}) < 14 ranges, with sample means of (z) = 0.85 and (log (L{sub TIR})) = 11.5. We find that down to the flux limits of our Spitzer MIPS sample (f{sub 24} > 200 {mu}Jy), 15%-20% of sources exhibit strong AGN signatures in their optical spectra. At this flux limit, the AGN population accounts for as much as 25%-30% of the integrated 24 {mu}m flux. This corresponds to an MIR AGN contribution {approx}2-3 x greater than that found in ISOCAM 15 {mu}m studies that used X-ray AGN identifications. Based on our spectroscopically selected AGN sample, we also investigate the merits of Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color selection for AGN identification. Our comparison reveals that although there is considerable overlap, a significant fraction of spectroscopic AGNs are not identifiable based on their MIR colors alone. Both the measured completeness and reliability of the IRAC color selections are found to be strongly dependent on the MIR flux limit. Finally, our spectroscopic AGN sample implies as much as a 3 x higher AGN surface density at high redshift (z > 1.2) than that of recent optical surveys at comparable optical flux limits, suggestive of a population of heavily obscured, optical/UV reddened AGNs.

  14. 2-.mu.m fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Wu, Jianfeng (Inventor); Geng, Jihong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A 2-.mu.m fiber Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source provides a wide emission bandwidth and improved spectral stability/purity for a given output power. The fiber ASE source is formed from a heavy metal oxide multicomponent glass selected from germanate, tellurite and bismuth oxides and doped with high concentrations, 0.5-15 wt. %, thulium oxides (Tm.sub.2O.sub.3) or 0.1-5 wt% holmium oxides (Ho.sub.2O.sub.3) or mixtures thereof. The high concentration of thulium dopants provide highly efficient pump absorption and high quantum efficiency. Co-doping of Tm and Ho can broaden the ASE spectrum.

  15. Nodes, networks, and MUMs: Preserving diversity at all scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noss, Reed F.; Harris, Larry D.

    1986-05-01

    The present focus of practical conservation efforts is limited in scope. This narrowness results in an inability to evaluate and manage phenomena that operate at large spatiotemporal scales. Whereas real ecological phenomena function in a space-time mosaic across a full hierarchy of biological entities and processes, current conservation strategies address a limited spectrum of this complexity. Conservation typically is static (time-limited), concentrates on the habitat content rather than the landscape context of protected areas, evaluates relatively homogeneous communities instead of heterogeneous landscapes, and directs attention to particular species populations and/or the aggregate statistic of species diversity. Insufficient attention has been given to broad ecological patterns and processes and to the conservation of species in natural relative abundance patterns (native diversity). The authors present a conceptual scheme that evaluates not only habitat content within protected areas, but also the landscape context in which each preserve exists. Nodes of concentrated ecological value exist in each landscape at all levels in the biological hierarchy. Integration of these high-quality nodes into a functional network is possible through the establishment of a system of interconnected multiple-use modules (MUMs). The MUM network protects and buffers important ecological entities and phenomena, while encouraging movement of individuals, species, nutrients, energy, and even habitat patches across space and time. An example is presented for the southeastern USA (south Georgia-north Florida), that uses riparian and coastal corridors to interconnect existing protected areas. This scheme will facilitate reintroduction and preservation of wide-ranging species such as the Florida panther, and help reconcile species-level and ecosystem-level conservation approaches.

  16. X-ray backlighting characterization experiments performed with laser wavelengths of 1. 06, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.

    1982-01-01

    We report the conversion efficiency, xi/sub x/, for production of x-ray backlighting line sources from 1.4 keV to 8.6 keV as a function of laser wavelength, -pulselength and intensity. For K-shell x-ray line emission we observed only a moderate increase in xi/sub x/ when using a 0.35..mu..m (instead of 1.06 ..mu..m) wavelength laser.

  17. Reflection Coefficients for Wires and Cables at 106 mum.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C L; Brandewie, R A

    1973-07-01

    Measurements are given of the reflectivity coefficient for a variety of wires and cables at 10.6 mum. The results are presented as a function of wire incidence angle for two polarizations, parallel and perpendicular to the samples. The normal incidence reflectivity is very high, ranging from 610% for aluminum wire down to 16.8% for hemp rope in parallel polarization. The perpendicular polarization results are lower by a factor that varied from 5.9 to 2.04. Depolarization by the wires was also determined. The depolarization ratio was found to vary between 17.7% and 1%, being larger for the more irregular samples. The results indicate that a wire avoidance system could be developed for airplanes or helicopters using a scanning 10.6 microm laser and coherent receiver. The power required for such an application is estimated from the data and is found to be relatively low, only 28 W being required to cover a 20 degrees x 90 degrees field in 1 sec.

  18. Effect of laser radiation absorption in water and blood on the optimal wavelength for endovenous obliteration of varicose veins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilin, K M; Minaev, V P; Sokolov, Aleksandr L

    2009-08-31

    This work examines laser radiation absorption in water and blood at the wavelengths that are used in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT): 0.81-1.06, 1.32, 1.47, 1.5 and 1.56 {mu}m. It is shown that the best EVLT conditions are ensured by 1.56-{mu}m radiation. Analysis of published data suggests that even higher EVLT efficacy may be achieved at wavelengths of 1.68 and 1.7 {mu}m. (laser medicine)

  19. Sum-frequency generation from molecular monolayers using 14 {mu}m radiation from the FELIX free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Ham, E.W.M.; Vrehen, Q.H.F.; Eliel, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a widely applied tool for study of surfaces and interfaces where molecules are present. It combines the surface specificity of a second-order nonlinear optical technique with the power of a spectroscopic method, and it can be used under widely varying experimental conditions ranging from UHV to electrochemical cells. The important characteristic of SFG is that it allows one to study the average spatial orientation of a molecular bond in a monolayer of molecules at an interface. Until recently SFG measurements were confined to the frequency interval Y {mu} > 1700 cm{sup -1} because of a lack of suitable laser sources at wave-lengths {lambda} > 6 {mu}m. So for most molecules only a few vibrational modes and thus intramolecular bonds can be studied. We have developed a universal sum-frequency spectrometer around the FELIX free-electron law that covers the complete molecular fingerprint since we can generate any IR wavelength between 2.75 and 110 f{mu} at the FELIX facility. We have used this setup for a series of exploratory SFG experiments in a frequency range that was hitherto unexplored in the study of molecular monolayers. We have studied thiol monolayers chemisorbed on a variety of noble metals (Au, Ag, Pt) where we focussed on the C-S stretch vibration at {nu} = 702 cm{sup -1} ({lambda} = 14.3 {mu}m). We have found spectroscopic features revealing the presence of both the trane and gauche conformers of the adsorbed molecules. The present measurements open a whole new wavelength range for nonlinear optical studies of interfaces.

  20. Optical amplification at the 1.31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1994-01-01

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 .mu.m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm.sup.3+ and Pr.sup.3+ ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm.sup.3+ ions to the Pr.sup.3+ ions, causing the Pr.sup.3+ ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31

  1. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS-PHASE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS IN THE 10-50 {mu}m SPECTRAL RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Joost M.; Redlich, Britta; Van der Meer, Alexander F. G.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-11-10

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations have been recorded in the 10-50 {mu}m (or 1000-200 cm{sup -1}) spectral range via IR multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Ionized PAHs are formed by UV laser ionization in an effusive beam and subsequently irradiated with a single pulse of narrowband tunable infrared light produced by the Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments FELICE. The ion population is then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Upon resonance, dissociation is induced so that IR spectra can be recorded by monitoring either the depleted parent ion intensity or the appearance of fragment ions as a function of the wavelength. The intracavity IR fluence enables the recording of IRMPD spectra of strongly bound PAH cations in the hitherto inaccessible far-IR spectral range. Experimental spectra are presented for the radical cations of anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene. Spectra calculated with density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311g(2df,2pd) level reproduce IR frequencies reasonably accurately in this spectral range when a uniform scaling factor of 0.94 over the complete 10-50 {mu}m spectral range is employed. We show that even vibrational modes with a calculated IR intensity lower than 1 km mol{sup -1} can be observed. For the catacondensed PAH cations we find CH out-of-plane bending vibrations involving four adjacent CH groups within a few wavenumbers of 733 cm{sup -1}, closely matching the 13.6 {mu}m UIR band. For the larger systems, pentacene and coronene, we observe a continuous structureless background absorption above 400 cm{sup -1} which is attributed to the high density of IR dipole allowed combination modes for these systems.

  2. InAlGaAs/InP light-emitting transistors operating near 1.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yong; Zhang Xuebing; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Dixon, Forest; Holonyak, Nick Jr.; Feng, Milton

    2008-06-01

    Light-emitting transistors (LETs) operating at around 1.55 {mu}m were investigated using InP/InAlGaAs heterostructures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By incorporating InGaAs quantum wells (QWs) in the base region of the N-InP/p-InAlGaAs/N-InAlAs heterojunction bipolar transistors, LET structures were achieved with a current gain of 45 and light emission at a wavelength of 1.65 {mu}m. The light output was found to be dependent on the base current. The larger the number of QWs incorporated in the base of the LETs, the larger the light output, with correspondingly reduced current gain. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy shows that the p-type dopant, zinc (Zn), which is commonly used in the growth of InAlGaAs, diffuses into the emitter and the base active QW region, leading to compromised electrical performance and light output intensity. Increasing the Zn doping level in the barrier layers of the QW structure causes the photoluminescence efficiency to decrease rapidly. Consequently, an alternative low-diffusivity dopant, carbon (C), was studied and a LET with a C-doped base was grown and fabricated. The highest light output was demonstrated for the C-doped LETs owing to the improved quality of the active layer.

  3. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug development... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  4. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights. 516... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive...

  5. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights. 516... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive...

  6. Broadband Ho{sup 3+}-doped fibre radiation source emitting at 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, A S; Sholokhov, E M; Paramonov, V M; Kosolapov, A F

    2008-10-31

    A 2-{mu}m broadband radiation source based on a fibre doped with holmium ions, which is pumped by a 1.12-{mu}m ytterbium fibre laser, is developed. The maximum output power of 8 mW is achieved for the emission spectrum width of 45 nm. (active optical fibres)

  7. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug development... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug development... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  9. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug development... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  10. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug development... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  11. 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguides grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Xu, Z.; Ng, T. K.; Lew, K. L.; Saadsaoud, N.; Zegaoui, M.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2008-03-17

    We demonstrate a 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguide grown by molecular beam epitaxy as an alternative to the AlGaAs/GaAs system. The 0.4-{mu}m-thick GaNAsSb guiding layer contains {approx}3.5% of N and 9% of Sb, resulting in optical band gap of 0.88 eV. The refractive index of the GaNAsSb layer was measured from 800 to 1700 nm. The GaNAsSb layer has a refractive index value of 3.42 at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The propagation loss measured using the Fabry-Perot resonance method was found to be affected by nitrogen-related defect absorption.

  12. 1.59 {mu}m room temperature emission from metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Frigeri, P.; Trevisi, G.; Franchi, S.

    2008-05-26

    We present design, preparation by molecular beam epitaxy, and characterization by photoluminescence of long-wavelength emitting, strain-engineered quantum dot nanostructures grown on GaAs, with InGaAs confining layers and additional InAlAs barriers embedding InAs dots. Quantum dot strain induced by metamorphic lower confining layers is instrumental to redshift the emission, while a-few-nanometer thick InAlAs barriers allow to significantly increase the activation energy of carriers' thermal escape. This approach results in room temperature emission at 1.59 {mu}m and, therefore, is a viable method to achieve efficient emission in the 1.55 {mu}m window and beyond from quantum dots grown on GaAs substrates.

  13. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  14. Severe oligospermia associated with a unique balanced reciprocal translocation t(6;12)(q23;q24.3): male infertility related to t(6;12).

    PubMed

    Bianco, B; Christofolini, D; Gava, M; Mafra, F; Moraes, E; Barbosa, C

    2011-04-01

    The prevalence of chromosome abnormalities is increased in infertile men, the incidence of a chromosomal factor being estimated to be about 8%. We report two brothers, a 38-year-old man with 10 years' primary infertility and severe oligospermia, but otherwise healthy, and a 35-year-old man with primary infertility and a history of mumps during puberty. Semen and karyotype analysis, and investigation of Y-chromosome microdeletions were performed. An apparently unique reciprocal translocation t(6;12)(q23;q24.3) was found in both infertile brothers. Semen analyses showed severe oligospermia. No Y-chromosome microdeletions were found. These two cases support the relationship between both environmental and chromosomal abnormalities, combined or separated, with male infertility. Investigation of genetic alterations in infertile males has to be performed prior to performing any assisted reproduction technique. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Improving the Precollegiate Curriculum on Latin America, Grades 6-12. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, John D.

    The Latin America Project, which developed print and nonprint materials for use in grades 6-12, is described. The two-year effort was conducted in five phases: survey of existing materials; the development of curriculum units; review of curriculum by teachers attending summer institutes; field testing and evaluation; and dissemination. Titles of…

  16. Teens on Target Violence Prevention Curriculum for Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Marla G.; Calhoun, Deane

    This curriculum is designed to help schools implement programs to prevent violence among students in grades 6-12. It is a six-session, school based curriculum intended for adolescents who are living in communities experiencing high rates of violence. It is facilitated by trained Teens on Target (TNT) members/peer educators, young people who are…

  17. Health Problems in the Classroom 6-12: An A-Z Reference Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Dolores M.; Fontaine, Karen Lee; Price, Bernadette K.

    This guide provides a resource for middle and high school teachers, teacher aides, administrators, and educators, covering health problems that affect students in grades 6-12. The handbook alphabetically lists the most current health concerns for this age group. Part 1, "Health Issues in the Classroom," includes (1) "Health,…

  18. Teens on Target Violence Prevention Curriculum for Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Marla G.; Calhoun, Deane

    This curriculum is designed to help schools implement programs to prevent violence among students in grades 6-12. It is a six-session, school based curriculum intended for adolescents who are living in communities experiencing high rates of violence. It is facilitated by trained Teens on Target (TNT) members/peer educators, young people who are…

  19. West Nile virus activity--United States, October 6-12, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-15

    During October 6-12, a total of 86 cases of human West Nile virus (WNV) illness were reported from 18 states (Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah).

  20. Teaching Global Awareness with Simulations and Games. Grades 6-12. Global Awareness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Steven L.; And Others

    This teaching guide contains 15 simulation/games for students in grades 6-12 on the topic of global awareness. The overall objective is to help students understand various global concepts and social studies content. Specifically, it gives students the chance to experience and understand international/intercultural situations which involve people…

  1. Health Problems in the Classroom 6-12: An A-Z Reference Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Dolores M.; Fontaine, Karen Lee; Price, Bernadette K.

    This guide provides a resource for middle and high school teachers, teacher aides, administrators, and educators, covering health problems that affect students in grades 6-12. The handbook alphabetically lists the most current health concerns for this age group. Part 1, "Health Issues in the Classroom," includes (1) "Health,…

  2. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  3. Teaching Global Awareness Using the Media. Grades 6-12, Global Awareness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Steven L.; And Others

    This teaching guide on global awareness contains 15 media-related activities for students in grades 6-12. The objective is to help students see how the media affect their opinions and the roles the media plays in world affairs. The activities are divided into five sections. The first section contains a general survey of the students' knowledge of…

  4. Language Arts Grades 6-12 Program Evaluation, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadden, Jerry M.

    The Language Arts 6-12 Program of the Des Moines Independent Community School District (Iowa) is directed by its mission statement to provide a quality educational program to a diverse community of students where all are expected to learn. The Language Arts supervisor is responsible for supervising and coordinating all aspects of the middle and…

  5. 41 CFR 51-6.12 - Specification changes and similar actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES § 51-6.12 Specification changes and similar actions. (a) Contracting activities shall notify the nonprofit agency or agencies authorized to furnish a commodity on the Procurement List and the... Procurement List, including a change that involves the assignment of a new national stock number or item...

  6. A new optical wavelength ratio measurement apparatus: The fringe counting sigmameter

    SciTech Connect

    Juncar, P.; Elandaloussi, H.; Himbert, M.

    1994-12-31

    A new compact and achromatic Michelson-type interferometer with a variable path difference is presented. This {open_quotes}fringe-counting sigmameter{close_quotes} allows to measure optical wavelength ratios between two radiations emitted by stabilized lasers. Maintained in vacuum, this apparatus can determine wavelength/frequency laser radiation from 0,36 {mu}m to 1,5 {mu}m with a relative accuracy of 5.10{sup -9}, with the use of a reference stabilized He-Ne laser.

  7. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6100 Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters... reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6100 Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters... reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2...

  9. Transparency of the Atmosphere to Short Horizontal Wavelength Gravity Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-16

    around the initial horizontal wavelengths and the maxi - mum value is normalized to 1.0 (black rectangles). Then the function y ¼ 1 p arctan zxþ hð Þ þ...Space Res., 35, 2017 –2023, doi:10.1016/ j.asr.2005.04.109. Ern, M., P. Preusse, and C. D. Warner (2006), Some experimental con- straints for spectral

  10. SPITZER 24 {mu}m SURVEY FOR DUST DISKS AROUND HOT WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, You-Hua; Bilikova, Jana; Gruendl, Robert A.; Su, Kate Y. L.; De Marco, Orsola; Guerrero, Martin A.; Updike, Adria C.; Rauch, Thomas

    2011-09-15

    Two types of dust disks around white dwarfs (WDs) have been reported: small dust disks around cool metal-rich WDs consisting of tidally disrupted asteroids and a large dust disk around the hot central WD of the Helix planetary nebula (PN) possibly produced by collisions among Kuiper-Belt-like objects. To search for more dust disks of the latter type, we have conducted a Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m survey of 71 hot WDs or pre-WDs, among which 35 are central stars of PNe (CSPNs). Nine of these evolved stars are detected and their 24 {mu}m flux densities are at least two orders of magnitude higher than their expected photospheric emission. Considering the bias against the detection of distant objects, the 24 {mu}m detection rate for the sample is {approx}>15%. It is striking that seven, or {approx}20%, of the WD and pre-WDs in known PNe exhibit 24 {mu}m excesses, while two, or 5%-6%, of the WDs not in PNe show 24 {mu}m excesses and they have the lowest 24 {mu}m flux densities. We have obtained follow-up Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra for five objects. Four show clear continuum emission at 24 {mu}m, and one is overwhelmed by a bright neighboring star but still shows a hint of continuum emission. In the cases of WD 0950+139 and CSPN K 1-22, a late-type companion is present, making it difficult to determine whether the excess 24 {mu}m emission is associated with the WD or its red companion. High-resolution images in the mid-infrared are needed to establish unambiguously the stars responsible for the 24 {mu}m excesses.

  11. DISCOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF 21 {mu}m FEATURE SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kevin; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Matsuura, Mikako; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Sahai, Raghvendra; Gruendl, Robert A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Indebetouw, Remy; Marengo, Massimo

    2011-07-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectroscopy has been obtained for 15 carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and for two other such stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Of these 17 PPNe, the unidentified 21 {mu}m feature is strong in 7 spectra, weak in 2 spectra, and very weak or questionable in 4 spectra. Two of the four spectra without the 21 {mu}m feature have a very strong feature near 11 {mu}m, similar to a feature observed in some carbon-rich planetary nebulae (PNe) in the LMC. We attribute this feature to unusual SiC dust, although the feature-to-continuum ratio is much larger than for SiC features in Galactic or Magellanic Cloud carbon star spectra. The remaining two objects show typical carbon-rich PPNe spectra with no 21 {mu}m features. One of the LMC objects that lacks the 21 {mu}m feature and one SMC object with a questionable 21 {mu}m detection may have mixed dust chemistries based upon their spectral similarity to Galactic [WC] PNe. The 13 objects that either definitely or may show the 21 {mu}m feature have distinct dust shell properties compared to the Galactic 21 {mu}m objects-the 21 {mu}m features are weaker, the estimated dust temperatures are significantly higher, the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands are stronger, and the UIRs show more structure. Four of the 21 {mu}m objects appear to show normal SiC emission features in their spectra. Many of the PPNe show strong 30 {mu}m features, although this feature carries less of the total mid-infrared emission than is normally the case for the Galactic 21 {mu}m PPNe. The LMC objects are in the LMC halo rather than in the LMC bar. The estimated luminosities of these PPNe vary from 4700 to 12,500 L{sub sun}.

  12. Optical investigation of vacuum evaporated Se80-xTe20Sbx (x = 0, 6, 12) amorphous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepika; Singh, Hukum

    2017-09-01

    Amorphous thin films of Se80-xTe20Sbx (x = 0, 6, 12) chalcogenide glasses has been deposited onto pre-cleaned glass substrate using thermal evaporation technique under a vacuum of 10-5 Torr. The absorption and transmission spectra of these thin films have been recorded using UV spectrophotometer in the spectral range 400-2500 nm at room temperature. Swanepoel envelope method has been employed to obtain film thickness and optical constants such as refractive index, extinction coefficient and dielectric constant. The optical band gap of the samples has been calculated using Tauc relation. The study reveals that optical band gap decreases on increase in Sb content. This is due to decrease in average single bond energy calculated using chemical bond approach. The values of urbach energy has also been computed to support the above observation. Variation of refractive index has also been studies in terms of wavelength and energy using WDD model and values of single oscillator energy and dispersion energy has been obtained.

  13. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  14. Q-switched lasing at 2 {mu}m in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, S N; Khromov, M N; Shestakov, A V

    2009-05-31

    The parameters of a Q-switched longitudinally-diode-pumped Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser are presented. The pulse repetition rate is f = 1-15 Hz. The maximum average output power is 5 W (at f = 5-15 kHz), the minimum pulse duration is 130 ns (f = 1 kHz), the efficiency is 26% (with the slope efficiency of 58%). The laser wavelength under pumping in the region of 803-805 nm is 1.99 {mu}m. (lasers and amplifiers)

  15. Method for improving the spectral flatness of the supercontinuum at 1.55 {mu}m in tapered microstructured optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, N.; Broderick, N. G. R.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a method for enhancing the flatness of a supercontinuum centered at 1.55 {mu}m by the use of specially designed tapered microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). Based on the procedure presented one can determine the linear taper profile parameters and the optimum launching conditions needed to achieve the broadest supercontinuum spectra (SC) and the best spectra flatness. We quantify the maximally broad and flat SC using the calculated standard deviation of the spectra at the required wavelength range and show that it is possible to obtain significantly better results than those obtained by using an untapered fiber.

  16. 2 {mu}m laterally coupled distributed-feedback GaSb-based metamorphic laser grown on a GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Apiratikul, P.; He, L.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2013-06-10

    We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (DFB) laser grown on a GaAs substrate operating continuous wave at room temperature. The laser structure was designed to operate near a wavelength of 2 {mu}m and was grown metamorphically with solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The device was fabricated using a 6th-order deep etch grating structure as part of the sidewalls of the narrow ridge waveguide. The DFB laser emits total output power of up to 40 mW in a single longitudinal mode operation at a heat-sink temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C.

  17. Single-mode fibre coupler with the 3-dB splitting ratio simultaneously at 0.83 and 1.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Gelikonov, V M; Gelikonov, G V

    2004-10-31

    The problem of designing a two-wave single-mode-fibre 3-dB coupler is considered. The method is proposed for adjusting the parameters of the coupler for simultaneous use of radiation at 0.83 and 1.3 {mu}m in one fibre interferometer. The dependence of the coupling efficiency on the wavelength is studied experimentally for different angle mismatches of fibres in the coupler. The results of experiments and numerical calculations are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 {mu}m AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. E.; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R.; Sturch, Laura E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: amonson@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: lsturch@bu.edu

    2011-12-10

    The Carnegie Hubble Program is designed to improve the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of Spitzer. The ultimate goal is a determination of the Hubble constant to an accuracy of 2%. This paper is the first in a series on the Cepheid population of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and focusses on the period-luminosity (PL) relations (Leavitt laws) that will be used, in conjunction with observations of Milky Way Cepheids, to set the slope and zero point of the Cepheid distance scale in the mid-infrared. To this end, we have obtained uniformly sampled light curves for 85 LMC Cepheids, having periods between 6 and 140 days. PL and period-color relations are presented in the 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands. We demonstrate that the 3.6 {mu}m band is a superb distance indicator. The cyclical variation of the [3.6]-[4.5] color has been measured for the first time. We attribute the amplitude and phase of the color curves to the dissociation and recombination of CO molecules in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The CO affects only the 4.5 {mu}m flux making it a potential metallicity indicator.

  19. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy for Carbon Isotope Analysis with 2 {mu}m Diode Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromoto, K.; Tomita, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-17

    We have made a prototype based on CRDS with 2 {mu}m diode laser for carbon isotope analysis of CO{sub 2} in air. The carbon isotope ratio was obtained to be (1.085{+-}0.012)x10{sup -2} which shows good agreement with the isotope ratio measured by the magnetic sector-type mass spectrometer within uncertainty. Hence, we demonstrated the carbon isotope analysis based on CRDS with 2 {mu}m tunable diode laser.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ISOCAM CVF spectrometer 2.2-16.5{mu}m spectra (Engelke+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, C. W.; Kraemer, K. E.; Price, S. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present all ISOCAM Circular Variable Filter (CVF) spectra that cover more than one-third of the 2.2-16.5{mu}m spectral range of the instrument. The 364 spectra have been classified according to the classification system of Kraemer et al. (2002ApJS..140..389K), as modified by Hodge et al. (2004, Cat. ) to account for the shorter wavelength range. Prior to classification, the spectra were processed and recalibrated to create a uniform database. Aperture photometry was performed at each wavelength centered on the brightest position in each image field and the various spectral segments merged into a single spectrum. The aperture was the same for all scale sizes of the images. Since this procedure differs fundamentally from that used in the initial ISOCAM calibration, a recalibration of the spectral response of the instrument was required for the aperture photometry. The recalibrated spectra and the software used to create them are available to the community on-line via the ISO Data Archive. (1 data file).

  1. Investigation of Antioxidative and Anticancer Potentials of Streptomyces sp. MUM256 Isolated from Malaysia Mangrove Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2015-01-01

    A Streptomyces strain, MUM256 was isolated from Tanjung Lumpur mangrove soil in Malaysia. Characterization of the strain showed that it has properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. In order to explore the potential bioactivities, extract of the fermented broth culture of MUM256 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method. DPPH and SOD activity were utilized to examine the antioxidant capacity and the results have revealed the potency of MUM256 in superoxide anion scavenging activity in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity of MUM256 extract was determined using cell viability assay against 8 different panels of human cancer cell lines. Among all the tested cancer cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive toward the extract treatment. At the highest concentration of tested extract, the result showed 2.3-, 2.0-, and 1.8-folds higher inhibitory effect against HCT116, HT29, and Caco-2 respectively when compared to normal cell line. This result has demonstrated that MUM256 extract was selectively cytotoxic toward colon cancer cell lines. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its bioactivities, the extract was then subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. The analysis resulted in the identification of chemical constituents including phenolic and pyrrolopyrazine compounds which may responsible for antioxidant and anticancer activities observed. Based on the findings of this study, the presence of bioactive constituents in MUM256 extract could be a potential source for the development of antioxidative and chemopreventive agents. PMID:26635777

  2. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  3. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF A SAMPLE OF 70 mum SELECTED GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD. I. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Frayer, D. T.; Aussel, H.; Arnouts, S.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Surace, J.; Yan, L.; Brusa, M.; Hasinger, G.; Caputi, K.; Carollo, C. M.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Faure, C.; Koekemoer, A. M. E-mail: jeyhan@noao.ed

    2010-02-01

    We present a large robust sample of 1503 reliable and unconfused 70 mum selected sources from the multiwavelength data set of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. Using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, we estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosity, L{sub IR} (8-1000 mum), by finding the best-fit template from several different template libraries. The long-wavelength 70 and 160 mum data allow us to obtain a reliable estimate of L{sub IR}, accurate to within 0.2 and 0.05 dex, respectively. The 70 mum data point enables a significant improvement over the luminosity estimates possible with only a 24 mum detection. The full sample spans a wide range in IR luminosity, L{sub IR} approx 10{sup 8}-10{sup 14} L{sub sun}, with a median luminosity of 10{sup 11.4} L{sub sun}. We identify a total of 687 luminous, 303 ultraluminous, and 31 hyperluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, ULIRGs, and HyLIRGs) over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 3.5 with a median redshift of 0.5. Presented here are the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for each of the sources compiled from the extensive multiwavelength data set from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared. A catalog of the general properties of the sample (including the photometry, redshifts, and L{sub IR}) is included with this paper. We find that the overall shape of the SED and trends with L{sub IR} (e.g., IR color temperatures and optical-IR ratios) are similar to what has been seen in studies of local objects; however, our large sample allows us to see the extreme spread in UV to near-infrared colors spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude. In addition, using SED fits we find possible evidence for a subset of cooler ultraluminous objects than observed locally. However, until direct observations at longer wavelengths are obtained, the peak of emission and the dust temperature cannot be well constrained. We use these SEDs, along with the deep radio and X-ray coverage of the field, to identify a large sample of candidate active

  4. Metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling to nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Dongwon; Koo, Sukmo; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2009-10-12

    We propose a novel metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling into a nanophotonic waveguide. Using the plasmonic waveguide structure in Fresnel lens form, a much wider beam acceptance angle and wavelength-scale working distance of the lens was realized compared to a conventional dielectric Fresnel lens. By applying the plasmon waveguide dispersion relation to a phased antenna array model, we also develop and analyze design rules and parameters for the suggested metal slit Fresnel lens. Numerical assessment of the suggested structure shows excellent coupling efficiency (up to 59%) of the 10 mum free-space Gaussian beam to the 0.36 mum Si waveguide within a working distance of a few mum.

  5. SHELS: OPTICAL SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF WISE 22 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-10-10

    We use a dense, complete redshift survey, the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS), covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region of a deep imaging survey, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), to study the optical spectral properties of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22 {mu}m selected galaxies. Among 507 WISE 22 {mu}m selected sources with (S/N){sub 22{mu}m} {>=} 3 ( Almost-Equal-To S{sub 22{mu}m} {approx}> 2.5 mJy), we identify the optical counterparts of 481 sources ({approx}98%) at R < 25.2 in the very deep, DLS R-band source catalog. Among them, 337 galaxies at R < 21 have SHELS spectroscopic data. Most of these objects are at z < 0.8. The infrared (IR) luminosities are in the range 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}(L{sub Sun }) {approx}< L{sub IR} {approx}< 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}(L{sub Sun }). Most 22 {mu}m selected galaxies are dusty star-forming galaxies with a small (<1.5) 4000 A break. The stacked spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies binned in IR luminosity show that the strength of the [O III] line relative to H{beta} grows with increasing IR luminosity. The optical spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies also show that there are some ({approx}2.8%) unusual galaxies with very strong [Ne III] {lambda}3869, 3968 emission lines that require hard ionizing radiation such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or extremely young massive stars. The specific star formation rates (sSFRs) derived from the 3.6 and 22 {mu}m flux densities are enhanced if the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies have close late-type neighbors. The sSFR distribution of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies containing AGNs is similar to the distribution for star-forming galaxies without AGNs. We identify 48 dust-obscured galaxy candidates with large ({approx}> 1000) mid-IR to optical flux density ratio. The combination of deep photometric and spectroscopic data with WISE data suggests that WISE can probe the universe to z {approx} 2.

  6. PROBING THE '30 {mu}m' FEATURE: LESSONS FROM EXTREME CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, Stephen J.; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin E-mail: speckan@missouri.edu

    2013-02-20

    Some carbon-rich evolved stars exhibit a very prominent spectral feature at {approx}{sup 3}0 {mu}m''. The C-rich nature of these objects suggests that the carrier is a sulfide, carbide, or other substance apt to form in a reducing environment. However, the carrier of this spectral feature remains disputed, with magnesium sulfide (MgS) as the most favored candidate. In order to investigate the carrier of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature further, we have taken a dual approach, studying both laboratory and observational data. In order to obtain a homogeneous sample, we studied the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature observed in the spectra of galactic extreme carbon stars that exhibit the 11 {mu}m SiC absorption feature. Thus, we avoid potential differences in the target objects that could contribute to the observed differences in the shape, position, and strength of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature. In addition, we analyzed the shape and position of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' features for a range of sulfide minerals for which laboratory data exist. Our study of observed astronomical features shows a range of shapes and positions for the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature despite similarities in the source objects. The nature of our sample argues against grain processing or temperature differences due to hardening of the stellar radiation field with evolution. While there are very few correlations between spectral parameters for our sample, the peak positions of the {approx}11 {mu}m absorption and 30 {mu}m emission features do correlate, and these peak positions correlate with the modeled optical depth. These correlations suggest that the carriers of the observable spectral features are closely related to one another and to the density/pressure in the dust formation zone. Furthermore, we suggest that the blue-broadening of the 11 {mu}m feature cannot be attributed to SiS{sub 2} based on existing laboratory spectra, but further lab work is needed to investigate the effect of increasing oxidation.

  7. Streptomyces sp. MUM212 as a Source of Antioxidants with Radical Scavenging and Metal Chelating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Bukhari, Sarah Ibrahim; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and other radicals potentially cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA which may ultimately lead to various complications including mutations, carcinogenesis, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, aging, and inflammatory disease. Recent reports demonstrate that Streptomyces bacteria produce metabolites with potent antioxidant activity that may be developed into therapeutic drugs to combat oxidative stress. This study shows that Streptomyces sp. MUM212 which was isolated from mangrove soil in Kuala Selangor, Malaysia, could be a potential source of antioxidants. Strain MUM212 was characterized and determined as belonging to the genus Streptomyces using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The MUM212 extract demonstrated significant antioxidant activity through DPPH, ABTS and superoxide radical scavenging assays and also metal-chelating activity of 22.03 ± 3.01%, 61.52 ± 3.13%, 37.47 ± 1.79%, and 41.98 ± 0.73% at 4 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, MUM212 extract was demonstrated to inhibit lipid peroxidation up to 16.72 ± 2.64% at 4 mg/mL and restore survival of Vero cells from H2O2-induced oxidative damages. The antioxidant activities from the MUM212 extract correlated well with its total phenolic contents; and this in turn was in keeping with the gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis which revealed the presence of phenolic compounds that could be responsible for the antioxidant properties of the extract. Other chemical constituents detected included hydrocarbons, alcohols and cyclic dipeptides which may have contributed to the overall antioxidant capacity of MUM212 extract. As a whole, strain MUM212 seems to have potential as a promising source of novel molecules for future development of antioxidative therapeutic agents against oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:28567016

  8. Preparation of AlAsSb and mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) lasers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) infrared lasers and LEDs are being developed for use in chemical sensor systems. As-rich, InAsSb heterostructures display unique electronic properties that are beneficial to the performance of these midwave infrared emitters. The authors have grown AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} epitaxial layers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using trimethylamine (TMAA) or ethyldimethylamine alane (EDMAA), triethylantimony (TESb) and arsine. They examined the growth of AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} using temperatures of 500 to 600 {degrees}C, pressures of 70 to 630 torr, V/III ratios of 1-27, and growth rates of 0.3 to 2.7 {mu}m/hour in a horizontal quartz reactor. The semi-metal properties of a p-GaAsSb/n-InAs heterojunction are utilized as a source for injection of electrons into the active region of lasers. A regrowth technique has been used to fabricate gain-guided lasers using AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} for optical confinement with either a strained InAsSb/InAs multi-quantum well (MQW) or an InAsSb/InAsP strained layer superlattice (SLS) as the active region. Under pulsed injection, the InAsSb/InAs MQW laser operated up to 210K with an emission wavelength of 3.8-3.9 {mu}m. Under pulsed optical pumping, the InAsSb/InAsP SLS operated to 240K with an emission wavelength of 3.5-3.7 {mu}m. LED emission has been observed with both active regions in both p-n junction and semi-metal injection structures.

  9. Electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Heyu; Huang, Yuanhe; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-07-15

    Structures, stabilities, electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons (GyNRs) with armchair and zigzag edges are investigated using the self-consistent field crystal orbital method based on density functional theory. It is found that the 1D GyNRs are more stable than the 2D 6,6,12-graphyne sheet in the view of the Gibbs free energy. The stabilities of these GyNRs decrease as their widths increase. The calculated band structures show that all these GyNRs are semiconductors and that dependence of band gaps on the ribbon width is different from different types of the GyNRs. The carrier mobility was calculated based on the deformation theory and effective mass approach. It is found that the carrier mobilities of these GyNRs can reach the order of 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2} V {sup –1}s{sup –1} at room temperature and are comparable to those of graphene NRs. Moreover, change of the mobilities with change of the ribbon width is quite different from different types of the GyNRs.

  10. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  11. Iodine deficiency disorder in children aged 6-12 years of Ambala, Haryana.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, C; Pathak, R; Ahluwalia, S K; Goel, R K D; Devgan, S

    2013-06-08

    We conducted this study to assess the prevalence of goitre among 2700 children (6-12 yr) of district Ambala in Haryana. Children were examined as per standards laid by National iodine deficiency disorder control programme (NIDDCP). Multi stage cluster sampling method was used. Urine and salt samples were also studied for iodine concentration. The overall prevalence of goitre in the studied subjects was 12.6%. The median urinary iodine excretion in the study sample was more than 100 ug/L Iodine content was found to be adequate in 88% of salt samples. We conclude that there was a high prevalence of goitre in young children despite iodine repletion. This calls for identification of factors to strengthen NIDDCP and the need to emphasize use of iodized salt in Haryana.

  12. Oral health status of children aged 6-12 years from the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve.

    PubMed

    Jipa, Ilia Teodora; Amariei, Corneliu I

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oral health status of children aged 6-12 years old living in the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve. The entire population of 6-12-year-olds living in the Reserve was targeted. A cross-sectional study consisting of dental examinations based on World Health Organization (WHO) 1997 criteria was performed in 2011. Dental caries, periodontal (gingival) health, oral hygiene, orthodontic status, and dental fluorosis were assessed at the children?s schools by one examiner. A total of 595 children were examined. The overall mean DMFT was 2.01 (range 0-13) and 32.9% of children had caries-free permanent teeth. The mean DMFT for 12-year-olds was 2.46. Gingival bleeding was found in 32.8% of the children and oral hygiene worsened with age. Only 8% of 12-year-olds were free of dental plaque. There was a low need for orthodontic treatment (89% of children were Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need grade 1 or 2) and only 2% had any noticeable fluorosis. The oral health status of children living in the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve can be classified as quite poor, especially due to the low number of caries-free children and the high prevalence of children with gingival bleeding and poor or fair oral hygiene. Malocclusion and fluorosis do not appear to be public health problems for this population. Considering the poor economic development of the region, with bad access to dental services, special health education programmes are necessary in order to reach the WHO oral health goals for 2020.

  13. Laser-plasma interaction experiments at laser wavelengths of 1. 064. mu. m, 0. 532. mu. m, and 0. 355. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.; Turner, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of laser wavelength on laser-plasma coupling is one of the critical issues facing the laser driven inertial confinement community. The advantages of using lasers with output wavelength less than 1 ..mu..m, such as enhanced absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency, reduction in parametric instabilities and corresponding suprathermal electron generation, have long been predicted theoretically.

  14. A passively mode-locked fiber laser at 1.54 mum with a fundamental repetition frequency reaching 2 GHz.

    PubMed

    McFerran, J J; Nenadovic, L; Swann, W C; Schlager, J B; Newbury, N R

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a fundamentally mode-locked fiber laser with a repetition frequency in excess of 2 GHz at a central wavelength of 1.535 mum. Co-doped ytterbium-erbium fiber provides the gain medium for the laser, affording high gain per unit length, while a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SAM) provides the pulse shaping mechanism in a standing wave cavity. Results are shown confirming cw mode-locking for 1 GHz and 2 GHz repetition frequency systems. The response of the frequency comb output to pump power variations is shown to follow a single pole response. The timing jitter of a 540MHz repetition-rate laser has been suppressed to below 100 fs through phase-lead compensated feedback to the pump power. Alternatively, a single comb line of a 850MHz repetition-rate laser has been phase-locked to a narrow linewidth cw laser with an in-loop phase jitter of 0.06 rad(2). The laser design is compatible with low-noise oscillator applications.

  15. Narrow-stripe metal-clad ridge-waveguide laser for 1. 3. mu. m wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.; Stegmueller, B.

    1986-04-21

    Metal-clad ridge-waveguide lasers with stripe widths between 1.5 and 3 ..mu..m have been developed in InGaAsP-InP for 1.3 ..mu..m wavelength. By an appropriate design for these lasers, threshold currents as low as 20 mA are achieved for 200-..mu..m-long cavities. The corresponding low heat dissipation enables cw operation of upside-down mounted devices up to 85 /sup 0/C heat sink temperature.

  16. Long wavelength, high gain InAsSb strained-layer superlattice photoconductive detectors

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A high gain photoconductive device for 8 to 12 .mu.m wavelength radiation including an active semiconductor region extending from a substrate to an exposed face, the region comprising a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x compounds having x>0.75. A pair of spaced electrodes are provided on the exposed face, and changes in 8 to 12 .mu.m radiation on the exposed face cause a large photoconductive gain between the spaced electrodes.

  17. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with the drug development plan submitted to the agency under § 516.20 and (2) Compliance with all... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Termination of MUMS-drug designation. 516.29 Section 516.29 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  18. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... successful drug development in a timely manner, and (iii) Any other information required under § 516.20. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species Animal...

  20. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species Animal...

  1. Tunable, Single-frequency, Diode-pumped 2.3mum VECSEL.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J-M; Maclean, A J; Burns, D; Riis, E; Schulz, N; Rattunde, M; Manz, C; Köhler, K; Wagner, J

    2007-06-25

    We report high-performance single-frequency operation of a directly diode-pumped GaSb-based vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) at 2.3mum. Tunability of 70nm and a maximum single frequency output of 0.68W is demonstrated.

  2. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... exclusive marketing rights under this subpart. (d) FDA may terminate designation if it independently...

  3. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species Animal...

  4. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drug Development that includes the following information: (a) A short account of the progress of drug... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug. 516.30 Section 516.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  5. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... successful drug development in a timely manner, and (iii) Any other information required under § 516.20. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... successful drug development in a timely manner, and (iii) Any other information required under § 516.20. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with the drug development plan submitted to the agency under § 516.20 and (2) Compliance with all... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Termination of MUMS-drug designation. 516.29 Section 516.29 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... successful drug development in a timely manner, and (iii) Any other information required under § 516.20. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drug Development that includes the following information: (a) A short account of the progress of drug... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug. 516.30 Section 516.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with the drug development plan submitted to the agency under § 516.20 and (2) Compliance with all... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Termination of MUMS-drug designation. 516.29 Section 516.29 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... successful drug development in a timely manner, and (iii) Any other information required under § 516.20. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  12. Iterative development of MobileMums: a physical activity intervention for women with young children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the iterative development process and final version of ‘MobileMums’: a physical activity intervention for women with young children (<5 years) delivered primarily via mobile telephone (mHealth) short messaging service (SMS). Methods MobileMums development followed the five steps outlined in the mHealth development and evaluation framework: 1) conceptualization (critique of literature and theory); 2) formative research (focus groups, n= 48); 3) pre-testing (qualitative pilot of intervention components, n= 12); 4) pilot testing (pilot RCT, n= 88); and, 5) qualitative evaluation of the refined intervention (n= 6). Results Key findings identified throughout the development process that shaped the MobileMums program were the need for: behaviour change techniques to be grounded in Social Cognitive Theory; tailored SMS content; two-way SMS interaction; rapport between SMS sender and recipient; an automated software platform to generate and send SMS; and, flexibility in location of a face-to-face delivered component. Conclusions The final version of MobileMums is flexible and adaptive to individual participant’s physical activity goals, expectations and environment. MobileMums is being evaluated in a community-based randomised controlled efficacy trial (ACTRN12611000481976). PMID:23256730

  13. "I Asked My Mum, but" and Other Cases of Unsuccessful Information Seeking by Asking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Failure to find information is common. An exploratory analysis of cases when family members or friends were asked for information can provide better understanding of when, how and why interpersonal information seeking within a close network of individuals fails. Method. A sample of utterances (in form of "I asked my mum, but") was…

  14. BCL6, MUM1 AND CD10 EXPRESSION IN MANTLE CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) characteristically express CD20, CD5 and cyclin-D1, carries the translocation t(11;14) (q13;q32) and typically has no expression of germinal center (GC) cell markers. So-called aberrant phenotypes such as CD5 negative and cyclin-D1-negative-MCL have been described. Also few cases with CD10 and/or BCL-6 protein expression have been reported. We analyzed 127 MCL looking for the frequency of aberrant immunophenotype, CD10, BCL-6 and MUM1 expression. All cases were CD20 and cyclin-D1 positive, 96% expressed CD5 and 98% showed the t(11;14). BCL-6 expression was observed in 12 % of the cases and MUM1 in 35%. No one case showed CD10 positivity in 30% or more neoplastic cells. Only 3 cases showed 10 to 20% of tumoral cells positive for CD10. MUM1 expression was observed in 67% of the BCL-6 positive cases. 32% of the cases showed a MUM1+/BCL-6-/CD10- phenotype and 56% had a triple-negative-pattern. Aberrant phenotype is infrequent but not rare, and does not rule out a diagnosis of MCL in an otherwise typical case. PMID:19826251

  15. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of…

  16. SPITZER 70 AND 160 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Huynh, M. T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Fadda, D.; Helou, G.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Lee, N.; Surace, J. A.; Capak, P.; Murphy, E.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Fu, H.; Afonso-Luis, A.; Sargent, M. T.

    2009-11-15

    We present Spitzer 70 and 160 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS). The data processing techniques are discussed for the publicly released products consisting of images and source catalogs. We present accurate 70 and 160 {mu}m source counts of the COSMOS field and find reasonable agreement with measurements in other fields and with model predictions. The previously reported counts for GOODS-North and the extragalactic First Look Survey are updated with the latest calibration, and counts are measured based on the large area SWIRE survey to constrain the bright source counts. We measure an extragalactic confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 9.4 {+-} 3.3 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 160 {mu}m band based on the deep S-COSMOS data and report an updated confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 0.35 {+-} 0.15 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 70 {mu}m band.

  17. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the Validity of the MUM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. "The Journal of Experimental Education", 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding…

  18. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the Validity of the MUM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. "The Journal of Experimental Education", 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding…

  19. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in a major species, its designation will not be terminated on the grounds that the number of animals... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a...

  20. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  1. Meaningful, Authentic and Place-Based Informal Science Education for 6-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    American Indians are underrepresented in STEM and especially in Earth sciences. They have the lowest high school graduation rate and highest unemployment. On the other hand, tribes are in search of qualified young people to work in geo- and hydro-technical fields to manage reservations' natural resources. Dalbotten and her collaborators at the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and local 6-12 teachers ran a place-based but non-themed informal monthly science camps (gidakiimanaaniwigamig) for 7 years starting 2003. Camps were held on reservation and some activities focused on observing seasonal changes. The students enjoyed coming to the camps but the camp activities went largely unnoticed by the reservation itself. For the last 5 years, we and the same cast of characters from the gidakiimanaaniwigamig camps ran a very place-based, research-based camp program, manoomin. The research was focused on manoomin (wild rice) which is a culturally important plant and food that grows in local lakes and wetlands. Manmade changes in hydrology, toxic metals from mining, and changing weather patterns due to climate change threaten this precious resource. Our plan was for 6-12 students to investigate the past, the present and the future conditions of manoomin on and around the reservation. It became clear by 3rd year that the research project, as conceived, was overly ambitious and could not be completed at the level we hoped in a camp setting (6 weekend camps = 6 full days per year). However, students felt that they were involved in research that was beneficial to their reservation, reported gaining self-confidence to pursue a career in science, and stated a desired to obtain a college degree. They also became aware of STEM employment opportunities on reservation that they could aim for. The camps also fostered a trusting relationship between researchers at Fond du Lac resource managers and the U. of MN. Based on these experiences, we proposed a new format for these

  2. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  3. QUANTIFYING NON-STAR-FORMATION-ASSOCIATED 8 {mu}m DUST EMISSION IN NGC 628

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Alison F.; Calzetti, Daniela; Thilker, David A.; Aniano, Gonzalo; Draine, Bruce T.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Sandstrom, Karin; Smith, J. D. T.

    2013-01-10

    Combining H{alpha} and IRAC images of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 628, we find that between 30% and 43% of its 8 {mu}m dust emission is not related to recent star formation. Contributions from dust heated by young stars are separated by identifying H II regions in the H{alpha} map and using these areas as a mask to determine the 8 {mu}m dust emission that must be due to heating by older stars. Corrections are made for sub-detection-threshold H II regions, photons escaping from H II regions, and for young stars not directly associated with H II regions (i.e., 10-100 Myr old stars). A simple model confirms that this amount of 8 {mu}m emission can be expected given dust and PAH absorption cross sections, a realistic star formation history, and the observed optical extinction values. A Fourier power spectrum analysis indicates that the 8 {mu}m dust emission is more diffuse than the H{alpha} emission (and similar to observed H I), supporting our analysis that much of the 8 {mu}m-emitting dust is heated by older stars. The 8 {mu}m dust-to-H{alpha} emission ratio declines with galactocentric radius both within and outside of H II regions, probably due to a radial increase in disk transparency. In the course of this work, we have also found that intrinsic diffuse H{alpha} fractions may be lower than previously thought in galaxies, if the differential extinction between H II regions and diffuse regions is taken into account.

  4. An Experimental Trial of Adaptive Programming in Drug Court: Outcomes at 6, 12 and 18 Months.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Harron, Ashley

    2014-06-01

    Test whether an adaptive program improves outcomes in drug court by adjusting the schedule of court hearings and clinical case-management sessions pursuant to a priori performance criteria. Consenting participants in a misdemeanor drug court were randomly assigned to the adaptive program (n = 62) or to a baseline-matching condition (n = 63) in which they attended court hearings based on the results of a criminal risk assessment. Outcome measures were re-arrest rates at 18 months post-entry to the drug court and urine drug test results and structured interview results at 6 and 12 months post-entry. Although previously published analyses revealed significantly fewer positive drug tests for participants in the adaptive condition during the first 18 weeks of drug court, current analyses indicate the effects converged during the ensuing year. Between-group differences in new arrest rates, urine drug test results and self-reported psychosocial problems were small and non-statistically significant at 6, 12 and 18 months post-entry. A non-significant trend (p = .10) suggests there may have been a small residual impact (Cramer's ν = .15) on new misdemeanor arrests after 18 months. Adaptive programming shows promise for enhancing short-term outcomes in drug courts; however, additional efforts are needed to extend the effects beyond the first 4 to 6 months of enrollment.

  5. An Experimental Trial of Adaptive Programming in Drug Court: Outcomes at 6, 12 and 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Harron, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Test whether an adaptive program improves outcomes in drug court by adjusting the schedule of court hearings and clinical case-management sessions pursuant to a priori performance criteria. Methods Consenting participants in a misdemeanor drug court were randomly assigned to the adaptive program (n = 62) or to a baseline-matching condition (n = 63) in which they attended court hearings based on the results of a criminal risk assessment. Outcome measures were re-arrest rates at 18 months post-entry to the drug court and urine drug test results and structured interview results at 6 and 12 months post-entry. Results Although previously published analyses revealed significantly fewer positive drug tests for participants in the adaptive condition during the first 18 weeks of drug court, current analyses indicate the effects converged during the ensuing year. Between-group differences in new arrest rates, urine drug test results and self-reported psychosocial problems were small and non-statistically significant at 6, 12 and 18 months post-entry. A non-significant trend (p = .10) suggests there may have been a small residual impact (Cramer's ν = .15) on new misdemeanor arrests after 18 months. Conclusions Adaptive programming shows promise for enhancing short-term outcomes in drug courts; however, additional efforts are needed to extend the effects beyond the first 4 to 6 months of enrollment. PMID:25346652

  6. Correlates of sexuality communication among mothers and 6-12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Pluhar, E I; DiIorio, C K; McCarty, F

    2008-05-01

    This study assessed the extent to which personal characteristics, knowledge and beliefs, and family interactions and relationships are related to the occurrence of mother-child communication about sexuality. The study used a descriptive, cross-sectional design among a convenience sample of 298 predominantly lower- to middle-income African American mothers and 298 of their 6-12-year-old-children recruited from a youth-serving, community-based organization. Participants completed a computer-based interview to collect data on sexuality communication, general mother-child communication, parental involvement and monitoring, parent relationship with child's peer group, child's social skills and problem behaviours, mothers' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, comfort with sexuality communication, and demographics. Mothers were more likely to communicate with daughters and older children. Greater self-efficacy and comfort in sexuality communication were related to greater sexuality communication. We also explored several inconsistent findings in previous studies - mother's age, socio-economic status and religiosity. Mother's age and socio-economic status were not significant, and religiosity approached statistical significance. Mother's self-efficacy and comfort are potentially modifiable variables and therefore should be taken into consideration when designing interventions that aim to increase parent-child communication about sexuality.

  7. Improved executive functions in 6-12-year-old children following cognitively engaging tennis lessons.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao

    2016-11-16

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relationships between cognitively engaging exercise (i.e., game-based and coordination exercises), executive functions (i.e., inhibitory control and working memory), and physical fitness. Forty junior tennis players (6-12 years old), who regularly participated in tennis lessons (2.55 years, SD = 1.61) prior to the study, were investigated. All participants completed evaluations of executive functions (inhibitory control and working memory) at rest. The duration of each lessons' instructional activities, including coordination training, game-based exercise, rallying, and non-physical activity (explanations and breaks), was recorded. Physical fitness was evaluated using the Tennis Field Test. A longer duration of game-based exercise was positively correlated with inhibitory control and physical fitness. Coordination training was associated with improved working memory. Non-physical activity was inversely correlated with inhibitory control, working memory, and physical fitness. The results suggest that game-based tennis lessons have beneficial effects on inhibitory control and physical fitness levels, and a longer duration of coordination training is associated with better working memory. The present study indicates that shortened non-physical activity time within a sports setting is associated with the development of executive functions and physical fitness.

  8. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  9. Whole-grain food consumption in Singaporean children aged 6-12 years.

    PubMed

    Neo, Jia En; Binte Mohamed Salleh, Saihah; Toh, Yun Xuan; How, Kesslyn Yan Ling; Tee, Mervin; Mann, Kay; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Seal, Chris J; Brownlee, Iain A

    2016-01-01

    Public health bodies in many countries are attempting to increase population-wide habitual consumption of whole grains. Limited data on dietary habits exist in Singaporean children. The present study therefore aimed to assess whole grain consumption patterns in Singaporean children and compare these with dietary intake, physical activity and health parameters. Dietary intake (assessed by duplicate, multipass, 24-h food recalls), physical activity (by questionnaire) and anthropometric measurements were collected from a cross-section of 561 Singaporean children aged 6-12 years. Intake of whole grains was evaluated using estimates of portion size and international food composition data. Only 38·3 % of participants reported consuming whole grains during the dietary data collection days. Median intake of whole grains in consumers was 15·3 (interquartile range 5·4-34·8) g/d. The most commonly consumed whole-grain food groups were rice (29·5 %), wholemeal bread (28·9 %) and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (18·8 %). A significantly lower proportion of Malay children (seven out of fifty-eight; P < 0·0001) consumed whole grains than children of other ethnicities. Only 6 % of all children consumed the amount of whole grains most commonly associated with improved health outcomes (48 g/d). There was no relationship between whole grain consumption patterns and BMI, waist circumference or physical activity but higher whole grain intake was associated with increased fruit, vegetable and dairy product consumption (P < 0·001). These findings demonstrate that consumption of whole grain foods is low at a population level and infrequent in Singaporean children. Future drives to increase whole-grain food consumption in this population are likely to require input from multiple stakeholders.

  10. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  11. Switching of the photonic band gap in three-dimensional film photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composites in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, A. B. Grudinkin, S. A.; Poddubny, A. N.; Kaplan, S. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of three-dimensional photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composite films in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range important for practical applications (Telecom standard) are numerically calculated. For opal pores, the range of filling factors is established (0.25-0.6) wherein the composite exhibits the properties of a three-dimensional insulator photonic crystal. On the basis of the opal-VO{sub 2} composites, three-dimensional photonic film crystals are synthesized with specified parameters that provide a maximum shift of the photonic band gap in the vicinity of the wavelength {approx}1.5 {mu}m ({approx}170 meV) at the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}.

  12. 0.4-1.4 {mu}m Visible to Near-Infrared Widely Broadened Super Continuum Generation with Er-doped Ultrashort Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizawa, Norihiko; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Mitsuzawa, Hideyuki

    2009-03-17

    Visible to near-infrared widely broadened super continuum generation is demonstrated using ultrashort-pulse fiber laser system. Er-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification system operated at 1550 nm in wavelength is used for the amplifier system, which generated ultrashort-pulse of 112 fs in FWHM with output power of 160 mW, on average. Almost pedestal free 200 fs second harmonic generation pulse is generated at 780 nm region using periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3} and conversion efficiency is as high as 37%. 0.45-1.40 {mu}m widely broadened super continuum is generated in highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber and spectrum flatness is within {+-}6 dB. All of the fiber devices are fusion spliced so that this system shows a good stability.

  13. Self-assembled InAs quantum wire lasers on (001)InP at 1.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, F.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, L.; Gonzalez, Y.; Garcia, J. M.; Dotor, M. L.

    2006-08-28

    In this work, the authors present results on the growth by atomic layer molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of lasers with one and three stacked layers of InAs quantum wires (QWRs) as active zone and aluminum-free waveguides on (001) InP substrates. The separated confinement heterostructure consists of n-p InP claddings and a waveguide formed by short period superlattices of (InP){sub 5}/(GaInAs){sub 4} lattice matched to the InP substrate. The optimum growth conditions (substrate temperature and As and P pressures) have been determined to obtain waveguides with a flat surface in order to get a uniform QWR distribution. Lasing emission is observed at a wavelength of {approx}1.66 {mu}m up to 270 K from 15x3000 {mu}m{sup 2} devices, with a threshold current density at that temperature of 2 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Optical fibre with a germanate glass core for lasing near 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoirin, Vladislav V; Mashinskii, Valerii M; Iskhakova, L D; Dianov, Evgenii M; Yashkov, M V; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N

    2011-01-24

    An optical fibre with a core based on thulium-doped germanate glass (45SiO{sub 2} - 55GeO{sub 2}) and a quartz glass cladding is developed for the first time. Lasing on Tm{sup 3+} ions ({lambda} =1.862 {mu}m) with an output power up to 70 mW at a differential efficiency of 37% is obtained in a laser based on this fibre. (letters)

  15. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  16. Line-by-line radiative excitation model for the non-equilibrium atmosphere: Application to CO[sub 2] 15-[mu]m emission

    SciTech Connect

    Wintersteiner, P.P. ); Picard, R.H.; Sharma, R.D.; Winick, J.R. )

    1992-11-20

    We describe a new line-by-line (LBL) algorithm for radiative excitation in infrared bands in a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) planetary atmosphere. Specifically, we present a predictive model for the terrestrial CO[sub 2] 15[mu]m emission that incorporates this generic algorithm, and validate the model by comparing its results with emission spectra obtained in a limb-scanning rocket experiment. The unique features of the reactive-excitation algorithm are discussed in this paper. These features contribute to accurate radiative transfer results and reliable atmospheric cooling rates. For altitudes above 40 km, we present results of model calculations of CO[sub 2]([nu][sub 2]) vibrational temperatures, 15-[mu]m limb spectral radiances, and cooling rates, for the main band and for weaker hot and isotopic bands. We calculate the excitation and deexcitation rates due to different processes. We compare the predicted limb radiance with earthlimb spectral scans obtained in the SPIRE rocket experiment over Poker Flat, Alaska, and get excellent agreement as a function of both wavelength and tangent height. This constitutes the first validation of a long-wavelength CO[sub 2] non-LTE emission model using an actual atmospheric data set and verifies the existence of certain aeronomic features that have only been predicted by models and constrains the previously unknown value of the very important rate constant for deactivation of the CO[sub 2] bending mode by atomic oxygen to the range of 5-6 [times] 10[sup [minus]12] cm[sup 3]/(mol s) at mesospheric and lower thermospheric temperatures. We discuss the significance of this large value for terrestrial and Venusian thermospheres and the convergence rate of the iterative scheme, the model's sensitivity to the background atmosphere, the importance of the lower boundary surface contribution, and the effects of the choice of the layer thickness and the neglect of line overlap. 86 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  18. Wavelength selection beyond turing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Tzuk, Omer

    2017-06-01

    Spatial patterns arising spontaneously due to internal processes are ubiquitous in nature, varying from periodic patterns of dryland vegetation to complex structures of bacterial colonies. Many of these patterns can be explained in the context of a Turing instability, where patterns emerge due to two locally interacting components that diffuse with different speeds in the medium. Turing patterns are multistable, meaning that many different patterns with different wavelengths are possible for the same set of parameters. Nevertheless, in a given region typically only one such wavelength is dominant. In the Turing instability region, random initial conditions will mostly lead to a wavelength that is similar to that of the leading eigenvector that arises from the linear stability analysis, but when venturing beyond, little is known about the pattern that will emerge. Using dryland vegetation as a case study, we use different models of drylands ecosystems to study the wavelength pattern that is selected in various scenarios beyond the Turing instability region, focusing on the phenomena of localized states and repeated local disturbances.

  19. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  20. Microscopic single-crystal refractometry as a function of wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L.D. )

    1994-07-01

    The refractive indices of crystal fragments 50--200 [mu]m in size can be measured for light wavelengths between 365 and 1100 nm with a spindle-stage refractometer. Established methods from optical crystallograpy are used to orient a crystal on the microscope spindle stage and then to match its refractive index to an immersion fluid. The refractive index of the fluid for the wavelength of light and matching temperature is determined by comparison of a reference crystal on a second spindle axis with the fluid under the match conditions. Investigations of new nonlinear-optical crystals admirably demonstrate the advantages of measuring the refractive index to [plus minus] 0.0004 in small single crystals.

  1. Wavelength shifting in GaAs quantum well lasers by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.H.; Jagadish, C.

    1997-11-01

    Proton irradiation followed by rapid thermal annealing was used to selectively induce layer intermixing and thus shift the emission wavelengths of GaAs{endash}AlGaAs graded-index separate-confinement-heterostructure quantum well lasers. Up to 40 nm shifts were observed in 4 {mu}m ridge waveguide devices irradiated to a dose of 1.5{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}. Although the wavelength shifts were accompanied by some degradation in the lasing threshold current and differential quantum efficiency, they were still quite acceptable at moderate wavelength shifts. This technique provides a simple and promising postgrowth process of integrating lasers of different wavelengths for wavelength-division-multiplexing applications. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Triple wavelength monitor PDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Deukhee; Ha, Chang-woo; Shin, Sang-cheol; Kwon, Kyoung-soo; Ko, Joo-yul; Kang, Shin-jae

    2006-08-01

    Recently the demand for high-capacity optical storage systems compatible with CD, DVD, and Blue is growing. We designed the Vertical NIP photodiode with a diameter of 700um and the trans-impedance circuits by using 0.6um BiCMOS process. The measured sensitivity of the photodiode is 0.25, 0.42, and 0.48A/W for 405, 650, and 780nm wavelength lights, respectively. The capacitance of the PD is 4.5pF. Monitor PDIC for detecting triple wavelength lights is presented in this paper. The complete monitor PDIC with the NIP photodiode of 700um in diameter occupies 1900um*1200um. -3dB bandwidth is 110MHz and the temperature drift of output voltage is 3.2%.

  3. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated 2010-2011 influenza vaccine in Taiwan infants aged 6-12 months.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kao-Pin; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Yen, Ting-Yu; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Chih; Chen, An-Chyi; Chow, Julie Chi; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-05-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the immune responses and safety of an influenza vaccine in vaccine-naïve infants aged 6-12 months, and was conducted from November 2010 to May 2011. Fifty-nine infants aged 6-12 months received two doses of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine 4 weeks apart. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were measured 4 weeks after the two doses of study vaccine. Based on the assumption that a hemagglutination inhibition titer of 1:40 or greater against the antigen would be protective in adults, two doses of the study vaccine generated a protective immune response of 63.2% against influenza A(H1N1), 82.5% against influenza A(H3N2) and 38.6% against influenza B viruses in infants aged 6-12 months. The geometric mean fold rises against influenza type A and B viruses also met the European Medicines Agency criteria for flu vaccines. The solicited events within 7 days after vaccination were mild in intensity. No deaths or adverse events such as optic neuritis, cranial neuropathy, and brachial neuropathy or Guillain-Barre syndrome were reported. Two doses of inactivated influenza vaccine were well tolerated and induced a protective immune response against influenza in infants aged 6-12 months.

  5. Fabrication of 3-{mu}m diameter pin hole array (PHA) on thick W substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Levato, T.; Pathak, N. C.; Ciricosta, O.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Giulietti, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, D.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Delogu, P.

    2010-02-02

    Pin-hole arrays are used for a variety of applications including, for example, X-ray imaging of laser-plasmas for fusion relevant studies. More recently, a novel X-ray imaging technique has been proposed (this conference L. A. Gizzi et al.) within the High Power Laser Energy Research Facility (HiPER) to obtain spectrally resolved X-ray imaging using single photon detection. This technique requires a large number of images or, alternatively, large arrays of pin-holes, possibly with very small diameter (<<10 {mu}m). In view of this, a technique was implemented for the fabrication of large arrays of pin-holes in thick metal substrates. Here we report on the optimizations of the laser-matter interaction process to obtain high aspect ratio cylinder-like pin-hole on heavy metal substrate by using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa femtosecond laser pulses operating at 10 Hz. The influence of an air breakdown and a (ns)prepulse, on the drilled pin-hole, is showed by means of SEM images both for surface effects and internal quality of the channels, with evidence of micro and nano-sized structures. The holes drilled at an intensity just below the laser breakdown threshold for plasma creation in air, have an internal diameter of about 3 {mu}m on a W substrate of 70 {mu}m thickness, a micro-cylinder-like shape and no detectable deviations of the axis from a straight line. Arrays of up to 800 pin-holes were produced with the pin-hole properties being highly stable across the array. The final X-ray transmission is showed by using a mu-focus X-ray source.

  6. Remote Mapping of Vegetation and Geological Features by Lidar in the 9-11-mum Region.

    PubMed

    Foy, B R; McVey, B D; Petrin, R R; Tiee, J J; Wilson, C W

    2001-08-20

    We report examples of the use of a scanning tunable CO(2) laser lidar system in the 9-11-mum region to construct images of vegetation and rocks at ranges as far as 5 km from the instrument. Range information is combined with horizontal and vertical distances to yield an image with three spatial dimensions simultaneous with the classification of target type. Object classification is based on reflectance spectra, which are sufficiently distinct to allow discrimination between several tree species, between trees and scrub vegetation, and between natural and artificial targets. Limitations imposed by laser speckle noise are discussed.

  7. Apparatus for the measurement of the optical constants and thermal radiative properties of pure liquid metals from 0. 4 to 10 [mu]m

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M.A.; McLean, W. II ); Self, S.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Measurements of the optical constants and thermal radiative properties of high-temperature solid tungsten and molten aluminum have been made using a new instrument that includes two independent optical systems and surface control and analysis capability. The two optical systems, one for measuring the complex index of refraction by ellipsometry, the other for measuring the normal spectral emissivity by direct comparison to an integral blackbody cavity, operate over the wavelength range 0.4--10 [mu]m with sample temperatures between 940 and 1630 K. The surface science capabilities of the instrument permit the preparation of high-purity samples of known composition [ital in] [ital situ]. The apparatus includes two 5-keV argon-ion sputter guns, an ultrahigh vacuum pumping system, and an Auger spectrometer. The two sputter guns allow surface cleaning to occur while optical measurements are being made, or while Auger spectroscopy is determining the surface composition of solid or liquid samples. The ellipsometric optical system uses a novel radiation source (a carbon composite element), refractive optics (calcium fluoride), interference filters for spectral selection, and both calcite and wire grid polarizers to cover the extended wavelength range. The system for measuring the normal spectral emissivity uses reflective optics and an integral blackbody cavity that is located in the wall of the crucible holding the liquid sample. The use of two measurement techniques gives independent determinations of the normal spectral emissivity and thus allows reliable estimation of experimental errors.

  8. Efficient GaInNAs Gain Mirrors for Semiconductor Disk Lasers at 1.18 {mu}m and 1.22 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Puustinen, Janne; Leinonen, Tomi; Rautiainen, Jussi; Haerkoenen, Antti; Hakkarainen, Teemu; Guina, Mircea

    2010-11-10

    We report two GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor disk lasers emitting at the wavelengths of 1180 nm and 1220 nm. The lasers generated 5 W and 7 W output powers, respectively, at a mount temperature of 15 deg. C. Both the gain mirrors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and consisted of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector and an active region with 10 GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QWs.

  9. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

  10. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  11. Millimeter wavelength thermographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Cacak, R K; Winans, D E; Edrich, J; Hendee, W R

    1981-01-01

    Two new types of thermographic instruments sensitive to millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation have been designed, constructed, and tested. These instruments utilize wavelengths that are three orders of magnitude longer and much more penetrating than those used in conventional infrared thermography. The instruments are capable of detecting apparent thermal variations as small as a fraction of a degree existing at tissue depths of several millimeters below the skin. By comparison, conventional IR thermographic units are limited to sampling radiation emitted only from the surface. The millimeter wave thermographic units are designed to contribute to the clinical detection of breast abnormalities with the specific aim of accurately and noninvasively detecting breast cancer.

  12. Evaluation of optical coherence quantitation of analytes in turbid media by use of two wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyam, U.S.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Da Silva, L.B.; Everett, M.J.

    1999-04-01

    We introduce a novel method for determining analyte concentration as a function of depth in a highly scattering media by use of a dual-wavelength optical coherence tomography system. We account for the effect of scattering on the measured attenuation by using a second wavelength that is not absorbed by the sample. We assess the applicability of this technique by measuring the concentration of water in an Intralipid phantom, using a probe wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m and a reference wavelength of 1.31 {mu}m. The results of our study show a strong correlation between the measured absorption and the water content of the sample. The accuracy of the technique, however, was limited by the dominance of scattering over absorption in the turbid media. Thus, although the effects of scattering were minimized, significant errors remained in the calculated absorption values. More-accurate results could be obtained with the use of more powerful superluminescent diodes and a choice of wavelengths at which absorption effects are more significant relative to scattering. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  13. Determination of arm fat area and arm muscle area norms in children 6-12 years of age in Bursa.

    PubMed

    Günay, U; Sapan, N; Salih, C; Doğruyol, H

    1990-01-01

    Since arm fat area and arm muscle area measurements are said to assess the calorie and protein reserves in the body more accurately than triceps skinfold thickness measurements, we decided to use this system on 1497 girls and 1651 boys who were pupils in elementary schools in Bursa. From the data obtained, percentile norms for the children aged between 6-12 were calculated and percentile curves were drawn. The data that we collected can be used in future nutritional surveys.

  14. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  15. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  16. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Microlens performance limits in sub-2mum pixel CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yijie; Fesenmaier, Christian C; Catrysse, Peter B

    2010-03-15

    CMOS image sensors with smaller pixels are expected to enable digital imaging systems with better resolution. When pixel size scales below 2 mum, however, diffraction affects the optical performance of the pixel and its microlens, in particular. We present a first-principles electromagnetic analysis of microlens behavior during the lateral scaling of CMOS image sensor pixels. We establish for a three-metal-layer pixel that diffraction prevents the microlens from acting as a focusing element when pixels become smaller than 1.4 microm. This severely degrades performance for on and off-axis pixels in red, green and blue color channels. We predict that one-metal-layer or backside-illuminated pixels are required to extend the functionality of microlenses beyond the 1.4 microm pixel node.

  18. THE 8 {mu}m PHASE VARIATION OF THE HOT SATURN HD 149026b

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Charbonneau, David; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2009-09-20

    We monitor the star HD 149026 and its Saturn-mass planet at 8.0 {mu}m over slightly more than half an orbit using the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find an increase of 0.0227% +- 0.0066% (3.4sigma significance) in the combined planet-star flux during this interval. The minimum flux from the planet is 45% +- 19% of the maximum planet flux, corresponding to a difference in brightness temperature of 480 +- 140 K between the two hemispheres. We derive a new secondary eclipse depth of 0.0411% +- 0.0076% in this band, corresponding to a dayside brightness temperature of 1440 +- 150 K. Our new secondary eclipse depth is half that of a previous measurement (3.0sigma difference) in this same bandpass by Harrrington et al. We re-fit the Harrrington et al. data and obtain a comparably good fit with a smaller eclipse depth that is consistent with our new value. In contrast to earlier claims, our new eclipse depth suggests that this planet's dayside emission spectrum is relatively cool, with an 8 {mu}m brightness temperature that is less than the maximum planet-wide equilibrium temperature. We measure the interval between the transit and secondary eclipse and find that that the secondary eclipse occurs 20.9{sup +7.2}{sub -6.5} minutes earlier (2.9sigma) than predicted for a circular orbit, a marginally significant result. This corresponds to ecos(omega) = -0.0079{sup +0.0027}{sub -0.0025}, where e is the planet's orbital eccentricity and omega is the argument of pericenter.

  19. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Dawoo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2012-02-15

    We investigate the connection between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by comparing 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with AGN properties. Utilizing the slitless spectroscopic capability of the AKARI space telescope, we observe a moderate-luminosity Type I AGN at z {approx} 0.4 to measure global starburst activity. The 3.3 {mu}m PAH emissions are detected for 7 out of 26 target galaxies. We find no strong correlation between the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and AGN luminosity in the limited range of the observed AGN luminosity, suggesting that global star formation may not be closely related to AGN activity. Combining our measurements with previous 3.3 {mu}m measurements of low-redshift Type I AGNs in the literature, we investigate the connection between nuclear starburst and AGN activity. In contrast to global star formation, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity measured from the central part of galaxies correlates with AGN luminosity, implying that starburst activity and AGN activity are directly connected in the nuclear region.

  20. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  1. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  2. X-ray spectrum in the range (6-12) A emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Levi, Izhak; Hurvitz, Gilad; Ehrlich, Yosi; Fraenkel, Moshe; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2009-05-15

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium (6-12 A) is presented, using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic considerations. Resonance 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4d, 3d-4p, and 3p-4s transitions in Ni samarium ions and in neighboring ionization states (from Mn to Zn ions) were identified. The experiment results show changes in the fine details of the plasma spectrum for different laser intensities.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

  4. IFR4/MUM1-positive lymphoma in Waldeyer ring with co-expression of CD5 and CD10.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Al-Kzayer, Lika'a Fasih Y; Liu, Tingting; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Nakazawa, Yozo; Koike, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    IRF4/MUM1-positive lymphoma is a new subgroup of germinal center-derived B-cell lymphoma, predominantly involving the Waldeyer ring (WR) in children. CD5 expression is rare in these lymphomas. We report a 7-year-old Chinese male with B-cell lymphoma. Evaluation of his specimen by morphology, immunohistochemistry, and FISH analysis demonstrated IRF4/MUM1-positive lymphoma with strong and extensive CD5 and CD10 positivity. Despite the lack of t(14;18)(q32;q21) rearrangement, BCL2 protein was expressed. Our report highlights the clinicopathologic features of IFR4/MUM1-positive lymphoma in WR with co-expression of CD5 and CD10, and thereby provides insight into this newly recognized disease entity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Campbell, E.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Storm, E.

    1985-03-05

    Three important high-temperature, high-density experiments were conducted recently using the 10-TW, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous experiments with long wavelength lasers (lambda greater than or equal to 1..mu..m) in which inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray laser, and other high-temperature physics concepts were being tested. The demonstrations were: (1) large-scale plasmas (typical dimensions of up to 1000 laser wavelengths) were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped. (2) Deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 g/cm/sup 3/ and a pressure of 10/sup 10/ atm. (3) A 700-fold amplification of soft x rays by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 A (62 eV) from Se/sup +24/ ions was observed in a laser-generated plasma. Isoelectronic scaling to 155 A (87 eV) in Y/sup +29/ was also demonstrated.

  6. DETECTIONS OF WATER ICE, HYDROCARBONS, AND 3.3 {mu}m PAH IN z {approx} 2 ULIRGs

    SciTech Connect

    Sajina, Anna; Spoon, Henrik; Yan Lin; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Fadda, Dario; Elitzur, Moshe

    2009-09-20

    We present the first detections of the 3 {mu}m water ice and 3.4 {mu}m amorphous hydrocarbon (HAC) absorption features in z {approx} 2 ULIRGs. These are based on deep rest-frame 2-8 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 11 sources selected for their appreciable silicate absorption. The HAC-to-silicate ratio for our z {approx} 2 sources is typically higher by a factor of 2-5 than that observed in the Milky Way. This HAC 'excess' suggests compact nuclei with steep temperature gradients as opposed to predominantly host obscuration. Beside the above molecular absorption features, we detect the 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature in one of our sources with three more individual spectra showing evidence for it. Stacking analysis suggests that water ice, hydrocarbons, and PAH are likely present in the bulk of this sample even when not individually detected. The most unexpected result of our study is the lack of clear detections of the 4.67 {mu}m CO gas absorption feature. Only three of the sources show tentative signs of this feature at significantly lower levels than has been observed in local ULIRGs. Overall we find that the closest local analogs to our sources, in terms of 3-4 {mu}m color, HAC-to-silicate and ice-to-silicate ratios, as well as low PAH equivalent widths, are sources dominated by deeply obscured nuclei. Such sources form only a small fraction of ULIRGs locally and are commonly believed to be dominated by buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample suggests that, in an absolute number, such buried AGNs are at least an order of magnitude more common at z {approx} 2 than today. The presence of PAH suggests that significant levels of star formation are present even if the obscured AGNs typically dominate the power budget.

  7. THE 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Im, Myungshin; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Yamada, Rika; Inami, Hanae; Armus, Lee; Ohyama, Youichi; Helou, George; Shi, Yong E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features dominate the mid-infrared spectra of star-forming galaxies and can be useful to calibrate star formation rates (SFRs) and diagnose ionized states of grains. However, the PAH 3.3 {mu}m feature has not been studied as much as other PAH features since it is weaker than others and resides outside of Spitzer capability. In order to detect and calibrate the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and investigate its potential as an SFR indicator, we carried out an AKARI mission program, AKARI mJy Unbiased Survey of Extragalactic Sources (AMUSES), and compared its sample with various literature samples. We obtained 2-5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra of 20 flux-limited galaxies with mixed spectral energy distribution classes, which yielded the detection of the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission from 3 out of 20 galaxies. For the combined sample of AMUSES and literature samples, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities correlate with the infrared luminosities of star-forming galaxies, albeit with a large scatter (1.5 dex). The correlation appears to break down at the domain of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and the power of the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity as a proxy for the infrared luminosity is hampered at log[L {sub PAH3.3} erg{sup -1} s{sup -1}] > {approx}42.0. Possible origins for this deviation in the correlation are discussed, including contributions from active galactic nuclei and strongly obscured young stellar objects, and the destruction of PAH molecules in ULIRGs.

  8. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  9. THE LEGACY OF SCUPOL: 850 {mu}m IMAGING POLARIMETRY FROM 1997 TO 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M.; Curran, Rachel L.

    2009-05-15

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 {mu}m in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced {approx}50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard 'jiggle-map' mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in {rho} Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  10. CONVERTING FROM 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m FLUXES TO STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Eskew, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis; Meidt, Sharon E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    We use high spatial resolution maps of stellar mass and infrared flux of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to calibrate a conversion between 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes and stellar mass, M{sub *} = 10{sup 5.65} F{sup 2.85}{sub 3.6} F{sup -1.85}{sub 4.5}(D/0.05){sup 2} M{sub Sun }, where fluxes are in Jy and D is the luminosity distance to the source in Mpc, and to provide an approximate empirical estimate of the fractional internal uncertainty in M{sub *} of 0.3{radical}(N/10{sup 6}), where N is the number of stars in the region. We find evidence that young stars and hot dust contaminate the measurements, but attempts to remove this contamination using data that are far superior to what are generally available for unresolved galaxies resulted in marginal gains in accuracy. The scatter among mass estimates for regions in the LMC is comparable to that found by previous investigators when modeling composite populations, and so we conclude that our simple conversion is as precise as possible for the data and models currently available. Our results allow for a reasonably bottom-heavy initial mass function, such as Salpeter or heavier, and moderately disfavor lighter versions such as a diet-Salpeter or Chabrier initial mass function.

  11. A NEW 24 {mu}m PHASE CURVE FOR {upsilon} ANDROMEDAE b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Harrington, Joseph; Cho, James Y.-K.; Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: J.Cho@qmul.ac.u E-mail: kristen@astro.columbia.ed

    2010-11-10

    We report the detection of 24 {mu}m variations from the planet-hosting {upsilon} Andromedae system consistent with the orbital periodicity of the system's innermost planet, {upsilon} And b. We find a peak-to-valley phase curve amplitude of 0.00130 times the mean system flux. Using a simple model with two hemispheres of constant surface brightness and assuming a planetary radius of 1.3 R{sub J} give a planetary temperature contrast of {approx}>900 K and an orbital inclination of {approx}>28{sup 0}. We further report the largest phase offset yet observed for an extrasolar planet: the flux maximum occurs {approx}80{sup 0} before phase 0.5. Such a large phase offset is difficult to reconcile with most current atmospheric circulation models. We improve on earlier observations of this system in several important ways: (1) observations of a flux calibrator star demonstrate the MIPS detector is stable to 10{sup -4} on long timescales, (2) we note that the background light varies systematically due to spacecraft operations, precluding use of this background as a flux calibrator (stellar flux measured above the background is not similarly affected), and (3) we calibrate for flux variability correlated with motion of the star on the MIPS detector. A reanalysis of our earlier observations of this system is consistent with our new result.

  12. UVIS G280 Wavelength Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, Howard

    2009-07-01

    Wavelength calibration of the UVIS G280 grism will be established using observations of the Wolf Rayet star WR14. Accompanying direct exposures will provide wavelength zeropoints for dispersed exposures. The calibrations will be obtained at the central position of each CCD chip and at the center of the UVIS field. No additional field-dependent variations will be obtained.

  13. THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  14. Evaluation of Visual Pedagogy in Dental Check-Ups and Preventive Practices among 6-12-Year-Old Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilchian, Firoozeh; Shakibaei, Fereshteh; Jarah, Zeinab Taghi

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of visual pedagogy in dental check-ups and preventive practices among children with autism aged 6-12. In this randomized double-blind clinical trial, the cooperation of 40 children with autism age 6-12. The selected children were equally divided into two groups of case and control (n = 20). The obtained…

  15. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  16. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  17. SPITZER 24 {mu}m EXCESSES FOR BRIGHT GALACTIC STARS IN BOOeTES AND FIRST LOOK SURVEY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, L. R.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Weedman, D. W.; Houck, J. R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Soifer, B. T.; Brand, K.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2009-07-15

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V {approx}< 13 mag) having f {sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m) > 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 deg{sup 2} for the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 deg{sup 2} for the First Look Survey (FLS). One hundred and twenty-eight stars are identified in Booetes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K - [24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the Two Micron All Sky Survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 {mu}m luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 {mu}m excesses with (K - [24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least eight of the FGK stars with excesses are main-sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main-sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main-sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 {mu}m infrared excesses. This result is statistically similar to the fraction of stars with debris disks found among previous Spitzer targeted observations of much brighter, main-sequence field stars.

  18. Fast stabilization of a CO{sub 2} laser for a frequency standard at 10 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, M.Q.; Sassi, M.P.; Zucco, M.

    1994-12-31

    A CO{sub 2} laser has been frequency stabilized to an OsO{sub 4} transition with a control bandwidth of 10 kHz. The obtained spectral purity of the laser is 100 Hz. The realization of very accurate frequency standards and experiments of high resolution spectroscopy in the 10 {mu}m region are made possible by this source.

  19. The growth and delivery of mesenchymal and limbal stem cells using copolymer polyamide 6/12 nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holan, Vladimir; Javorkova, Eliska; Trosan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The injured or otherwise damaged cornea is healed by limbal stem cells (LSC). If the limbus where LSC reside is also damaged or nonfunctional, the cornea cannot heal properly and this defect leads to impaired vision that can result in blindness. The only way to treat total LSC deficiency is by transplantation of limbal tissue or a transfer of LSC. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown as another promising source of stem cells for corneal healing and regeneration. Here, we describe a protocol for the use of polyamide 6/12 nanofiber scaffolds for the growth of MSC and LSC, and for their transfer onto a mechanically damaged ocular surface in the experimental mouse model.

  20. Leukocyte Count versus C-Reactive Protein Levels in Obese Portuguese Patients Aged 6-12 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Henrique; Rocha, Susana; Rego, Carla; Mansilha, Helena Ferreira; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Santos-Silva, Alice; Belo, Luís

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate whether total and differential WBC counts are altered in young obese patients (aged 6-12 years) and if a relationship exists between WBC counts and the severity of obesity as well as with CRP level. Materials and Methods: a group of 77 obese patients [32 males and 45 females] and 19 controls [7 males and 12 females] were studied. Total WBC count was performed by using an automatic blood cell counter. Blood cell morphology and WBC differential count were evaluated in Wright stained blood films. The plasma levels of CRP were evaluated by immunoturbidimetry. Results: obese participants presented with a statistically significant higher neutrophil percentage and CRP levels when compared to controls; the median CRP value was about 5 times higher than that observed in controls. Absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio were also higher in patients, though without statistical significance. The parameters that were statistically significant related with adiposity markers were neutrophil count and CRP levels. The neutrophil count was positively and statistically correlated with body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, waist circumference and waist/height ratio, and also with CRP levels. In multiple regression analysis, the only variable that remained statistically associated with neutrophil count was CRP (neutrophil count = 2.612 + 0.439lnCRP; standardised coefficient/beta: 0.384, P=0.001). When performing multiple regression without CRP, the only variable that remained statistically associated with neutrophil count was BMI. Conclusions: our results demonstrated in obese patients aged 6-12 years, a significant change in the differential leukocyte count towards neutrophilia, together with a significant higher CRP concentration, and that absolute neutrophil count correlates with obesity markers and with CRP levels. Our data also indicate that neutrophil count, a current clinically used low-cost parameter, may be used as an obesity

  1. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  2. Multiple-wavelength tunable laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tunable laser includes dispersion optics for separating generated laser pulses into first and second wavelength pulses directed along first and second optical paths. First and second reflective mirrors are disposed in the first and second optical paths, respectively. The laser's output mirror is partially reflective and partially transmissive with respect to the first wavelength and the second wavelength in accordance with provided criteria. A first resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the first mirror, while a second resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the second mirror. The second resonator length is a function of the first resonator length.

  3. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT COMPANION TO ALCOR USING MMT/AO 5 {mu}m IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Hinz, Philip M.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-03-15

    We report the detection of a faint stellar companion to the famous nearby A5V star Alcor (80 UMa). The companion has M-band ({lambda} = 4.8 {mu}m) magnitude 8.8 and projected separation 1.''11 (28 AU) from Alcor. The companion is most likely a low-mass ({approx}0.3 M {sub sun}) active star which is responsible for Alcor's X-ray emission detected by ROSAT (L {sub X} {approx_equal} 10{sup 28.3} erg s{sup -1}). Alcor is a nuclear member of the Ursa Major star cluster (UMa; d {approx_equal} 25 pc, age {approx_equal} 0.5 Gyr), and has been occasionally mentioned as a possible distant (709'') companion of the stellar quadruple Mizar ({zeta} UMa). Comparing the revised Hipparcos proper motion for Alcor with the mean motion for other UMa nuclear members shows that Alcor has a peculiar velocity of 1.1 km s{sup -1}, which is comparable to the predicted velocity amplitude induced by the newly discovered companion ({approx}1 km s{sup -1}). Using a precise dynamical parallax for Mizar and the revised Hipparcos parallax for Alcor, we find that Mizar and Alcor are physically separated by 0.36 {+-} 0.19 pc (74 {+-} 39 kAU; minimum 18 kAU), and their velocity vectors are marginally consistent ({chi}{sup 2} probability 6%). Given their close proximity and concordant motions we suggest that the Mizar quadruple and the Alcor binary be together considered the second closest stellar sextuplet. The addition of Mizar-Alcor to the census of stellar multiples with six or more components effectively doubles the local density of such systems within the local volume (d < 40 pc)

  5. Carbon dioxide sequestration monitoring and verification via laser based detection system in the 2 mum band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Seth David

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a known contributor to the green house gas effect. Emissions of CO2 are rising as the global demand for inexpensive energy is placated through the consumption and combustion of fossil fuels. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may provide a method to prevent CO2 from being exhausted to the atmosphere. The carbon may be captured after fossil fuel combustion in a power plant and then stored in a long term facility such as a deep geologic feature. The ability to verify the integrity of carbon storage at a location is key to the success of all CCS projects. A laser-based instrument has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU) to measure CO2 concentrations above a carbon storage location. The CO2 Detection by Differential Absorption (CODDA) Instrument uses a temperature-tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode that is capable of accessing a spectral region, 2.0027 to 2.0042 mum, that contains three CO2 absorption lines and a water vapor absorption line. This instrument laser is aimed over an open-air, two-way path of about 100 m, allowing measurements of CO2 concentrations to be made directly above a carbon dioxide release test site. The performance of the instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is studied using a newly developed CO2 controlled release facility. The field and CO2 releases are managed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at MSU. Two test injections were carried out through vertical wells simulating seepage up well paths. Three test injections were done as CO2 escaped up through a slotted horizontal pipe simulating seepage up through geologic fault zones. The results from these 5 separate controlled release experiments over the course of three summers show that the CODDA Instrument is clearly capable of verifying the integrity of full-scale CO2 storage operations.

  6. THE INCIDENCE OF DEBRIS DISKS AT 24 {mu}m AND 670 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Laurie E.; Trilling, David E.; Rieke, George; Su, Kate

    2012-05-10

    We use Spitzer Space Telescope 24 {mu}m data to search for debris disks among 122 AFGKM stars from the {approx}670 Myr clusters Hyades, Coma Ber, and Praesepe, utilizing a number of advances in data reduction and determining the intrinsic colors of main-sequence stars. For our sample, the 1{sigma} dispersion about the main-sequence V-K{sub S} , K{sub S} -[24] locus is approximately 3.1%. We identify seven debris disks at 10% or more ({>=}3{sigma} confidence level) above the expected K{sub S} -[24] for purely photospheric emission. The incidence of excesses of 10% or greater in our sample at this age is 5.7{sup +3.1} {sub -1.7}%. Combining with results from the literature, the rate is 7.8{sup +4.2}{sub -2.1}% for early-type (B9-F4) stars and 2.7{sup +3.3}{sub -1.7}% for solar-like (F5-K9) stars. Our primary sample has strict criteria for inclusion to allow comparison with other work; when we relax these criteria, three additional debris disks are detected. They are all around stars of solar-like type and hence reinforce our conclusion that disks around such stars are still relatively common at 670 Myr and are similar to the rate around early-type stars. The apparently small difference in decay rates between early-type and solar-like stars is inconsistent with the first-order theoretical predictions that the later type stellar disks would decay an order of magnitude more quickly than the earlier type ones.

  7. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH INVESTIGATION OF MIPSGAL 24 {mu}m COMPACT BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Flagey, N.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Billot, N.

    2011-11-01

    The MIPSGAL 24 {mu}m Galactic Plane Survey has revealed more than 400 compact-extended objects. Less than 15% of these MIPSGAL bubbles (MBs) are known and identified as evolved stars. We present Spitzer observations of four MBs obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph to determine the origin of the mid-IR emission. We model the mid-IR gas lines and the dust emission to infer physical conditions within the MBs and consequently their nature. Two MBs show a dust-poor spectrum dominated by highly ionized gas lines of [O IV], [Ne III], [Ne V], [S III], and [S IV]. We identify them as planetary nebulae with a density of a few 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and a central white dwarf of {approx}>200,000 K. The mid-IR emission of the two other MBs is dominated by a dust continuum and lower-excitation lines. Both of them show a central source in the near-IR (Two Micron All Sky Survey and IRAC) broadband images. The first dust-rich MB matches a Wolf-Rayet star of {approx}60,000 K at 7.5 kpc with dust components of {approx}170 and {approx}1750 K. Its mass is about 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} and its mass loss is about 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The second dust-rich MB has recently been suggested as a Be/B[e]/luminous blue variable candidate. The gas lines of [Fe II] as well as hot continuum components ({approx}300 and {approx}1250 K) arise from the inside of the MB while its outer shell emits a colder dust component ({approx}75 K). The distance to the MB remains highly uncertain. Its mass is about 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} and its mass loss is about 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}.

  8. Study of ablation by laser irradiation of plane targets at wavelengths 1. 05, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Toner, W.T.; Goldsack, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Veats, S.A.; Cunningham, P.F.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ablation by laser irradiation at wavelengths lambda = 1.05, 0.53, and 0.35 ..mu..m has been studied from analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra of layered targets and of ion emission. Irradiance was varied in the range 2 x 10/sup 13/ to 2 x 10/sup 15/ W cm/sup -2/ with constant laser power and variable focal spot size. Deductions include the effect of lateral energy transport from small focal spots and ablation rates and ablation pressures obtained both in the limit of negligible transport and when lateral transport is significant. Advantages of short wavelengths for ablatively driven implosions are quantified.

  9. Ronchi test with equivalent wavelength.

    PubMed

    García-Arellano, Anmi; Granados-Agustín, Fermín; Campos-García, Manuel; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2012-05-20

    In this work we present an experimental proposal to evaluate optical surfaces with high slopes or with infrared wavelengths based on the Ronchi test as well as on the concept of equivalent wavelength. A spatial modulator is used in the implementation of the Ronchi test, and a white LED with different color filters is employed in order to generate different wavelengths. Two Ronchigrams with incoherent light, each one for a different color, are registered and computationally processed, thus generating a third one with an equivalent wavelength. The results obtained show that it is possible to generate patterns with traditional rulings and substructured sequences of Katyl. Additionally, we discuss some of the limitations of employing different rulings. Finally, we found that appropriate image enhancing algorithms allow us to improve the visibility of the resulting fringes and thus obtain a better analysis.

  10. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  11. Risk factors for sonographic internal anal sphincter gaps 6-12 months after delivery complicated by anal sphincter tear.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Catherine S; Richter, Holly E; Gutman, Robert E; Brown, Morton B; Whitehead, William E; Fine, Paul M; Hakim, Christiane; Harford, Frank; Weber, Anne M

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for internal anal sphincter (IAS) gaps on postpartum endoanal ultrasound in women with obstetric anal sphincter tear. This prospective study included 106 women from the Childbirth and Pelvic Symptoms Imaging Supplementary Study who had third- or fourth-degree perineal laceration at delivery and endoanal ultrasound 6-12 months postpartum. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact and t tests and logistic regression. Mean (+/- SD) age was 27.7 (+/- 6.2) years. Seventy-nine women (76%) were white and 22 (21%) black. Thirty-seven (35%) had sonographic IAS gaps. Risk factors for gaps included fourth- vs third-degree perineal laceration (odds ratio [OR] 15.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.8, 50) and episiotomy (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2, 9.1). Black race (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05, 0.96) was protective. In women with obstetric anal sphincter repairs, fourth-degree tears and episiotomy are associated with more frequent sonographic IAS gaps.

  12. [Weight status, dietary habits and physical activity among 6-12 year-old children in Castile-La Mancha].

    PubMed

    Santiago, S; Cuervo, M; Zazpe, I; Ortega, A; García-Perea, A; Martínez, J A

    2014-02-01

    Childhood obesity is a multifactorial disease, in which unhealthy dietary patterns and sedentary lifestyles play a decisive role. The aim of this study was to assess the weight status, dietary habits and physical activity in Castile-La Mancha children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3061 children 6-12 years-old who were participating in the programme, "Alimenta su salud". Anthropometric measurements, food consumption frequency, dietary habits and physical activity were assessed by a questionnaire, including gender, age and geographical influences. The prevalence of subjects with excess weight-for-height was 24.0% and obesity was 14.3%, with geographical differences. Girls more often have mid-morning snacks, consume more supplements, and reported to be less active than boys. Special diets and sports activities were lower in children aged 6-9 years as compared to the 10-12 years old group. The intake of vegetables and fruit is low, while there is overconsumption of sausages, pastries, salted snacks, sweets and fast food, with some differences by age group. One out of four children is overweight or obese in this population. Children do not meet recommendations for fruit and vegetables and there is a high consumption of foods associated with obesity risk. Physical inactivity was more prevalent during the weekends, and among girls. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of food habits in children aged 6-12 years and the risk of caries.

    PubMed

    Doichinova, Liliya; Bakardjiev, Peter; Peneva, Milena

    2015-01-02

    Food is necessary for the proper growth and development of children. The excessive intake of low-molecular carbohydrates constitutes a serious health issue, which has an unfavourable impact on the dental health status. The aim of this study was to assess the food habits in healthy children aged 6-12 years and the effect on their oral risk profile. The study included 100 children. The assessment of their nutrition was done with the help of a seven-day reproduction of the food intake and a survey used to determine their underlying food habits and preferences. The results revealed unbalanced nutrition of the children and increased intake of simple sugar, which will increase the risk of development of dental caries. The observed high levels of DMFT (number of decayed, missing and filled teeth) in 54% of the children is a logical result of the frequent intake of sugary foods and beverages for a long period of time, as this will increase the acid production by microorganisms in dental plaque, which is one of the leading etiologic factors for the development of caries. It is necessary for dentists to administer control over the carbohydrate intake and the food habits of children, as well as to encourage non-cariogenic diet in order to keep their good oral health.

  14. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  15. Spatial phase stepping wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; García-Márquez, Jorge; Fodor, Jozsua; Juncar, Patrick

    2005-03-01

    A new way of evaluating the ratio between a reference wavelength radiation and an unknown wavelength radiation in a two-beam interferometer is proposed here. The advantage of two-beam interferometry is the sinusoidal fringe signal for which precise phase detection algorithms exist. Modern algorithms can cope with different sources of errors, and correct them. We recall the principle of the Michelson-type lambdameter using temporal interference and we introduce the Young-type lambdameter using spatial interference. The Young-type lambdameter is based on the acquisition of the interference pattern from two point sources (e.g. two ends of monomode fibres projected onto a CCD camera). The measurement of an unknown wavelength can be achieved by comparing with a reference wavelength. Accurate interference phase maps can be calculated using spatial phase shifting. In this way, each small group of contiguous pixels acts as a single interferometer, and the whole set of pixels corresponds to many hundreds or thousands of interferometric measurement system units. The analysis of uncertainties shows that resolutions better than 10-7 can be achieved. An advantage of the fibre wavelength metre described here is the measurement velocity that takes only a few seconds.

  16. Monolithic multiple wavelength ridge waveguide laser array fabricated by Nd:YAG laser-induced quantum well intermixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowski, J. J.; Feng, Y.; Poole, P. J.; Buchanan, M.; Poirier, S.; Genest, J.; Aimez, V.

    2002-07-01

    Maskless selective area cw Nd:YAG laser annealing of GaInAsP/InP quantum well (QW) structures has been investigated as a possible route towards the fabrication of monolithically integrated photonic circuits. Laser irradiation of a 5 QW laser structure, originally designed for lasers emitting at 1.52 mum, yielded material having a continuously changing band gap ranging from 1.52 to 1.4 mum over the distance of about 3 mm. Bars with arrays of ridge waveguide lasers, having cavity lengths from 300 to 600 mum, were fabricated from the processed material. An individual bar, 2-3 mm long, comprised lasers operating typically between 1.4 and 1.52 mum. The lasers showed stable threshold current density and high quantum efficiency at all operating wavelengths. The results indicate that the applied approach has the potential to realize the cost-effective fabrication of advanced photonic devices and photonic integrated circuits. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  17. Interaction of endokinin A/B and (Mpa(6))-γ2-MSH-6-12 in pain regulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lanxia; Yang, Qing; He, Chunbo; Wei, Chunnan; Yang, Yinliang; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-10-01

    The present study focused on the interactive effects of (Mpa(6))-γ2-MSH-6-12 (Mpa, spinal level) and endokinin A/B (EKA/B, supraspinal level) on pain regulation in mice. EKA/B (30 pmol) only weakened 100 pmol Mpa-induced hyperalgesia at 5 min, but could enhance it during 20-30 min. However, EKA/B (100 pmol) antagonized all dose levels of Mpa significantly at 5 min and blocked them completely at 10 min. EKA/B (3 nmol) co-injected with Mpa presented marked analgesia at 5 min and enduring hyperalgesia within 20-60 min. To investigate the underlying mechanisms between Mpa and EKA/B, SR140333B and SR142801 (NK1 and NK3 receptor antagonists, respectively) were utilized. SR140333B had no influence on Mpa, while SR142801 potentiated it during 20-30 min. Whereas, SR140333B and SR142801 could block the co-administration of Mpa and EKA/B (30 pmol) separately at 5 min and 30 min. These phenomena might attribute to that these two antagonists promoted the antagonism of EKA/B (30 pmol) at the early stage, while antagonized EKA/B preferentially in the latter period. SR140333B weakened the analgesia of EKA/B (3 nmol), but produced no effect on Mpa. However, SR140333B failed to affect the co-injection of Mpa and EKA/B, which implied that EKA/B cooperated with Mpa prior to SR140333B. These results could potentially help to better understand the interaction of NK and MrgC receptors in pain regulation in mice.

  18. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Hwang, H. S.; Dickinson, M.; Rigopoulou, D.

    2010-05-10

    We present a multi-wavelength, UV-to-radio analysis for a sample of massive (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) IRAC- and MIPS 24 {mu}m detected Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) with spectroscopic redshifts z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-North field. For LBGs without individual 24 {mu}m detections, we employ stacking techniques at 24 {mu}m, 1.1 mm, and 1.4 GHz to construct the average UV-to-radio spectral energy distribution and find it to be consistent with that of a luminous infrared galaxy with L{sub IR} = 4.5{sup +1.1}{sub -2.3} x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} and a specific star formation rate of 4.3 Gyr{sup -1} that corresponds to a mass doubling time {approx}230 Myr. On the other hand, when considering the 24 {mu}m detected LBGs we find among them galaxies with L{sub IR}>10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, indicating that the space density of z {approx} 3 UV-selected ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) is {approx}(1.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3}. We compare measurements of star formation rates from data at different wavelengths and find that there is tight correlation (Kendall's {tau}>99.7%) and excellent agreement between the values derived from dust-corrected UV, mid-IR, millimeter, and radio data for the whole range of L{sub IR} up to L{sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 13} L{sub sun}. This range is greater than that for which the correlation is known to hold at z {approx} 2, possibly due to the lack of significant contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the 24 {mu}m flux at z {approx} 3. The fact that this agreement is observed for galaxies with L{sub IR}>10{sup 12} L{sub sun} suggests that star formation in UV-selected ULIRGs, as well as the bulk of star formation activity at this redshift, is not embedded in optically thick regions as seen in local ULIRGs and submillimeter-selected galaxies at z = 2.

  19. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  20. 1 {mu}m EXCESS SOURCES IN THE UKIDSS. I. THREE T DWARFS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SOUTHERN EQUATORIAL STRIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.; Murata, K. L.; Fujiwara, M.; Nagayama, T.; Peterson, B. A.; Suenaga, T.; Furusawa, K.; Miyake, N.; Omori, K.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.

    2011-08-15

    We report the discovery of two field brown dwarfs, ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0321+0051, and the rediscovery of ULAS J0226+0051 (IfA 0230-Z1), in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern equatorial stripe. They are found in the course of our follow-up observation program of 1 {mu}m excess sources in the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs spectra at red optical wavelengths (6500-10500 A) are presented, which reveal that they are early-T dwarfs. The classification is also supported by their optical to near-infrared colors. It is noted that ULAS J0321+0051 is one of the faintest currently known T dwarfs. The estimated distances to the three objects are 50-110 pc, thus they are among the most distant field T dwarfs known. The dense temporal coverage of the target fields achieved by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey allows us to perform a simple time-series analysis of the dwarfs. We create stacked images of each year from 2002-2007 and find significant proper motions of 150-290 mas yr{sup -1} or transverse velocities of 40-100 km s{sup -1} for ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0226+0051. We also find that there are no detectable, long-term (a-few-year) brightness variations above a few times 0.1 mag for the two brown dwarfs.

  1. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  2. Formation of primary kimberlite melts - Constraints from experiments at 6-12 GPa and variable CO2/H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girnis, A. V.; Bulatov, V. K.; Brey, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Liquidus phase relations were experimentally studied in model kimberlite melts at 6-12 GPa. Four starting materials were used with different CO2 and H2O contents but almost identical proportions of other components (~ 35 wt.% SiO2, 3 wt.% Al2O3, 10 wt.% FeO, 33 wt.% MgO, 15 wt.% CaO, 0.3 wt.% Na2O, and 1 wt.% K2O on a 100% volatile-free basis). The liquidus phase of the CO2 richest mixture (33 wt.% CO2 and no H2O) is coesite at P > 6-8 GPa and low-Ca pyroxene at lower pressures. In an H2O-free mixture with lower CO2 content (18 wt.%) low-Ca pyroxene is the main liquidus phase and coesite was never observed in the experimental products. The addition of water (mixtures with 10 wt.% H2O + 9 wt.% CO2 and 12 wt.% H2O + 5 wt.% CO2) depresses the liquidus temperature and expands the crystallization field of olivine. At high pressures (> 8 GPa), garnet crystallization dominates near-liquidus phase relations. Based on the experimental data, possible conditions of the simultaneous saturation of kimberlite melt with olivine + low-Ca pyroxene ± garnet were estimated. High-Ca pyroxene was never found in the near-liquidus assemblages despite the high-CaO compositions of the starting mixtures. It was shown that the supposed primary kimberlite melt can be in equilibrium with the garnet harzburgite assemblage at 6-8 GPa and variable volatile contents, from ~ 15 wt.% CO2 under anhydrous conditions to 20 wt.% H2O and low CO2. These conditions correspond to possible parameters of kimberlite magma generation by partial melting of carbonated garnet harzburgite in the lithospheric mantle. The primary CO2 content could be higher if the kimberlite magma was poorer in SiO2 (more ‘carbonatitic'). The maximum CO2 content is limited by the appearance of magnesite on the liquidus at 20-22 wt.%, which is much lower than CO2 solubility in kimberlite melt at 7-8 GPa (> 30 wt.%). The content of H2O in primary kimberlite magmas depends on the bulk H2O content in the source, because no hydrous

  3. Observational properties of simulated galaxies in overdense and average regions at redshifts z ≃ 6-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Shlosman, Isaac; Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We use high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies of Romano-Díaz et al., post-processing them with a panchromatic three-dimensional radiation transfer code to obtain the galaxy UV luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 6-12. The galaxies are followed in a rare, heavily overdense region within a ˜5σ density peak, which can host high-z quasars, and in an average density region, down to the stellar mass of Mstar ˜ 4 × 107 M⊙. We find that the overdense regions evolve at a substantially accelerated pace - the most massive galaxy has grown to Mstar ˜ 8.4 × 1010 M⊙ by z = 6.3, contains dust of Mdust ˜ 4.1 × 108 M⊙, and is associated with a very high star formation rate, SFR ˜ 745 M⊙ yr- 1. The attained SFR-Mstar correlation results in the specific SFR slowly increasing with Mstar. Most of the UV radiation in massive galaxies is absorbed by the dust, its escape fraction fesc is low, increasing slowly with time. Galaxies in the average region have less dust, and agree with the observed UV LF. The LF of the overdense region is substantially higher, and contains much brighter galaxies. The massive galaxies are bright in the infrared (IR) due to the dust thermal emission, with LIR ˜ 3.7 × 1012 L⊙ at z = 6.3, while LIR < 1011 L⊙ for the low-mass galaxies. Therefore, ALMA can probe massive galaxies in the overdense region up to z ˜ 10 with a reasonable integration time. The UV spectral properties of discy galaxies depend significantly upon the viewing angle. The stellar and dust masses of the most massive galaxy in the overdense region are comparable to those of the sub-millimetre galaxy found by Riechers et al. at z = 6.3, while the modelled SFR and the sub-millimetre flux fall slightly below the observed one. Statistical significance of these similarities and differences will only become clear with the upcoming ALMA observations.

  4. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  5. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  6. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  7. Long wavelength luminescence from gallium-indium-nitrogen-arsenic-antimony on gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Vincent F.

    GaInNAs grown on GaAs has recently been found to optically emit at wavelengths longer than previously thought possible with material grown epitaxially on GaAs substrates. Dilute-nitride GaInNAs alloys have quickly become an excellent candidate for low cost 1.3--1.55 mum vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and high power edge emitting lasers in the past few years. Nitride-arsenide alloys were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a N radio frequency (RF) plasma cell. The nitride-arsenide based crystal is grown under metastable conditions with low substrate temperatures and a highly reactive N radical plasma source. However, defects generated during this non-equilibrium growth are a source for non-radiative recombination and diminished photoluminescence (PL). By rapid thermal annealing (RTA) the material after growth, defects are removed from the crystal and the material quality of the GaInNAs films improves significantly. By measuring structural changes that occur during anneal, new insight has been made into the mechanisms which cause the optoelectronic properties to improve. In an effort to further enhance crystal quality, Sb present during GaInNAs growth is thought to act as a surfactant to maintain surface planarity, and phase coherence, resulting in increased PL efficiency. With the addition of Sb, we have observed both a sharp intensity increase in samples with a high In concentration and a bandgap past 1.3 mum. Increasing the In or N content in materials with PL over 1.3 mum normally drops optical intensity; however, using Sb, we can maintain high PL efficiency out to 1.6 mum. Since both In and Sb in GaAs add compressive stress and the solubility of N in GaAs is limited, there is a need for GaNAs tensile strain compensating barriers for applications in multiple quantum well, high-intensity devices. With the development of GaInNAsSb alloys and strain compensated barriers, even longer wavelengths are possible on GaAs, greatly

  8. Modifying Driving Laser Wavelength to Generate Coherent, Ultrafast X-rays from Phase-Matched High-Order Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Chang

    Recently, ultrafast, coherent X-ray science and technology has received a lot of attentions, especially with respect to tabletop X-rays produced by high harmonic generation (HHG). The femtosecond-to-attosecond X-ray pulse enables the dynamics of chemical reactions, nano-materials and bio-molecular systems to be studied with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. However, the bright HHG light source is limited to < 150 eV spectral region due to phase-mismatch issue and the lack of the right driving laser wavelength. Development of phase-matching scheme and different-wavelength lasers for extending bright HHG to shorter wavelengths becomes a challenge. Over the past five years, we essentially solve the high-harmonic phase matching problem using longer driving wavelengths. Our experimental results have shown that full phase matching of HHG scales very strongly with wavelength of the driving laser, making it possible for the first time to obtain bright phase-matched emission to the 0.5 keV using a 2 mum laser and the keV using a 3.9 mum laser with a conversion efficiency >1000 times that previously reported. Their supercontinuum bandwidths are capable of generation extremely short pulses down to single digit attoseconds ( 10--18 sec). This timescale is remarkable in that it approaches a new regime where light transit times approach atomic dimensions. On the other hand, by using a shorter wavelength of driving laser (0.4 um), we also optimized the HHG flux ˜ 10 times brighter than before in the EUV spectral region between 45 and 60 eV. We found that the most substantial HHG enhancement arises when the right combination of the laser wavelengths, gas species and gas pressures. A high flux tabletop coherent X-ray beam line is feasible to implement, for applications in biological and materials imaging, or as a seeding source for a free-electron laser amplifier.

  9. High-frequency demodulation of multiphoton fluorescence in long-wavelength hyper-Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Olbrechts, G; Wostyn, K; Clays, K; Persoons, A

    1999-03-15

    Suppression of the multiphoton fluorescence contribution to the hyper-Rayleigh (second-order nonlinear optical) scattering signal was recently achieved by intrinsic demodulation of the fluorescence at high amplitude-modulation (AM) frequencies [Olbrechts et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2233 (1998)]. These high AM frequencies were obtained from the high harmonic content in the Fourier spectrum of a repetitive train of femtosecond pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser emitting at 800 nm. We have used a femtosecond parametric oscillator to shift the fundamental wavelength to 1.3 mum . By further improving the detection electronics, we can now obtain fluorescence suppression at AM frequencies up to 600 MHz. Fluorescence-free hyperpolarizability values were obtained for fluorescent dipolar compounds as well as for an ionic fluorophore. The results also indicate that shifting the fundamental wavelength to the near infrared only is not a general solution to the multiphoton fluorescence problem in hyper-Rayleigh scattering.

  10. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  11. Laser wavelength selector and output coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hard, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    Optical system eliminates displacement occurring when wavelengths are selected in multiple wavelength laser utilizing intracavity wavelength selection by first-order Littrow reflection of plane grating. Output coupling varies direction of output beam as different wavelengths are selected by grating rotation.

  12. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.

  13. InAs/InP single quantum wire formation and emission at 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martinez-Pastor, J.

    2006-12-04

    Isolated InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires have been grown using in situ accumulated stress measurements to adjust the optimal InAs thickness. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows highly asymmetric nanostructures with average length exceeding more than ten times their width. High resolution optical investigation of as-grown samples reveals strong photoluminescence from individual quantum wires at 1.5 {mu}m. Additional sharp features are related to monolayer fluctuations of the two-dimensional InAs layer present during the early stages of the quantum wire self-assembling process.

  14. The distinct clinical features and prognosis of the CD10⁺MUM1⁺ and CD10⁻Bcl6⁻MUM1⁻ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting-Xun; Miao, Yi; Wu, Jia-Zhu; Gong, Qi-Xing; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Hua, Dong; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-02-09

    Using an immunohistochemistry (IHC) based method, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be classified into germinal center B-cell (GCB) and non-GCB subtypes. However, the prognostic value of Hans algorithm was contradictory in the literature. Using IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we analyzed the antibodies applied in Hans algorithm and other genetic factors in 601 DLBCL patients and prognostic value of Hans algorithm in 306 cases who were treated with chemoimmunotherapy. The results showed that patients with GCB subtype have better overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than non-GCB cases. However, to some extent, double positive (CD10(+)MUM1(+), DP) and triple negative (CD10(-)Bcl6(-)MUM(-), TN) showed different clinical characteristics and prognosis to others that were assigned to the same cell-of-origin group. The DP group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.3650) and PFS (median PFS: 47.0 vs. 32.7 months, P = 0.0878) with the non-GCB group while the TN group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.9278) and PFS (median PFS: both not reached, P = 0.9420) with the GCB group. In conclusion, Recognition of specific entities in Hans algorithm could help us to accurately predict outcome of the patients and choose the best clinical management for them.

  15. Multi-wavelength holographic profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, E. A.; Gesualdi, M. R.; Muramatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for surface profilometry by holography is presented. We used a diode laser emitting at many wavelengths simultaneously as the light source and a Bi 12TiO 20 (BTO) crystal as the holographic medium in single exposure processes. The employ of multi-wavelength, large free spectral range (FSR) lasers leads to holographic images covered of interference fringes corresponding to the contour lines of the studied surface. In order to obtain the relief of the studied surface, the fringe analysis was performed by the phase stepping technique (PST) and the phase unwrapping was carried out by the Cellular-automata method. We analysed the relief of a tilted flat metallic bar and a tooth prosthesis.

  16. The Effect of Recorded Mum's Lullaby and Brahm’s Lullaby on Oxygen Saturation in Preterm Infants: a Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeili, Mahnaz; Sabet, Tahmineh; MustafaGharebaghi, Manijeh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Arshadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Music stimulation has been shown to provide significant benefits to preterm infants. Thus the aim of this study was determine the effect of recorded mum's lullaby and Brahm’s lullaby on oxygen saturation in preterm infants. Methods: This double-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out on 66 premature newborns with the postnatal age of ≥3 days and weight ≤ 2800 grams at Taleghani Hospital. Infants were randomly divided into three groups: control, Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby groups. Infants were continuously monitored for primary outcome of percutaneous oxygen saturation, for three consecutive sessions. Results: There were significant difference in neonate oxygen saturation between the Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby as compared with control groups in the 15 minutes after intervention. Conclusion: This study showed beneficial effects of Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby sound. Therefore; it may be used for improving short term outcomes in premature infants. PMID:26989669

  17. Stellar activity at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1986-01-01

    Hundreds of stars have now been detected at radio wavelengths. At least four processes are believed to cause the radio emission: thermal bremsstrahlung, gyrosynchrotron, cyclotron maser, and plasma radiation. Here the characteristics of the various classes of detected stars are reviewed, along with the putative reasons for the radio emission. The classes of stars described include: single stars, binaries containing two main sequences and/or giant stars, binaries containing one white dwarf, and binaries containing one neutron star or black hole.

  18. Four-wave mixing parametric oscillation and frequency comb generation at visible wavelengths in a silica microbubble resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Jiang, Xuefeng; Kasumie, Sho; Zhao, Guangming; Xu, Linhua; Ward, Jonathan M.; Yang, Lan; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-11-01

    Frequency comb generation in microresonators at visible wavelengths has found applications in a variety of areas such as metrology, sensing, and imaging. To achieve Kerr combs based on four-wave mixing in a microresonator, dispersion must be in the anomalous regime. In this work, we demonstrate dispersion engineering in a microbubble resonator (MBR) fabricated by a two-CO$_2$ laser beam technique. By decreasing the wall thickness of the MBR down to 1.4 $\\mu$m, the zero dispersion wavelength shifts to values shorter than 764 nm, making phase matching possible around 765 nm. With the optical \\textit{Q}-factor of the MBR modes being greater than $10^7$, four-wave mixing is observed at 765 nm for a pump power of 3 mW. By increasing the pump power, parametric oscillation is achieved, and a frequency comb with 14 comb lines is generated at visible wavelengths.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of the MobileMums intervention to increase physical activity among mothers with young children: a Markov model informed by a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Burn, Edward; Marshall, Alison L; Miller, Yvette D; Barnett, Adrian G; Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Graves, Nicholas

    2015-04-29

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of the MobileMums intervention. MobileMums is a 12-week programme which assists mothers with young children to be more physically active, primarily through the use of personalised SMS text-messages. A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model to estimate and compare the costs and consequences of MobileMums and usual care. This study considers the cost-effectiveness of MobileMums in Queensland, Australia. A hypothetical cohort of over 36 000 women with a child under 1 year old is considered. These women are expected to be eligible and willing to participate in the intervention in Queensland, Australia. The model was informed by the effectiveness results from a 9-month two-arm community-based randomised controlled trial undertaken in 2011 and registered retrospectively with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611000481976). Baseline characteristics for the model cohort, treatment effects and resource utilisation were all informed by this trial. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of MobileMums compared with usual care. The intervention is estimated to lead to an increase of 131 QALYs for an additional cost to the health system of 1.1 million Australian dollars (AUD). The expected incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for MobileMums is 8608 AUD per QALY gained. MobileMums has a 98% probability of being cost-effective at a cost-effectiveness threshold of 64 000 AUD. Varying modelling assumptions has little effect on this result. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of 64 000 AUD, MobileMums would likely be a cost-effective use of healthcare resources in Queensland, Australia. Australian Clinical Trials Registry; ACTRN12611000481976. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography selectively extracting wavelength information from wavelength-multiplexed holograms.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Mori, Ryota; Kikunaga, Shuhei; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography that selectively extracts wavelength information from five wavelength-multiplexed holograms is presented. Specific phase shifts for respective wavelengths are introduced to remove the crosstalk components and extract only the object wave at the desired wavelength from the holograms. Object waves in multiple wavelengths are selectively extracted by utilizing 2π ambiguity and the subtraction procedures based on phase-shifting interferometry. Numerical results show the validity of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also experimentally demonstrated.

  1. A novel laser wavelength meter based on the measurement of synthetic wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Yang, Wanfu; Wei, Ruofei; Zhao, Siwei

    2010-11-01

    The accuracy of the current wavelength meter using optical interferometry is limited by the numbers of fringe counted. To solve this problem, a novel laser wavelength meter based on the measurement of synthetic wavelength is proposed. The unknown wavelength is obtained by measuring the value of synthetic wavelength produced by the unknown and reference wavelengths, and half of this value corresponds to 2π variation of the phase difference between the interference signals of the unknown and reference wavelengths. The optical configuration of the wavelength meter is designed and the measurement principle is analyzed theoretically. To verify its feasibility, three helium-neon lasers' wavelengths were determined experimentally, and a relative uncertainty on the unknown wavelength of the order of 10-8 was realized. Accuracy analysis shows that this wavelength meter has the advantage of high accuracy when the unknown wavelength is around the standard laser wavelength recommended by CIPM.

  2. An innovative method for the preparation of mum (Thai fermented sausages) with acceptable technological quality and extended shelf-life.

    PubMed

    Wanangkarn, Amornrat; Liu, Deng-Cheng; Swetwiwathana, Adisorn; Tan, Fa-Jui

    2012-11-15

    Freshly-manufactured mum sausages were assigned to two processing methods (process I: stored at ∼30 °C for 14 days; process II: stored at ∼30 °C for three days, vacuum-packaged, and stored at 4 °C until day 28). Physicochemical, microbial, textural, and sensory properties of samples were analysed. The results showed that dehydration was more intense in process I samples, and resulted in lower moisture content and water activity. Significant decreases in pH values, and increases in lactic acid were observed in both samples by day 3. The total microflora and lactic acid bacteria counts increased rapidly during the fermentation and then decreased while the Enterobacteriaceae counts decreased steadily. Too much dehydration resulted in tough textures and unacceptable sensory qualities for process I samples. In conclusion, after three days of fermentation, with vacuum-packaging, ripening and storage at 4 °C up to 28 days, it is possible to produce mum sausages with better qualities and an extended shelf life.

  3. Focusing X-rays to a 1-{mu}m spot using elastically bent, graded multilayer coated mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Kortright, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In the x-ray fluorescent microprobe at beamline 10.3.1, the ALS bending magnet source is demagnified by a factor of several hundred using a pair of mirrors arranged in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. These are coated with multilayers to increase reflectivity and limit the pass band of the x-rays striking the sample. The x-rays excite characteristic fluorescent x-rays of elements in the sample, which are analyzed by an energy dispersive Si-Li detector, for a sensitive assay of the elemental content. By scanning the focal spot the spatial distribution of the elements is determined; the spatial resolution depends on the size of this spot. When spherical mirrors are used, the spatial resolution is limited by aberrations to 5 or 10 {mu}m. This has been improved to 1 {mu}m through the use of an elliptical mirror formed by elastically bending a plane mirror of uniform width and thickness with the optimum combination of end couples.

  4. Internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Women With Postnatal Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial of MumMoodBooster

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, Jeannette; Danaher, Brian G; Holt, Charlene; Holt, Christopher J; Seeley, John R; Tyler, Milagra S; Ross, Jessica; Ericksen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few published controlled trials examining the efficacy of Internet-based treatment for postnatal depression (PND) and none that assess diagnostic status (clinical remission) as the primary outcome. This is despite the need to improve treatment uptake and accessibility because fewer than 50% of postnatally depressed women seek help, even when identified as depressed. Objective In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), we aimed to test the efficacy of a 6-session Internet intervention (the MumMoodBooster program, previously evaluated in a feasibility trial) in a sample of postnatal women with a clinical diagnosis of depression. The MumMoodBooster program is a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention, is highly interactive, includes a partner website, and was supported by low-intensity telephone coaching. Methods This was a parallel 2-group RCT (N=43) comparing the Internet CBT treatment (n=21) to treatment as usual (n=22). At baseline and at 12 weeks after enrollment, women’s diagnostic status was assessed by telephone with the Standardized Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV) and symptom severity with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Depression symptoms were measured repeatedly throughout the study period with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Results At the end of the study, 79% (15/19) of women who received the Internet CBT treatment no longer met diagnostic criteria for depression on the SCID-IV (these outcome data were missing for 2 intervention participants). This contrasted with only 18% (4/22) remission in the treatment as usual condition. Depression scores on the BDI-II showed a large effect favoring the intervention group (d=.83, 95% CI 0.20-1.45). Small to medium effects were found on the PHQ-9 and on measures of anxiety and stress. Adherence to the program was very good with 86% (18/21) of users completing all sessions; satisfaction with the program was rated 3.1 out of 4 on average. Conclusions Our results

  5. Internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Women With Postnatal Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial of MumMoodBooster.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Jeannette; Danaher, Brian G; Gemmill, Alan W; Holt, Charlene; Holt, Christopher J; Seeley, John R; Tyler, Milagra S; Ross, Jessica; Ericksen, Jennifer

    2016-03-07

    There are few published controlled trials examining the efficacy of Internet-based treatment for postnatal depression (PND) and none that assess diagnostic status (clinical remission) as the primary outcome. This is despite the need to improve treatment uptake and accessibility because fewer than 50% of postnatally depressed women seek help, even when identified as depressed. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), we aimed to test the efficacy of a 6-session Internet intervention (the MumMoodBooster program, previously evaluated in a feasibility trial) in a sample of postnatal women with a clinical diagnosis of depression. The MumMoodBooster program is a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention, is highly interactive, includes a partner website, and was supported by low-intensity telephone coaching. This was a parallel 2-group RCT (N=43) comparing the Internet CBT treatment (n=21) to treatment as usual (n=22). At baseline and at 12 weeks after enrollment, women's diagnostic status was assessed by telephone with the Standardized Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV) and symptom severity with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Depression symptoms were measured repeatedly throughout the study period with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). At the end of the study, 79% (15/19) of women who received the Internet CBT treatment no longer met diagnostic criteria for depression on the SCID-IV (these outcome data were missing for 2 intervention participants). This contrasted with only 18% (4/22) remission in the treatment as usual condition. Depression scores on the BDI-II showed a large effect favoring the intervention group (d=.83, 95% CI 0.20-1.45). Small to medium effects were found on the PHQ-9 and on measures of anxiety and stress. Adherence to the program was very good with 86% (18/21) of users completing all sessions; satisfaction with the program was rated 3.1 out of 4 on average. Our results suggest that our Internet CBT program, Mum

  6. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  7. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10-8.

  8. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8).

  9. THE MASS LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: EMPIRICAL RELATIONS FOR EXCESS EMISSION AT 8 AND 24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Leitherer, Claus; Vijh, Uma; Gordon, Karl D.; Sewilo, Marta; Volk, Kevin; Blum, Robert D.; Harris, Jason; Babler, Brian L.; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl A.; Cohen, Martin; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Markwick-Kemper, Francisca

    2009-06-15

    We present empirical relations describing excess emission from evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey which includes the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m bands. We combine the SAGE data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; J, H, and K {sub s}) and the optical Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; U, B, V, and I) point source catalogs in order to create complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates in the LMC. AGB star outflows are among the main producers of dust in a galaxy, and this mass loss results in an excess in the fluxes observed in the 8 and 24 {mu}m bands. The aim of this work is to investigate the mass loss return by AGB stars to the interstellar medium of the LMC by studying the dependence of the infrared excess flux on the total luminosity. We identify oxygen-rich, carbon-rich, and extreme AGB star populations in our sample based on their 2MASS and IRAC colors. The SEDs of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars are compared with appropriate stellar photosphere models to obtain the excess flux in all the IRAC bands and the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. Extreme AGB stars are dominated by circumstellar emission at 8 and 24 {mu}m; thus we approximate their excesses with the flux observed in these bands. We find about 16,000 O-rich, 6300 C-rich, and 1000 extreme sources with reliable 8 {mu}m excesses, and about 4500 O-rich, 5300 C-rich, and 960 extreme sources with reliable 24 {mu}m excesses. The excesses are in the range 0.1 mJy to 5 Jy. The 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses for all three types of AGB candidates show a general increasing trend with luminosity. The color temperature of the circumstellar dust derived from the ratio of the 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses decreases with an increase in excess, while the 24 {mu}m

  10. Luciferases with tunable emission wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Kai; Hiblot, Julien; Yu, Qiluiyang; Sabbadini, Marina; Reymond, Luc; Xue, Lin; Sallin, Olivier; Schena, Alberto; Griss, Rudolf; Hill, Nicholas

    2017-09-22

    We introduce luciferases whose emission maxima can be tuned to different wavelengths by chemical labeling. These tunable luciferases are generated by inserting the small luciferase NanoLuc into the structures of the self-labeling proteins SNAP-tag or HaloTag7 near their active sites. Labeling of the tags with a fluorophore shifts the emission maximum of NanoLuc to that of the fluorophore. Luciferases with tunable colors have applications as reporter genes, for the construction of biosensors and in bioimaging. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  12. Terahertz wavelength encoding compressive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) compressive imaging can obtain two dimensional image with a single or linear detector, which can overcome the bottleneck problem of lacking of THz two dimensional detectors. In this presentation, we propose a method to obtain two dimensional images using a linear detector. A plano-convex cylindrical lens is employed to perform Fourier transform and to encode one dimensional information of an object into wavelengths. After recording, both amplitude and phase information for different frequency at each pixel of the line detector are extracted, two dimensional image of the object can be reconstructed. Numerical simulation demonstrates the validity of the proposed method.

  13. MID-INFRARED GALAXY MORPHOLOGY FROM THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): THE IMPRINT OF THE DE VAUCOULEURS REVISED HUBBLE-SANDAGE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AT 3.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Aravena, Manuel; Hinz, Joannah L.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Masters, Karen L.; Comeron, Sebastien

    2010-09-15

    Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera imaging provides an opportunity to study all known morphological types of galaxies in the mid-IR at a depth significantly better than ground-based near-infrared and optical images. The goal of this study is to examine the imprint of the de Vaucouleurs classification volume in the 3.6 {mu}m band, which is the best Spitzer waveband for galactic stellar mass morphology owing to its depth and its reddening-free sensitivity mainly to older stars. For this purpose, we have prepared classification images for 207 galaxies from the Spitzer archive, most of which are formally part of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G), a Spitzer post-cryogenic ('warm') mission Exploration Science Legacy Program survey of 2331 galaxies closer than 40 Mpc. For the purposes of morphology, the galaxies are interpreted as if the images are blue light, the historical waveband for classical galaxy classification studies. We find that 3.6 {mu}m classifications are well correlated with blue-light classifications, to the point where the essential features of many galaxies look very similar in the two very different wavelength regimes. Drastic differences are found only for the most dusty galaxies. Consistent with a previous study by Eskridge et al., the main difference between blue-light and mid-IR types is an {approx}1 stage interval difference for S0/a to Sbc or Sc galaxies, which tend to appear 'earlier' in type at 3.6 {mu}m due to the slightly increased prominence of the bulge, the reduced effects of extinction, and the reduced (but not completely eliminated) effect of the extreme population I stellar component. We present an atlas of all of the 207 galaxies analyzed here and bring attention to special features or galaxy types, such as nuclear rings, pseudobulges, flocculent spiral galaxies, I0 galaxies, double-stage and double-variety galaxies, and outer rings, that are particularly distinctive in the mid-IR.

  14. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF THE [N II] 205 {mu}m LINE IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: THE [N II] 205 {mu}m EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Lord, S.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Mazzarella, J.; Schulz, B.; Isaak, K. G.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Evans, A.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Petric, A. O.; Sanders, D. B.; Van der Werf, P. P.

    2013-03-01

    We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 {mu}m line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (L{sub [N{sub II]}}) and the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}), as well as the dependence of L{sub [N{sub II]}}/L{sub IR} ratio on L{sub IR}, far-infrared colors (IRAS f{sub 60}/f{sub 100}), and the [O III] 88 {mu}m to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that L{sub [N{sub II]}} correlates almost linearly with L{sub IR} for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies (all having L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) in our sample, which implies that L{sub [N{sub II]}} can serve as a star formation rate tracer which is particularly useful for high-redshift galaxies that will be observed with forthcoming submillimeter spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean L{sub [N{sub II]}}-L{sub IR} relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests that the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.

  15. 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m PHASE CURVES AND EVIDENCE FOR NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole; Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Aigrain, Suzanne; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Henry, Gregory W.; Langton, Jonathan

    2012-07-20

    We present new, full-orbit observations of the infrared phase variations of the canonical hot Jupiter HD 189733b obtained in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope. When combined with previous phase curve observations at 8.0 and 24 {mu}m, these data allow us to characterize the exoplanet's emission spectrum as a function of planetary longitude and to search for local variations in its vertical thermal profile and atmospheric composition. We utilize an improved method for removing the effects of intrapixel sensitivity variations and robustly extracting phase curve signals from these data, and we calculate our best-fit parameters and uncertainties using a wavelet-based Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis that accounts for the presence of time-correlated noise in our data. We measure a phase curve amplitude of 0.1242% {+-} 0.0061% in the 3.6 {mu}m band and 0.0982% {+-} 0.0089% in the 4.5 {mu}m band, corresponding to brightness temperature contrasts of 503 {+-} 21 K and 264 {+-} 24 K, respectively. We find that the times of minimum and maximum flux occur several hours earlier than predicted for an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, consistent with the eastward advection of gas by an equatorial super-rotating jet. The locations of the flux minima in our new data differ from our previous observations at 8 {mu}m, and we present new evidence indicating that the flux minimum observed in the 8 {mu}m is likely caused by an overshooting effect in the 8 {mu}m array. We obtain improved estimates for HD 189733b's dayside planet-star flux ratio of 0.1466% {+-} 0.0040% in the 3.6 {mu}m band and 0.1787% {+-} 0.0038% in the 4.5 {mu}m band, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 1328 {+-} 11 K and 1192 {+-} 9 K, respectively; these are the most accurate secondary eclipse depths obtained to date for an extrasolar planet. We compare our new dayside and nightside spectra for HD 189733b to the predictions of one-dimensional radiative transfer models from

  16. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  17. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  18. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  19. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  20. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  1. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  2. Single event upset and hardening in 0.15 /spl mu/m antifuse-based field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Wong, W.; Wolday, S.; Cronquist, B.; McCollum, J.; Katz, R.; Kleyner, I.

    2003-12-01

    The single event effects and hardening of a 0.15 /spl mu/m antifuse FPGA, the AX device, were investigated by beam test and computer simulation. The beam test showed no permanent damage mode. Functional failures were observed and attributed to the upsets in a control logic circuit, the startup sequencer. Clock upsets were observed and attributed to the single event transients in the clock network. Upsets were also measured in the user flip-flop and embedded SRAM. The hardening technique dealing with each upset mode is discussed in detail. SPICE and three-dimensional mixed-mode simulations were used to determine the design rules for mitigating the multiple upsets due to glancing angle and charge sharing. The hardening techniques have been implemented in the newly fabricated RTAXS device. Preliminary heavy-ion-beam test data show that all the hard-wired hardening solutions are working successfully.

  3. Localized (5 {mu}m) probing and detailed mapping of hair with synchrotron powered FT-IR microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, David L. Williams, Gwyn P.

    1998-06-01

    The thickness and high absorptivity of single hairs typically result in the saturation of major infrared bands and their distortion. Single human hairs longitudinally microtomed and mounted on mirror slides were scanned routinely in the past with a 20thinsp{mu}m{times}100thinsp{mu}m aperture that limited spatial resolution for localized probing and detailed mapping. Use of the nondivergent, bright, and low-noise synchrotron source for FT-IR microspectroscopy enables good S/N even at apertures as small as 5{endash}6 {mu}m. Functional group mapping as well as localized probing for extraneous materials illustrates the utility of this powerful probe. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Observation of nonlinear optical phenomena in air and fused silica using a 100 GW, 1.54 mum source.

    PubMed

    Naudeau, M L; Law, R J; Luk, T S; Nelson, T R; Cameron, S M; Rudd, J V

    2006-06-26

    A 100-GW optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier system is used to study nonlinear effects in the 1.54 mum regime. When focusing this beam in air, strong third-harmonic generation (THG) is observed, and both the spectra and efficiency are measured. Broadening is observed on only the blue side of the third-harmonic signal and an energy conversion efficiency of 0.2% is achieved. When propagated through a 10-cm block of fused silica, a collimated beam is seen to collapse and form multiple filaments. The measured spectral features span 400-2100 nm. The spectrum is dominated by previously unobserved Stokes emissions and broad emissions in the visible.

  5. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  6. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  7. SPITZER IRS SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS 8 {mu}m SOURCES IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: TESTING COLOR-BASED CLASSIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Catherine L.; Kastner, Joel H.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2009-12-15

    We present archival Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 19 luminous 8 {mu}m selected sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The object classes derived from these spectra and from an additional 24 spectra in the literature are compared with classifications based on Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)/MSX (J, H, K, and 8 {mu}m) colors in order to test the 'JHK8' (Kastner et al.) classification scheme. The IRS spectra confirm the classifications of 22 of the 31 sources that can be classified under the JHK8 system. The spectroscopic classification of 12 objects that were unclassifiable in the JHK8 scheme allow us to characterize regions of the color-color diagrams that previously lacked spectroscopic verification, enabling refinements to the JHK8 classification system. The results of these new classifications are consistent with previous results concerning the identification of the most infrared-luminous objects in the LMC. In particular, while the IRS spectra reveal several new examples of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with O-rich envelopes, such objects are still far outnumbered by carbon stars (C-rich AGB stars). We show that Spitzer IRAC/MIPS color-color diagrams provide improved discrimination between red supergiants and oxygen-rich and carbon-rich AGB stars relative to those based on 2MASS/MSX colors. These diagrams will enable the most luminous IR sources in Local Group galaxies to be classified with high confidence based on their Spitzer colors. Such characterizations of stellar populations will continue to be possible during Spitzer's warm mission through the use of IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] and 2MASS colors.

  8. Evaluation of Visual Pedagogy in Dental Check-ups and Preventive Practices Among 6-12-Year-Old Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Nilchian, Firoozeh; Shakibaei, Fereshteh; Jarah, Zeinab Taghi

    2017-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of visual pedagogy in dental check-ups and preventive practices among children with autism aged 6-12. In this randomized double-blind clinical trial, the cooperation of 40 children with autism age 6-12. The selected children were equally divided into two groups of case and control (n = 20). The obtained data were analyzed by statistical tests, including Chi square and independent t test. The results of Cochran showed a significant increase in children's cooperation with regard to fluoride therapy in the case group by repeating the visit and training sessions (p ≤ 0.001). The findings of this study demonstrated, visual pedagogy was merely effective in the case of fluoride therapy in the case group.

  9. Synthesis, NMR analysis and X-ray crystal structure of 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazatetraasterane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong-bo; Song, Xiu-qing; Yan, Hong; Xin, Hong-xing

    2017-02-01

    Novel 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazatetraasterane (3, Tetraethyl 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazapentacyclo [6.4.0.02,7.04,11.05,10]dodecane-1,5,7,11-tetracarboxylate) was prepared by naphthoylation of 3,9-diazatetraasterane (2). The target compound was isolated and unambiguously confirmed by NMR spectra, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In order to discuss the spatial effects on the NMR of 3 by the naphthoyl group, spectra analysis (1D-NMR and 2D-NMR) of 2 and 3 was conducted in details by the shifts and assignments of signals. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction assists to explain the molecular asymmetry of 3 and elucidates the effects of naphthoyl group on the geometry of the central cage of 3,9-diazatetraasterane.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of an Improved Version of MobileMums, an Intervention for Increasing Physical Activity in Women with Young Children.

    PubMed

    Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Miller, Yvette D; Graves, Nicholas; Barnett, Adrian G; Marshall, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    Women with young children (<5 years) are an important group for physical activity intervention. The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of MobileMums-a physical activity intervention for women with young children. Women were randomized to MobileMums (n = 133) or a control group (n = 130). MobileMums was delivered primarily via individually tailored text messages. Moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was measured by self-report and an accelerometer at baseline, end of the intervention (13 weeks), and 6 months later (9 months). Changes were analyzed using repeated-measures models. MobileMums was feasible to deliver and acceptable to women. Self-reported MVPA duration (minutes/week) and frequency (days/week) increased significantly post-intervention (13-week intervention effect 48.5 min/week, 95 % credible interval (CI) [13.4, 82.9] and 1.6 days/week, 95 % CI [0.6, 2.6]). Intervention effects were not maintained 6 months later. No effects were observed in accelerometer-derived MVPA. MobileMums increased women's self-reported MVPA immediately post-intervention. Future investigations need to target sustained physical activity improvements (ACTRN12611000481976).

  11. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  12. Long wavelength resonator-QWIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. K.; Allen, S. C.; Wei, Y.; Sun, J. G.; Olver, K. A.; Fu, R. X.

    2016-05-01

    We are developing resonator-QWIPs for long wavelength applications. Detector pixels with 25 μm pitch were hybridized to fanout circuits for radiometric measurements. With a moderate doping of 0.5 x 1018 cm-3, we achieved a quantum efficiency of 37% and conversion efficiency of 15% in a 1.3 μm-thick active material and 35% QE and 21% CE in a 0.6 μm-thick active material. Both detectors are cutoff at 10.5 μm with a 2 μm bandwidth. The temperature at which photocurrent equals dark current is about 65 K under F/2 optics. The thicker detector shows a large QE polarity asymmetry due to nonlinear potential drop in the QWIP material layers.

  13. Holmium Oxide Glass Wavelength Standards

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Holmium oxide glass has been used as a wavelength standard for over four decades. These standards have shown insignificant spectral variation from batch to batch and from one manufacturer to another. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has certified and recertified holmium oxide glass samples for over four decades. Over this period of time there has been no recorded instance of a spectral shift of the certified bands for any of the samples measured. Moreover, these samples are known to be robust and relatively insensitive to a normal range of temperature and humidity. Based on the extensive experience that NIST has with this material and its long-term stability, NIST will no longer recommend the recertification of these standards. Furthermore, traceability may be established either through the supplier or by the end user without the need for NIST involvement. PMID:27110474

  14. Phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry at EUV wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Sang Lee

    1997-04-01

    A novel phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is being used to perform wavefront-measuring metrology at 13.4-nm wavelength to characterize aberrations in a multilayer-coated 10x Schwarzschild objective designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography experiments. To achieve 0.1-micron critical dimension pattern transfer with EUV projection lithography at 13.4-nm wavelength, nearly diffraction-limited all-reflective multilayer-coated optical systems with 0.1 numerical aperture are required. The EUV wavefront, determined by the mirror surfaces and the reflective multilayer coatings, is measurable only at the operational wavelength of the system. The authors goal is to measure the EUV wavefront to an accuracy of 0.01 waves rms (0.13 nm). The PS/PDI is a type of point-diffraction interferometer, modified for significantly improved throughput and phase-shifting capability. The interferometer design utilizes a grating beamsplitter and pinhole spatial filters in the object and image planes of the optical system under test. The 10x-reduction Schwarzschild objective, with image-side numerical aperture of 0.08, is illuminated by a sub-micron pinhole in the object plane. A coarse, 20-micron pitch grating placed between the illumination pinhole and the Schwarzschild system serves a dual role as a small-angle beam-splitter and a phase-shifting element. The first-order diffracted beam from the grating is spatially filtered in the image plane of the Schwarzschild with a sub-100-nm pinhole and becomes the `D reference` wave in the interferometer. The zero-order beam is the `test` wave, and it passes unobstructed through a 4.5-{mu}m window in the image plane. The test and reference beams are separated by several microns in the image plane to minimize beam overlap. The interference fringes are recorded with a CCD detector placed about 12 cm from the Schwarzschild image plane.

  15. Set the P.A.C.E.! A Curriculum to Promote Mother-Child Communication about Sexuality and Reduce Sexual Risk Behaviors in Children Ages 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen K.; Pluhar, Erika I.; Pines, Kathy; Jennings, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe the Set the P.A.C.E.! (Parents And Children Empowered) curriculum designed for mothers of children 6-12 years of age. The development of the curriculum was part of a research study to test an intervention to enhance the mother's role in promoting resilience among 6- to 12-year-old children and to reduce the risk of…

  16. 11 CFR 111.24 - Civil Penalties (2 U.S.C. 437g(a) (5), (6), (12), 28 U.S.C. 2461 nt.).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...), 28 U.S.C. 2461 nt.). 111.24 Section 111.24 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROCEDURE (2 U.S.C. 437g, 437d(a)) Enforcement § 111.24 Civil Penalties (2 U.S.C. 437g(a) (5), (6), (12), 28 U.S.C. 2461 nt.). (a) Except as provided in 11 CFR part 111, subpart B and in paragraph (b...

  17. Set the P.A.C.E.! A Curriculum to Promote Mother-Child Communication about Sexuality and Reduce Sexual Risk Behaviors in Children Ages 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen K.; Pluhar, Erika I.; Pines, Kathy; Jennings, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe the Set the P.A.C.E.! (Parents And Children Empowered) curriculum designed for mothers of children 6-12 years of age. The development of the curriculum was part of a research study to test an intervention to enhance the mother's role in promoting resilience among 6- to 12-year-old children and to reduce the risk of…

  18. [Nutritional condition and serum protein concentration in children (6-12 years old) of Chacopata Sucre State, Venezuela (December--January, 1997)].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Solange; García, Andrés Gerardi; Lugo, Raquel Salazar

    2004-01-01

    A biochemical and anthropometrical study of 175 children (6-12 years old) from Chacopata, Sucre State was done (December--January, 1997). The children were evaluated by combined anthropometrical indicators (OMS), clinical, nutritional and biochemical tests. The results showed 81.71% well-nourished children, 4.57% obese children and 13.72% with some degree of undernutrition: 3.43% acute undernourished and 10.29% chronic undernourished. Total seric proteins including fractions: albumin, alfa-1 alfa-2, beta and gamma globulins as well as total globulins and albumin/globulin indexes were at the normal reference range for children (6-12 years old). A significative increase in alfa-1 globulin (0.18+/-0.08 g/dl; 8-9 years old group) and decrease of alfa-2 globulin (0.71+/-0.11 g/dl; 10-12 year old group) was observed. Biochemical results associated with nutritional condition showed normal values, moreover, this biochemical index decreased in the undernourished group. A significant decrease of the seric beta globulin in the undernourished children (0.72+/-0,12 g/dl) with respect to the well-nourished children (0.79+/-0.15) was found. In children (6-12 years old) from Chacopata, compensated chronic undernourishement is prevalent.

  19. THE ORIGIN OF THE 3.4 {mu}m FEATURE IN WILD 2 COMETARY PARTICLES AND IN ULTRACARBONACEOUS INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Matrajt, G.; Flynn, G.; Brownlee, D.; Joswiak, D.; Bajt, S.

    2013-03-10

    We analyzed two ultracarbonaceous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and two cometary Wild 2 particles with infrared spectroscopy. We characterized the carrier of the 3.4 {mu}m band in these samples and compared its profile and the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios to the 3.4 {mu}m band in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM), in the insoluble organic matter from three primitive meteorites, in asteroid 24 Themis, and in the coma of comet 103P/Hartley 2. We found that the 3.4 {mu}m band in both Wild 2 and IDPs is similar, but different from all of the other astrophysical environments that we compared it to. The 3.4 {mu}m band in the IDPs and Wild 2 particles is dominated by CH{sub 2} groups, the peaks are narrower and stronger than in the meteorites, asteroid Themis, and the DISM. Also, the presence of the carbonyl group C=O at {approx}1700 cm{sup -1} (5.8 {mu}m) in most of the spectra of our samples indicates that these aliphatic chains have O bonded to them, which is quite different from astronomical spectra of the DISM. Based on all of these observations, we conclude that the origin of the carrier of the 3.4 {mu}m band in the IDPs and Wild 2 samples is not interstellar; instead, we suggest that the origin lies in the outermost parts of the solar nebula.

  20. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  1. NEAR-INFRARED AND MILLIMETER-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF Mol 160: A MASSIVE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf-Chase, Grace; Smutko, Michael; Sherman, Reid; Harper, Doyal A.; Medford, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We have discovered two compact sources of shocked H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m emission coincident with Mol 160 (IRAS 23385+6053), a massive star-forming core thought to be a precursor to an ultracompact H II region. The 2.12 {mu}m sources lie within 2'' (0.05 pc) of a millimeter-wavelength continuum peak where the column density is {>=}10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. We estimate that the ratio of molecular hydrogen luminosity to bolometric luminosity is >0.2%, indicating a high ratio of mechanical to radiant luminosity. CS J = 2{yields}1 and HCO{sup +} J = 1{yields}0 observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) indicate that the protostellar molecular core has a peculiar velocity of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} with respect to its parent molecular cloud. We also observed 95 GHz CH{sub 3}OH J = 8{yields}7 Class I maser emission from several locations within the core. Comparison with previous observations of 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser emission shows that the maser sources have a high mean ratio of 95 GHz to 44 GHz intensity. Our observations strengthen the case that Mol 160 (IRAS 23385+6053) is a rapidly accreting massive protostellar system in a very early phase of its evolution.

  2. DISCOVERY OF A RICH CLUSTER AT z = 1.63 USING THE REST-FRAME 1.6 {mu}m 'STELLAR BUMP SEQUENCE' METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Hoekstra, Henk; Wilson, Gillian; Demarco, Ricardo; Nantais, Julie; Lidman, Chris; Yee, H. K. C.; Rettura, Alessandro

    2013-04-10

    We present a new two-color algorithm, the 'Stellar Bump Sequence' (SBS), that is optimized for robustly identifying candidate high-redshift galaxy clusters in combined wide-field optical and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The SBS algorithm is a fusion of the well-tested cluster red-sequence method of Gladders and Yee with the MIR 3.6 {mu}m-4.5 {mu}m cluster detection method developed by Papovich. As with the cluster red-sequence method, the SBS identifies candidate overdensities within 3.6 {mu}m-4.5 {mu}m color slices, which are the equivalent of a rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m stellar bump 'red-sequence'. In addition to employing the MIR colors of galaxies, the SBS algorithm incorporates an optical/MIR (z'-3.6 {mu}m) color cut. This cut effectively eliminates foreground 0.2 mu}m-4.5 {mu}m colors that are similarly red as z > 1.0 galaxies and add noise when searching for high-redshift galaxy overdensities. We demonstrate using the z {approx} 1 GCLASS cluster sample that similar to the red sequence, the stellar bump sequence appears to be a ubiquitous feature of high-redshift clusters, and that within that sample the color of the stellar bump sequence increases monotonically with redshift and provides photometric redshifts accurate to {Delta}z = 0.05. We apply the SBS method in the XMM-LSS SWIRE field and show that it robustly recovers the majority of confirmed optical, MIR, and X-ray-selected clusters at z > 1.0 in that field. Lastly, we present confirmation of SpARCS J022427-032354 at z = 1.63, a new cluster detected with the method and confirmed with 12 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts obtained using FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We conclude with a discussion of future prospects for using the algorithm.

  3. The distinct clinical features and prognosis of the CD10+MUM1+ and CD10−Bcl6−MUM1− diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ting-Xun; Miao, Yi; Wu, Jia-Zhu; Gong, Qi-Xing; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Hua, Dong; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Using an immunohistochemistry (IHC) based method, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be classified into germinal center B-cell (GCB) and non-GCB subtypes. However, the prognostic value of Hans algorithm was contradictory in the literature. Using IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we analyzed the antibodies applied in Hans algorithm and other genetic factors in 601 DLBCL patients and prognostic value of Hans algorithm in 306 cases who were treated with chemoimmunotherapy. The results showed that patients with GCB subtype have better overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than non-GCB cases. However, to some extent, double positive (CD10+MUM1+, DP) and triple negative (CD10−Bcl6−MUM−, TN) showed different clinical characteristics and prognosis to others that were assigned to the same cell-of-origin group. The DP group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.3650) and PFS (median PFS: 47.0 vs. 32.7 months, P = 0.0878) with the non-GCB group while the TN group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.9278) and PFS (median PFS: both not reached, P = 0.9420) with the GCB group. In conclusion, Recognition of specific entities in Hans algorithm could help us to accurately predict outcome of the patients and choose the best clinical management for them. PMID:26857366

  4. Single-wavelength STED microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Stephen C.

    2011-03-01

    The zero-point STED microscope (US Pat. 5,866,911)1 was the first far-field microscope to overcome the diffraction limit, but optimally it requires two expensive synchronized short-pulsed lasers. Replacing the synchronized pulsed lasers with CW lasers had been proposed to reduce costs1, but this seriously reduced resolution compared to a similarly powered pulsed STED microscope. A recent theoretical and experimental study (Nat. Methods 4, 915 (2007))3 argued that CW STED has better resolution than previously believed, but there appear to be flaws in the theory sufficient to raise questions about its reported experimental confirmation. We describe an alternative approach to reducing cost of the STED microscope while preserving resolution. A portion of the beam from a femtosecond pulsed laser of a wavelength able to excite fluorescence by multiphoton absorption, is passed through a long optical fiber to stretch the pulses to reduce their peak power so they can no longer excite but can quench by stimulated emission. The stretched pulses are shaped into a doughnut profile and then recombined with the first beam for interaction with the specimen. With suitable fluorophores, this instrument should be able to match the resolution performance of the pulsed laser STED microscope using separate lasers. Particularly when added to an existing multiphoton microscope, such performance should be achievable at extremely low added cost.

  5. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  6. Generation and homodyne detection of continuous-variable entangled optical beams with a large wavelength difference

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xiaomin; Xie Changde; Li Yongmin

    2011-08-15

    We present a scheme for generating and homodyne detecting of continuous-variable entanglement of bright optical beams with a large wavelength difference by utilizing an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) simultaneously. Entangled optical beams at 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m are generated from the OPA; the seed beams injected in the OPA as well as the local oscillators at the two wavelengths needed for homodyne detection are provided by the OPO. The entangler is a ring resonator involving a second-order nonlinear crystal that is pumped from two opposite directions. In one direction the pump power is above the oscillation threshold and the optical nonlinear resonator operates as an OPO. In the other direction the pump power is below the threshold and it operates as a phase-sensitive frequency nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier. Our scheme combines the advantages of both OPO and OPA quantum optical devices and opens another avenue for preparation and homodyne detection of high quality bright entangled light with a large wavelength difference.

  7. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  8. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  9. Ultra-low-power, long-wavelength photoreceivers for massively-parllel optical data links

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, M.L.; Patrizi, G.A.; Enquist, P.M.; Carson, R.F.; Craft, D.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1996-03-01

    An ultra-low-power, long-wavelength photoreceiver based on InGaAs/InP heterojunction bipolar transistors is reported. The photoreceivers were designed for massively parallel applications where low-power density is necessary for both electrical and thermal reasons. We demonstrate two-dimensional, four-by-four arrays of photoreceivers for free-space optical data links that interface directly with 3.3 V CMOS ASICs and dissipate less than 12 mW/channel; lower power is possible. Propagation delays of {approx}1 nsec were measured and large signal operation of 800 Mbits/sec is demonstrated. The array is on a 500 {mu}m pitch and can be easily scaled to much higher density. The photoreceivers can be utilized in both free-space and guided-wave applications.

  10. Cathodo- and radioluminescence of Tm 3+ : YAG and Nd 3+ : YAG in an extended wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, A. F.; Braggio, C.; Carugno, G.; Chiossi, F.; Guarise, M.

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the cathodo- and radioluminescence of Nd:YAG and of Tm:YAG single crystals in an extended wavelength range up to $\\approx 5\\,\\mu$m in view of developing a new kind of detector for low-energy, low-rate energy deposition events. Whereas the light yield in the visible range is as large as $\\approx 10^{4}\\,$photons/MeV, in good agreement with literature results, in the infrared range we have found a light yield $\\approx 5\\times 10^{4}\\,$photons/MeV, thereby proving that ionizing radiation is particularly efficient in populating the low lying levels of rare earth doped crystals.

  11. Short-wavelength MEMS-tunable VCSELs.

    PubMed

    Cole, Garrett D; Behymer, Elaine; Bond, Tiziana C; Goddard, Lynford L

    2008-09-29

    We present electrically-injected MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths below 800 nm. Operation in this wavelength range, near the oxygen A-band from 760-780 nm, is attractive for absorption-based optical gas sensing. These fully-monolithic devices are based on an oxide-aperture AlGaAs epitaxial structure and incorporate a suspended dielectric Bragg mirror for wavelength tuning. By implementing electrostatic actuation, we demonstrate the potential for tuning rates up to 1 MHz, as well as a wide wavelength tuning range of 30 nm (767-737 nm).

  12. 880 {mu}m IMAGING OF A TRANSITIONAL DISK IN UPPER SCORPIUS: HOLDOVER FROM THE ERA OF GIANT PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Menard, Francois

    2012-07-01

    We present 880 {mu}m images of the transition disk around the star [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, a solar mass star in the nearby Upper Scorpius association. With a resolution down to 0.''34, we resolve the inner hole in this disk, and via model fitting to the visibilities and spectral energy distribution we determine both the structure of the outer region and the presence of sparse dust within the cavity. The disk contains {approx}0.1 M{sub Jup} of millimeter-emitting grains, with an inner disk edge of about 70 AU. The inner cavity contains a small amount of dust with a depleted surface density in a region extending from about 20 to 70 AU. Taking into account prior observations indicating little to no stellar accretion, the lack of a binary companion, and the presence of dust near {approx}0.1 AU, we determine that the most likely mechanism for the formation of this inner hole is the presence of one or more giant planets.

  13. VARIATIONS OF THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURES IN THE ACTIVELY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS: DG Tau AND XZ Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Bary, Jeffrey S.; Leisenring, Jarron M.; Skrutskie, Michael F. E-mail: jml2u@virginia.ed

    2009-11-20

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed multiple epochs of 11 actively accreting T Tauri stars in the nearby Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. In total, 88 low-resolution mid-infrared spectra were collected over 1.5 years in Cycles 2 and 3. The results of this multi-epoch survey show that the 10 mum silicate complex in the spectra of two sources-DG Tau and XZ Tau-undergoes significant variations with the silicate feature growing both weaker and stronger over month- and year-long timescales. Shorter timescale variations on day- to week-long timescales were not detected within the measured flux errors. The time resolution coverage of this data set is inadequate for determining if the variations are periodic. Pure emission compositional models of the silicate complex in each epoch of the DG Tau and XZ Tau spectra provide poor fits to the observed silicate features. These results agree with those of previous groups that attempted to fit only single-epoch observations of these sources. Simple two-temperature, two-slab models with similar compositions successfully reproduce the observed variations in the silicate features. These models hint at a self-absorption origin of the diminution of the silicate complex instead of a compositional change in the population of emitting dust grains. We discuss several scenarios for producing such variability including disk shadowing, vertical mixing, variations in disk heating, and disk wind events associated with accretion outbursts.

  14. Reliability, validity, and norms of the 2-min walk test in children with and without neuromuscular disorders aged 6-12.

    PubMed

    Pin, Tamis W; Choi, H L

    2017-03-03

    The 2-min walk test may be more appropriate functional exercise test for young children. This study aimed to examine the 2-min walk test's reliability; validity; and minimal clinically important difference; and to establish norms for children aged 6-12. Sixty-one healthy children were recruited to examine the 2-min walk test's reliability. Forty-six children with neuromuscular disorders (63% cerebral palsy) were recruited to test the validity. The normative study involved 716 healthy children without neuromuscular disorders (male = 51%, female = 49%). They walked at a self-selected speed for 2 min along a smooth, flat path 15 m in length. The mean distance covered in the 2-min walk test was 152.8 m (SD =27.5). No significant difference was found in the children's test-retest results (p > 0.05). The intra- and inter-rater reliability were high (all intra-class correlation coefficients >0.8). All children, except one with neuromuscular disorders, completed the 2-min walk test, of which the minimal clinically important difference at 95% confidence interval was 23.2 m for the entire group, 15.7 m for children walking with aids, and 16.6 m for those walking independently. The 2-min walk test is a feasible, reliable, and valid exercise test for children with and without neuromuscular disorders aged 6-12. The first normative references and minimal clinically important difference for children with neuromuscular disorders were established for children of this age group. Implications for rehabilitation The 2-min walk test is a feasible, safe, reliable, and valid time-based walk test for children aged 6-12 years. Normative references have been established for healthy children aged 6-12 years. Minimal clinically important difference at 95% confidence interval were calculated for children with neuromuscular disorders who walked without aids (i.e., independent and stand-by supervision) and those who walked with aids equal to 16.6 and 15.7 m, respectively

  15. Electron beam generation in open hollow-cathode discharge and the characteristics of He-Xe laser on the Xe line at {lambda} = 2.026 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'skaya, E V; Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E

    2010-09-10

    An open hollow-cathode discharge, generating an electron beam, is implemented in a cell with an active volume of 6.2 L. An electron-beam current of 3.4 A at an average power of 2.5 kW is obtained in helium in the quasi-cw regime at an anode voltage of 1.5 kV. Lasing in a He-Xe mixture on the 5d[3/2]{sup 0}{sub 1}-6p[3/2]{sub 1} transition in xenon at the wavelength {lambda} = 2.026 {mu}m under electron-beam excitation is investigated. The optimal component ratio in the He : Xe mixture is 99.5 : 0.5 (p{sub He} = 4-8 Torr). The lasing power linearly increases with increasing the electron-beam power. It is shown that the discharge of this type can be used as an electron-beam source for exciting gaseous active media. (lasers)

  16. Photovoltaic effect in water induced by a 2.92-{mu}m Cr{sup 3+}:Yb{sup 3+}:Ho{sup 3+}: YSGG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Il'ichev, Nikolai N; Kulevskii, L A; Pashinin, Pavel P

    2005-10-31

    The appearance of the potential difference is observed on electrodes placed in a cell with water irradiated by a Q-switched 2.92-{mu}m Cr{sup 3+}:Yb{sup 3+}:Ho{sup 3+}:YSGG laser. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Noise performance of 0.35-(mu)m SOI CMOS devices and micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binkley, D. M.; Hopper, C. E.; Cressler, J. D.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Blalock, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents measured noise for 0.35(mu)m, silicon-on-insulator devices and a micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation. Flicker noise voltage, important for gyros having low frequency output, increases less than 32% after irradiation.

  18. Wavelength-domain RF photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lu

    This thesis presents a novel approach to RF-photonic signal processing applications based on wavelength-domain optical signal processing techniques using broadband light sources as the information carriers, such as femtosecond lasers and white light sources. The wavelength dimension of the broadband light sources adds an additional degree of freedom to conventional optical signal processing systems. Two novel wavelength-domain optical signal processing systems are presented and demonstrated in this thesis. The first wavelength-domain RF photonic signal processing system is a wavelength-compensated squint-free photonic multiple beam-forming system for wideband RF phased-array antennas. Such a photonic beam-forming system employs a new modulation scheme developed in this thesis, which uses traveling-wave tunable filters to modulate wideband RF signals onto broadband optical light sources in a frequency-mapped manner. The wavelength dimension of the broadband light sources provides an additional dimension in the wavelength-compensated Fourier beam-forming system for mapping the received RF frequencies to the linearly proportional optical frequencies, enabling true-time-delay beam forming, as well as other novel RF-photonic signal processing functions such as tunable filtering and frequency down conversion. A new slow-light mechanism, the SLUGGISH light, has also been discovered with an effective slow-light velocity of 86 m/s and a record time-bandwidth product of 20. Experimental demonstration of true-time-delay beam forming based on the SLUGGISH light effect has also been presented in this thesis. In the second wavelength-domain RF photonic signal processing system, the wavelength dimension increases the information carrying capacity by spectrally multiplexing multiple wavelength channels in a wavelength-division-multiplexing fiber-optic communication system. A novel ultrafast all-optical 3R (Re-amplification, Retiming, Re-shaping) wavelength converter based on

  19. Optimum wavelengths for two color ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The range uncertainties associated with the refractive atmosphere can be mitigated by the technique of two color, or dual wavelength, ranging. The precision of the differential time of flight (DTOF) measurement depends on the atmospheric dispersion between the two wavelengths, the received pulsewidths and photoelectron counts, and on the amount of temporal averaging. In general, the transmitted wavelengths are not independently chosen but instead are generated via nonlinear optics techniques (harmonic crystals, Raman scattering, etc.) which also determine their relative pulsewidths. The mean received photoelectrons at each wavelength are calculated via the familiar radar link equation which contains several wavelength dependent parameters. By collecting the various wavelength dependent terms, one can define a wavelength figure of merit for a two color laser ranging system. In this paper, we apply the wavelength figure of merit to the case of an extremely clear atmosphere and draw several conclusions regarding the relative merits of fundamental-second harmonic, fundamental-third harmonic, second-third harmonic, and Raman two color systems. We find that, in spite of the larger dispersion between wavelengths, fundamental-third harmonic systems have the lowest figure of merit due to a combination of poor detector performance at the fundamental and poor atmospheric transmission at the third harmonic. The fundamental-second harmonic systems (approximately 700 nm and 350 nm) have the highest figure of merit, but second-third harmonic systems, using fundamental transmitters near 1000 nm, are a close second. Raman-shifted transmitters appear to offer no advantage over harmonic systems because of the relatively small wavelength separation that can be achieved in light gases such as hydrogen and the lack of good ultrashort pulse transmitters with an optimum fundamental wavelength near 400 nm.

  20. Comparison of Effects of Local Anesthesia and Two-Point Acupressure on the Severity of Venipuncture Pain Among Hospitalized 6-12-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Pour, Parisa Shahmohammadi; Ameri, Golnaz Foroogh; Kazemi, Majid; Jahani, Yones

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of topical anesthesia and acupressure at the Yintang (Extra 1) and the Laogong (P-8) points on the severity of venipuncture pain among hospitalized 6-12-year-old children. A sample (n = 120) of 6-12-year-old hospitalized children was recruited from two teaching hospitals located in Rafsanjan, Iran. The children were allocated to the topical anesthesia, acupressure, and control groups. For children in the topical anesthesia and the acupressure groups, eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream and two-point acupressure were used, respectively, prior to performing venipuncture, whereas children in the control group only received routine prevenipuncture care. The severity of venipuncture pain was evaluated 5 minutes after performing venipuncture by using the Face, Leg, Activity, Cry, and Consolability behavioral pain assessment scale. The findings revealed that pain severity in both experimental groups was significantly lower than that in the control group, whereas there was no significant difference between the experimental groups regarding pain severity. Although acupressure was as effective as topical anesthesia cream in alleviating children's venipuncture pain, nurses are recommending to use acupressure instead of pharmacological pain management agents because of its greater safety, cost-effectiveness, and applicability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Comparative Study of Probiotic Ice Cream and Probiotic Drink on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Levels in 6-12 Years Age Group Children.

    PubMed

    Mahantesha, Taranatha; Reddy, K M Parveen; Kumar, N H Praveen; Nara, Asha; Ashwin, Devasya; Buddiga, Vinutna

    2015-09-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in the world. Probiotics are one the various preventive methods to reduce dental caries. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of probiotic ice cream and drink on salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in children of 6-12 years age group. A three phase study was carried out in children (n = 50) of 6-12 years age with zero decayed missing filled teeth (dmft)/DMFT. They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva samples were collected before the consumptions of probiotic ice cream and probiotic drink. Colony count obtained was recorded as baseline data. For both groups probiotic ice cream and drink was given randomly for 7 days and a washout period of 90 days were given and then the saliva samples were collected and colony counting was done. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's paired t-test and multiple comparisons by Tukey's honest significant difference test which showed, there is a significant reduction in salivary S. mutans level in both groups after 7 days period. However, after washout period only probiotic ice cream showed reduction whereas drink did not. Also, there was no significant difference between probiotic ice cream and drink. Probiotic organisms definitely have a role in reducing the salivary S. mutans level and ice cream would be a better choice than drink. However, the prolonged use of the agents and their effects on caries is still to be determined.

  2. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  3. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  4. Expression IRF/MUM1>25% Predictor to Three-year Survival of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in the Immunochemotherapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Sofo-Hafizovic, Alma; Chikha, Adisa; Gojak, Refet; Hadzimesic, Emina Suljovic

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Non Hodgkin lymphoma-Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBC) is composed of more varieties of one disease. Analysis and understanding of a wide range of characteristics of the disease, which include: clinical, immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and molecular characteristics may improve treatment results. Aim: achieving the estimated three-year survival and influence of IRF/MUM1 expression to three-year survival. Material and methods: A study was retrospective–prospective, patients were followed for seven years a period of dine. The study included 60 patients de novo DLBCL. Age was 18-72 years old, the average age 45 years, male 31 (51,7%) and female 29 (48.3%). Median follow-up was 47 months (3-91 months). To determine differentiation immunophenotype antibodies those were used anti-CD20, anti-CD10, anti-Bcl-6, IRF-4/MUM1, CD 138. Results: Included the GCB type was 65%. Impact prognostic index IPI>2 GBC vs non GBC p=0,038 X2. Statistically significant difference was confirmed compared to the IPI> 2 to 3 year OS p<0,0005 X2. Significantly longer three-year survival was provided in the group GCB 36 (92,3%) vs. non GCB 8 (38,1%) p=0,003 X2. Clinical and immunohistochemical factors showed a significant impact to three-year survival by univariate: LDH p=0,005, MUM1 p=0,003, while CD10 p=0,069 was confirmed on the level of borderline impact. Using multivariate analysis, expression MUM1 has the greatest impact p<0.0005 OR=0.083 (95% CI 0.23-0.303) on the disease outcome – three-year survival. Conclusion: expression MUM1 >25% has the greatest impact on the disease outcome – three-year survival. PMID:27994293

  5. Expression IRF/MUM1>25% Predictor to Three-year Survival of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in the Immunochemotherapy Era.

    PubMed

    Sofo-Hafizovic, Alma; Chikha, Adisa; Gojak, Refet; Hadzimesic, Emina Suljovic

    2016-10-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma-Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBC) is composed of more varieties of one disease. Analysis and understanding of a wide range of characteristics of the disease, which include: clinical, immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and molecular characteristics may improve treatment results. achieving the estimated three-year survival and influence of IRF/MUM1 expression to three-year survival. A study was retrospective-prospective, patients were followed for seven years a period of dine. The study included 60 patients de novo DLBCL. Age was 18-72 years old, the average age 45 years, male 31 (51,7%) and female 29 (48.3%). Median follow-up was 47 months (3-91 months). To determine differentiation immunophenotype antibodies those were used anti-CD20, anti-CD10, anti-Bcl-6, IRF-4/MUM1, CD 138. Included the GCB type was 65%. Impact prognostic index IPI>2 GBC vs non GBC p=0,038 X(2). Statistically significant difference was confirmed compared to the IPI> 2 to 3 year OS p<0,0005 X(2). Significantly longer three-year survival was provided in the group GCB 36 (92,3%) vs. non GCB 8 (38,1%) p=0,003 X(2). Clinical and immunohistochemical factors showed a significant impact to three-year survival by univariate: LDH p=0,005, MUM1 p=0,003, while CD10 p=0,069 was confirmed on the level of borderline impact. Using multivariate analysis, expression MUM1 has the greatest impact p<0.0005 OR=0.083 (95% CI 0.23-0.303) on the disease outcome - three-year survival. expression MUM1 >25% has the greatest impact on the disease outcome - three-year survival.

  6. INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE 12 {mu}m SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, J. F.; Yzaguirre, A.; Jakoboski, J.; Stevenosky, M. J.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Robinson, A.; Baum, S. A.; Buchanan, C. L.; Elitzur, M.; Elvis, M.

    2010-03-01

    The mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 83 active galaxies, mostly Seyfert galaxies, selected from the extended 12 {mu}m sample are presented. The data were collected using all three instruments, Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRS data were obtained in spectral mapping mode, and the photometric data from IRAC and IRS were extracted from matched, 20'' diameter circular apertures. The MIPS data were obtained in SED mode, providing very low-resolution spectroscopy (R {approx} 20) between {approx}55 and 90 {mu}m in a larger, 20'' x 30'' synthetic aperture. We further present the data from a spectral decomposition of the SEDs, including equivalent widths and fluxes of key emission lines; silicate 10 {mu}m and 18 {mu}m emission and absorption strengths; IRAC magnitudes; and mid-far-infrared spectral indices. Finally, we examine the SEDs averaged within optical classifications of activity. We find that the infrared SEDs of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s with hidden broad line regions (HBLRs, as revealed by spectropolarimetry or other technique) are qualitatively similar, except that Seyfert 1s show silicate emission and HBLR Seyfert 2s show silicate absorption. The infrared SEDs of other classes within the 12 {mu}m sample, including Seyfert 1.8-1.9, non-HBLR Seyfert 2 (not yet shown to hide a type 1 nucleus), LINER, and H II galaxies, appear to be dominated by star formation, as evidenced by blue IRAC colors, strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, and strong far-infrared continuum emission, measured relative to mid-infrared continuum emission.

  7. A tunable wavelength-conversion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kentaro; Kuno, Masaaki; Yamakoshi, Shigenobu; Wakao, Kiyohide

    1992-05-01

    A novel wavelength-conversion laser was fabricated using monolithic integration of a bistable laser diode and a wavelength-tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser. This device converts an input light signal with a certain wavelength to output light with a tunable wavelength over 3.5 nm. Input power required for switching is investigated, and its resonant dependence on input wavelength is revealed. Input polarization is also discussed, and suppression of crosstalk is demonstrated. This device's turn-off switching response is greatly influenced by the light power of the input signal as well as bias current, and the first 1 Gb/s operation is achieved in optimum conditions for fast turn-off and stable turn-on.

  8. GHRS Cycle 5 Echelle Wavelength Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1995-07-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle A. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  9. CALIBRATION OF [O IV] 26 {mu}m AS A MEASURE OF INTRINSIC ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, J. R.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Aniano, G.

    2009-08-01

    We compare [O IV] 25.89 {mu}m emission line luminosities with very hard (10-200 keV) X-rays from Swift, INTEGRAL, and BeppoSAX for a complete sample of 89 Seyferts from the Revised Shapley-Ames sample. Using Seyfert 1s, we calibrate [O IV] as a measure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) intrinsic luminosity, for particular use in high-obscuration environments. With this calibration, we measure the average decrement in 14-195 keV X-ray to [O IV] luminosity ratio for Seyfert 2s compared to type 1s. We find a decrement of 3.1 {+-} 0.8 for Seyfert 2s, and a decrement of 5.0 {+-} 2.7 for known Compton-thick Seyfert 2s. These decrements imply column densities of approximately log N{sub H} = 24.6 cm{sup -2} and 24.7 cm{sup -2}, respectively. Thus, we infer that the average Seyfert 2 is more highly obscured and intrinsically more luminous than would be inferred even from the very hard X-rays. We demonstrate two applications of the hard X-ray to [O IV] ratio. For the extremely obscured NGC 1068, we measure a column density of log N{sub H} = 25.3-25.4 cm{sup -2}. Finally, by comparing [O IV] luminosities to total infrared luminosities for 12 bright ultraluminous infrared galaxies, we find that four have substantial AGN contributions.

  10. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, R B; Grist, E; Thompson, K; Woodhead, A D

    1993-01-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm--the UV-A and visible spectral regions. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8341684

  12. Wavelength initialization employing wavelength recognition scheme in WDM-PON based on tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sil-Gu; Lee, Eun-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jyung Chan

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to initialize the wavelength of tunable lasers in WDM-PON employing wavelength recognition scheme with an optical filter as a function of wavelength and accomplished plug and play operation. We also implemented a transceiver based on our proposed wavelength initialization scheme and then experimentally demonstrated the feasibility in WDM-PON configuration guaranteeing 16 channels with 100 GHz channel spacing. Our proposal is a cost-effective and easy-to-install method to realize the wavelength initialization of ONU. In addition, this method will support compatibility with all kind of tunable laser regardless of their structures and operating principles.

  13. Study of the interaction between a diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA-b-PAA and a gemini surfactant 12-6-12 in basic media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongmei; Peng, Baoliang; Liang, Yanyan; Han, Xia; Liu, Honglai

    2009-05-01

    The interactions between negatively charged diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA(71)-b-PAA(59) and oppositely charged gemini surfactant hexylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) in basic media were studied using dynamic light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, surface tension, and (1)H NMR. With increased addition of surfactant, the conformation of polyelectrolyte experienced changes from the initial unimer with open-extended PAA block, to the nano-scaled aggregates/complexes with a maximum hydrodynamic diameter (D(h)), and finally to the stable complexes with a smaller D(h). Accordingly, the value of D(h) during the whole process of increasing the surfactant concentration changed from 14-17 nm, to 184 nm, and to the final 70 nm, respectively. This transformation was driven by the electrostatic attractive/repulsive interactions, the hydrophobic interaction between hydrophobic surfactant tails, and the hydrophilicity of PDMA block.

  14. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  15. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  16. Wavelength selective uncooled infrared sensor by plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Okada, Kazuya; Fukushima, Naoki; Kimata, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A wavelength selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensor using two-dimensional plasmonic crystals (2D PLCs) has been developed. The numerical investigation of 2D PLCs demonstrates that the wavelength of absorption can be mainly controlled by the period of the surface structure. A microelectromechanical systems-based uncooled IR sensor with 2D PLCs as the IR absorber was fabricated through a complementary metal oxide semiconductor and a micromachining technique. The selective enhancement of responsivity was observed at the wavelength that coincided with the period of the 2D-PLC absorber.

  17. Sub-wavelength focusing meta-lens.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-03-25

    We show that a planar plasmonic metamaterial with spatially variable meta-atom parameters can focus transmitted light into sub-wavelength hot-spots located beyond the near-field of the metamaterial. By nano-structuring a gold film we created an array of meta-lenses generating foci of 160 nm (0.2λ) in diameter when illuminated by a wavelength of 800 nm. We attribute the occurrence of sub-wavelength hotspots beyond the near field to the phenomenon of superoscillation.

  18. Wavelength multicasting in silicon photonic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Lee, Benjamin G; Turner-Foster, Amy C; Foster, Mark A; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L; Bergman, Keren

    2010-08-16

    We demonstrate a scalable, energy-efficient, and pragmatic method for high-bandwidth wavelength multicasting using FWM in silicon photonic nanowires. We experimentally validate up to a sixteen-way multicast of 40-Gb/s NRZ data using spectral and temporal responses, and evaluate the resulting data integrity degradation using BER measurements and power penalty performance metrics. We further examine the impact of this wavelength multicasting scalability on conversion efficiency. Finally, we experimentally evaluate up to a three-way multicast of 160-Gb/s pulsed-RZ data using spectral and temporal responses, representing the first on-chip wavelength multicasting of pulsed-RZ data.

  19. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2010-01-01

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the 3P0, 3P1, and 3P2 metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  20. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and liver metabolism comparisons between 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Santamaria, Raphael; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the physiological changes (withdrawal and corneal reflexes, respiratory and cardiac frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature) following intraperitoneal administration of ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg) to 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats (n=6/age group). Plasma pharmacokinetics, liver metabolism, and blood biochemistry were examined for a limited number of animals to better explain anesthetic drug effects. Selected organs were collected for histopathology. The results for the withdrawal and corneal reflexes suggest a shorter duration and decreased depth of anesthesia with aging. Significant cardiac and respiratory depression, as well as decreased blood oxygen saturation, occurred in all age groups however, cardiac frequency was the most affected parameter with aging, since the 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old animals did not recuperate to normal values during recovery from anesthesia. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T1/2 and AUC) increased and drug clearance decreased with aging, which strongly suggests that drug exposure is associated with the physiological results. The findings for liver S9 fractions of 18-month-old rats compared with the other age groups suggest that following a normal ketamine anesthetic dose (80 mg/kg), drug metabolism is impaired, leading to a significant increase of drug exposure. In conclusion, age and related factors have a substantial effect on ketamine and xylazine availability, which is reflected by significant changes in pharmacokinetics and liver metabolism of these drugs, and this translates into shorter and less effective anesthesia with increasing age. PMID:26489361

  1. Comparative Study of Probiotic Ice Cream and Probiotic Drink on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Levels in 6-12 Years Age Group Children

    PubMed Central

    Mahantesha, Taranatha; Reddy, K M Parveen; Kumar, N H Praveen; Nara, Asha; Ashwin, Devasya; Buddiga, Vinutna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in the world. Probiotics are one the various preventive methods to reduce dental caries. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of probiotic ice cream and drink on salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in children of 6-12 years age group. Materials and Methods: A three phase study was carried out in children (n = 50) of 6-12 years age with zero decayed missing filled teeth (dmft)/DMFT. They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva samples were collected before the consumptions of probiotic ice cream and probiotic drink. Colony count obtained was recorded as baseline data. For both groups probiotic ice cream and drink was given randomly for 7 days and a washout period of 90 days were given and then the saliva samples were collected and colony counting was done. Results: Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s paired t-test and multiple comparisons by Tukey’s honest significant difference test which showed, there is a significant reduction in salivary S. mutans level in both groups after 7 days period. However, after washout period only probiotic ice cream showed reduction whereas drink did not. Also, there was no significant difference between probiotic ice cream and drink. Conclusion: Probiotic organisms definitely have a role in reducing the salivary S. mutans level and ice cream would be a better choice than drink. However, the prolonged use of the agents and their effects on caries is still to be determined. PMID:26435616

  2. Wavelength Shifting Efficiency of Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) at Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher; Orebi Gann, Gabriel; Gehman, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) is a commonly used wavelength shifter (WLS) in neutrino and dark matter liquid noble gas scintillator detectors. Thin films of wavelength shifters are used to shift ultraviolet scintillation light into the visible spectrum for event reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency of TPB is a function of the incident ultraviolet photon wavelength and is an important parameter for detector design, simulation and reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency and emission spectrum has been previously measured down to 120 nm [Gehman et al., 2011]. To build liquid noble gas scintillator detectors with lighter elements (Ne, He) that use TPB as a WLS medium, the wavelength shifting efficiency must be known closer to 80 nm. This talk will present the current status and preliminary results from a set of measurements that will improve the precision of the efficiency of 120 nm, and extend the data to wavelengths as low as 45 nm.

  3. A SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED EXCESS OF 24 mum SOURCES IN A SUPER GALAXY GROUP AT z = 0.37: ENHANCED DUSTY STAR FORMATION RELATIVE TO THE CLUSTER AND FIELD ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie; Moustakas, John; Bai, Lei; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Kautsch, Stefan J.; Holden, Bradford P.

    2009-11-01

    To trace how dust-obscured star formation varies with environment, we compare the fraction of 24 mum sources in a super galaxy group to the field and a rich galaxy cluster at z approx 0.35. We draw on multi-wavelength observations{sup 9}Based on observations made with (1) The ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatories under program IDs 072.A-0367, 076.B-0362, 078.B-0409; (2) the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (GO-10499); STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555; (3) the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA; support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech (GO-20683); (4) the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060; and (5) the Magellan 6.5 m telescope operated by OCIW. that combine Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer imaging with extensive optical spectroscopy (>1800 redshifts) to isolate galaxies in each environment and thus ensure a uniform analysis. We focus on the four galaxy groups (sigma{sub 1D} = 303-580 km s{sup -1}) in supergroup 1120-12 that will merge to form a galaxy cluster comparable in mass to Coma. We find that (1) the fraction of supergroup galaxies with SFR{sub IR} >= 3 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} is 4 times higher than in the cluster (32% +- 5% versus 7% +- 2%); (2) the supergroup's infrared luminosity function confirms that it has a higher density of IR members compared to the cluster and includes bright IR sources (log(L {sub IR})[erg s{sup -1}] >45) not found in galaxy clusters at z approx< 0.35; and (3) there is a strong trend of decreasing 24 mum fraction with increasing galaxy density, i.e., an infrared-density relation, not observed in the cluster. These dramatic differences are surprising

  4. Apparatus for shifting the wavelength of light

    DOEpatents

    McCulla, William H.; Allen, Jr., John D.

    1983-01-01

    A light beam is reflected back and forth between a rotating body having a retroreflection corner at opposite ends thereof and a fixed mirror to change the wavelength of the light beam by the Doppler effect.

  5. SALSA - A lunar submillimeter-wavelength array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Marsh, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design for a Synthesis Array for Lunar Submillimeter Astronomy (SALSA) is described with emphasis on information relevant to its implementation. SALSA is optimized to synthesize images of astronomical sources at wavelengths between 60 and 300 microns with an angular resolution of 10 milliarcseconds at the shortest wavelength. The discussion covers engineering considerations and descriptions of subsystems, including the environmental shield, antenna, and beam transport.

  6. SALSA - A lunar submillimeter-wavelength array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Marsh, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design for a Synthesis Array for Lunar Submillimeter Astronomy (SALSA) is described with emphasis on information relevant to its implementation. SALSA is optimized to synthesize images of astronomical sources at wavelengths between 60 and 300 microns with an angular resolution of 10 milliarcseconds at the shortest wavelength. The discussion covers engineering considerations and descriptions of subsystems, including the environmental shield, antenna, and beam transport.

  7. Nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses from an erbium fibre laser to the range of 0.8 - 1 {mu}m in silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    We consider different mechanisms of nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses emitted by an erbium fibre system ({lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m) to the range of 0.8 - 1.2 {mu}m in nonlinear silica fibres. The generation efficiency and the centre frequencies of dispersive waves are found as functions of the parameters of the fibre and the input pulse. Simple analytical estimates are obtained for the spectral distribution of the intensity and the frequency shift of a wave packet in the region of normal dispersion during the emission of a high-order soliton under phase matching conditions. In the geometrical optics approximation the frequency shifts are estimated in the interaction of dispersive waves with solitons in various regimes. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Le role du phytoplancton de petite taille (<20 mum) dans les variations des proprietes optiques des eaux du Saint-Laurent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, Sebastien

    Les mesures satellitaires de couleur des oceans sont largement determinees par les proprietes optiques inherentes (IOPs) des eaux de surface. D'autre part, le phytoplancton de petite taille (<20 mum) est le plus souvent dominant dans les oceans, et peut donc etre une source importante de variation des IOPs dans les oceans. Dans ce contexte, le but principal de ce doctorat etait de definir l'impact du phytoplancton (<20 mum) sur les variations des proprietes optiques de l'Estuaire et du Golfe du Saint-Laurent (Canada). Afin d'atteindre cet objectif, il etait necessaire de determiner en milieu controle les facteurs de variabilite des proprietes optiques cellulaires et des IOPs du phytoplancton (<20 mum) des eaux du Saint-Laurent, et d'evaluer la contribution du phytoplancton (<20 mum) aux proprietes optiques totales des eaux du Saint-Laurent. Des experiences en laboratoire ont montre que les variations des proprietes optiques des cellules phytoplanctoniques soumises a un cycle jour-nuit, ainsi qu'a des changements concomitants d'intensite lumineuse, peuvent contribuer significativement a la variabilite des proprietes optiques observee en milieu naturel. D'autres experiences ont, quant a elles, mis en evidence que les variations des proprietes optiques des cellules phytoplanctoniques dues aux phases de croissance peuvent alterer les IOPs des oceans, particulierement pendant les periodes de floraison. De plus, la presence de bacteries et de particules detritiques peut egalement affecter la variabilite des IOPs totales, notamment la diffusion. Au printemps, dans l'Estuaire et le Golfe du Saint-Laurent, la contribution du phytoplancton <20 mum aux IOPs presentait des differences regionales evidentes pour les proprietes d'absorption et de diffusion. En plus de la variabilite spatiale, les proprietes optiques cellulaires presentaient des variations journalieres, et ce particulierement pour le picophytoplancton. Enfin, la plupart des differences observees dans les

  9. Wavelength-tunable duplex integrated light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Yasaka, Hiroshi; Oe, Kunishige

    1996-04-01

    A monolithically integrated opto-electronic device is proposed as a fast wavelength-switching light source. This tunable duplex integrated light source comprises two wavelength-tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes (LDs), two MQW-electro-absorption optical switches, a Y-shaped waveguide coupler, a MQW-electro-absorption modulator, and two thermal drift compensators (TDCs). The wavelength-switching time of the optical switches was estimated to be 60 ps including a 50-ps rise time for the electrical-pulse generator. The wavelength of a 10-Gbit/s NRZ-modulated optical signal can be switched without bit loss. The function of the TDCs is to keep the device-chip temperature constant. Thermal-transient- induced wavelength drift with a millisecond-order time constant, which has been reported for DBR-LDs, and thermal crosstalk between the tuning regions of the integrated LDs, which causes wavelength fluctuation, are effectively suppressed by thermal-drift-compensation operation using the TDCs.

  10. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths. PMID:27659800

  11. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-09-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths.

  12. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Andrew J.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. E.; Scowcroft, Victoria; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R. E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: persson@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2012-11-10

    The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a systematic improvement in the distance scale leading to a determination of the Hubble constant to within an accuracy of 2%. This paper focuses on the measurement and calibration of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity (PL, Leavitt) relation using the warm Spitzer/IRAC 1 and 2 bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. We present photometric measurements covering the period range 4-70 days for 37 Galactic Cepheids. Data at 24 phase points were collected for each star. Three PL relations of the form M = a(log (P) - 1) + b are derived. The method adopted here takes the slope a to be -3.31, as determined from the Spitzer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data of Scowcroft et al. Using the geometric Hubble Space Telescope guide-star distances to 10 Galactic Cepheids, we find a calibrated 3.6 {mu}m PL zero point of -5.80 {+-} 0.03. Together with our value for the LMC zero point, we determine a reddening-corrected distance modulus of 18.48 {+-} 0.04 mag to the LMC. The mid-IR period-color diagram and the [3.6]-[4.5] color variation with phase are interpreted in terms of CO absorption at 4.5 {mu}m. This situation compromises the use of the 4.5 {mu}m data for distance determinations.

  13. Effect of temperature on the {sup 127}I{sub 2} fluorescence excited by He-Ne laser radiation (0.63 {mu}m)

    SciTech Connect

    Kireev, S.V.; Shnyrev, S.L.

    1994-10-01

    Effect of temperature on the fluorescence of molecular iodine-127 vapors excited by the 0.63 {mu}m radiation of a {sup 3}He-{sup 22}Ne laser was studied. It was shown that heating iodine vapors can increase the sensitivity of the iodine-127 detection by the laser-fluorescent method by approximately an order of magnitude. The main contribution to the fluorescence signal is made by the absorption line 6-3 P(33). 20 refs., 4 figs.

  14. CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 {mu}m ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-10-10

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker for exolife. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 {mu}m oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 {mu}m with the IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by midnight. By compiling nearby star catalogs combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if it exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant source of photon noise for the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m band detection comes from the night airglow if the contribution of the stellar point-spread function (PSF) halo is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors, for which the detection contrast is limited by photon noise, can detect the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m absorption band of Earth twins for {approx}50 candidates of the late-type star. This paper demonstrates the importance of deploying a small inner working angle as an efficient coronagraph and extreme adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, and clearly shows that doing so will enable the study of potentially habitable planets.

  15. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  16. BLAST05: POWER SPECTRA OF BRIGHT GALACTIC CIRRUS AT SUBMILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Arabindo; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2010-01-10

    We report multi-wavelength power spectra of diffuse Galactic dust emission from Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope observations at 250, 350, and 500 mum in Galactic plane fields in Cygnus X and Aquila. These submillimeter power spectra statistically quantify the self-similar structure observable over a broad range of scales and can be used to assess the cirrus noise which limits the detection of faint point sources. The advent of submillimeter surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory makes the wavelength dependence a matter of interest. We show that the observed relative amplitudes of the power spectra can be related through a spectral energy distribution (SED). Fitting a simple modified black body to this SED, we find the dust temperature in Cygnus X to be 19.8 +- 1.5 K and in the Aquila region 16.8 +- 0.8 K. Our empirical estimates provide important new insight into the substantial cirrus noise that will be encountered in forthcoming observations.

  17. A 12 GHz wavelength spacing multi-wavelength laser source for wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, P. C.; Shiu, R. K.; Bitew, M. A.; Chang, T. L.; Lai, C. H.; Junior, J. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a multi-wavelength laser source with 12 GHz wavelength spacing based on a single distributed feedback laser. A light wave generated from the distributed feedback laser is fed into a frequency shifter loop consisting of 50:50 coupler, dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifier, optical filter, and polarization controller. The frequency of the input wavelength is shifted and then re-injected into the frequency shifter loop. By re-injecting the shifted wavelengths multiple times, we have generated 84 optical carriers with 12 GHz wavelength spacing and stable output power. For each channel, two wavelengths are modulated by a wireless data using the phase modulator and transmitted through a 25 km single mode fiber. In contrast to previously developed schemes, the proposed laser source does not incur DC bias drift problem. Moreover, it is a good candidate for radio-over-fiber systems to support multiple users using a single distributed feedback laser.

  18. Applying the Power of Reticular Chemistry to Finding the Missing alb-MOF Platform Based on the (6,12)-Coordinated Edge-Transitive Net.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijie; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Jiang, Hao; Bhatt, Prashant M; Guillerm, Vincent; Dauzon, Emilie; Xue, Dong-Xu; O'Keeffe, Michael; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Highly connected and edge-transitive nets are of prime importance in crystal chemistry and are regarded as ideal blueprints for the rational design and construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We report the design and synthesis of highly connected MOFs based on reticulation of the sole two edge-transitive nets with a vertex figure as double six-membered-ring (d6R) building unit, namely the (4,12)-coordinated shp net (square and hexagonal-prism) and the (6,12)-coordinated alb net (aluminum diboride, hexagonal-prism and trigonal-prism). Decidedly, the combination of our recently isolated 12-connected (12-c) rare-earth (RE) nonanuclear [RE9(μ3-OH)12(μ3-O)2(O2C-)12] carboxylate-based cluster, points of extension matching the 12 vertices of hexagonal-prism d6R, with 4-connected (4-c) square porphyrinic tetracarboxylate ligand led to the formation of the targeted RE-shp-MOF. This is the first time that RE-MOFs based on 12-c molecular building blocks (MBBs), d6R building units, have been deliberately targeted and successfully isolated, paving the way for the long-awaited (6,12)-c MOF with alb topology. Indeed, combination of a custom-designed hexacarboxylate ligand with RE salts led to the formation of the first related alb-MOF, RE-alb-MOF. Intuitively, we successfully transplanted the alb topology to another chemical system and constructed the first indium-based alb-MOF, In-alb-MOF, by employing trinuclear [In3(μ3-O)(O2C-)6] as the requisite 6-connected trigonal-prism and purposely made a dodecacarboxylate ligand as a compatible 12-c MBB. Prominently, the dodecacarboxylate ligand was employed to transplant shp topology into copper-based MOFs by employing the copper paddlewheel [Cu2(O2C-)4] as the complementary square building unit, affording the first Cu-shp-MOF. We revealed that highly connected edge-transitive nets such shp and alb are ideal for topological transplantation and deliberate construction of related MOFs based on minimal edge-transitive nets.

  19. In vivo characterization of CYP2D6*12, *29 and *84 using dextromethorphan as a probe drug: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Twist, Greyson P; Farrow, Emily G; Lowry, Jennifer A; Soden, Sarah E; Miller, Neil A

    2017-04-01

    CYP2D6*84 was first described in a Black South African subject, however, its function remains unknown. Astrolabe, a probabilistic scoring tool developed in our laboratory to call genotypes from whole genome sequence, identified CYP2D6*84 in a trio. The father presented with intermediate metabolism when challenged with the CYP2D6 probe drug dextromethorphan (DM/dextrorphan [DX] = 0.0839). Since his second allele, CYP2D6*12, is nonfunctional, the observed activity is derived by CYP2D6*84. This finding suggests that the allele's hallmark P267H causes decreased activity toward DM and that this allele should receive a value of 0.5 for Activity Score calculations. The mother's DM/DX of 0.0543 was consistent with the decreased activity classification of CYP2D6*29. The child, a critically ill neonate, was not phenotyped, but predicted to be a normal metabolizer.

  20. Impact of parent-related factors on dental caries in the permanent dentition of 6-12-year-old children: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santhosh; Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Kroon, Jeroen; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-03-01

    To synthesise data from the literature on the effects of various parent-related characteristics (socio-demographic, behavioural and family environment) on dental caries in the permanent dentition of children. Available studies in which the effects of parent-related characteristics on dental caries experience in the permanent dentition of children aged 6-12 years were evaluated. PubMed, Medline via OVID and CINAHL Plus via EBSCO, restricted to scientific articles, were searched in April 2015. English language and time filters (articles published from 2000) were used. A total of 4162 titles were retrieved, of which 2578 remained after duplicates were removed. After review of titles and their abstracts by two independent reviewers, 114 articles were considered relevant for full text review. Of these, 48 were considered for final inclusion. Data extraction was performed by two authors using piloted data extraction sheets. Most of the literature on determinants of dental caries has been limited to socio-economic and behavioural aspects: we found few studies evaluating the effects of family environment and parental oral hygiene behaviour. Children belonging to lower socio-economic classes experienced more caries. In more than half the studies, children of highly educated, professional and high income parents were at lower risk for dental caries. There were conflicting results from studies on the effect of variables related to family environment, parents' oral hygiene behaviour and parent's disease status on dental caries in their children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A first principles study on the solvation and structure of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, n=6-12

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bing; Liu Zhifeng

    2004-11-01

    The structures of hydrated sulfate clusters, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} with n=6-12, are obtained by density functional theory calculations. For SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}, two structures with symmetric distribution of H{sub 2}O molecules around the sulfate group are favored in energy. The structures for the smaller clusters, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} with n=6-11, are obtained by taking away one H{sub 2}O molecule successively from the two symmetric SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12} isomers. The hydrogen bonding between the sulfate O atoms and H{sub 2}O molecules are strong. So are the hydrogen bonds among H{sub 2}O molecules, which are facilitated by the structure of the polyatomic sulfate group. The solvation energy is quite large (often exceeding 15 kcal/mol). The patterns for structural and energy changes as the cluster size increases are very different from the well studied hydrated halide ions, although the competition between solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions is again an important factor. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations also show 'crowding' effects in the first solvation of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12} at raised temperature.

  2. The beneficial effects of game-based exercise using age-appropriate tennis lessons on the executive functions of 6-12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao

    2017-03-06

    This study evaluated the effects of two different types of tennis lessons-those involving a technique-based approach (TBA) and those involving a game-based approach (PLAY+STAY [P+S])-on the executive functions (EFs) of junior tennis players. Eighty-one tennis players (6-12 years old) were recruited and assigned to one of three groups: TBA, P+S, or watching TV (CONT). Subjects completed evaluations of EFs (inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) before and after 50min programs. The overall score for EFs improved significantly for both the P+S and TBA groups but not for the CONT group; indeed the CONT group showed no improvement in overall EFs. Furthermore, the overall EF score improved more for P+S participants than for those in TBA. Looking at components of EFs, the pattern for inhibitory control reflected the pattern for the overall EF index: Improvement in the P+S and TBA groups but not in the CONT group. Only the P+S group improved in working memory. Thus, playing tennis and practicing isolated tennis skills both improved EFs of junior players more than did watching TV, and game-based tennis lessons seem to hold more promise for improving EFs than drills of tennis skills.

  3. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  4. Dual-wavelengths photoacoustic temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu; Jian, Xiaohua; Dong, Fenglin; Cui, Yaoyao

    2017-02-01

    Thermal therapy is an approach applied in cancer treatment by heating local tissue to kill the tumor cells, which requires a high sensitivity of temperature monitoring during therapy. Current clinical methods like fMRI near infrared or ultrasound for temperature measurement still have limitations on penetration depth or sensitivity. Photoacoustic temperature sensing is a newly developed temperature sensing method that has a potential to be applied in thermal therapy, which usually employs a single wavelength laser for signal generating and temperature detecting. Because of the system disturbances including laser intensity, ambient temperature and complexity of target, the accidental errors of measurement is unavoidable. For solving these problems, we proposed a new method of photoacoustic temperature sensing by using two wavelengths to reduce random error and increase the measurement accuracy in this paper. Firstly a brief theoretical analysis was deduced. Then in the experiment, a temperature measurement resolution of about 1° in the range of 23-48° in ex vivo pig blood was achieved, and an obvious decrease of absolute error was observed with averagely 1.7° in single wavelength pattern while nearly 1° in dual-wavelengths pattern. The obtained results indicates that dual-wavelengths photoacoustic sensing of temperature is able to reduce random error and improve accuracy of measuring, which could be a more efficient method for photoacoustic temperature sensing in thermal therapy of tumor.

  5. Effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2016-09-01

    In microholographic recording, expensive laser diodes having no spectrum broadening (single mode) and no wavelength variation are used. On the other hand, in conventional optical disk systems, cheap laser diodes having spectrum broadening (multimode) and wavelength variation are used. It is a great advantage if the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems can be used for microholographic recording. Therefore, the effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The laser diodes were modeled so that the full width at 1/e2 maximum of the spectrum was 0.8 nm and the center wavelength was 405 nm. The numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85 and the thickness of the recording medium was 300 μm. The diffraction efficiency of the diffracted beam from a microhologram was calculated using the coupled wave theory and the following results were obtained. The diffraction efficiency decreased by three orders of magnitude by replacing single-mode laser diodes with multimode laser diodes, which makes it necessary to enhance the readout signal. The tolerance of the optical path length difference between the signal and reference beams was -50 110 μm, which makes it necessary to adjust the optical path length difference. The tolerance of the wavelength variation was 405 +/- 0.5 nm, which makes it necessary to select the laser diodes. The conclusion was that it is not practical to use the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems for microholographic recording.

  6. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE STAR-FORMING CORE AHEAD OF HH 80N

    SciTech Connect

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Garay, Guido; Calvet, Nuria; Beltran, Maria T.

    2011-09-01

    We present observations of continuum emission in the mid-infrared to millimeter wavelength range, complemented with ammonia observations, of the dense core ahead of the radio Herbig-Haro (HH) object HH 80N, found in the GGD 27 region. The continuum emission in all the observed bands peaks at the same position, consistent with the presence of an embedded object, HH 80N-IRS1, within the core. The distribution of the Very Large Array ammonia emission is well correlated with that of the dust, suggesting that photochemical effects caused by the nearby HH object do not play an important role in shaping this particular molecular emission. In order to unveil the nature of HH 80N-IRS1, we analyzed the continuum data of this source, using self-consistent models of protostellar collapse. We find that a young protostar surrounded by a slowly rotating collapsing envelope of radius {approx}0.08 pc and 20 M{sub sun} plus a circumstellar disk of radius {approx}300 AU and 0.6 M{sub sun} provide a good fit to the observed spectral energy distribution and to the maps at 350 {mu}m, 1.2 mm, and 3.5 mm of HH 80N-IRS1. Besides, the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment and Plateau de Bure Interferometer continuum maps at 350 {mu}m and 3.5 mm, respectively, reveal additional clumps in the continuum emission. Given the modeling results and the observed morphology of the emission, we propose a scenario consisting of a central embedded Class 0 object, HH 80N-IRS1, with the rest of the material of the HH 80N core possibly undergoing fragmentation that may lead to the formation of several protostars.

  7. [Influence of wearing long wavelength filter glasses on refractive development of children's hyperopia].

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Yu, Z Q; Chu, R Y; Qian, Y S; Xu, Y; Wang, X Q

    2017-01-11

    Objective: To investigate the effect of wearing long wavelength filter glasses on refractive development of children's hyperopia. Methods: Case control study. Seventeen 5-7 years' old children with high hyperopia from optometry clinic of Eye and ENT Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University were enrolled in this research. The experiment design was self-control between right and left eye, 3 children were lost during two years' period of observation, all the children's hyperopic refraction were more than +6.00 D, cycloplegic by 1% atropine. All the children were required to wear long wavelength filter glasses for 6 hours after waking up, the rest of the time with the conventional glasses. Refraction, axis and red/green match point were tested before the intervention and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months, after the intervention. Results: After two years' intervention, hyperopia decreased, eye axis increased, the best corrected visual acuity increased both in experimental eyes and control eyes, but there were no statistically significant difference between the two groups at each time point. All children were with normal color vision, compared to the long-wavelength light, the hyperopic eyes were more sensitive to middle-wavelength light, no significant difference was found between two groups, red/green match points were 42.802±1.216 and 42.889±1.560 respectively. After wearing long wavelength filter, red/green match point were significant decreased in the experimental group in 6 months and 12 months time points (6 months: 0.995±0. 543 vs. 0.104±0.143, t=3.04, P=0.005, 12 months: 1.096±0.392 vs. 0.17±0.248, t=2.725, P=0.008). The experiment eyes were more sensitive to long-wavelength light than the control eyes. But in later time, there was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: Wearing long wavelength filter glasses two years has no effect on refractive development on children with high hyperopia, but it can cause short-term chromatic adaptation, making

  8. Wavelength-codified fiber laser hydrogen detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigosa-Blanch, A.; Díez, A.; González-Segura, A.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.

    2005-11-01

    We report a scheme for an optical hydrogen detector that codifies the information in wavelength. The system is based on an erbium-doped fiber laser with two coupled cavities and a Palladium-coated tapered fiber within one of the laser cavities. The tapered fiber acts as the hydrogen-sensing element. When the sensing element is exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere, its attenuation decreases changing the cavity losses. This change leads the system to switch lasing from the wavelength of the auxiliary cavity to the characteristic wavelength of the cavity which contains the sensing element. The detection level can be shifted by adjusting the reflective elements of the cavity containing the sensing element.

  9. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  10. Metallic Colloid Wavelength-Ratiometric Scattering Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Roll, David; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2009-01-01

    Gold and silver colloids display strong colors as a result of electron oscillations induced by incident light, which are referred to as the plasmon absorption. This absorption is dependent on colloid–colloid proximity, which has been the basis of absorption assays using colloids. We now describe a new approach to optical sensing using the light scattering properties of colloids. Colloid aggregation was induced by avidin–biotin interactions, which shifted the plasmon absorption to longer wavelengths. We found the spectral shift results in changes in the scattering at different incident wavelengths. By measuring the ratio of scattered intensities at two incident wavelengths, this measurement was made independent of the total colloid concentration. The high scattering efficiency of the colloids resulted in intensities equivalent to fluorescence when normalized by the optical density of the fluorophore and colloid. This approach can be used in a wide variety of assay formats, including those commonly used with fluorescence detection. PMID:14570195

  11. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  12. Effective wavelength scaling for optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Lukas

    2007-06-29

    In antenna theory, antenna parameters are directly related to the wavelength lambda of incident radiation, but this scaling fails at optical frequencies where metals behave as strongly coupled plasmas. In this Letter we show that antenna designs can be transferred to the optical frequency regime by replacing lambda by a linearly scaled effective wavelength lambda(eff)=n(1)+n(2)lambda/lambda(p), with lambda(p) being the plasma wavelength and n(1), n(2) being coefficients that depend on geometry and material properties. It is assumed that the antenna is made of linear segments with radii R < lambda. Optical antennas hold great promise for increasing the efficiency of photovoltaics, light-emitting devices, and optical sensors.

  13. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  14. Coumarins as wavelength shifters in polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. W.; Zhang, G.

    1995-02-01

    A series of commercially available coumarins was tested as wavelength shifters in polystyrene for a tile/fiber calorimeter application. The objective was to find a compound that when incorporated in a polystyrene matrix absorbed in the 400-450 nm wavelength range, fluoresced in the green region of the visible spectrum ( λem = 450-550 nm), and exhibited both short decay time and high quantum yield. Transmittance, fluorescence, and decay time determinations were performed in order to characterize each coumarin in polystyrene. Two coumarins (C510 and C515) were found to have faster decay times (˜8 ns vs. 12 ns) and superior light output (100-120%) compared to the commonly-used green wavelength shifter, K-27.

  15. Galactic Astronomy at Long Wavelengths: Past Prologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. J. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the course of his long career, Bill Erickson has conducted long wavelength observations on a number of Galactic objects. These include observations of or searches for supernova remnants, pulsars, extrasolar planets, and the interstellar medium. Throughout, he has been instrumental in attempting to obtain higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity at long wavelengths. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of the questions that Bill tried to address with his observations remain unsolved today. These include such fundamental issues as, How are particles accelerated? Where are particles accelerated? What are the environmental impact, both direct and indirect, of particle acceleration? I shall provide a brief and necessarily incomplete survey of Bill's work in the Galaxy and show how it sets the stage for many of the questions facing modern long-wavelength instruments.

  16. Wavelength Dependence on the Space Charge Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Teague, L.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2012-05-31

    The distribution of the internal electric field in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) materials has significant effects on the charge collection ability. Light exposure at various wavelengths is a relatively unexplored process that alters charge collection at the anode contact. The use of multiple wavelengths can target charge carriers at various trap energies and positions throughout the crystal. The controlled illumination increases charge collection by releasing trapped electron and hole carriers in the crystal despite differences in light energy. Our study presents the results from our investigation of the effect of external illumination of CZT on the internal electric field via the Pockels effect. The space charge collection is further analyzed based on location and intensity relative to the specific wavelength of illumination.

  17. Suggested isosbestic wavelength calibration in clinical analyses.

    PubMed

    Hoxter, G

    1979-01-01

    I recommend the use of isosbestic points for conveniently checking the wavelength scale of spectrophotometers in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Colorimetric pH indicators, hemoglobin derivatives, and other radiation-absorbing substances that are convertible into stable isomers of different absorption spectra provide a means for calibrating many different wavelengths by comparing the absorptivities of these isomers in equimolar solutions. The method requires no special precautions and results are independent of substance concentration and temperature between 4 and 45 degrees C. Isosbestic calibration may be important for (e.g.) coenzyme-dependent dehydrogenase activity determinations and in quality assurance programs.

  18. New method for spectrofluorometer monochromator wavelength calibration.

    PubMed

    Paladini, A A; Erijman, L

    1988-09-01

    A method is presented for wavelength calibration of spectrofluorometer monochromators. It is based on the distortion that the characteristic absorption bands of glass filters (holmium or didymium oxide), commonly used for calibration of spectrophotometers, introduce in the emitted fluorescence of fluorophores like indole, diphenyl hexatriene, xylene or rhodamine 6G. Those filters or a well characterized absorber with sharp bands like benzene vapor can be used for the same purpose. The wavelength calibration accuracy obtained with this method is better than 0.1 nm, and requires no modification in the geometry of the spectrofluorometer sample compartment.

  19. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  20. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  1. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  2. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  3. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  4. New design for a wavelength demultiplexing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethmann, Konrad; Orghici, Rozalia; Pichler, Elke; Zywietz, Urs; Schimdt, Thomas; Gleissner, Uwe; Kelb, Christian; Roth, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Carsten; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG) originally designed as demultiplexing device and manufactured with well established silicon wafer technology are already used successfully as compact spectrometers with high resolution1. In this paper, the concept of a new design for a wavelength demultiplexing device based on tailor-made polymers is presented. The motivation for a new design is a smaller footprint of the device and the avoidance of bended waveguides and the associated losses. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize the design. Using microscope projection lithography and hot embossing a first polymer based device was realized. Its characterization and the achieved performance in terms of resolution and covered wavelength range will be discussed.

  5. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  6. Half wavelength dipole antennas over stratified media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorraca, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical solutions of the fields induced by half-wavelength, horizontal, electric field dipoles (HEDS) are determined based on studies of infinitesimal, horizontal, electric field dipoles over low loss plane-stratified media. To determine these solutions, an approximation to the current distribution of a half-wavelength HED is derived and experimentally verified. Traverse and antenna measurements obtained on the Athabasca Glacier in the summer of 1971 are related to the characteristics of the transmitting antenna design, and the measurement techniques and field equipment used in the glacier trials are described and evaluated.

  7. Optimal wavelength selection for noncontact reflection photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral Martinez, Luis F.; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we obtain backscattered signals from human forehead for wavelengths from 380 to 980 nm. The results reveal bands with strong pulsatile signals that carry useful information. We describe those bands as the most suitable wavelengths in the visible and NIR regions from which heart and respiratory rate parameters can be derived using long distance non-contact reflection photoplethysmography analysis. The latter results show the feasibility of a novel technique for remotely detection of vital signs in humans. This technique, which may include morphological analysis or maps of tissue oxygenation, is a further step to real non-invasive remote monitoring of patients.

  8. A 0.6 to 4.1 mum spectroscopic study of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Michael C.

    2004-10-01

    We present the results of a 0.6 to 4.1 μm spectroscopic survey of a sample of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from M0 V to T5 V. The survey was conducted with SpeX, a 0.8 to 5.5 μm, medium-resolution spectrograph and imager on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We developed a data reduction package for SpeX called Spextool which performs all the steps necessary to produce fully reduced spectra including preparation of calibration frames, processing and spectral extraction of science frames, wavelength calibration of spectra, and flux calibration of spectra. We have identified the most prominate atomic and molecular absorption features including ˜100 new FeH features, ˜30 new CH4 features, a new band of VO, and ˜80 atomic features. We have also derived the bolometric luminosities and effective temperatures of the dwarfs. Finally, by comparing the dwarf spectra to synthetic spectra computed from model atmospheres we show, for the first time, spectroscopic evidence for the prescence of condenstate clouds in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs.

  9. Retrofit Weight-Loss Outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 Months and Characteristics of 12-Month High Performers: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Kachin, Kevin; Berger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is the leading cause of preventable death costing the health care system billions of dollars. Combining self-monitoring technology with personalized behavior change strategies results in clinically significant weight loss. However, there is a lack of real-world outcomes in commercial weight-loss program research. Objective Retrofit is a personalized weight management and disease-prevention solution. This study aimed to report Retrofit’s weight-loss outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 months and characterize behaviors, age, and sex of high-performing participants who achieved weight loss of 10% or greater at 12 months. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed from 2011 to 2014 using 2720 participants enrolled in a Retrofit weight-loss program. Participants had a starting body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m² and were at least 18 years of age. Weight measurements were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 months in the program to evaluate change in body weight, BMI, and percentage of participants who achieved 5% or greater weight loss. A secondary analysis characterized high-performing participants who lost ≥10% of their starting weight (n=238). Characterized behaviors were evaluated, including self-monitoring through weigh-ins, number of days wearing an activity tracker, daily step count average, and engagement through coaching conversations via Web-based messages, and number of coaching sessions attended. Results Average weight loss at 6 months was −5.55% for male and −4.86% for female participants. Male and female participants had an average weight loss of −6.28% and −5.37% at 12 months, respectively. Average weight loss at 24 months was −5.03% and −3.15% for males and females, respectively. Behaviors of high-performing participants were assessed at 12 months. Number of weigh-ins were greater in high-performing male (197.3 times vs 165.4 times, P=.001) and female participants (222 times vs 167 times, P<.001) compared with remaining participants

  10. Retrofit Weight-Loss Outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 Months and Characteristics of 12-Month High Performers: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Painter, Stefanie; Ditsch, Gary; Ahmed, Rezwan; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Kachin, Kevin; Berger, Jan

    2016-08-22

    Obesity is the leading cause of preventable death costing the health care system billions of dollars. Combining self-monitoring technology with personalized behavior change strategies results in clinically significant weight loss. However, there is a lack of real-world outcomes in commercial weight-loss program research. Retrofit is a personalized weight management and disease-prevention solution. This study aimed to report Retrofit's weight-loss outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 months and characterize behaviors, age, and sex of high-performing participants who achieved weight loss of 10% or greater at 12 months. A retrospective analysis was performed from 2011 to 2014 using 2720 participants enrolled in a Retrofit weight-loss program. Participants had a starting body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m² and were at least 18 years of age. Weight measurements were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 months in the program to evaluate change in body weight, BMI, and percentage of participants who achieved 5% or greater weight loss. A secondary analysis characterized high-performing participants who lost ≥10% of their starting weight (n=238). Characterized behaviors were evaluated, including self-monitoring through weigh-ins, number of days wearing an activity tracker, daily step count average, and engagement through coaching conversations via Web-based messages, and number of coaching sessions attended. Average weight loss at 6 months was -5.55% for male and -4.86% for female participants. Male and female participants had an average weight loss of -6.28% and -5.37% at 12 months, respectively. Average weight loss at 24 months was -5.03% and -3.15% for males and females, respectively. Behaviors of high-performing participants were assessed at 12 months. Number of weigh-ins were greater in high-performing male (197.3 times vs 165.4 times, P=.001) and female participants (222 times vs 167 times, P<.001) compared with remaining participants. Total activity tracker days and average steps per

  11. Design of a Self-Management Program for Children Aged 6-12 Years with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus at the Community Hospital Herdecke, Germany.

    PubMed

    Berger, Bettina; Sethe, Dominik; Hilgard, Dörte; Martin, David; Heusser, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) must replace lacking endogenous insulin by daily insulin injections or insulin pumps. Standards of treatment include educational programs enabling self-management. The program 'Herdecker Kids with Diabetes' (HeKiDi) is based on an anthroposophic understanding of the human being and intends to provide an individualized, patient-oriented approach to developing diabetes-related and comprehensive human competencies. Analysis of the HeKiDi program for children (6-12 years) with T1DM as the first part of an evaluation of a complex intervention. Ethnographic approach, following the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ), including field observations and interviews with responsible persons, content analysis of materials for determining the structure and the curriculum, presented according to the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR). The curriculum follows the standard but adds a learning circle between the child and the therapeutic team comprising 3 stages: (1) perception of the abilities and needs of the individual child supported by adult mentors themselves suffering from T1DM, (2) reflection within the therapeutic team, and (3) daily feedback to the child. Curricular Learning Objectives: Children feel recognized and supported in their individual developmental and diabetes-related competencies and develop motoric, artistic, communicative, and social skills to strengthen their self-efficacy and to understand T1DM as a lifelong awareness process. The curriculum including its associated learning goals and methods was presented. The program was explained and shown to be reproducible. Whether this program truly leads to better outcomes in regard to self-efficacy and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin) and how parents and children perceive this will have to be assessed using a comparative interventional study. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. On the Relative Importance of Convection and Temperature on the Behavior of the Ionosphere in North American during January 6-12, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Buonsanto, M. J.; Reinisch, B. W.; Holt, J.; Fennelly, J. A.; Scali, J. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J.; Brittnacher, M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements from a network of digisondes and an incoherent scatter radar In Eastern North American For January 6-12, 1997 have been compared with the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model which now includes the effects of electric field convective. With the exception of Bermuda, the model reproduces the daytime electron density very well most of the time. As is typical behavior for winter solar minimum on magnetically undisturbed nights, the measurements at Millstone Hill show high electron temperatures before midnight followed by a rapid decay, which is accompanied by a pronounced density enhancement in the early morning hours. The FLIP model reproduces the nighttime density enhancement well, provided the model is constrained to follow the topside electron temperature and the flux tube is full. Similar density enhancements are seen at Goose Bay, Wallops Island and Bermuda. However, the peak height variation and auroral images indicate the density enhancements at Goose Bay are most likely due to particle precipitation. Contrary to previously published work we find that the nighttime density variation at Millstone Hill is driven by the temperature behavior and not the other way around. Thus, in both the data and model, the overall nighttime density is lowered and the enhancement does not occur if the temperature remains high all night. Our calculations show that convections of plasma from higher magnetic latitudes does not cause the observed density maximum but it may enhance the density maximum if over-full flux tubes are convected over the station. On the other had, convection of flux tubes with high temperatures and depleted densities may prevent the density maximum from occurring. Despite the success in modeling the nighttime density enhancements, there remain two unresolved problems. First, the measured density decays much faster than the modeled density near sunset at Millstone Hill and Goose Bay though not at lower latitude stations. Second, we

  13. ±J Ising model on mixed Archimedean lattices: (33,42), (32,4,3,4), (3,122), (4,6,12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrecht, W.; Valdés, J. F.

    2013-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of finding analytical expressions describing the ground state properties of mixed Archimedean lattices over which a generalized Edwards-Anderson model (±J Ising model) is defined. A local frustration analysis is performed based on representative cells for (33,42), (32,4,3,4), (3,122) and (4,6,12) lattices, following the notation proposed by Grünbaum and Shephard. The concentration of ferromagnetic (F) bonds x is used as the independent variable in the analysis (1-x is the concentration for antiferromagnetic (A) bonds), where x spans the range [0.00,1.00]. The presence of A bonds brings frustration, whose clear manifestation is when bonds around the minimum possible circuit of bonds (plaquette) cannot be simultaneously satisfied. The distribution of curved (frustrated) plaquettes within the representative cell is determinant for the evaluation of the parameters of interest such as average frustration segment, energy per bond, and fractional content of unfrustrated bonds. Two methods are developed to cope with this analysis: one based on the direct probability of a plaquette being curved; the other one is based on the consideration of the different ways bonds contribute to the particular plaquette configuration. Exact numerical simulations on a large number of randomly generated samples associated to (33,42) and (32,4,3,4) lattices allow to validate the previously described theoretical analysis. It is found that the first method presents slight advantages over the second one. However, both methods give an excellent description for most of the range for x. The small deviations at specific intervals of x for each lattice are relevant to the self-imposed limitations of both methods due to practical reasons. A particular discussion for the point x=0.50 for each one of the four lattices also sheds light on the general trends of the properties described here.

  14. On the Relative Importance of Convection and Temperature on the Behavior of the Ionosphere in North American during January 6-12, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Buonsanto, M. J.; Reinisch, B. W.; Holt, J.; Fennelly, J. A.; Scali, J. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J.; Brittnacher, M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements from a network of digisondes and an incoherent scatter radar In Eastern North American For January 6-12, 1997 have been compared with the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model which now includes the effects of electric field convective. With the exception of Bermuda, the model reproduces the daytime electron density very well most of the time. As is typical behavior for winter solar minimum on magnetically undisturbed nights, the measurements at Millstone Hill show high electron temperatures before midnight followed by a rapid decay, which is accompanied by a pronounced density enhancement in the early morning hours. The FLIP model reproduces the nighttime density enhancement well, provided the model is constrained to follow the topside electron temperature and the flux tube is full. Similar density enhancements are seen at Goose Bay, Wallops Island and Bermuda. However, the peak height variation and auroral images indicate the density enhancements at Goose Bay are most likely due to particle precipitation. Contrary to previously published work we find that the nighttime density variation at Millstone Hill is driven by the temperature behavior and not the other way around. Thus, in both the data and model, the overall nighttime density is lowered and the enhancement does not occur if the temperature remains high all night. Our calculations show that convections of plasma from higher magnetic latitudes does not cause the observed density maximum but it may enhance the density maximum if over-full flux tubes are convected over the station. On the other had, convection of flux tubes with high temperatures and depleted densities may prevent the density maximum from occurring. Despite the success in modeling the nighttime density enhancements, there remain two unresolved problems. First, the measured density decays much faster than the modeled density near sunset at Millstone Hill and Goose Bay though not at lower latitude stations. Second, we

  15. Perfluorooctanoate exposure in a highly exposed community and parent and teacher reports of behaviour in 6-12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cheryl R; Savitz, David A; Bellinger, David C

    2014-03-01

    In toxicology studies, perfluorinated compounds affect fetal growth, development, viability, and postnatal growth. There are limited epidemiologic studies on child development. We recruited and evaluated 321 children who participated in the C8 Health Project, a 2005-06 survey in a mid-Ohio Valley community highly exposed to perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) through contaminated drinking water. We examined associations between measured childhood PFOA serum concentration and mother and teacher reports of executive function (Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behaviour (Conner's ADHD Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Scales), and behavioural problems (Behaviour Assessment System for Children) assessed 3 to 4 years later at ages 6-12 years. Overall, neither reports from mothers nor teachers provided clear associations between exposure and child behaviour. Mother reports, however, did suggest favourable associations between exposure and behaviour among boys and adverse associations among girls. On the composite scale from the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (n = 318), PFOA exposure had a favourable association among boys (highest vs. lowest quartile β = -6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] -11.43, -1.35) and an adverse association among girls (highest vs. lowest quartile β = 4.42; 95% CI -0.03, 8.87; interaction P = 0.01). Teacher reports (n = 189) replicated some, but not all of the sex interactions observed in mothers' reports. Aggregate results did not suggest adverse effects of PFOA on behaviour, but sex-specific results raise the possibility of differing patterns by sex. Results are not consistent between mothers' and teachers' reports. Effect modification by sex may warrant further investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Development of rotational movements, hand shaping, and accuracy in advance and withdrawal for the reach-to-eat movement in human infants aged 6-12 months.

    PubMed

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Karl, Jenni M; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2012-06-01

    The reach-to-eat movement, transport of a hand to grasp an object that is withdrawn and placed in the mouth, is amongst the earliest developing functional movements of human infants. The present longitudinal study is the first description of the maturation of hand-rotation, hand shaping, and accuracy associated with the advance and withdrawal phases of the movement. Eight infants, aged 6-12 months, and eight adults, were video recorded as they reached for familiar objects or food items. Hand, arm, and trunk movements were assessed frame-by-frame with the Skilled Reaching Rating Scale, previously developed for the assessment of adult reaching, and supplementary kinematic analysis. Reach-to-eat maturation was characterized by three changes. First, for advance, a simple open hand transport gradually matured to a movement associated with pronation and hand shaping of the digits for precision grasping. Second, for withdrawal to the mouth, a direct withdrawal movement gradually became associated with hand supination that oriented the target object to the mouth. Third, associated with the maturation of rotational movements, inaccurate and fragmented hand transport and withdrawal movements developed into precise targeting of the hand-to-object and object-to-mouth. Across the age range, there was a decrease in bimanual reaching and an increase in right handed reaching. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that the maturation of the reach-to-eat movement involves the development of rotational and shaping movements of the hand and visual and somatosensory guidance of a preferred hand. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A. B.; Daly, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that gravity and topography anomalies on the earth's surface may provide new information about deep processes occurring in the earth, such as those associated with mantle convection. Two main reasons are cited for this. The first is the steady improvement that has occurred in the resolution of the long wavelength gravity field, particularly in the wavelength range of a few hundred to a few thousand km, mainly due to increased coverage of terrestrial gravity measurements and the development of radar altimeters in orbiting satellites. The second reason is the large number of numerical and laboratory experiments of convection in the earth, including some with deformable upper and lower boundaries and temperature-dependent viscosity. The oceans are thought to hold the most promise for determining long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies, since their evolution has been relatively simple in comparison with that of the continents. It is also shown that good correlation between long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies exists over some portions of the ocean floor

  18. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  19. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  20. Intraocular lens short wavelength light filtering.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Keith H; Gibson, G Anthony

    2010-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the effects of reactive oxygen species ('free radicals') in ageing, both in the body overall and specifically in the eye. Cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are two major causes of blindness, with cataract accounting for 48 per cent of world blindness and AMD accounting for 8.7 per cent. Both cataract and AMD affect an older population (over 50 years of age) and while cataract is largely treatable provided resources are available, AMD is a common cause of untreatable, progressive visual loss. There is evidence that AMD is linked to exposure to short wavelength electromagnetic radiation, which includes ultraviolet, blue and violet wavelengths. The ageing crystalline lens provides some protection to the posterior pole because, as it yellows with age, its spectral absorption increasingly blocks the shorter wavelengths of light. Ultraviolet blocking intraocular lenses (IOLs) have been the standard of care for many years but a more recent trend is to include blue-blocking filters based on theoretical benefits. As these filters absorb part of the visible spectrum, they may affect visual function. This review looks at the risks and the benefits of filtering out short wavelength light in pseudophakic patients.

  1. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  2. Investigation of optimum wavelengths for oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huong, Audrey K. C.; Stockford, Ian M.; Crowe, John A.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2009-07-01

    An evaluation of the optimum choice of wavelengths, when using the 'Modified Lambert-Beer law' to estimate blood oxygen saturation, that minimises the mean error across a range of oxygen saturation values is presented. The stability of this approach and its susceptibility to noise are also considered.

  3. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  4. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  5. Concepts for a short wavelength rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Shchelkunov, S.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Three concepts of an rf gun to be operated at 0.1-10 mm wavelengths are considered. In all the concepts, the rf system exploits an accelerating traveling wave. In comparison with a classical decimeter standing-wave rf gun, we analyze the advantages of new concepts, available rf sources, and achievable beam parameters.

  6. Pump noise cancellation in parametric wavelength converters.

    PubMed

    Ataie, Vahid; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andereas O J; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-12-10

    A novel technique for pump noise effect mitigation in parametric wavelength converters is introduced. The method relies on digital signal processing and effectively takes advantage of the correlation property between the pump and idler, imposed by the parametric interaction. A 4 dB improvement in receiver performance is demonstrated experimentally for the conventional 10 Gbps OOK signal converted over 20 nm.

  7. SDIO long wavelength infrared detector requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duston, Dwight

    1990-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has a significant requirement for infrared sensors for surveillance, tracking and discrimination of objects in space. Projected SDIO needs cover the range from short wavelengths out to 30 microns. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several approaches including innovative concepts based on semiconductors and superconductors.

  8. Aero-Optics at Shorter Wavelengths.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    heliostat 1.93 1788 60 coelostat 2.40 2161 60 Changing from a CO2 laser to an iodine laser gives a wavelength ratio of 1/8. Assuming S is fixed, the...thickness and velocity profile. When the wall is concave to the external flow, Gortler vortices may occur. Cooling or heating can alter boundary layer

  9. Short wavelength radio observations of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Passive radio observations are discussed from 1 mm to 2 cm wavelengths. The interferometric technique was used to observe the brightness of the rings. The reflectivity and disk temperature are also considered. The differences between radio and radar observations are examined and discussed.

  10. Age-related changes in wavelength discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shinomori, Keizo; Schefrin, Brooke E.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Wavelength discrimination functions (420 to 620–650 nm) were measured for four younger (mean 30.9 years) and four older (mean 72.5 years) observers. Stimuli consisted of individually determined isoluminant monochromatic lights (10 Td) presented in each half of a 2° circular bipartite field with use of a Maxwellian-view optical system. A spatial two-alternative forced-choice method was used in combination with a staircase procedure to determine discrimination thresholds across the spectrum. Small but consistent elevations in discrimination thresholds were found for older compared with younger observers. Because the retinal illuminance of the stimuli was equated across all observers, these age-related losses in discrimination are attributable to neural changes. Analyses of these data reveal a significant change in Weber fraction across adulthood for a chromatically opponent pathway receiving primarily antagonistic signals from middle-wavelength-sensitive and long-wavelength-sensitive cones but not for a short-wavelength-sensitive cone pathway. PMID:11205976

  11. Phototransistors For Long-Wavelength Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstain, Shmuel I.

    1991-01-01

    Phototransistors of proposed new type used to detect photons having wavelengths of 8 to 150 micrometers. Detection based on impurity-to-continuum transitions. Integrated-circuit imaging arrays of such phototransistors useful in infrared remote sensing. Device of this type silicon, germanium, or silicon/germanium phototransistor in which junction between collector and base lightly doped with impurities.

  12. Two-wavelength anastigmatic Dyson imaging spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Montero-Orille, Carlos; Prieto-Blanco, Xesús; González-Núñez, Héctor; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2010-07-15

    High-quality Dyson imaging spectrometers are designed by applying a telecentric condition for off-axis image points. By imposing this condition for two different wavelengths, designs presenting low aberrations for the whole spectral range of the system are obtained. A UV-TO-NIR fast design (f/1.5) exhibiting excellent optical performance is presented.

  13. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy of n-Zn(Mg)O as a low-damping plasmonic material at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofev, Sergey; Kalusniak, Sascha; Schaefer, Peter; Henneberger, Fritz

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate that Zn(Mg)O:Ga layers can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a two-dimensional mode with high structural perfection up to Ga mole fractions of about 6.5%. The doping efficiency is practically 100% so that free-carrier concentrations of almost 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} can be realized providing a zero-crossover wavelength of the real part of the dielectric function as short as 1.36 {mu}m, while the plasmonic damping does not exceed 50 meV. Structural, electrical, and optical data consistently demonstrate a profound change of the Ga incorporation mode beyond concentrations of 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} attended by deterioration of the plasmonic features.

  15. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF IRON SILICATES IN THE INFRARED TO MILLIMETER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH AND TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, C. R.; Kinzer, R. E.; Cataldo, G.; Wollack, E. J.; Nuth, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2013-06-10

    The Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques program utilizes multiple instruments to provide spectral data over a wide range of temperatures and wavelengths. Experimental methods include Vector Network Analyzer and Fourier transform spectroscopy transmission, and reflection/scattering measurements. From this data, we can determine the optical parameters for the index of refraction, n, and the absorption coefficient, k. The analysis of the laboratory transmittance data for each sample type is based upon different mathematical models, which are applied to each data set according to their degree of coherence. Presented here are results from iron silicate dust grain analogs, in several sample preparations and at temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K, across the infrared and millimeter portion of the spectrum (from 2.5 to 10,000 {mu}m or 4000 to 1 cm{sup -1}).

  16. High-Power fiber amplifier with widely tunable repetition rate, fixed pulse duration, and multiple output wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Paul E; Farrow, Roger L; Kliner, Dahv A V; Fève, Jean-Philippe; Landru, Nicolas

    2006-11-27

    We report a pulsed, fiber-amplified microchip laser providing widely tunable repetition rate (7.1 - 27 kHz) with constant pulse duration (1.0 ns), pulse energy up to 0.41 mJ, linear output polarization, diffraction-limited beam quality (M(2) < 1.2), and < 1% pulse-energy fluctuations. The pulse duration was shown to minimize nonlinear effects that cause temporal and spectral distortion of the amplified pulses. This source employs passive Q-switching, single-stage single-pass amplification, and cw pumping, thus offering high efficiency, simplicity, and compact, rugged packaging for use in practical applications. The high peak power and high beam quality make this system an ideal pump source for nonlinear frequency conversion, and we demonstrated efficient harmonic generation and optical parametric generation of wavelengths from 213 nm to 4.4 mum with Watt-level output powers.

  17. Methods of controlling the emission wavelength in InAs/GaAsN/InGaAsN heterostructures on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mamutin, V. V. Egorov, A. Yu.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Nadtochy, A. M.; Pirogov, E. V.

    2008-07-15

    Studies of the properties of InGaAsN compounds and methods of controlling the emission wavelength in InAs/GaAsN/InGaAsN heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates are reviewed. The results for different types of heterostructures with quantum-size InGaAsN layers are presented. Among those are (1) traditional InGaAsN quantum wells in a GaAs matrix, (2) InAs quantum dots embedded in an (In)GaAsN layer, and (3) strain-compensated superlattices InAs/GaAsN/InGaAsN with quantum wells and quantum dots. The methods used in the study allow controllable variations in the emission wavelength over the telecommunication range from 1.3 to 1.76 {mu}m at room temperature.

  18. Single quantum dot emission at telecom wavelengths from metamorphic InAs/InGaAs nanostructures grown on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Trevisi, G.; Frigeri, P.; Rivas, D.; Munoz-Matutano, G.; Suarez, I.; Alen, B.; Canet, J.; Martinez-Pastor, J. P.

    2011-04-25

    We report on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and the study by atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence of low density metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantum dots. subcritical InAs coverages allow to obtain 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} dot density and metamorphic In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As (x=0.15,0.30) confining layers result in emission wavelengths at 1.3 {mu}m. We discuss optimal growth parameters and demonstrate single quantum dot emission up to 1350 nm at low temperatures, by distinguishing the main exciton complexes in these nanostructures. Reported results indicate that metamorphic quantum dots could be valuable candidates as single photon sources for long wavelength telecom windows.

  19. Ion-implanted WN 0.25{mu}m gate MESFET fabricated using I-line photolithography for application to MMIC and digital IC

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, E.O.; Yang, J.W.; Park, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    Straightforward WN 0.25{mu}m gate MESFET process based on direct ion-implantation and i-line photolithography with double exposure process has produced high performance MESFETs. The maximum transconductance of 600mS/mm and the k-factor of 450ms/Vmm were obtained. As high as 65GHz of cut-off frequency has been realized without any deembedding of parasitic effects. The MESFET shows the minimum noise figure of 0.87 dB and the associated gain of 9.97dB at 12GHz.

  20. EXPLAINING THE [C II]157.7 {mu}m DEFICIT IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES-FIRST RESULTS FROM A HERSCHEL/PACS STUDY OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A.; Charmandaris, V.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; Malhotra, S.; Meijerink, R.; Stacey, G.; Petric, A. O.; Lu, N.; Veilleux, S.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Lord, S.; Appleton, P.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present the first results of a survey of the [C II]157.7 {mu}m emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The [C II] luminosities, L{sub [C{sub II]}}, of the LIRGs in GOALS range from {approx}10{sup 7} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun }. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [C II]/FIR with far-IR (FIR) flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from {approx}10{sup -2} to 10{sup -4}, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [C II]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region ({Sigma}{sub MIR}), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [C II]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming LIRGs have a mean [C II]/FIR {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, while galaxies with low polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), span the full range in [C II]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure star-forming galaxies are considered, the [C II]/FIR ratio still drops by an order of magnitude, from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3}, with {Sigma}{sub MIR} and {Sigma}{sub IR}, implying that the [C II]157.7 {mu}m luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most local LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission most likely associated to the youngest stars. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [C II]/FIR {>=} 10{sup -3} typical of high 6.2 {mu}m PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the FIR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [C II]/FIR and the specific SFR for star

  1. Multiple wavelength LED on monolithic QW structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariya, Abdullah J.; LiKamWa, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    A monolithically integrated multi-wavelength LED based on selective dielectric cap intermixing is investigated experimentally. The proposed LED emits radiation with multiple wavelength peaks from one compact easy to fabricate quantum well (QW) structure. Each wavelength has an independent emission power control, allowing the LED to radiate one or more wavelengths simultaneously. The LED material is an AlGaAs/GaAs QW p-i-n heterostructure. The device is divided into three selectively intermixed regions using an impurity-free vacancy induced intermixing technique creating localized intermixed areas. Each region is intermixed to varying extent resulting in different luminescence peaks and by separately addressing each section with its electrical current, the net emission spectrum can be fully controlled. The fabrication process starts with the growth of a 400nm thick layer of SiO2 over the whole sample using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Three regions with different SiO2 thicknesses are defined via two photolithographic and subsequent reactive ion etching steps. The sample is then annealed at 975°C for 20s to activate the intermixing of the constituent atoms of the quantum well and barrier materials. The degree of intermixing is determined by the thickness of the SiO2 cap. After removal of the SiO2 cap, contact stripes are evaporated on each region to act as an independent intensity power control for that region. Experimental results have shown that a controllable 10nm, 21nm and 33nm blue shifts of the peak wavelength of emission from that of the as-grown sample corresponding to 0, 100nm, and 400nm thick SiO2 caps respectively.

  2. Imaging Uranus at Submillimeter to Centimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Butler, B. J.; Gurwell, M. A.

    2007-10-01

    We have been making regular observations of Uranus for the past several years, in part to search for variability associated with the 2007 equinox. We will present an analysis of our current data set, spanning wavelengths from 1 mm to 20 cm (using the SMA and VLA radio observatories), including our latest data collected in August of 2007. These wavelengths probe the atmosphere from pressures of 1 to 50 bars, which extends from the lower tropopause far into convectively dominated regions, and includes several altitudes of cloud formation. We have found that, at all our wavelengths, the planet appears symmetric, with both the north (spring) and south (fall) polar regions being radio bright. At pressures greater than a few bars, this is almost certainly due to the poles being depleted in atmospheric absorbers by convective processes (Hofstadter and Butler 2003, Icarus 165, 168-180). Near 1 bar, the bright poles could be due to the physical temperature being 5 K higher there than at the equator, or due to a strong depletion of CH4 vapor over the poles. A combination of the two seems likely, as compositional variations are consistent with the circulation inferred from several data sets, and 2 K temperature variations are found both in theoretical models (Friedson and Ingersoll 1987, Icarus 69, 135-156) and in Voyager infrared measurements made in 1986 during southern summer solstice (Hanel et al. 1986, Science 233, 70-74). We will discuss these results in the context of observations of Uranus made at other wavelengths, and recent images we have acquired of Neptune at radio wavelengths. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. We acknowledge the support of NASA's Planetary Astronomy program, and of the VLA and SMA observatories.

  3. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general

  4. Interleukin-1beta, -6, -12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in brains of dogs with canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gröne, A; Alldinger, S; Baumgärtner, W

    2000-10-02

    Canine distemper virus infection in dogs is commonly associated with demyelinating central nervous system lesions. Investigations on viral protein expression by studying mRNA and protein distribution together with the characterization of CD4 and CD8 inflammatory cells and MHC class II up-regulation revealed a biphasic disease process. To further investigate the cellular interactions in the different plaque types the cerebella of 14 dogs with confirmed distemper infection were investigated for expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, -6, -12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) by immunohistochemistry using rabbit polyclonal anti-cytokine antibodies. T-cells and astrocytes were identified with rabbit anti CD3- and GFAP-monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, respectively; and microglia/macrophages were characterized by their ability to bind lectin from Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-1). To further name the cytokine expressing cells immunoenzymatic double staining using DAB and New Fuchsin was performed. White matter lesions were classified according to histopathological criteria into acute, subacute and chronic. Canine distemper virus nucleoprotein antigen was demonstrated in nearly all plaques, except in older plaques where virus was not present within the plaque but adjacent to the lesion. IL-1 expression was observed to varying degrees in all types of lesions. Most often IL-1 was present in CD3 and BS-1 positive cells in the brain parenchyma in earlier plaques and comprising perivascular cuffs found in chronic plaques. IL-6 expression was present in all lesions, and followed a similar distribution pattern as IL-1. IL-12 displayed very often a granular extracellular pattern of immunoreactivity, especially in the brain parenchyma, and was found only in individual perivascular cells. TNF staining, predominantly found in astrocytes, was present in lesions of various types; however, staining appeared to be stronger in acute lesions and decreased in chronic plaques. In the

  5. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Goitre among 6-12-year-old Children in a Rural Area of Karnataka in South India.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Bhanu; Suman, G; Hemanth, T; Shivaraj, N S; Murthy, N S

    2016-01-01

    In India, endemic goitre is present in sub-Himalayan region and in pockets in states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Gujarat. Being a public health problem amenable for prevention, the assessment of prevalence of endemic goitre in an area helps in understanding whether the preventive strategies under National Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control Program (NIDDCP) have any impact on the control of endemic goitre. Hence, the current study was carried out to determine the prevalence, distribution and factors associated with iodine deficiency goitre among 6-12-year-old children in a rural area in south Karnataka. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 838 children, using a questionnaire adopted from Iodized Salt Program Assessment Tool and the tools prescribed by WHO for goitre survey. The prevalence of goitre in the study area was 21.9% (95% CI 19.2-24.8). There was higher prevalence of goitre among those having salt iodine <15 ppm than those with >15 ppm (P = 0.01; OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.10-2.29). In 10% of the children, urinary iodine excretion (UIE) was assessed and prevalence was higher among those with <100 μg/l of UIE than those with normal UIE, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.8, OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.62-2.96). Multiple logistic regression revealed that gender (P = 0.002; OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.21-2.35) was an independent variable associated with goitre. The study area was found to be moderately endemic for goitre based on the WHO criteria. Higher prevalence of goitre was found to be still associated with consumption of low iodized salt (<15 ppm) necessitating emphasis on monitoring of salt iodine levels in the study area. Though NIDDCP is being implemented since five decades in India, the burden of iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs) is still high demanding further impetus to the monitoring systems of the programme.

  6. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  7. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  8. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography.

    PubMed

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Paquit, Vincent C; Tobin, Kenneth W

    2008-06-23

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  9. RED SUPERGIANTS AS POTENTIAL TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS: SPATIALLY RESOLVED 4.6 {mu}m CO EMISSION AROUND VY CMa AND BETELGEUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Nathan; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ryde, Nils E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu

    2009-03-15

    We present high-resolution 4.6 {mu}m CO spectra of the circumstellar environments of two red supergiants (RSGs) that are potential supernova (SN) progenitors: Betelgeuse and VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). Around Betelgeuse, {sup 12}CO emission within {+-}3'' ({+-}12 km s{sup -1}) follows a mildly clumpy but otherwise spherical shell, smaller than its {approx}55'' shell in K I {lambda}7699. In stark contrast, 4.6 {mu}m CO emission around VY CMa is coincident with bright K I in its clumpy asymmetric reflection nebula, within {+-}5'' ({+-}40 km s{sup -1}) of the star. Our CO data reveal redshifted features not seen in K I spectra of VY CMa, indicating a more isotropic distribution of gas punctuated by randomly distributed asymmetric clumps. The relative CO and K I distribution in Betelgeuse arises from ionization effects within a steady wind, whereas in VY CMa, K I is emitted from skins of CO cloudlets resulting from episodic mass ejections 500-1000 yr ago. In both cases, CO and K I trace potential pre-SN circumstellar matter: we conclude that an extreme RSG like VY CMa might produce a Type IIn event like SN 1988Z if it were to explode in its current state, but Betelgeuse will not. VY CMa demonstrates that luminous blue variables are not necessarily the only progenitors of SNe IIn, but it underscores the requirement that SNe IIn suffer enhanced episodic mass loss shortly before exploding.

  10. InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells emitting at 1.5 {mu}m grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Pereiro, J.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-07

    This work reports on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting at 1.5 {mu}m. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show satellite peaks up to the second order. Estimated values of well (3 nm) and barrier (9 nm) thicknesses were derived from transmission electron microscopy and the fit between experimental data and simulated XRD spectra. Transmission electron microscopy and XRD simulations also confirmed that the InGaN barriers are relaxed with respect to the GaN template, while the InN MQWs grew under biaxial compression on the InGaN barriers. Low temperature (14 K) photoluminescence measurements reveal an emission from the InN MQWs at 1.5 {mu}m. Measurements as a function of temperature indicate the existence of localized states, probably due to InN quantum wells' thickness fluctuations as observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  11. TASTRAK spectroscopy of polonium-210 alpha-particle activity at bone surfaces: Evidence for a concentrated surface deposit less than 3 {mu}m deep

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, P.L.; Henshaw, D.L.; Keitch, P.A.; Allen, J.E.; Fews, A.P.

    1994-10-01

    The technique of {alpha}-particle spectroscopy by CR-39 type TASTRAK plastic has been used to study the depth distribution of natural {alpha}-particle emitters at the surface of human bone. The predominant component of this {alpha}-particle activity was {sup 210}Po supported by {sup 210}Pb, although a smaller activity of {sup 226}Ra was also detected. Autopsy samples of human femur and cranium were obtained from subjects age 63 to 86. Both cortical and trabecular surfaces were analyzed. The results indicate that {sup 210}Pb-supported {sup 210}Po is concentrated at the surfaces of human bone from elderly subjects, in a narrow band 3 {mu}m deep or less, by a factor of about four. As a result, the {alpha}-particle dose to the nuclei of cells lining bone surfaces is around 1.8 times greater than that calculated for a uniform volume distribution. Polonium-210 activity indicates the distribution of {sup 210}Pb, and of stable lead, received by continuous intake throughout life at a very low level. A persistent bone surface concentration of lead and other osteotropic metals may be associated with the hypermineralized layer about 1 {mu}m thick which occurs at the surface of resting bone mineral. 31 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Eye-safe visible wavelength lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, T. W.; Reagan, J. A.

    Recent technological advances on several fronts offer the possibility for relatively low-cost, eye-safe visible-wavelength lidar systems for autonomous aerosol/environmental monitoring applications. Improved silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes that have become available offer high-quantum-efficiency detection at very low dark counts (10 to 1000 count/s) and can be used in a photon counting mode for signal plus background and dark current photoelectron count rates of megahertz. The essential requirements and features of a possible lidar system that capitalizes on technical advances on several fronts are outlined. A baseline lidar system is suggested for monitoring tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Sensitivity to wavelength, background radiation, detector characteristics, and other system parameters is discussed for several simulated data sets.

  13. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity.

  14. Discrete Wavelength-Locked External Cavity Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    A prototype improved external cavity laser (ECL) was demonstrated in the second phase of a continuing effort to develop wavelength-agile lasers for fiber-optic communications and trace-gas-sensing applications. This laser is designed to offer next-generation performance for incorporation into fiber-optic networks. By eliminating several optical components and simplifying others used in prior designs, the design of this laser reduces costs, making lasers of this type very competitive in a price-sensitive market. Diode lasers have become enabling devices for fiber optic networks because of their cost, compactness, and spectral properties. ECLs built around diode laser gain elements further enhance capabilities by virtue of their excellent spectral properties with significantly increased (relative to prior lasers) wavelength tuning ranges. It is essential to exploit the increased spectral coverage of ECLs while simultaneously insuring that they operate only at precisely defined communication channels (wavelengths). Heretofore, this requirement has typically been satisfied through incorporation of add-in optical components that lock the ECL output wavelengths to these specific channels. Such add-in components contribute substantially to the costs of ECL lasers to be used as sources for optical communication networks. Furthermore, the optical alignment of these components, needed to attain the required wavelength precision, is a non-trivial task and can contribute substantially to production costs. The design of the present improved ECL differs significantly from the designs of prior ECLs. The present design relies on inherent features of components already included within an ECL, with slight modifications so that these components perform their normal functions while simultaneously effecting locking to the required discrete wavelengths. Hence, add-in optical components and the associated cost of alignment can be eliminated. The figure shows the locking feedback signal

  15. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  16. Zero-Points of FOS Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Michael R.; Kerber, Florian

    We have investigated the internal zero-points of the HST's Faint object spectrograph (FOS) on-orbit wavelength calibration between 1990 (launch) and 1997 (de-commissioning). The analysis is based on cross-correlating about 1200 WAVECAL exposures for the high-resolution dispersers, using as templates those exposures which define the dispersion solutions currently in use by the FOS pipeline. FOS has two channels BLUE/RED using two independent Digicon detectors. For BLUE systematic shifts of the zero-points are present, which amount to a maximum offset of 7 pixels (1.75 diodes) over the entire period. The zero-points for RED modes present an apparently random distribution with a peak-to-peak range of 7 pixels. We discu ss the effect of the geomagnetic environment as a possible cause for the observed behaviour and describe the ongoing work to reduce the uncertainty in the wavelength scale.

  17. Dual-wavelength laser with topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum in solid-state lasers for the first time to our knowledge. Single tunable Hermite-Gaussian (HG0,n) (0 ≤ n ≤ 7) laser modes with dual wavelength were generated using an isotropic cavity. With a mode-converter, the corresponding Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0,n) laser modes were obtained. The oscillating laser modes have two types of photons at the wavelengths of 1077 and 1081 nm and equal orbital angular momentum of nħ per photon. These results identify the possibility of simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal and controllable orbital angular momentum. It can be proposed that this laser should have promising applications in many fields based on its compact structure, tunable orbital angular momentum, and simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  19. Eye-safe visible wavelength lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, T. W.; Reagan, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent technological advances on several fronts offer the possibility for relatively low-cost, eye-safe visible-wavelength lidar systems for autonomous aerosol/environmental monitoring applications. Improved silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes that have become available offer high-quantum-efficiency detection at very low dark counts (10 to 1000 count/s) and can be used in a photon counting mode for signal plus background and dark current photoelectron count rates of megahertz. The essential requirements and features of a possible lidar system that capitalizes on technical advances on several fronts are outlined. A baseline lidar system is suggested for monitoring tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Sensitivity to wavelength, background radiation, detector characteristics, and other system parameters is discussed for several simulated data sets.

  20. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li; Geisler, Wilson S; May, Keith A

    2011-01-01

    We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats). Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  1. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  2. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  3. Synchronous two-wavelength temporal interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Gao, Zhan; Qin, Jie; Li, Guangyu; Feng, Ziang; Wang, Shengjia

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry is an optical measuring method with the character of non-destructive, high sensitivity and high accuracy. However, its measurement range is limited by the phase ambiguity. Hence the method with two separate different wavelengths light source is introduced to enlarge the measurement range. As for the two-wavelength interferometry case, phase shifting is the traditional way to acquire the phase map, it needs to repeat the measurement twice, which means the measurement cannot be accomplished in real time. Hence to solve the problem, a temporal sequence interferometry has been used. This method can obtain the desired phase information in real time by using the Fourier transform methods of the interferogram recorded in a sequence while the object is being deformed. But, it is difficult to retrieve the phase information directly due to the multi extreme points in one period of the cosine function. In this paper, an algorithm based on the wavelet ridge analysis is adopted to retrieve the two wavelength phase fluctuation caused by the displacement simultaneously. The preliminary experiment is conducted and the results are compared with theoretical simulations to validate the proposed approach. The laser emits light with two wavelengths 532 nm and 473 nm, two separated interference patterns in time sequence are detected by the CCD camera in the same time. The overlapped interferograms of two colors are analyzed by this algorithm and the corresponding phase information are obtained. The maximum error value between the simulation and theory is 0.03 um and the relative error is 0.33%.

  4. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  5. Subnanosecond Short Wavelength Generation Using Optical Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    wide and separated by 7 ft or in one line of width 11 ft. This latter linewidth was ten times larger than the N2 laser which was used in previous...WAVELENGTH GENERATION USING OPTICAL FIBERS Elea Garmire Center for Laser Studies University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-1112 213-743-5355...submitted to Dr. Schlossberg Air Force Office of Scientific Research ABSTRACT A one-year study of nonlinear optical effects in fibers using UV lasers

  6. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  7. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties.

  8. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  9. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  10. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  11. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  12. Digital wavelength-selected DBR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbread, Neil D.; Ward, Andrew J.; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Robbins, David J.

    2003-07-01

    Widely tunable monolithic InP lasers can, in principle, cover one or other of the Er-doped fibre amplifier windows. These windows span wavelength ranges of around 40-50nm. However, the change in refractive index that can be achieved by current injection into a grating section is limited to about 1-2% corresponding to around 10-20nm in wavelength, so some further mechanism is required to extend the tuning range. In this paper, we present a new multi-section, digital supermode DBR laser (DS-DBR) that can be controlled in a simple, quasi-digital manner. The wavelength is coarsely selected by applying current to one of the front contacts to form an enhanced reflection peak and select a sub-band of the total tuning range. Current applied to the rear grating contact allows tuning within that range and a phase section allows fine tuning control. By selecting front contacts in turn, the full tuning range of the device can be accessed. We will present an overview of the device together with some simple modelling to show how the device will perform. This will be followed by a brief description of the fabrication and a comprehensive set of experimental results including RIN and linewidth measurements.

  13. Gas sensing using wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Flores, D.; Ferreira, J.; Frazao, O.; Santos, J. L.; Baptista, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental setup has been developed for different gas species sensing based on the Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The target is the measurement of ammonia, carbon dioxide and methane concentrations. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region using optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity are modulated applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allows the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise is reduced. The wavelength modulated laser light is tuned to the absorption line of the target gas and the absorption information can be retrieved by means of synchronous detection using a lock-in amplifier, where the amplitude of the second harmonic of the laser modulation frequency is proportional to the gas concentration. The amplitude of the second harmonic is normalised by the average laser intensity and detector gain through a LabVIEW® application, where the main advantage of normalising is that the effects of laser output power fluctuations and any variations in laser transmission, or optical-electrical detector gain are eliminated. Two types of sensing heads based on free space light propagation with different optical path length were used, permitting redundancy operation and technology validation.

  14. Two-wavelength lidar inversion algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kunz, G J

    1999-02-20

    Potter [Appl. Opt. 26, 1250 (1987)] has presented a method to determine profiles of the atmospheric aerosol extinction coefficients by use of a two-wavelength lidar with the assumptions of a constant value for the extinction-to-backscatter ratio for each wavelength and a constant value for the ratio between the two extinction coefficients at the two wavelengths. Triggered by this idea, Ackermann [Appl. Opt. 36, 5134 (1997)] expanded this method to consider lidar returns that are a composition of scattering by atmospheric aerosols and molecules, assuming that the molecular scattering is known. In both papers the method is based on the well-known solutions of Bernoulli's differential equation in an iterative scheme with an unknown boundary transmission condition. This boundary condition is less sensitive to noise than boundary extinction conditions. My main purpose is to critically consider the principle behind Potter's method, because it seems that there are several reasons why the number of solutions is not limited to one, as suggested by his original work.

  15. Efficient light emission at 1.54 mum from Er in Si excited by hot electron injection through thin suboxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markmann, M.; Sticht, A.; Bobe, F.; Zandler, G.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G.; Muller, E.

    2002-06-01

    We studied the electroluminescence of Er:O-doped Si pn diodes and unipolar structures with thin SiO1.6 suboxide barriers, which were deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. These suboxide layers reveal a barrier height of about 320 meV in the conduction band and therefore raise the average kinetic energy of electrons injected through the barrier into the Er:O doped region. These electrons turn out to be advantageous for impact excitation processes with the erbium ion. Compared to conventional reverse biased pn diodes a ten-times higher sigma][tau product for impact excitation (1.2 x10-19 cm2 s) can be achieved in pn diodes with a suboxide injector at 10 K. The saturation electroluminescence (EL) intensity is enlarged in reverse bias and suppressed in forward bias compared to a diode without a suboxide layer. These structures exhibit a reduction of the EL intensity by a factor of 3 for increasing temperature from 10 to 300 K and yield a two-times higher EL output at 1.54 mum and 300 K than an optimized reverse biased pn diode without a suboxide layer. At 300 K this results in an absolute output power of 250 nW and an external quantum efficiency of 1.3 x10-4 at 1.54 mum. For the unipolar structure with an integrated suboxide barrier the EL output also depends on the current flow direction: Injecting the electrons hot through the suboxide barrier into the Er:O doped region results in a six times higher EL intensity at 1.54 mum than for the opposite biasing condition. The EL is detectable up to 300 K with a reduction of the intensity by a factor of 8 between 10 and 300 K. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on unipolar structures with an incorporated barrier to provide insight into the carrier density and carrier energy distribution after injection through the barrier.

  16. BLAST: CORRELATIONS IN THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 250, 350, AND 500 mum REVEAL CLUSTERING OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, Marco P.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; MacTavish, Carrie J.; Negrello, Mattia; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We detect correlations in the cosmic far-infrared background due to the clustering of star-forming galaxies in observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope, at 250, 350, and 500 mum. We perform jackknife and other tests to confirm the reality of the signal. The measured correlations are well fitted by a power law over scales of 5'-25', with DELTAI/I = 15.1% +- 1.7%. We adopt a specific model for submillimeter sources in which the contribution to clustering comes from sources in the redshift ranges 1.3 <= z <= 2.2, 1.5 <= z <= 2.7, and 1.7 <= z <= 3.2, at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. With these distributions, our measurement of the power spectrum, P(k{sub t}heta), corresponds to linear bias parameters, b = 3.8 +- 0.6, 3.9 +- 0.6, and 4.4 +- 0.7, respectively. We further interpret the results in terms of the halo model, and find that at the smaller scales, the simplest halo model fails to fit our results. One way to improve the fit is to increase the radius at which dark matter halos are artificially truncated in the model, which is equivalent to having some star-forming galaxies at z >= 1 located in the outskirts of groups and clusters. In the context of this model, we find a minimum halo mass required to host a galaxy is log(M{sub min}/M{sub sun}) = 11.5{sup +0.4}{sub -0.1}, and we derive effective biases b{sub eff} = 2.2 +- 0.2, 2.4 +- 0.2, and 2.6 +- 0.2, and effective masses log(M{sub eff}/M{sub odot})=12.9+-0.3, 12.8 +- 0.2, and 12.7 +- 0.2, at 250, 350 and 500 mum, corresponding to spatial correlation lengths of r{sub 0} = 4.9, 5.0, and 5.2+-0.7 h{sup -1}Mpc, respectively. Finally, we discuss implications for clustering measurement strategies with Herschel and Planck.

  17. Superheterodyne configuration for two-wavelength interferometry applied to absolute distance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Droz, Nathalie; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    We present a new superheterodyne technique for long-distance measurements by two-wavelength interferometry (TWI). While conventional systems use two acousto-optic modulators to generate two different heterodyne frequencies, here the two frequencies result from synchronized sweeps of optical and radio frequencies. A distributed feedback laser source is injected in an intensity modulator that is driven at the half-wave voltage mode. A radio-frequency signal is applied to this intensity modulator to generate two optical sidebands around the optical carrier. This applied radio frequency consists of a digital ramp between 13 and 15 GHz, with 1 ms duration and with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. Simultaneously, the laser source is frequency modulated by a current modulation that is synchronized on the radio-frequency ramp as well as on a triangle waveform. These two frequency-swept optical signals at the output of the modulator illuminate a Michelson interferometer and create two distinct distance-dependent heterodyne frequencies on the photodetector. The superheterodyne signal is then detected and bandpass filtered to retrieve the absolute distance measurement. Experiments between 1 and 15 m confirm the validity of this new concept, leading to a distance accuracy of {+-} 50 {mu}m for a 1 ms acquisition time.

  18. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  19. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  20. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  1. a Self-Consistent Analysis of Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Wavelength Metal-Grating Free Electron Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yansun

    A theoretical exploration of the characteristics and operational requirements of far-infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength Metal-Grating Free-Electron-Lasers is presented. In the device an open planar type of quasi-optical resonator is loaded with a strip of rectangular metal-grating, and driven by a moderate energy electron beam. The basic tuning features and energy storage capacity of the resonator are described by the dispersion relation of the periodic slow -wave structure. To give a complete description of electron and wave dynamics in the laser oscillator, a set of self -consistent equations are derived through the use of the Lorentz force equation and the Maxwell's equations. Small signal gain and output efficiency of the device are developed from the self-consistent model. The nonlinear saturation is examined with a strong-field technique which is based upon a simple nonlinear ordinary differential equation of Duffing type. A detailed evaluation of the start-current, optimum interaction length and output efficiency of the laser oscillator at far-infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength region, indicates that the operations at wavelengths from 1mm to 100mum could be optimized at the output efficiencies around 1% with the use of an 100keV to 1MeV electron beam of current densities from 10 to 100(A/cm{^2}) and a 10 to 20cm long grating section. A theory of klystron type Metal-Grating Free Electron Lasers is also developed. Results of the proof-of-principle tests in the lower-millimeter wavelength region show that the klystron type devices generate more coherent radiations with start-current below 0.5A, and output power and efficiency up to 600watts and 2% at about 35GHz.

  2. DETECTION OF PARENT H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} MOLECULES IN THE 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF COMET C/2007 N3 (LULIN) OBSERVED WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ueno, Munetaka; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ishiguro, Masateru; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the near-infrared at a post-perihelion heliocentric distance of 1.7 AU. Observations were performed with the spectroscopic (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) and imaging (2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m) modes on 2009 March 30 and 31 UT, respectively. AKARI images of the comet exhibit a sunward crescent-like shape coma and a dust tail extended toward the anti-solar direction. The 4.1 {mu}m image (CO/CO{sub 2} and dust grains) shows a distribution different from the 2.4 and 3.2 {mu}m images (H{sub 2}O and dust grains). The observed spectrum shows distinct bands at 2.66 and 4.26 {mu}m, attributed to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, respectively. This is the fifth comet in which CO{sub 2} has been directly detected in the near-infrared spectrum. In addition, CO at 4.67 {mu}m and a broad 3.2-3.6 {mu}m emission band from C-H bearing molecules were detected in the AKARI spectrum. The relative abundance ratios CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and CO/H{sub 2}O derived from the molecular production rates are {approx}4%-5% and <2%, respectively. Comet Lulin belongs to the group that has relatively low abundances of CO and CO{sub 2} among all observed comets.

  3. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH EXCESS PERIPHERAL H ATOMS (H {sub n} -PAHs) AND THEIR RELATION TO THE 3.4 AND 6.9 {mu}m PAH EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H {sub n} -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm{sup -1} (2.5-20 {mu}m) infrared spectra of 23 H {sub n} -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 {mu}m weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 {mu}m, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 {mu}m region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH{sub 2}- deformation mode near 6.9 {mu}m. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 {mu}m features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 {mu}m features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H {sub n} -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  4. 1550-nm wavelength-tunable HCG VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Christopher; Rao, Yi; Huang, Michael; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate wavelength-tunable VCSELs using high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the top output mirror on VCSELs, operating at 1550 nm. Tunable HCG VCSELs with a ~25 nm mechanical tuning range as well as VCSELs with 2 mW output power were realized. Error-free operation of an optical link using directly-modulated tunable HCG VCSELs transmitting at 1.25 Gbps over 18 channels spaced by 100 GHz and transmitted over 20 km of single mode fiber is demonstrated, showing the suitability of the HCG tunable VCSEL as a low cost source for WDM communications systems.

  5. Multi-wavelength applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadely, Ross

    2010-12-01

    Using an array of multi-wavelength data, we examine a variety of astrophysical problems with gravitational lensing. First, we seek to understand the mass distribution of an early-type galaxy with an analysis of the lens Q0957+561. We dissect the lens galaxy into luminous and dark components, and model the environment using results from weak lensing. Combining constraints from newly-discovered lensed images and stellar population models, we find the lens has a density profile which is shallower than isothermal, unlike those of typical early-type galaxies. Finally, using the measured time delay between the quasar images we find the Hubble constant to be H 0 = 79.3+6.7-8.5 km s-1 Mpc-1 . One intriguing application of lensing is to exploit the lens magnification boost to study high-redshift objects in greater detail than otherwise possible. Here, we analyze the mid-infrared properties of two lensed z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, using Spitzer /IRS spectra to study their rest-frame ˜ 5-12 μm emission. Both systems exhibit strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in the spectra, indicating strong star formation and the absence of significant AGN activity. For SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, this detection belies that inferred from optical measurements, indicating mid-IR spectroscopy provides key information needed to understand the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. While lensing provides measurements of the macroscopic properties of lens systems, it can also shed light on small-scale structure of galaxies. To identify and understand lens substructure, we examine the multi-wavelength properties of flux ratios for six lenses. Variations of the flux ratios with wavelength can be used to study the lensed quasars and the small-scale mass distribution of lens galaxies. We detect strong multi-wavelength variations in the lenses HE 0435-1223 and SDSS 0806+2006. For HE 0435-1223, we study its

  6. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  7. Quasi-optical diplexer for millimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Wordeman, M R

    1978-12-01

    A quasi-optical diplexer for injection of signal and local oscillator frequencies into a mixer at millimeter wave-lengths is described. The diplexer accepts both image and signal bands, presents low loss at both the signal and local oscillator frequencies and rejects local oscillator noise at the signal frequency. The configuration of the device makes it particularly useful for Cassegrain receivers using a cooled mixer and a lens corrected feed system. The diplexer has been tested at 150 GHz on the 11-m radio telescope operated by The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona.

  8. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AMMONIA ICE FILTER wN.EL B - FAR IP#RARED, I80 K SOLOMETRIC DETECTOR ARRAY, 64 x 64 PIXELS 8I 570 - 630 16.7 BANDPASS FILTER B2 470 - 510 20.4...34* IMPROVED COOLING IS EXPENSIVE IN MASS AND POWER "* IMPROVED DETECTOR PERFORMANCE IS EXPENSIVE IN UP FRONT DEVELOPMENT COSTS 27 • • a !I I I SAFIRE...range from short wavelengths out to 30 gtm. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several

  9. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  10. Wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Li, Junjie; Kan, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram composed of subwavelength metallic antennas is designed and demonstrated experimentally in the terahertz (THz) regime. Different character patterns are generated at the separated working frequencies 0.50 THz and 0.63 THz which determine a narrow frequency bandwidth of 130 GHz. The two working frequencies are around the central resonance frequency of the antennas where antennas behave strong wavefront modulation. Each antenna is fully utilized to control the wavefront of the metasurface at different frequencies by an optimization algorithm. The results demonstrate a candidate way to design multi-colors optical display elements. PMID:27752118

  11. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    shock tube dissociation of fluorine azide, (2) identify and characterize alternatives to BiF as the lasant in an excited NF driven laser , (3) develop...L.F. Phillips KINETICS OF 12 FOLLOWING ArF LASER EXCITATION: THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF THE A’(2u) STATE J. Phys. Chem., 88, 6084 (1984) 267. Tellinghuisen...VISIBLE WAVELENGTH CHEMICAL LASER SCHEMES BASED ON THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF CHLORINE AZIDE Proc. Int. Conf on.LASERS 󈨟, Eds. F.J. Duarte and D.G. Harris

  12. The effect of track structure on cell inactivation and chromosome damage at a constant let of 120 keV/mum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E. H.; Bailey, S. M.; Chen, D. J.; Cornforth, M. N.

    The influence of track structure on chromosome damage and cell inactivation are being investigated. Plateau-phase normal human fibroblast cultures were irradiated with gamma rays, and He, Ne and Ar ions. Particle velocities were chosen so that all beams had an LET of 120 keV/mum. In this constant-LET experimental design, the radial distribution of excitations and ionizations about the particle track is the most significant variable. Using premature chromosome condensation, chromatin breaks were measured at two time points, promptly after irradiation and after a prolonged incubation to allow for repair. These measurements give an indication of both initial chromosomal damage and also residual damage that is either not repaired or is misrepaired. Survival was measured under the same conditions. Results indicate that the RBEs for both cell inactivation and, to a lesser extent, chromosome damage decrease as particle energy increases.

  13. Compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ions in silicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Fan Sijun; Li Kefeng; Zhang Lei; Wang Shikai; Hu Lili

    2012-11-15

    The compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ion-doped lead silicate glasses is investigated. Judd-Ofelt parameters are calculated and their variation with different glass modifier ions is obtained. The Judd-Ofelt parameters increase with decreased modifier ionic radius. A large spontaneous emission probability and a large emission cross-section are found to be related with the strength of the modifier ion. Fluorescence spectra are analyzed using rate equations and compared with recorded data. The results are very close, indicating the reliability of this method. Non-radiative probability is deduced by fitting the fluorescence decay curve; it becomes smaller with increased ionic field strength. Energy transfer processes are studied using the extended overlap integral method.

  14. NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH THERMAL FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR ICES CONTRIBUTION TO THE 5-8 mum REGION TOWARD EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bossa, J. B.; Theule, P.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2009-12-20

    Aminomethanol (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH) is formed at low temperature from the purely thermal reaction of NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}CO in laboratory interstellar ice analogs. We report for the first time its infrared and mass spectra. We study its reaction and desorption kinetics using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Its reaction rate is estimated to be k(T) = 0.05 x exp(-4.5(kJ mol{sup -1})/RT) and its desorption energy to be E{sub des} = 58 +- 2 kJ mol{sup -1}. NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH can also contribute to the 5-8 mum region of thermally processed ices encountered in many young stellar objects. Gas phase NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH may be present in hot core regions, when the frozen material is desorbed.

  15. Broadening and shifting of the methanol 119 {mu}m gain line of linear and circular polarization by collision with chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Bakos; G. Djotyan; Zsuzsa Soerlei; J. Szigeti; D. K. Mansfield; J. Sarkozi

    2000-06-21

    Evidence of circular dichroism has been observed in the spectral properties of a gas of left-right symmetric molecules. This dichroism comes about as the result of collisions of the symmetric molecules with left-right asymmetric molecules introduced as a buffer gas. In this sense, the dichroism can be said to have been transferred from the chiral buffer molecules to the symmetric, non-chiral molecules of the background vapor. This transferred dichroism appears as broadening in the gain line of the symmetric molecule which is asymmetric with respect to the right or left handedness of a circularly polarized probe. The broadening of the 119 {mu}m line of the methanol molecule was observed using infrared-far infrared double resonance spectroscopy.

  16. Empirical formulas for design and optimization of 1. 55 [mu]m InGaAs/InGaAsP strained-quantum-well lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.H.; Lo, Y.H. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of strain and number of quantum wells on optical gain, differential gain, and nonlinear gain coefficient in 1.55 [mu]m InGaAs/InGaAsP strained-quantum-well lasers are theoretically investigated first. Well approximated empirical expressions are then proposed to model these effects. Using these formulas, one can easily and accurately predict the performance of a laser diode for a given structure. Therefore, these empirical formulas are useful tools for design and optimization of strained quantum well lasers. As a general design guideline revealed from the empirical formulas, the threshold current is reduced with the compressive strain, and the modulation band-width is most efficiently increased with the number of wells.

  17. INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION LAW TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER III: J, H, K{sub S} BANDS IN THE 2MASS AND THE MKO SYSTEMS, AND 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m IN THE SPITZER/IRAC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Tamura, Motohide; Hatano, Hirofumi; Kato, Daisuke; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2009-05-10

    We have determined interstellar extinction law toward the Galactic center (GC) at the wavelength from 1.2 to 8.0 {mu}m, using point sources detected in the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared (NIR) survey and those in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and Spitzer/IRAC/GLIMPSE II catalogs. The central region |l | {approx}<3.{sup 0}0 and |b | {approx}<1.{sup 0}0 has been surveyed in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands with the IRSF telescope and the SIRIUS camera whose filters are similar to the Mauna Kea Observatories (MKO) NIR photometric system. Combined with the GLIMPSE II point source catalog, we made K{sub S} versus K{sub S} - {lambda} color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) where {lambda}=3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m. The K{sub S} magnitudes of bulge red clump stars and the K{sub S} - {lambda} colors of red giant branches are used as a tracer of the reddening vector in the CMDs. From these magnitudes and colors, we have obtained the ratios of total-to-selective extinction A{sub K{sub S}}/E{sub K{sub S}}{sub -{lambda}} for the four IRAC bands. Combined with A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub S}} for the J and H bands derived by Nishiyama et al., we obtain A{sub J} :A{sub H} :A{sub K{sub S}}:A {sub [3.6]}:A {sub [4.5]}:A {sub [5.8]}:A {sub [8.0]} = 3.02:1.73:1:0.50:0.39:0.36:0.43 for the line of sight toward the GC. This confirms the flattening of the extinction curve at {lambda} {approx}> 3 {mu}m from a simple extrapolation of the power-law extinction at shorter wavelengths, in accordance with recent studies. The extinction law in the 2MASS J, H, and K{sub S} bands has also been calculated, and good agreement with that in the MKO system is found. Thus, it is established that the extinction in the wavelength range of J, H, and K{sub S} is well fitted by a power law of steep decrease A {sub {lambda}} {proportional_to} {lambda}{sup -2.0} toward the GC. In nearby molecular clouds and diffuse interstellar medium, the lack of reliable measurements of the total-to-selective extinction ratios

  18. Mutual enhancements of CFD modeling and experimental data: a case study of 1-mum particle deposition in a branching airway model.

    PubMed

    Longest, P Worth; Oldham, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    In order to better understand aerosol dynamics and deposition in the complex flow field of the respiratory tract, both in vitro experiments and numerical modeling techniques have widely been employed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling offers the flexibility of easily modifying system parameters such as flow rates, particle sizes, system geometry, and heterogeneous outlet conditions. However, a number of numerical errors and artifacts can lead to nonphysical CFD results. Experimental methods offer the advantage of physical realism; however, parameter variation is often difficult. The objective of this study is to illustrate the use of CFD to enhance the understanding of experimental results. In parallel, the selected experimental results have been used to partially validate the CFD predictions. A specific case study has been considered focusing on 1-mum particle depositions in a physiologically realistic bifurcation (PRB) model of respiratory generations 3-5. Previous experiments in this system report a deposition rate of approximately 0.01%. An in-depth CFD analysis has been employed to evaluate two cases of the empirical model. The first case consists of only the PRB double bifurcation geometry. The second case includes a portion of the experimental particle delivery system, which may influence the entering velocity and particle profiles. To assess the influence of upstream transition and turbulence, each of the two cases considered has been evaluated using laminar and low Reynolds number k-omega approximations. Results indicate that both upstream flow effects and turbulent or transitional flow play a significant role in determining the deposition of 1-mum particles in the model considered. Simulating upstream flow effects and laminar flow was required to match the empirically reported deposition fraction and provided a two orders of magnitude improvement over initial CFD estimates. This study highlights the need to consider the effects of experimental

  19. WISE TF: A MID-INFRARED, 3.4 {mu}m EXTENSION OF THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION USING WISE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lagattuta, David J.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Hong Tao; Springob, Christopher M.; Masters, Karen L.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Jones, D. Heath

    2013-07-10

    We present a mid-infrared Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using photometry from the 3.4 {mu}m W1 band of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite. The WISE TF relation is formed from 568 galaxies taken from the all-sky 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) galaxy catalog, spanning a range of environments including field, group, and cluster galaxies. This constitutes the largest mid-infrared TF relation constructed to date. After applying a number of corrections to galaxy magnitudes and line widths, we measure a master TF relation given by M{sub corr} = -22.24 - 10.05[log (W{sub corr}) - 2.5], with an average dispersion of {sigma}{sub WISE} = 0.686 mag. There is some tension between WISE TF and a preliminary 3.6 {mu}m relation, which has a shallower slope and almost no intrinsic dispersion. However, our results agree well with a more recent relation constructed from a large sample of cluster galaxies. We additionally compare WISE TF to the near-infrared 2MTF template relations, finding a good agreement between the TF parameters and total dispersions of WISE TF and the 2MTF K-band template. This fact, coupled with typical galaxy colors of (K - W1) {approx} 0, suggests that these two bands are tracing similar stellar populations, including the older, centrally-located stars in the galactic bulge which can (for galaxies with a prominent bulge) dominate the light profile.

  20. MIPS 24 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE HUBBLE DEEP FIELD SOUTH: PROBING THE IR-RADIO CORRELATION OF GALAXIES AT z>1

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, Minh T.; Gawiser, Eric; Marchesini, Danilo; Brammer, Gabriel; Guaita, Lucia

    2010-11-10

    We present MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of the Hubble Deep Field South taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The resulting image is 254 arcmin{sup 2} in size and has a sensitivity ranging between {approx}12 and {approx}30 {mu}Jy rms, with a median sensitivity of {approx}20 {mu}Jy rms. A total of 495 sources have been cataloged with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5{sigma}. The source catalog is presented as well as source counts which have been corrected for completeness and flux boosting. The IR sources are then combined with MUSYC optical/NIR and ATHDFS radio observations to obtain redshifts and radio flux densities of the sample. We use the IR/radio flux density ratio (q{sub 24}) to explore the IR-radio correlation for this IR sample and find q{sub 24} = 0.71 {+-} 0.31 for sources detected in both IR and radio. The results are extended by stacking IR sources not detected in the radio observations and we derive an average q{sub 24} for redshift bins between 0 < z < 2.5. We find that the high-redshift (z>1) sources have an average q{sub 24} ratio which is better fit by local LIRG SEDs rather than local ULIRG SEDs, indicating that high-redshift ULIRGs differ in their IR/radio properties. So, ULIRGs at high-redshift have SEDs different from those found locally. Infrared-faint radio sources are examined, and while nine radio sources do not have an MIPS detection and are therefore radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), only one radio source has an extreme IRAC 3.6 {mu}m to radio flux density ratio indicating it is a radio-loud AGN at z>1.

  1. A Model Secondary (6-12) Plan for Reading Intervention and Development: A Response to Requests from Minnesota Schools and Districts to Provide Guidance in Developing Reading Intervention Programs for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Jan; Houck, Bonnie; Klund, Sue; Hexum-Platzer, Sharon; Vortman-Smith, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The "Model Secondary (6-12) Plan for Reading Intervention and Development" has been designed to meet the cognitive needs of middle school through high school students whose reading performance ranges from those significantly below expectation through those reading at or above grade level. The reading needs of the population of students in need of…

  2. Laser-to-electricity energy converter for short wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wavelength energy converter can be made using Schottky barrier structure. It has wider band gap than p-n junction silicon semiconductors, and thus it has improved response at wavelengths down to and including ultraviolet region.

  3. Monolithic single mode interband cascade lasers with wide wavelength tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Scheuermann, J.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-11-01

    Monolithic two-section interband cascade lasers offering a wide wavelength tunability in the wavelength range around 3.7 μm are presented. Stable single mode emission in several wavelength channels was realized using the concept of binary superimposed gratings and two-segment Vernier-tuning. The wavelength selective elements in the two segments were based on specially designed lateral metal grating structures defined by electron beam lithography. A dual-step dry etch process provided electrical separation between the segments. Individual current control of the segments allowed wavelength channel selection as well as continuous wavelength tuning within channels. A discontinuous tuning range extending over 158 nm in up to six discrete wavelength channels was achieved. Mode hop free wavelength tuning up to 14 nm was observed within one channel. The devices can be operated in continuous wave mode up to 30 °C with the output powers of 3.5 mW around room temperature.

  4. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M.; Krysa, A. B.

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5 nm at 300 K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11 nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  5. Wavelengths for EVE coronal dimming signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Simoes, P. J. D. A.; Kukstas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range. We have shown that dimmings occurred in most of the 31 X-class flares that occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations, we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejections from the low corona. We can estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked" at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. Because of its high photon throughput, EVE data determine line centroids with precisions of a few km/s equivalent. In the present study we analyze the wavelengths of the dimmed regions, characterizing their displacements from the mean wavelengths as functions of heliographic position, time, event magnitude, and excitation state of Fe.

  6. Dye mixtures for ultrafast wavelength shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.; Liu, L.; Palsule, C.; Borst, W.; Wigmans, R.; Barashkov, N.

    1994-12-31

    Particle detectors based on scintillation processes have been used since the discovery of radium about 100 years ago. The fast signals that can be obtained with these detectors, although often considered a nice asset, were rarely essential for the success of experiments. However, the new generation of high energy particle accelerators require particle detectors with fast response time. The authors have produced fast wavelength shifters using mixtures of various Coumarin dyes with DCM in epoxy-polymers (DGEBA+HHPA) and measured the properties of these wavelength shifters. The particular mixtures were chosen because there is a substantial overlap between the emission spectrum of Coumarin and the absorption spectrum of DCM. The continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectra have been studied as a function of component concentration to optimize the decay times, emission peaks and quantum yields. The mean decay times of these mixtures are in the range of 2.5--4.5 ns. The mean decay time increases with an increase in Coumarin concentration at a fixed DCM concentration or with a decrease in DCM concentration at a fixed Coumarin concentration. This indicates that the energy transfer is radiative at lower relative DCM concentrations and becomes non-radiative at higher DCM concentrations.

  7. Retinal injury thresholds for blue wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Lund, David J; Stuck, Bruce E; Edsall, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The interaction mechanism leading to laser-induced retinal alteration can be thermal or non-thermal, depending upon the wavelength of the laser radiation and the duration of the exposure. To investigate the effect of exposure duration on the interaction mechanism, retinal injury thresholds in the rhesus monkey were experimentally measured for exposure to laser radiation at wavelengths of 441.6, 457.9, 476.5, and 496.5 nm. Exposure durations were 0.1, 1, 5, 16, and 100 s; and 1/e retinal irradiance diameters were 50, 125, and 327 microm. Tissue response was observed via ophthalmoscope 1 h and 48 h post exposure. Thermal and non-thermal damage thresholds were obtained depending upon the exposure duration. These threshold data are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature for 100-s duration exposures, but differences were noted for shorter exposures. The current study yielded an estimated injury threshold for 1-s duration, 327-microm retinal irradiance diameter exposures at 441.6 nm, which is an order of magnitude higher than that previously reported. This study provides evidence that laser-induced retinal damage is primarily induced via thermal mechanisms for exposures shorter than 5 s in duration. Arguments are presented that support an amendment of the thermal hazard function, R(lambda).

  8. Long-Wavelength Instability in Marangoni Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHook, Stephen J.; Schatz, Michael F.; Swift, Jack B.; McCormick, W. D.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1996-01-01

    Our experiments in thin liquid layers (approximately 0.1 mm thick) heated from below reveal a well-defined long-wavelength instability: at a critical temperature difference across the layer, the depth of the layer in the center of the cell spontaneously decreases until the liquid-air interface ruptures and a dry spot forms. The onset of this critical instability occurs at a temperature difference across the liquid layer that is 35% smaller than that predicted in earlier theoretical studies of a single layer model. Our analysis of a two-layer model yields predictions in accord with the observations for liquid layer depths greater than or equal to 0.15 mm, but for smaller depths there is an increasing difference between our predictions and observations (the difference is 25% for a layer 0.06 mm thick). In microgravity environments the long-wavelength instability observed in our terrestrial experiments is expected to replace cellular convection as the primary instability in thick as well as thin liquid layers heated quasistatically from below.

  9. Raman Amplifier Performance under New Wavelength Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ashraf A. M.; Mustafa, Fathy M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the benefits of Raman amplifier (RA) for long-haul Ultra Wideband (UW)-WDM optical communications systems, we are studying and investigating how to widen the bandwidth and flatten the gain of RA by testing it in a new wider range of wavelengths (1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm) instead of the benchmark range (1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm). Four different ranges of signal wavelengths are used in this paper with the aim of testing the performance of RA model proposed in [13-15]: 1. 1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.45 μm 2. 1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm 3. 1.65 μm≤λsignal≤1.75 μm 4. 1.43 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm Different model sizes are used and analyzed to get wider bandwidth and more flat gain.

  10. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  11. Wavelength independent normal incident quantum cascade detectors.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Arvind P; Sivco, Deborah; Gmachl, Claire F

    2016-10-31

    We demonstrate a novel technique for normal-incident absorption in intersubband infrared detectors by taking advantage of light scattering from the side-walls of a wet-etched mesa. We fabricate 'spiral' and 'hairpin' shaped quantum cascade detector at a peak wavelength of 6.6 μm, and compare their performance with a standard rectangular mesa. We achieve a peak responsivity of 6 mA/W for the spiral and 12 mA/W for the hairpin detectors at normal incidence, comparable to the 8.8 mA/W obtained for the mesa at 45 degree incidence. We obtain a background limited detectivity of about 3×1010 cmHz/W for the spiral and hairpin detectors at 80 K, compared to 3×108 cmHz/W for the standard mesa. This method to achieve normal incidence absorption is wavelength independent, and does not involve complicated fabrication procedures, paving the way for widespread use of intersubband detectors in sensor applications.

  12. SHORT-WAVELENGTH MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: tina@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  13. Wavelength Calibration Accuracy for the STIS CCD and MAMA Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Hodge, Phil; Proffitt, Charles R.; Ayres, T.

    2011-03-01

    Two calibration programs were carried out to determine the accuracy of the wavelength solutions for the most used STIS CCD and MAMA modes after Servicing Mission 4. We report here on the analysis of this dataset and show that the STIS wavelength solution has not changed after SM4. We also show that a typical accuracy for the absolute wavelength zero-points is 0.1 pixels while the relative wavelength accuracy is 0.2 pixels.

  14. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples.

  15. Additive-Subtractive Two-Wavelength ESPI Contouring by Using a Synthetic Wavelength Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Frei, B; Kästle, R; Sennhauser, U

    1998-05-01

    The addition correlation of two speckle fields by simultaneousillumination at different wavelengths is used for object contouring ina Twyman-Green-type interferometer. Fringe visibility is enhancedwhen the stochastic speckle background intensity obtained from areference plane modulation is subtracted. We calculate the contourphase map by using a phase-shift algorithm in the syntheticwavelength. A comparison with a sequential illumination, phasedifference method based on a laser wavelength phase shift isgiven. The test setup does not need to be stable on aninterferometric scale, and therefore a method is provided that lendsitself to applications in noisy environments.

  16. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."

  17. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."

  18. Material growth and characterization of gallium arsenic antimide on gallium arsenide grown by MOCVD for long wavelength laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Min-Soo

    Due to the demand for faster and higher bit rate optical communication, long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) has been attracting great interests because of its ability of 2D array application. Although InGaAsP/InP edge emitting lasers (EEL) have been well developed and commercially available, the lack of high contrast distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for the material system forced to find new active materials that can be grown on GaAs substrate to exploit AlGaAs/GaAs DBR pairs. For the purpose, GaAsSb has been studied as the active material. This dissertation describes and discusses the GaAsSb semiconductor material growth, the optimization of the growth conditions, and the characterization of the laser devices fabricated from GaAsSb QW structures. Based on the optimal growth conditions, EELs operating at room temperature in CW mode at the wavelength of 1.27 mum have been demonstrated from the GaAsSb QW structure with GaAsP barriers grown monolithically by MOCVD.

  19. Use of layer strains in strained-layer superlattices to make devices for operation in new wavelength ranges, E. G. , InAsSb at 8 to 12. mu. m. [InAs/sub 1-x/Sb/sub x/

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-10-06

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device comprises a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8 to 12 ..mu..m. This radiation responsive p-n junction comprises a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors. The lattice constants of the two semiconductors are mismatched, whereby a total strain is imposed on each pair of alternating semiconductor layers in the SLS structure, the proportion of the total strain which acts on each layer of the pair being proportional to the ratio of the layer thicknesses of each layer in the pair.

  20. Multi-Wavelength Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

    The main image is a composite mosaic obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer and the infrared array camera. Thermal infrared emission at 24 microns detected by the photometer (red, bottom left inset) is combined with camera data at 8.0 microns (green, bottom center inset) and 3.6 microns (blue, bottom right inset).

    A visible-light image of Messier 81, obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a ground-based telescope, is shown in the upper right inset. Both the visible-light picture and the 3.6-micron near-infrared image trace the distribution of stars, although the Spitzer image is virtually unaffected by obscuring dust. Both images reveal a very smooth stellar mass distribution, with the spiral arms relatively subdued.

    As one moves to longer wavelengths, the spiral arms become the dominant feature of the galaxy. The 8-micron emission is dominated by infrared light radiated by hot dust that has been heated by nearby luminous stars. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from nearby stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles are composed of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand), carbonaceous grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and