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Sample records for 6-18ffluoro-l-dopa fdopa metabolism

  1. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females.

  2. Sensitivity of kinetic macro parameters to changes in dopamine synthesis, storage, and metabolism: a simulation study for [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET by a model with detailed dopamine pathway.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keisuke; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Takuya; Endres, Christopher J; Minato, Kotaro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative interpretation of brain [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET data has been made possible by several kinetic modeling approaches, which are based on different assumptions about complex [¹⁸F]FDOPA metabolic pathways in brain tissue. Simple kinetic macro parameters are often utilized to quantitatively evaluate metabolic and physiological processes of interest, which may include DDC activity, vesicular storage, and catabolism from (18) F-labeled dopamine to DOPAC and HVA. A macro parameter most sensitive to the changes of these processes would be potentially beneficial to identify impaired processes in a neurodegenerative disorder such as Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study is a systematic comparison of several [¹⁸F]FDOPA macro parameters in terms of sensitivities to process-specific changes in simulated time-activity curve (TAC) data of [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET. We introduced a multiple-compartment kinetic model to simulate PET TACs with physiological changes in the dopamine pathway. TACs in the alteration of dopamine synthesis, storage, and metabolism were simulated with a plasma input function obtained by a non-human primate [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET study. Kinetic macro parameters were calculated using three conventional linear approaches (Gjedde-Patlak, Logan, and Kumakura methods). For simulated changes in dopamine storage and metabolism, the slow clearance rate (k(loss) ) as calculated by the Kumakura method showed the highest sensitivity to these changes. Although k(loss) performed well at typical ROI noise levels, there was large bias at high noise level. In contrast, for simulated changes in DDC activity it was found that K(i) and V(T), estimated by Gjedde-Patlak and Logan method respectively, have better performance than k(loss).

  3. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  4. Lateralisation of striatal function: evidence from 18F-dopa PET in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheesman, A; Barker, R; Lewis, S; Robbins, T; Owen, A; Brooks, D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aetiology of the cognitive changes seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) is multifactorial but it is likely that a significant contribution arises from the disruption of dopaminergic pathways. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of the dopaminergic system to performance on two executive tasks using 18F-6-fluorodopa positron emission tomography (18F-dopa PET) in PD subjects with early cognitive changes. Methods: 16 non-demented, non-depressed PD subjects were evaluated with the Tower of London (TOL) spatial planning task, a verbal working memory task (VWMT) and 18F-dopa PET, all known to be affected in early PD. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) localised brain regions in which 18F-dopa uptake covaried with performance scores. Frontal cortical resting glucose metabolism was assessed with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET. Results: SPM localised significant covariation between right caudate 18F-dopa uptake (Ki) and TOL scores and between left anterior putamen Ki and VWMT performance. No significant covariation was found between task scores and 18F-dopa Ki values in either limbic or cortical regions. Frontal cortical glucose metabolism was preserved in all cases. Conclusions: These findings support a causative role of striatal dopaminergic depletion in the early impairment of executive functions seen in PD. They suggest that spatial and verbal executive tasks require integrity of the right and left striatum, respectively, and imply that the pattern of cognitive changes manifest by a patient with PD may reflect differential dopamine loss in the two striatal complexes. PMID:16107352

  5. FDOPA Patterns in Adrenal Glands: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Aurélie; Giraudet, Anne Laure; Kryza, David; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Bournaud-Salinas, Claire; Mognetti, Thomas; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Combemale, Patrick; Giammarile, Francesco; Houzard, Claire

    2017-05-01

    F-FDOPA is a well-established tool to explore pheochromocytomas. It tends to replace I-MIBG scan in metastatic pheochromocytomas, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-related tumors, succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit-negative tumors, and succinate dehydrogenase[ZERO WIDTH SPACE]-positive lesions. To our knowledge, no study has characterized physiological and pathological adrenal glands with F-FDOPA from a quantitative point of view. We report the features of different normal and pathological adrenal glands with F-FDOPA. Within our series, only pheochromocytomas present a significantly increased uptake reflecting the high specificity of this tracer. Tumors such as adenomas or myelolipomas present no F-FDOPA significant accumulation. Interestingly, adrenal gland hyperplasia and solitary glands do not demonstrate compensatory uptake.

  6. The effects of carbidopa on the metabolism of 6-( sup 18 F)fluoro-L-DOPA in rats, monkeys and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Melega, W.P.; Hoffman, J.M.; Luxen, A.; Nissenson, C.H.K.; Phelps, M.E.; Barrio, J.R. )

    1990-01-01

    After carbidopa pretreatment, FDOPA plasma metabolite profiles in all three species revealed extensive metabolism of FDOPA to 3-O-methyl-6-({sup 18}F)-fluoro-L-DOPA (3-OMFD). In humans, there were significant increases in FDOPA plasma levels for 30 min and in 3-OMFD levels for 120 min after FDOPA administration. 6-({sup 18}F)Fluorodopamine sulfate and ({sup 18}F)fluoro-homovanillic acid levels were decreased, while at all times, free 6-({sup 18}F)-fluorodopamine (FDA) and 6-({sup 18}F)-3-4 dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid (FDOPAC) were not detected. In rat brain, the FDOPA metabolite profile at 30 min was significantly altered by carbidopa pretreatment; increases were noted for striatum FDA and 3-OMFD, and for cerebellum FDOPA and 3-OMFD. Thus, carbidopa pretreatment increased FDOPA plasma levels for a given FDOPA dose and essentially restricted peripheral FDOPA metabolism to 3-OMFD formation. The increase in FDOPA bioavailability to the brain resulted in greater selective FDA accumulation in striatum. As such, carbidopa pretreatment for FDOPA-positron emission tomography studies will significantly increase the amount of radioactivity that can be attributable to FDA in cerebral regions of interest.

  7. Striatal FDOPA uptake and cognition in advanced non-demented Parkinson's disease: a clinical and FDOPA-PET study.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Marije; Portman, Axel T; Kiers, Henk A L; Maguire, Ralph P; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Koning, Marthe; Pruim, Jan; Leenders, Klaus L

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine the nature of the relationship between cognition and striatal dopaminergic functioning in 28 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) using fluorodopa Positron emission tomography (FDOPA-PET) and neuropsychological test scores. Mental flexibility was related to putamen activity while mental organization (executive memory and fluency) was related to caudate FDOPA uptake. Interestingly, the caudate may be more important in the mental components of executive functioning, while the putamen may be more important in the motor components of executive functioning.

  8. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  9. Blood-brain transfer and metabolism of 6-( sup 18 F)fluoro-L-dopa in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Reith, J.; Dyve, S.; Kuwabara, H.; Guttman, M.; Diksic, M.; Gjedde, A. )

    1990-09-01

    In a study designed to reveal the rates of blood-brain transfer and decarboxylation of fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA), we discovered a major discrepancy between the DOPA decarboxylase activity reported in the literature and the rate of FDOPA decarboxylation measured in the study. Donor rats received intravenous injections of 6 mCi fluorine-18-labeled FDOPA. The donor rats synthesized methyl-FDOPA. Arterial plasma, containing both FDOPA and methyl-FDOPA, was sampled from the donor rats at different times and reinjected into recipient rats in which it circulated for 20 s. The blood-brain clearance of the mixture of labeled tracers in the plasma was determined by an integral method. The individual permeabilities were determined by linear regression analysis, according to which the average methyl-FDOPA permeability in the blood-brain barrier was twice that of FDOPA, which averaged 0.037 ml g-1 min-1. The permeability ratio was used to determine the fractional clearance from the brain of FDOPA (and hence of methyl-FDOPA), which averaged 0.081 min-1. In the striatum, the measured average FDOPA decarboxylation rate constant (kD3) was 0.010 min-1, or no more than 1% of the rate of striatal decarboxylation of DOPA measured in vitro and in vivo. We interpreted this finding as further evidence in favor of the hypothesis that striatum has two dopamine (DA) pools, of which only DA in the large pool is protected from metabolism. Hence, no more than 1% of the quantity of fluoro-DA theoretically synthesized was actually retained in striatum.

  10. [¹⁸F]FDOPA uptake in the raphe nuclei complex reflects serotonin transporter availability. A combined [¹⁸F]FDOPA and [¹¹C]DASB PET study in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavese, N; Simpson, B S; Metta, V; Ramlackhansingh, A; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Brooks, D J

    2012-01-16

    Brain uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA, measured with PET, reflects the activity of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme largely expressed in monoaminergic nerve terminals. This enzyme catalyzes a number of decarboxylation reactions including conversion of l-dopa into dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptophan into serotonin. For more than 20years [(18)F]FDOPA PET has been used to assess dopaminergic nigrostriatal dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). More recently, however, [(18)F]FDOPA PET has also been employed as a marker of serotoninergic and noradrenergic function in PD patients. In this study, we provide further evidence in support of the view that [(18)F]FDOPA PET can be used to evaluate the distribution and the function of serotoninergic systems in the brain. Eighteen patients with PD were investigated with both [(18)F]FDOPA and [(11)C]DASB PET, the latter being a marker of serotonin transport (SERT) availability. We then assessed the relationship between measurements of the two tracers within brain serotoninergic structures. [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in the median raphe nuclei complex of PD patients was significantly correlated with SERT availability in the same structure. Trends towards significant correlations between [(18)F]FDOPA Ki values and [(11)C]DASB binding values were also observed in the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting a serotoninergic contribution to [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in these regions. Conversely, no correlations were found in brain structures with mixed dopaminergic, serotoninergic and noradrenergic innervations, or with predominant dopaminergic innervation. These findings provide evidence that [(18)F]FDOPA PET represents a valid marker of raphe serotoninergic function in PD and supports previous studies where [(18)F]FDOPA PET has been used to assess serotoninergic function in PD.

  11. Statistical parametric mapping with 18F-dopa PET shows bilaterally reduced striatal and nigral dopaminergic function in early Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Morrish, P; Rakshi, J; Uema, T; Ashburner, J; Bailey, D; Friston, K; Brooks, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To apply statistical parametric mapping to 18F-dopa PET data sets, to examine the regional distribution of changes in dopaminergic metabolism in early asymmetric Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—Thirteen normal volunteers (age 57.7 (SD 16.5) years; four women, nine men ) and six patients (age 50.3 (SD 13.5) years; three women, three men) with asymmetric (right sided) Parkinson's disease were studied. Images from each dynamic dopa PET dataset were aligned and parametric images of 18F-dopa influx (Ki) were created for each subject. The Ki images were transformed into standard stereotactic space. The Ki values of the caudate and putamen on spatially normalised images were compared with the Ki values before normalisation. The application of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) allowed statistical comparison of regional Ki values on a voxel by voxel basis between healthy volunteers and patients with Parkinson's disease.
RESULTS—There was a strong correlation between the Ki values before and after spatial normalisation (r=0.898, p=0.0001). Significant decreases in the Ki values were found for the Parkinson's desease group throughout the entire left putamen (p< 0.001) and focally in the dorsal right putamen (p< 0.001). Decreased Ki values were also shown bilaterally in the substantia nigra (p< 0.01).
CONCLUSION—Using (SPM) and 18F-dopa PET, reductions in both striatal and nigral brain dopaminergic function could be demonstrated in early Parkinson's disease.

 PMID:10329749

  12. The sensitivity and specificity of F-DOPA PET in a movement disorder clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nevein; Kusmirek, Joanna; Struck, Aaron F; Floberg, John M; Perlman, Scott B; Gallagher, Catherine; Hall, Lance T

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Early PD may present a diagnostic challenge with broad differential diagnoses that are not associated with nigral degeneration or striatal dopamine deficiency. Therefore, the early clinical diagnosis alone may not be accurate and this reinforces the importance of functional imaging targeting the pathophysiology of the disease process. 18F-DOPA L-6-[18F] fluoro-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalnine (18F-DOPA) is a positron emission tomography (PET) agent that measures the uptake of dopamine precursors for assessment of presynaptic dopaminergic integrity and has been shown to accurately reflect the monoaminergic disturbances in PD. In this study, we aim to illustrate our local experience to determine the accuracy of 18F-DOPA PET for diagnosis of PD. We studied a total of 27 patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out for all patients that underwent 18F-DOPA PET brain scan for motor symptoms suspicious for PD between 2001-2008. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the scans were performed. The patient’s medical records were then assessed for length of follow-up, response to levodopa, clinical course of illness, and laterality of symptoms at time of 18F-DOPA PET. The eventual diagnosis by the referring neurologist, movement disorder specialist, was used as the reference standard for further analysis. Of the 28 scans, we found that one was a false negative, 20 were true positives, and 7 were true negatives. The resultant values are Sensitivity 95.4% (95% CI: 100%-75.3%), Specificity 100% (95% CI: 100%-59.0%), PPV 100% (95% CI 100%-80.7%), and NPV 87.5% (95% CI: 99.5%-50.5%). PMID:27069770

  13. Effect of Carbidopa on 18F-FDOPA Uptake in Insulinoma: From Cell Culture to Small-Animal PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Detour, Julien; Pierre, Alice; Boisson, Fréderic; Kreutter, Guillaume; Lavaux, Thomas; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Kessler, Laurence; Brasse, David; Marchand, Patrice; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Patient premedication with carbidopa seems to improve the accuracy of 6-(18)F-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine ((18)F-FDOPA) PET for insulinoma diagnosis. However, the risk of PET false-negative results in the presence of carbidopa is a concern. Consequently, we aimed to evaluate the effect of carbidopa on (18)F-FDOPA uptake in insulinoma β-cells and an insulinoma xenograft model in mice.

  14. Differing patterns of striatal sup 18 F-dopa uptake in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J.; Ibanez, V.; Sawle, G.V.; Quinn, N.; Lees, A.J.; Mathias, C.J.; Bannister, R.; Marsden, C.D.; Frackowiak, R.S. )

    1990-10-01

    Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied regional striatal 18F-dopa uptake in 16 patients with L-dopa-responsive Parkinson's disease (PD), 18 patients with multiple system atrophy, and 10 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. Results were compared with those of 30 age-matched normal volunteers. The patients with PD showed significantly reduced mean uptake of 18F-dopa in the caudate and putamen compared to controls, but while function in the posterior part of the putamen was severely impaired (45% of normal), function in the anterior part of the putamen and in the caudate was relatively spared (62% and 84% of normal). Mean 18F-dopa uptake in the posterior putamen was depressed to similar levels in all patients. Unlike patients with PD, the patients with progressive supranuclear palsy showed equally severe impairment of mean 18F-dopa uptake in the anterior and posterior putamen. Caudate 18F-dopa uptake was also significantly lower in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy than in patients with PD, being depressed to the same level as that in the putamen. Mean 18F-dopa uptake values in the anterior putamen and caudate in patients with multiple system atrophy lay between PD and progressive supranuclear palsy levels. Locomotor disability of individual patients with PD or multiple system atrophy correlated with decline in striatal 18F-dopa uptake, but this was not the case for the patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. We conclude that patients with PD have selective nigral pathological features with relative preservation of the dopaminergic function in the anterior putamen and caudate, whereas there is progressively more extensive nigral involvement in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

  15. Antidepressant response to aripiprazole augmentation associated with enhanced FDOPA utilization in striatum: a preliminary PET study

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Charles R.; Chibnall, John T.; Cumming, Paul; Mintun, Mark A.; Gebara, Marie Anne I.; Perantie, Dana C.; Price, Joseph L.; Cornell, Martha E.; McConathy, Jonathan E.; Gangwani, Sunil; Sheline, Yvette I.

    2014-01-01

    Several double blind, prospective trials have demonstrated an antidepressant augmentation efficacy of aripiprazole in depressed patients unresponsive to standard antidepressant therapy. Although aripiprazole is now widely used for this indication, and much is known about its receptor-binding properties, the mechanism of its antidepressant augmentation remains ill-defined. In vivo animal studies and in vitro human studies using cloned dopamine dopamine D2 receptors suggest aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist; in this preliminary neuroimaging trial, we hypothesized that aripiprazole’s antidepressant augmentation efficacy arises from dopamine partial agonist activity. To test this, we assessed the effects of aripiprazole augmentation on the cerebral utilization of 6-[18F]-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (FDOPA) using positron emission tomography (PET). Fourteen depressed patients, who had failed 8 weeks of antidepressant therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, underwent FDOPA PET scans before and after aripiprazole augmentation; eleven responded to augmentation. Whole brain, voxel-wise comparisons of pre- and post-aripiprazole scans revealed increased FDOPA trapping in the right medial caudate of augmentation responders. An exploratory analysis of depressive symptoms revealed that responders experienced large improvements only in putatively dopaminergic symptoms of lassitude and inability to feel. These preliminary findings suggest that augmentation of antidepressant response by aripiprazole may be associated with potentiation of dopaminergic activity. PMID:24468015

  16. Functional characterization of non-metastatic paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma by 18F-FDOPA PET: focus on missed lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sophie; Blanchet, Elise M; Sebag, Frédéric; Chen, Clara C; Fakhry, Nicolas; Deveze, Arnaud; Barlier, Anne; Morange, Isabelle; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims and methods To evaluate the clinical value of 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET in relation to tumour localization and the patient’s genetic status in a large series of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PHEO/PGL) patients and to discuss in detail false-negative results. A retrospective study of PGL patients who were investigated with 18F-FDOPA PET or PET/CT imaging in two academic endocrine tumour centers was conducted (La Timone University Hospital, Marseilles, France and National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA). Results One hundred sixteen patients (39.7% harboring germline mutations in known disease susceptibility genes) were evaluated for a total of 195 PHEO/PGL foci. 18F-FDOPA PET correctly detected 179 lesions (91.8%) in 107 patients (92.2%). Lesion-based sensitivities for parasympathetic PGLs (head, neck, or anterior/middle thoracic ones), PHEOs, and extra-adrenal sympathetic (abdominal or posterior thoracic) PGLs were 98.2% [96.5% for Timone and 100% for NIH], 93.9% [93.8% and 93.9%], and 70.3% [47.1% and 90%], respectively (P<0.001). Sympathetic (adrenal and extra-adrenal) SDHx-related PGLs were at a higher risk for negative 18F-FDOPA PET than non-SDHx-related PGLs (14/24 vs 0/62, respectively, p<0.001). By contrast, the risk of negative 18F-FDOPA PET was lower for parasympathetic PGLs regardless of the genetic background (1/90 in SDHx vs 1/19 in non-SDHx tumours, p= 0.32). 18F-FDOPA PET failed to detect 2 head and neck PGLs (HNPGL), likely due to their small size, while most missed sympathetic PGL were larger and may have exhibited a specific 18F-FDOPA-negative imaging phenotype. 18F-FDG PET detected all the missed sympathetic lesions. Conclusions 18F-FDOPA PET appears to be a very sensitive functional imaging tool for HNPGL regardless of the genetic status of the tumours. Patients with false-negative tumours on 18F-FDOPA PET should be tested for SDHx mutations. PMID:23230826

  17. Postinjection L-phenylalanine increases basal ganglia contrast in PET scans of 6-18F-DOPA

    SciTech Connect

    Doudet, D.J.; McLellan, C.A.; Aigner, T.G.; Wyatt, R.; Adams, H.R.; Miyake, H.; Finn, R.T.; Cohen, R.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The sensitivity of 18F-DOPA positron emission tomography for imaging presynaptic dopamine systems is limited by the amount of specific-to-nonspecific accumulation of radioactivity in brain. In rhesus monkeys, we have been able to increase this ratio by taking advantage of the lag time between 18F-DOPA injection and the formation of its main metabolite, the amino acid 18F-fluoromethoxydopa, the entrance of which into brain is responsible for most of the brain's nonspecific radioactivity. By infusing an unlabeled amino acid, L-phenylalanine, starting 15 min after 18F-DOPA administration, we preferentially blocked the accumulation of 18F-fluoromethoxydopa by preventing its entrance into brain through competition at the large neutral amino acid transport system of the blood-brain barrier. This method appears as reliable as the original and more sensitive, as demonstrated by the comparison of normal and MPTP-treated animals under both conditions.

  18. Biopsy validation of 18F-DOPA PET and biodistribution in gliomas for neurosurgical planning and radiotherapy target delineation: results of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pafundi, Deanna H.; Laack, Nadia N.; Youland, Ryan S.; Parney, Ian F.; Lowe, Val J.; Giannini, Caterina; Kemp, Brad J.; Grams, Michael P.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Hoover, Jason M.; Hu, Leland S.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brinkmann, Debra H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delineation of glioma extent for surgical or radiotherapy planning is routinely based on MRI. There is increasing awareness that contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images (T1-CE) may not reflect the entire extent of disease. The amino acid tracer 18F-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F] fluoro-l-phenylalanine) has a high tumor-to-background signal and high sensitivity for glioma imaging. This study compares 18F-DOPA PET against conventional MRI for neurosurgical biopsy targeting, resection planning, and radiotherapy target volume delineation. Methods Conventional MR and 18F-DOPA PET/CT images were acquired in 10 patients with suspected malignant brain tumors. One to 3 biopsy locations per patient were chosen in regions of concordant and discordant 18F-DOPA uptake and MR contrast enhancement. Histopathology was reviewed on 23 biopsies. 18F-DOPA PET was quantified using standardized uptake values (SUV) and tumor-to-normal hemispheric tissue (T/N) ratios. Results Pathologic review confirmed glioma in 22 of 23 biopsy specimens. Thirteen of 16 high-grade biopsy specimens were obtained from regions of elevated 18F-DOPA uptake, while T1-CE was present in only 6 of those 16 samples. Optimal 18F-DOPA PET thresholds corresponding to high-grade disease based on histopathology were calculated as T/N > 2.0. In every patient, 18F-DOPA uptake regions with T/N > 2.0 extended beyond T1-CE up to a maximum of 3.5 cm. SUV was found to correlate with grade and cellularity. Conclusions 18F-DOPA PET SUVmax may more accurately identify regions of higher-grade/higher-density disease in patients with astrocytomas and will have utility in guiding stereotactic biopsy selection. Using SUV-based thresholds to define high-grade portions of disease may be valuable in delineating radiotherapy boost volumes. PMID:23460322

  19. Radionecrosis versus disease progression in brain metastasis. Value of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT/MRI.

    PubMed

    Hernández Pinzón, J; Mena, D; Aguilar, M; Biafore, F; Recondo, G; Bastianello, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT with magnetic resonance imaging fusion and the use of visual methods and quantitative analysis helps to differentiate between changes post-radiosurgery vs. suspicion of disease progression in a patient with brain metastases from melanoma, thus facilitating taking early surgical action.

  20. Combined PET/CT by 18F-FDOPA, 18F-FDA, 18F-FDG, and MRI correlation on a patient with Carney triad.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Patronas, Nicholas J; Chen, Clara C; Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Carney triad is a rare syndrome involving gastrointestinal stromal tumor, pulmonary chondroma, and extra-adrenal paraganglioma. We present a 21-year-old woman with the complete triad who was evaluated with MRI, F-FDOPA, F-FDA, and F-FDG. F-FDOPA best demonstrated the paraganglioma, whereas hepatic metastases noted by MRI demonstrated increased uptake only by F-FDG.

  1. Joint factor and kinetic analysis of dynamic FDOPA PET scans of brain cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dowson, N; Bourgeat, P; Rose, S; Daglish, M; Smith, J; Fay, M; Coulthard, A; Winter, C; MacFarlane, D; Thomas, P; Crozier, S; Salvado, O

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic analysis is an essential tool of Positron Emission Tomography image analysis. However it requires a pure tissue time activity curve (TAC) in order to calculate the system parameters. Pure tissue TACs are particularly difficult to obtain in the brain as the low resolution of PET means almost all voxels are a mixture of tissues. Factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing but is an underdetermined problem that can give arbitrary results. A joint factor and kinetic analysis is proposed whereby factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing of tissues. Hence, more meaningful parameters are obtained by the kinetic models, which also ensure a less ambiguous solution to the factor analysis. The method was tested using a cylindrical phantom and the 18F-DOPA data of a brain cancer patient.

  2. Use of [18F]FDOPA-PET for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We evaluated the utility of L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]fluoro-phenylalanine ([18F]FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) as a method for assessing the severity of dopaminergic dysfunction in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats by comparing it with quantitative biochemical, immunohistochemical, and behavioral measurements. Methods Different doses of 6-OHDA (0, 7, 14, and 28 μg) were unilaterally injected into the right striatum of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Dopaminergic functional activity in the striatum was assessed by [18F]FDOPA-PET, measurement of striatal dopamine (DA) and DA metabolite levels, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining, and methamphetamine-induced rotational testing. Results Accumulation of [18F]FDOPA in the bilateral striatum was observed in rats pretreated with both aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors. Unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA produced a significant site-specific reduction in [18F]FDOPA accumulation. The topological distribution pattern of [18F]FDOPA accumulation in the ipsilateral striatum agreed well with the pattern in TH-stained corresponding sections. A significant positive relationship was found between Patlak plot Ki values and striatal levels of DA and its metabolites (r = 0.958). A significant negative correlation was found between both Ki values (r = -0.639) and levels of DA and its metabolites (r = -0.719) and the number of methamphetamine-induced rotations. Conclusions Ki values determined using [18F]FDOPA-PET correlated significantly with the severity of dopaminergic dysfunction. [18F]FDOPA-PET makes it possible to perform longitudinal evaluation of dopaminergic function in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which is useful in the development of new drugs and therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD). PMID:22214344

  3. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  4. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  5. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and intestines. Several of the hormones of the endocrine system are involved in controlling the rate and direction ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System What Can I Do About My High Metabolism? ...

  6. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. Metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  7. Presynaptic Dopamine Capacity in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia Taking Clozapine: An [(18)F]DOPA PET Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euitae; Howes, Oliver D; Veronese, Mattia; Beck, Katherine; Seo, Seongho; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Yun-Sang; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2017-03-01

    Some patients with schizophrenia show poor response to first-line antipsychotic treatments and this is termed treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The differential response to first-line antipsychotic drugs may reflect a different underlying neurobiology. Indeed, a previous study found dopamine synthesis capacity was significantly lower in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. However, in this study, the treatment-resistant patients were highly symptomatic, whereas the responsive patients showed no or minimal symptoms. The study could not distinguish whether this was a trait effect or reflected the difference in symptom levels. Thus, we aimed to test whether dopaminergic function is altered in patients with a history of treatment resistance to first-line drugs relative to treatment responders when both groups are matched for symptom severity levels by recruiting treatment-resistant patients currently showed low symptom severity with the clozapine treatment. Healthy controls (n=12), patients treated with clozapine (n=12) who had not responded to first-line antipsychotics, and patients who had responded to first-line antipsychotics (n=12) were recruited. Participants were matched for age and sex and symptomatic severity level in patient groups. Participants' dopamine synthesis capacity was measured by using [(18)F]DOPA PET. We found that patients treated with clozapine show lower dopamine synthesis capacity than patients who have responded to first-line treatment (Cohen's d=0.9191 (whole striatum), 0.7781 (associative striatum), 1.0344 (limbic striatum), and 1.0189 (sensorimotor striatum) in line with the hypothesis that the dopaminergic function is linked to treatment response. This suggests that a different neurobiology may underlie treatment-resistant schizophrenia and that dopamine synthesis capacity may be a useful biomarker to predict treatment responsiveness.

  8. Dual time point method for the quantification of irreversible tracer kinetics: A reference tissue approach applied to [(18)F]-FDOPA brain PET.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isadora L; Meles, Sanne K; Willemsen, Antoon Tm; Dierckx, Rudi A; Marques da Silva, Ana M; Leenders, Klaus L; Koole, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Patlak graphical analysis (PGAREF) for quantification of irreversible tracer binding with a reference tissue model was approximated by a dual time point imaging approach (DTPREF). The DTPREF was applied to 18 [(18)F]-FDOPA brain scans using the occipital cortex as reference region (DTPOCC) and compared to both PGAOCC and striatal-to-occipital ratios (SOR). Pearson correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plots showed an excellent correlation and good agreement between DTPOCC and PGAOCC, while correlations between SOR and PGAOCC were consistently lower. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) demonstrated a similar performance for all methods in differentiating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) from healthy controls (HC). Specifically for [(18)F]-FDOPA brain imaging, these findings validate DTPOCC as an approximation for PGAOCC, providing the same quantitative information while reducing the acquisition time to two short static scans. For PD patients, this approach can greatly improve patient comfort while reducing motion artifacts and increasing image quality. In general, DTPREF can improve the clinical applicability of tracers with irreversible binding characteristics when a reference tissue is available.

  9. 123I-MIBG, 18F-DOPA and 18F-FDG in a patient with MEN2 syndrome and recurrent pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Marín-Oyaga, V A; Borrego-Dorado, I; Navarro-González, E; Martos-Martínez, J M; Vázquez-Albertino, R

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor located in the medulla of the adrenal gland that is characterized by high catecholamine synthesis. Surgery is the treatment of choice and is usually curative if appropriately diagnosed and excised. Imaging methods, both morphological and functional, are of great importance in presurgical evaluation. We report the case of a female patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, with bilateral adrenalectomy due to two pheochromocytomas and progressive elevation of urinary metanephrine. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a nodular image in the right adrenal fossa. The patient was referred to our unit in order to confirm suspicion of recurrence. Due to the absence of pathological findings in the (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy and high suspicion of recurrence, PET/CT imaging with (18)F-DOPA and (18)F-FDG were performed, and the diagnosis was confirmed.

  10. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, F J; Acevedo-Báñez, I; Martínez-Castillo, R; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Pachón-Garrudo, V M; Álvarez-Pérez, R M; García-Jiménez, R; Rivas-Infante, E; García-Morillo, J S; Borrego-Dorado, I

    2015-08-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different presentations of the disease were observed in our casuistic: most indolent form was a cutaneous confined disease, presented in only one patient. Multifocal involvement with central nervous system (CNS) preservation was observed in two patients. Most aggressive form consisted in a systemic involvement with CNS infiltration, presented in three patients. In our experience neurological involvement, among one case with isolate pituitary infiltration, was associated with mortality in all cases. 18FDG-PET/CT and BS were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement; locate the site for biopsy and the treatment response evaluation. By our knowledge, 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seems useful in the initial staging of ECD. A baseline 18FDG-PET/CT and BS may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate treatment response.

  11. Pre- and post-synaptic dopamine imaging and its relation with frontostriatal cognitive function in Parkinson disease: PET studies with [11C]NNC 112 and [18F]FDOPA.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Vanessa L; Fujita, Masahiro; Bara-Jimenez, William; Brown, Amira K; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Sangare, Janet; Herscovitch, Peter; Pike, Victor W; Hallett, Mark; Nathan, Pradeep J; Innis, Robert B

    2008-07-15

    Frontostriatal cognitive dysfunction is common in Parkinson disease (PD), but the explanation for its heterogeneous expressions remains unclear. This study examined the dopamine system within the frontostriatal circuitry with positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate pre- and post-synaptic dopamine function in relation to the executive processes in PD. Fifteen non-demented PD patients and 14 healthy controls underwent [(18)F]FDOPA (for dopamine synthesis) and [(11)C]NNC 112 (for D(1) receptors) PET scans and cognitive testing. Parametric images of [(18)F]FDOPA uptake (K(i)) and [(11)C]NNC 112 binding potential (BP(ND)) were calculated using reference tissue models. Group differences in K(i) and BP(ND) were assessed with both volume of interest and statistical parametric mapping, and were correlated with cognitive tests. Measurement of [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in cerebral cortex was questionable because of higher K(i) values in white than adjacent gray matter. These paradoxical results were likely to be caused by violations of the reference tissue model assumption rendering interpretation of cortical [(18)F]FDOPA uptake in PD difficult. We found no regional differences in D(1) receptor density between controls and PD, and no overall differences in frontostriatal performance. Although D(1) receptor density did not relate to frontostriatal cognition, K(i) decreases in the putamen predicted performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in PD only. These results suggest that striatal dopamine denervation may contribute to some frontostriatal cognitive impairment in moderate stage PD.

  12. Intra-individual comparison of 18F-FET and 18F-DOPA in PET imaging of recurrent brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Combs, Stephanie E.; Leotta, Karin; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Rieken, Stefan; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) and 18F-fluoroethyltyrosine (18F-FET) have already been used successfully for imaging of brain tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between these 2 promising tracers to determine the consequences for imaging protocols and the interpretation of findings. Methods Forty minutes of dynamic PET imaging were performed on 2 consecutive days with both 18F-DOPA and 18F-FET in patients with recurrent low-grade astrocytoma (n = 8) or high-grade glioblastoma (n = 8). Time-activity-curves (TACs), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and compartment modeling of both tracers were analyzed, respectively. Results The TAC of DOPA-PET peaked at 8 minutes p.i. with SUV 5.23 in high-grade gliomas and 10 minutes p.i. with SUV 4.92 in low-grade gliomas. FET-PET peaked at 9 minutes p.i. with SUV 3.17 in high-grade gliomas and 40 minutes p.i. with SUV 3.24 in low-grade gliomas. Neglecting the specific uptake of DOPA into the striatum, the tumor-to-brain and tumor-to-blood ratios were higher for DOPA-PET. Kinetic modeling demonstrated a high flow constant k1 (mL/ccm/min), representing cellular internalization through AS-transporters, for DOPA in both high-grade (k1 = 0.59) and low-grade (k1 = 0.55) tumors, while lower absolute values and a relevant dependency from tumor-grading (high-grade k1 = 0.43; low-grade k1 = 0.33) were observed with FET. Conclusions DOPA-PET demonstrates superior contrast ratios for lesions outside the striatum, but SUVs do not correlate with grading. FET-PET can provide additional information on tumor grading and benefits from lower striatal uptake but presents lower contrast ratios and requires prolonged imaging if histology is not available in advance due to a more variable time-to-peak. PMID:24305717

  13. Complex-1 activity and 18F-DOPA uptake in genetically engineered mouse model of Parkinson's disease and the neuroprotective role of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil K; El Refaey, Hesham; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2006-06-15

    Regional distribution of coenzyme Q10 and mitochondrial complex-1 activity were estimated in the brains of control-(C57BL/6), metallothionein knock out-, metallothionein transgenic-, and homozygous weaver mutant mice; and human dopaminergic (SK-N-SH) cells with a primary objective to determine the neuroprotective potential of coenzyme Q10 in Parkinson's disease. Complex-1 activity as well as coenzyme Q10 were significantly higher in the cerebral cortex as compared to the striatum in all the genotypes examined. Complex-1 activity and coenzyme Q10 were significantly reduced in weaver mutant mice and metallothionein knock out mice, but were significantly increased in metallothionein transgenic mice. The reduced complex-1 activity and 18F-DOPA uptake occurred concomitantly with negligible differences in the coenzyme Q10 between in the cerebral cortex and striatum of weaver mutant mice. Administration of coenzyme Q10 increased complex-1 activity and partially improved motoric performance in weaver mutant mice. Direct exposure of rotenone also reduced coenzyme Q10, complex-1 activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in SK-N-SH cells. Rotenone-induced down-regulation of complex-1 activity was attenuated by coenzyme Q10 treatment, suggesting that complex-1 may be down regulated due to depletion of coenzyme Q10 in the brain. Therefore, metallothionein-induced coenzyme Q10 synthesis may provide neuroprotection by augmenting mitochondrial complex-1 activity in Parkinson's disease.

  14. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred; Wilson, Don; Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur; Zhang, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Benard, Francois; Nichol, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm

  15. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  16. Equivalent dose rate at 1m of patients with known or suspected neuroendocrine tumor exiting a nuclear medicine department after (68)Ga-DOTATOC, (18)F-FDOPA or (18)F-FDG PET/CT, or (111)In-pentetreotide or (123)I-mIBG SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang-Yin, Jules; Dirand, Anne-Sophie; Sasanelli, Myriam; Corrégé, Gwenaelle; Peudon, Aude; Kiffel, Thierry; Nataf, Valérie; Clerc, Jérôme; Montravers, Françoise; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2017-02-16

    (123)I-mIBG and (111)In-pentetrotide SPECT have been used for functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) for the last two decades. More recently, PET/CT imaging with (18)F-FDG, (18)F-FDOPA and (68)Ga somatostatin-receptor ligands in NETs has been expanding. No direct measurements of the dose rate from NET patients exiting the nuclear medicine department could be found in the literature after PET/CT with (18)F-FDOPA or (68)Ga-DOTATOC, a somatostatin analogue. Methods: We measured the dose rates from NET patients undergoing PET/CT or SPECT/CT in our centers. A total of 103 paired measurements of equivalent dose rate at 1m of the patient (EDR-1m) were performed in 98 patients on leaving the department. The detector was facing the sternum or the urinary bladder, at a distance of 1 meter from and right in front of the patient. The practice for exiting the department differed according to whether the patient was referred to PET/CT or to SPECT/CT. PET/CT patients were discharged after imaging. Results: The median administered activity was 122 MBq in 53 (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CTs, 198 MBq in 15 (18)F-FDOPA PET/CTs and 176 MBq in 13 (18)F-FDG PET/CTs. The corresponding median EDR-1m (in µSv/h) were 4.8, 9.5 and 8.8 respectively facing the sternum, and 5.1, 10.1 and 9.5 respectively facing the bladder. SPECT/CT patients left the department earlier, just after radiopharmaceutical injection. The median administered activity was 170 MBq in 12 (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CTs and 186 MBq in 10 (123)I-mIBG SPECT/CTs. The corresponding median EDR-1m (in µSv/h) were 9.4, and 4.9 respectively at the level of the sternum, and 9.3 and 4.7 respectively at the level of the bladder. The EDR-1m was <20 µSv/h in all patients. Thus when exiting the nuclear medicine department, the NET patients injected with (68)Ga-DOTATOC or (123)I mIBG emitted an average EDR-1m roughly half of that of patients injected with other radiopharmaceuticals. This is a complementary argument for replacing

  17. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  18. Metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  19. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Severe infection throughout the body ( sepsis ) Thyroid disease Vitamin deficiencies (including vitamins B12 , B6 , E , and B1 ) Some ... best treatment is to correct the metabolic problem. Vitamin deficiencies are treated with diet or with vitamins by ...

  20. Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir V.

    Analysis of the metabolome with coverage of all of the possibly detectable components in the sample, rather than analysis of each individual metabolite at a given time, can be accomplished by metabolic analysis. Targeted and/or nontargeted approaches are applied as needed for particular experiments. Monitoring hundreds or more metabolites at a given time requires high-throughput and high-end techniques that enable screening for relative changes in, rather than absolute concentrations of, compounds within a wide dynamic range. Most of the analytical techniques useful for these purposes use GC or HPLC/UPLC separation modules coupled to a fast and accurate mass spectrometer. GC separations require chemical modification (derivatization) before analysis, and work efficiently for the small molecules. HPLC separations are better suited for the analysis of labile and nonvolatile polar and nonpolar compounds in their native form. Direct infusion and NMR-based techniques are mostly used for fingerprinting and snap phenotyping, where applicable. Discovery and validation of metabolic biomarkers are exciting and promising opportunities offered by metabolic analysis applied to biological and biomedical experiments. We have demonstrated that GC-TOF-MS, HPLC/UPLC-RP-MS and HILIC-LC-MS techniques used for metabolic analysis offer sufficient metabolome mapping providing researchers with confident data for subsequent multivariate analysis and data mining.

  1. Metabolic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function ...

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions are High blood pressure High blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels High levels of triglycerides, a type of fat, in your blood Low levels ...

  3. [Homocysteine metabolism].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takao; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur amino acid, is an intermediate metabolite of methionine. In 1969, McCully reported autopsy evidence of extensive arterial thrombosis and atherosclerosis in children with elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations and homocystinuria. On the basis of this observation, he proposed that elevated plasma homocysteine (hyperhomocysteinemia) can cause atherosclerotic vascular disease. Hyperhomocysteinemia is now well established as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease. Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is quite prevalent in the general population. It can be caused by genetic defects in the enzymes involved in homocysteine metabolism or nutritional deficiencies in vitamin cofactors, certain medications or renal disease. An increase of 5 micromol per liter in the plasma homocysteine concentration raises the risk of coronary artery disease by as much as an increase of 20 mg per deciliter in the cholesterol concentration. In this article, we review the biochemical, experimental and clinical studies on hyperhomocysteinemia, with emphasis on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of homocysteine.

  4. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  5. [Metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Shimpei

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (Mets) is a combination of disorders including abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes when occurring together. In Japan, diagnosis criteria of Mets consists of an increased waist circumference and 2 or more of CVD risk factors. Annual health checkups and health guidance using Mets criteria were established in 2008 for the prevention of life-style related diseases in Japan. In this issue, history and diagnostic criteria of Mets and concerns for Mets concept were described.

  6. Metabolic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Farina, Lorenzo; Colosimo, Alfredo; Giuliani, Alessandro

    The use of the term `network' is more and more widespread in all fields of biology. It evokes a systemic approach to biological problems able to overcome the evident limitations of the strict reductionism of the past twenty years. The expectations produced by taking into considerations not only the single elements but even the intermingled `web' of links connecting different parts of biological entities, are huge. Nevertheless, we believe that the lack of consciousness that networks, beside their biological `likelihood', are modeling tools and not real entities, could be detrimental to the exploitation of the full potential of this paradigm. Like any modeling tool the network paradigm has a range of application going from situations in which it is particularly fit to situations in which its application can be largely misleading. In this chapter we deal with an aspect of biological entities that is particularly fit for the network approach: the intermediate metabolism. This fit derives both from the existence of a privileged formalization in which the relative role of nodes (metabolites) and arches (enzymes) is immediately suggested by the system architecture. Here we will discuss some applications of both graph theory based analysis and multidimensional statistics method to metabolic network studies with the emphasis on the derivation of biologically meaningful information.

  7. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  8. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  9. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Metabolism disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vom Saal, Frederick

    2017-03-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations.

  11. Metabolic simulation chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Metabolic simulation combustion chamber was developed as subsystem for breathing metabolic simulator. Entire system is used for evaluation of life support and resuscitation equipment. Metabolism subsystem simulates a human by consuming oxygen and producing carbon dioxide. Basic function is to simulate human metabolic range from rest to hard work.

  12. Mangiferin modulation of metabolism and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, Ekaterina Vladimirovna; Chi, Yuling

    2016-09-10

    The recent emergence of a worldwide epidemic of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes, demands effective strategy to develop nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals to halt this trend. Natural products have long been and continue to be an attractive source of nutritional and pharmacological therapeutics. One such natural product is mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L. Reports on biological and pharmacological effects of MGF increased exponentially in recent years. MGF has documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies indicate that it modulates multiple biological processes involved in metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. MGF has been shown to improve metabolic abnormalities and disorders in animal models and humans. This review focuses on the recently reported biological and pharmacological effects of MGF on metabolism and metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(5):492-503, 2016.

  13. Inborn errors of metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism - inborn errors of ... Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn errors of metabolism. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 205. Rezvani I, Rezvani G. An ...

  14. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  15. Synthetic metabolism: metabolic engineering meets enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Erb, Tobias J; Jones, Patrik R; Bar-Even, Arren

    2017-01-30

    Metabolic engineering aims at modifying the endogenous metabolic network of an organism to harness it for a useful biotechnological task, for example, production of a value-added compound. Several levels of metabolic engineering can be defined and are the topic of this review. Basic 'copy, paste and fine-tuning' approaches are limited to the structure of naturally existing pathways. 'Mix and match' approaches freely recombine the repertoire of existing enzymes to create synthetic metabolic networks that are able to outcompete naturally evolved pathways or redirect flux toward non-natural products. The space of possible metabolic solution can be further increased through approaches including 'new enzyme reactions', which are engineered on the basis of known enzyme mechanisms. Finally, by considering completely 'novel enzyme chemistries' with de novo enzyme design, the limits of nature can be breached to derive the most advanced form of synthetic pathways. We discuss the challenges and promises associated with these different metabolic engineering approaches and illuminate how enzyme engineering is expected to take a prime role in synthetic metabolic engineering for biotechnology, chemical industry and agriculture of the future.

  16. Sustained metabolic scope.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C C; Nagy, K A; Diamond, J

    1990-03-01

    Sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) are time-averaged metabolic rates that are measured in free-ranging animals maintaining constant body mass over periods long enough that metabolism is fueled by food intake rather than by transient depletion of energy reserves. Many authors have suggested that SusMR of various wild animal species are only a few times resting (basal or standard) metabolic rates (RMR). We test this conclusion by analyzing all 37 species (humans, 31 other endothermic vertebrates, and 5 ectothermic vertebrates) for which SusMR and RMR had both been measured. For all species, the ratio of SusMR to RMR, which we term sustained metabolic scope, is less than 7; most values fall between 1.5 and 5. Some of these values, such as those for Tour de France cyclists and breeding birds, are surely close to sustainable metabolic ceilings for the species studied. That is, metabolic rates higher than 7 times RMR apparently cannot be sustained indefinitely. These observations pose several questions: whether the proximate physiological causes of metabolic ceilings reside in the digestive tract's ability to process food or in each tissue's metabolic capacity; whether ceiling values are independent of the mode of energy expenditure; whether ceilings are set by single limiting physiological capacities or by coadjusted clusters of capacities (symmorphosis); what the ultimate evolutionary causes of metabolic ceilings are; and how metabolic ceilings may limit animals' reproductive effort, foraging behavior, and geographic distribution.

  17. DREAMS of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic networks have been studied for several decades, and sophisticated computational frameworks are needed to augment experimental approaches to harness these complex networks. BNICE (Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer), a computational approach for the discovery of novel biochemical pathways that is based on biochemical transformations, overcomes many of the current limitations. BNICE and similar frameworks can be used in several different areas: (i) 'Design' of novel pathways for metabolic engineering; (ii) 'Retrosynthesis' of metabolic compounds; (iii) 'Evolution' analysis between metabolic pathways of different organisms; (iv) 'Analysis' of metabolic pathways; (v) 'Mining' of omics data; and (vi) 'Selection' of targets for enzyme engineering. Here, we discuss the issues and challenges in building such frameworks as well as the gamut of applications in biotechnology, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology.

  18. Stereoselectivity in drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong

    2007-04-01

    Many chiral drugs are used as their racemic mixtures in clinical practice. Two enantiomers of a chiral drug generally differ in pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic properties as a consequence of the stereoselective interaction with optically active biological macromolecules. Thus, a stereospecific assay to discriminate between enantiomers is required in order to relate plasma concentrations to pharmacological effect of a chiral drug. Stereoselective metabolism of drugs is most commonly the major contributing factor to stereoselectivity in pharmacokinetics. Metabolizing enzymes often display a preference for one enantiomer of a chiral drug over the other, resulting in enantioselectivity. The structural characteristics of enzymes dictate the enantiomeric discrimination associated with the metabolism of chiral drugs. The stereoselectivity can, therefore, be viewed as the physical property characteristic that phenotypes the enzyme. This review provides a comprehensive appraisal of stereochemical aspects of drug metabolism (i.e., enantioselective metabolism and first-pass effect, enzyme-selective inhibition or induction and drug interaction, species differences and polymorphic metabolism).

  19. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  1. Attractor Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Pelta, David A.; Veguillas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core) while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. Conclusions/Significance We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns, modify the efficiency

  2. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of an automatic computer controlled second generation breathing metabolic simulator (BMS). The simulator is used for evaluating and testing respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support, and resuscitation equipment. Any desired sequence of metabolic activities can be simulated on the device for up to 15 hours. The computer monitors test procedures and provides printouts of test results.

  3. Epigenetics and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Keating, Samuel T; El-Osta, Assam

    2015-02-13

    The molecular signatures of epigenetic regulation and chromatin architectures are fundamental to genetically determined biological processes. Covalent and post-translational chemical modification of the chromatin template can sensitize the genome to changing environmental conditions to establish diverse functional states. Recent interest and research focus surrounds the direct connections between metabolism and chromatin dynamics, which now represents an important conceptual challenge to explain many aspects of metabolic dysfunction. Several components of the epigenetic machinery require intermediates of cellular metabolism for enzymatic function. Furthermore, changes to intracellular metabolism can alter the expression of specific histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases conferring widespread variations in epigenetic modification patterns. Specific epigenetic influences of dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are observed across numerous organs and pathways associated with metabolism. Studies have started to define the chromatin-dependent mechanisms underlying persistent and pathophysiological changes induced by altered metabolism. Importantly, numerous recent studies demonstrate that gene regulation underlying phenotypic determinants of adult metabolic health is influenced by maternal and early postnatal diet. These emerging concepts open new perspectives to combat the rising global epidemic of metabolic disorders.

  4. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... McPherson RA, Pincus MR. Disease/organ panels. McPherson RA, ... . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:appendix 7.

  5. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  6. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  7. Metabolism of halophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Falb, Michaela; Müller, Kerstin; Königsmaier, Lisa; Oberwinkler, Tanja; Horn, Patrick; von Gronau, Susanne; Gonzalez, Orland; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In spite of their common hypersaline environment, halophilic archaea are surprisingly different in their nutritional demands and metabolic pathways. The metabolic diversity of halophilic archaea was investigated at the genomic level through systematic metabolic reconstruction and comparative analysis of four completely sequenced species: Halobacterium salinarum, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloquadratum walsbyi, and the haloalkaliphile Natronomonas pharaonis. The comparative study reveals different sets of enzyme genes amongst halophilic archaea, e.g. in glycerol degradation, pentose metabolism, and folate synthesis. The carefully assessed metabolic data represent a reliable resource for future system biology approaches as it also links to current experimental data on (halo)archaea from the literature. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0138-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18278431

  8. Systems Biology of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-03-08

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 86 is June 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  10. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed.

  11. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26327890

  12. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  13. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison P.; Bennett, George N.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    This paper presents a graph-based algorithm for identifying complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. These complex pathways are called branched pathways because they can arrive at a target compound through combinations of pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways, branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks. Automatic identification of branched pathways has a number of important applications in areas that require deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. Our algorithm utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on two well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that this new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways with complex structures.

  14. Fundamentals of cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors reprogram pathways of nutrient acquisition and metabolism to meet the bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox demands of malignant cells. These reprogrammed activities are now recognized as hallmarks of cancer, and recent work has uncovered remarkable flexibility in the specific pathways activated by tumor cells to support these key functions. In this perspective, we provide a conceptual framework to understand how and why metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumor cells, and the mechanisms linking altered metabolism to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Understanding these concepts will progressively support the development of new strategies to treat human cancer. PMID:27386546

  15. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  16. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  17. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  18. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  19. Metabolic rewiring in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris I.; Scott, David A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-driven metabolic rewiring is an adaptation to low nutrient and oxygen conditions in the tumor microenvironment that enables cancer cells of diverse origin to hyperproliferate. Aerobic glycolysis and enhanced reliance on glutamine utilization are prime examples of such rewiring. However, tissue of origin as well as specific genetic and epigenetic changes determines gene expression profiles underlying these metabolic alterations in specific cancers. In melanoma, activation of the MAPK pathway driven by mutant BRAF or NRAS is a primary cause of malignant transformation. Activity of the MAPK pathway, as well as other factors, such as HIF1α, Myc and MITF, are among those that control the balance between non-oxidative and oxidative branches of central carbon metabolism. Here, we discuss the nature of metabolic alterations that underlie melanoma development and affect its response to therapy. PMID:27270434

  20. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  1. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be given medication to decrease insulin resistance. While bariatric surgery for weight loss is not yet approved by ... Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Diabetes Center Metabolic Syndrome Weight Loss Surgery When Being Overweight Is a Health Problem Acanthosis ...

  2. [Metabolic syndrome and melatonin].

    PubMed

    Rapoport, S I; Molchanov, A Iu; Golichenkov, V A; Burlakova, O V; Suprunenko, E S; Savchenko, E S

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the following symptoms: obesity, AH, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance. Pathophysiologically, MS is underlain by disorders of many biochemical and physiological processes, such as elevated levels of low density lipoproteins, hyperstimulation of pancreatic b-cells, increased insulin secretion, substitution of lipid metabolism for carbohydrate one, overgrowth of adipose tissue, excess production of adiponectin, leptin and other signal molecules and a rise in their local intravascular concentration, weight gain. Endogenous and exogenous melatonin inhibits these pathophysiological mechanisms, normalizes metabolism, equilibrates insulin secretion, prevents pancreatic hyperfunction, phosphorylates insulin receptors, inactivates active oxygen and nitrogen species including those produced in LDLP metabolism. Melatonin has specific MT1 and MT2 receptors localized in all body cells. Due to this, it exerts combined preventive action in patients with MS. Recently, melatonin has been reported to have therapeutic effect in MS; it may be recommended to treat this condition.

  3. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  4. Diphosphoinositol Polyphosphates: Metabolic Messengers?

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    The diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (“inositol pyrophosphates”) are a specialized subgroup of the inositol phosphate signaling family. This review proposes that many of the current data concerning the metabolic turnover and biological effects of the diphosphoinositol polyphosphates are linked by a common theme: these polyphosphates act as metabolic messengers. This review will also discuss the latest proposals concerning possible molecular mechanisms of action of this intriguing class of molecules. PMID:19439500

  5. Bariatric and metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fried, M

    2013-09-01

    In the beginning of the 21st century obesity still represents health, social and economical threat for most of economically wealthy countries worldwide. Estimated direct costs for obesity and related comorbidities treatment exceed 5% of the total health care costs both in the US and in European Union. However, in addition there are obesity-related indirect costs linked to more frequent work sickness leave, higher unemployment rates and overall lower productivity of obese patients. Surgical treatment of obesity (bariatric surgery) is the most effective long-term treatment modality for those patients suffering from higher degrees of obesity. Bariatric surgery has not only positive effects on weight loss, but is also extremely effective in improving or resolving many of obesity-related comorbidities, which have evolved rapidly into the so-called metabolic surgery. T2DM may serve as excellent example of metabolic, obesity-related comorbidity which can be treated with bariatric-metabolic procedure even without direct relation to weight loss. In such cases bariatric surgery evolves into metabolic surgery. Thus metabolic operations (namely from the malabsorptive end) deeply influence hormonal secretion especially in the proximal part of small bowel, change parametres of entero-insular axis and have positive influence on insulin secretion, sensitivity and on the entire complex of glucose tolerance. Nowadays we can witness dramatic changes in perception of T2DM from bariatric surgeons, diabetologists, and many other medical specialists. T2DM has evolved from primarily medical disease into a condition where surgeons may play a more active role in the management of the diabetic patient. However, it has to be stressed that metabolic treatment of T2DM and other metabolic disorders need multidisciplinary approach and collaboration and that surgeon should play very important role as a multidisciplinary team member, however metabolic surgery should not yet be considered as stand

  6. Cellular metabolism and disease: what do metabolic outliers teach us?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of metabolic pathways based solely on biochemistry textbooks would underestimate the pervasive role of metabolism in essentially every aspect of biology. It is evident from recent work that many human diseases involve abnormal metabolic states – often genetically programmed – that perturb normal physiology and lead to severe tissue dysfunction. Understanding these metabolic outliers is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This review discusses the broad impact of metabolism in cellular function, how modern concepts of metabolism can inform our understanding of common diseases like cancer, and considers the prospects of developing new metabolic approaches to disease treatment. PMID:22424225

  7. Metabolic imprinting in obesity.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, E L; Grove, K L

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that early metabolic programming contributes to escalating obesity rates in children and adults. Metabolic imprinting is involved in the establishment of set points for physiologic and metabolic responses in adulthood. Evidence from epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that maternal health and nutritional status during gestation and lactation have long-term effects on central and peripheral systems that regulate energy balance in the developing offspring. Perinatal nutrition also impacts susceptibility to developing metabolic disorders and plays a role in programming body weight set points. The states of maternal energy status and health that are implicated in predisposing offspring to increased risk of developing obesity include maternal overnutrition, diabetes, and undernutrition. This chapter discusses the evidence from epidemiologic studies and animal models that each of these states of maternal energy status results in metabolic imprinting of obesity in offspring. Also, the potential molecular mediators of metabolic imprinting of obesity by maternal energy status including glucose, insulin, leptin, inflammatory cytokines and epigenetic mechanisms are considered.

  8. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emergent property of a complex system and test the hypothesis that the probability distribution of fluctuations in the metabolic rate of individuals has a “universal” form regardless of body size or taxonomic affiliation. We examined data from 71 individuals belonging to 25 vertebrate species (birds, mammals, and lizards). We report three main results. First, for all these individuals and species, the distribution of metabolic rate fluctuations follows a tent-shaped distribution with power-law decay. Second, the standard deviation of metabolic rate fluctuations decays as a power-law function of both average metabolic rate and body mass, with exponents −0.352 and −1/4 respectively. Finally, we find that the distributions of metabolic rate fluctuations for different organisms can all be rescaled to a single parent distribution, supporting the existence of general principles underlying the structure and functioning of individual organisms. PMID:17578913

  9. Urea metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Witte, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    Urea is a plant metabolite derived either from root uptake or from catabolism of arginine by arginase. In agriculture, urea is intensively used as a nitrogen fertilizer. Urea nitrogen enters the plant either directly, or in the form of ammonium or nitrate after urea degradation by soil microbes. In recent years various molecular players of plant urea metabolism have been investigated: active and passive urea transporters, the nickel metalloenzyme urease catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea, and three urease accessory proteins involved in the complex activation of urease. The degradation of ureides derived from purine breakdown has long been discussed as a possible additional metabolic source for urea, but an enzymatic route for the complete hydrolysis of ureides without a urea intermediate has recently been described for Arabidopsis thaliana. This review focuses on the proteins involved in plant urea metabolism and the metabolic sources of urea but also addresses open questions regarding plant urea metabolism in a physiological and agricultural context. The contribution of plant urea uptake and metabolism to fertilizer urea usage in crop production is still not investigated although globally more than half of all nitrogen fertilizer is applied to crops in the form of urea. Nitrogen use efficiency in crop production is generally well below 50% resulting in economical losses and creating ecological problems like groundwater pollution and emission of nitric oxides that can damage the ozone layer and function as greenhouse gasses. Biotechnological approaches to improve fertilizer urea usage bear the potential to increase crop nitrogen use efficiency.

  10. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  11. Metabolism in Fungal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Brunke, Sascha; Brown, Alistair J.P.; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pathogens must assimilate local nutrients to establish an infection in their mammalian host. We focus on carbon, nitrogen, and micronutrient assimilation mechanisms, discussing how these influence host–fungus interactions during infection. We highlight several emerging trends based on the available data. First, the perturbation of carbon, nitrogen, or micronutrient assimilation attenuates fungal pathogenicity. Second, the contrasting evolutionary pressures exerted on facultative versus obligatory pathogens have led to contemporary pathogenic fungal species that display differing degrees of metabolic flexibility. The evolutionarily ancient metabolic pathways are conserved in most fungal pathogen, but interesting gaps exist in some species (e.g., Candida glabrata). Third, metabolic flexibility is generally essential for fungal pathogenicity, and in particular, for the adaptation to contrasting host microenvironments such as the gastrointestinal tract, mucosal surfaces, bloodstream, and internal organs. Fourth, this metabolic flexibility relies on complex regulatory networks, some of which are conserved across lineages, whereas others have undergone significant evolutionary rewiring. Fifth, metabolic adaptation affects fungal susceptibility to antifungal drugs and also presents exciting opportunities for the development of novel therapies. PMID:25190251

  12. Metabolic scaling in turtles.

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Gordon R

    2013-04-01

    Bennett and Dawson (1976) presented an analysis of the relationship of metabolic rate (MR) and body mass among turtles, based on 10 studies, but unlike most of other groups of ectotherms, there has been no update to include the many later reports on turtles. Here I present a review of the data on turtle metabolic rates at 20, 25, and 30°C, along with regression equations and graphical analyses from a large number of studies. Two generalities emerge: (1) reported metabolic rates for sea turtles are higher than for other chelonians, although it is not certain whether this is an intrinsic characteristic of sea turtles or an artifact related to experimental conditions (such as greater activity of sea turtles in metabolic chambers and the fact that a number of studies were done with the turtles out of water), and (2) the slopes of the log-log plots of metabolic rate (MR) vs. body mass [b in the allometric equation MR=a(mass)(b)] are mostly lower than previously reported in smaller studies.

  13. Robustness of metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the robustness of cellular metabolism by simulating the system-level computational models, and also performed the corresponding experiments to validate our predictions. We address the cellular robustness from the ``metabolite''-framework by using the novel concept of ``flux-sum,'' which is the sum of all incoming or outgoing fluxes (they are the same under the pseudo-steady state assumption). By estimating the changes of the flux-sum under various genetic and environmental perturbations, we were able to clearly decipher the metabolic robustness; the flux-sum around an essential metabolite does not change much under various perturbations. We also identified the list of the metabolites essential to cell survival, and then ``acclimator'' metabolites that can control the cell growth were discovered. Furthermore, this concept of ``metabolite essentiality'' should be useful in developing new metabolic engineering strategies for improved production of various bioproducts and designing new drugs that can fight against multi-antibiotic resistant superbacteria by knocking-down the enzyme activities around an essential metabolite. Finally, we combined a regulatory network with the metabolic network to investigate its effect on dynamic properties of cellular metabolism.

  14. Evolution of Metabolic Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying

    Microbes are often found to have lost their ability to make essential metabolites (auxotrophs) and instead rely on other individuals for these metabolites. How might metabolic dependency evolve to be so common? When microbes live inside a host (endosymbionts), amply host metabolites support auxotrophic endosymbionts. If the host transmits only a small number of endosymbionts to its offspring, then auxotrophic endosymbionts can rise to high frequency simply by chance. On the other hand, auxotrophs have also been observed in abundant free-living bacteria found in ocean water where nutrient supply is low. How might auxotrophs rise to an appreciable frequency in a large population when nutrient supply is low? We have found commonly-encountered conditions that facilitate the evolution of metabolic dependency. Metabolic interactions can in turn shape spatial organization of microbial communities (Momeni et al. (2013) eLife 2, 00230; Momeni et al. (2013) eLife 2, 00960; Estrela and Brown (2013) PLoS Comput Biol 9, e1003398; Muller et al. (2014) PNAS 111, 1037-1042). Rapid evolution of metabolic dependency can contribute to the complexity of microbial communities. Evolution of metabolic dependency.

  15. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  16. Metabolic implications of menopause.

    PubMed

    Polotsky, Hanah N; Polotsky, Alex J

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases substantially during perimenopause and early menopause. Postmenopausal women are at a higher risk of hypertension, proatherogenic lipid changes, diabetes, and severe cardiovascular disease as compared with their premenopausal counterparts. Whether or not menopause has a causative contribution to the deteriorating metabolic profile that is independent of chronological aging has been a subject of many studies. Menopausal transition is associated with significant weight gain (2 to 2.5 kg over 3 years on average), which is not dissimilar to that in premenopausal women of like age. Concomitantly, there is an increase in abdominal adiposity and a decrease in energy expenditure, phenomena that have been postulated to explain the higher risk of metabolic syndrome and increases in cholesterol and triglycerides. Hypertension and diabetes become more prevalent with age and should be timely diagnosed and treated. Lifestyle changes including moderately decreased caloric intake and aerobic exercise could prevent proatherogenic changes and weight gain observed with aging. Accurate prediction of cardiovascular risk in midlife women is essential to help identify the subset of women who are likely to benefit from intensive management of metabolic risk factors. This review focuses on metabolic changes associated with menopausal transition, specifically alterations in weight, waist circumference, body fat distribution, energy expenditure, and circulating biomarkers including adipokines.

  17. Imaging metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weiping; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Chang, Young-Tae; Olivo, Malini; Velan, S Sendhil; Bhakoo, Kishore; Townsend, David; Radda, George K

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a fast growing public health burden for almost all the developed countries and many developing nations. Despite intense efforts from both biomedical and clinical scientists, many fundamental questions regarding its aetiology and development remain unclear, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging technologies to visualize lipid composition and distribution, insulin secretion, β-cell mass and functions in vivo. Such technologies would not only impact on our understanding of the complexity of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes, but also aid in their diagnosis, drug development and assessment of treatment efficacy. In this article we discuss and propose several strategies for visualization of physiological and pathological changes that affect pancreas and adipose tissue as a result of the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:20533426

  18. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  19. Endocannabinoids and Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gatta-Cherifi, Blandine; Cota, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is known to exert regulatory control on essentially every aspect related to the search for, and the intake, metabolism and storage of calories, and consequently it represents a potential pharmacotherapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and eating disorders. While the clinical use of the first generation of cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor blockers has been halted due to the psychiatric side effects that their use occasioned, recent research in animals and humans has provided new knowledge on the mechanisms of actions of the ECS in the regulation of eating behavior, energy balance, and metabolism. In this review, we discuss these recent advances and how they may allow targeting the ECS in a more specific and selective manner for the future development of therapies against obesity, metabolic syndrome, and eating disorders.

  20. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  1. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  2. Metabolism at Evolutionary Optimal States

    PubMed Central

    Rabbers, Iraes; van Heerden, Johan H.; Nordholt, Niclas; Bachmann, Herwig; Teusink, Bas; Bruggeman, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is generally required for cellular maintenance and for the generation of offspring under conditions that support growth. The rates, yields (efficiencies), adaptation time and robustness of metabolism are therefore key determinants of cellular fitness. For biotechnological applications and our understanding of the evolution of metabolism, it is necessary to figure out how the functional system properties of metabolism can be optimized, via adjustments of the kinetics and expression of enzymes, and by rewiring metabolism. The trade-offs that can occur during such optimizations then indicate fundamental limits to evolutionary innovations and bioengineering. In this paper, we review several theoretical and experimental findings about mechanisms for metabolic optimization. PMID:26042723

  3. Estuarine Total Ecosystem Metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total ecosystem metabolism (TEM), both as discrete measurements and as a theoretical concept, has an important history in ecosystem ecology, particularly in estuaries. Some of the earliest ecological studies were developed to determine how energy flowed through an ecosystem and w...

  4. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy.

  5. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  6. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  7. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  8. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  9. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described.

  10. Starch metabolism in leaves.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2008-01-01

    Starch is the most abundant storage carbohydrate produced in plants. The initiation of transitory starch synthesis and degradation in plastids depends mainly on diurnal cycle, post-translational regulation of enzyme activity and starch phosphorylation. For the proper structure of starch granule the activities of all starch synthase isoenzymes, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes are needed. The intensity of starch biosynthesis depends mainly on the activity of AGPase (adenosine 5'-diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase). The key enzymes in starch degradation are beta-amylase, isoamylase 3 and disproportionating enzyme. However, it should be underlined that there are some crucial differences in starch metabolism between heterotrophic and autotrophic tissues, e.g. is the ability to build multiprotein complexes responsible for biosynthesis and degradation of starch granules in chloroplasts. The observed huge progress in understanding of starch metabolism was possible mainly due to analyses of the complete Arabidopsis and rice genomes and of numerous mutants with altered starch metabolism in leaves. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge on transient starch metabolism in higher plants.

  11. Metabolism of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Lash, L H; Fisher, J W; Lipscomb, J C; Parker, J C

    2000-01-01

    A major focus in the study of metabolism and disposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) is to identify metabolites that can be used reliably to assess flux through the various pathways of TCE metabolism and to identify those metabolites that are causally associated with toxic responses. Another important issue involves delineation of sex- and species-dependent differences in biotransformation pathways. Defining these differences can play an important role in the utility of laboratory animal data for understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TCE in humans. Sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in absorption and distribution of TCE may play some role in explaining differences in metabolism and susceptibility to toxicity from TCE exposure. The majority of differences in susceptibility, however, are likely due to sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in activities of the various enzymes that can metabolize TCE and its subsequent metabolites. An additional factor that plays a role in human health risk assessment for TCE is the high degree of variability in the activity of certain enzymes. TCE undergoes metabolism by two major pathways, cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent oxidation and conjugation with glutathione (GSH). Key P450-derived metabolites of TCE that have been associated with specific target organs, such as the liver and lungs, include chloral hydrate, trichloroacetate, and dichloroacetate. Metabolites derived from the GSH conjugate of TCE, in contrast, have been associated with the kidney as a target organ. Specifically, metabolism of the cysteine conjugate of TCE by the cysteine conjugate ss-lyase generates a reactive metabolite that is nephrotoxic and may be nephrocarcinogenic. Although the P450 pathway is a higher activity and higher affinity pathway than the GSH conjugation pathway, one should not automatically conclude that the latter pathway is only important at very high doses. A synthesis of this information is then

  12. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirschey, Matthew D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Drew, Janice E.; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F.; Jones, Lee W.; Ko, Young H.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review “Hallmarks of Cancer”, where the dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results suggest that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it. PMID:26454069

  13. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirschey, Matthew D; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Diehl, Anna Mae E; Drew, Janice E; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F; Jones, Lee W; Ko, Young H; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A; Locasale, Jason W; Longo, Valter D; Lyssiotis, Costas A; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P; Pedersen, Peter L; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Wellen, Kathryn E

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review "Hallmarks of Cancer", where dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results demonstrate that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it.

  14. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  15. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  16. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  17. Exercise Metabolism: Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A; Maughan, Ronald J; Hargreaves, Mark

    2015-07-07

    The past 25 years have witnessed major advances in our knowledge of how exercise activates cellular, molecular, and biochemical pathways with regulatory roles in training response adaptation, and how muscle "cross-talk" with other organs is a mechanism by which physical activity exerts its beneficial effects on "whole-body" health. However, during the late 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries, scientific debate in the field of exercise metabolism centered on questions related to the sources of energy for muscular activity, diet-exercise manipulations to alter patterns of fuel utilization, as well as the factors limiting physical work capacity. Posing novel scientific questions and utilizing cutting-edge techniques, the contributions made by the great pioneers of the 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries laid the foundation on which much of our present knowledge of exercise metabolism is based and paved the way for future discoveries in the field.

  18. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  19. Trehalose metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Lunn, John Edward; Delorge, Ines; Figueroa, Carlos María; Van Dijck, Patrick; Stitt, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Trehalose is a quantitatively important compatible solute and stress protectant in many organisms, including green algae and primitive plants. These functions have largely been replaced by sucrose in vascular plants, and trehalose metabolism has taken on new roles. Trehalose is a potential signal metabolite in plant interactions with pathogenic or symbiotic micro-organisms and herbivorous insects. It is also implicated in responses to cold and salinity, and in regulation of stomatal conductance and water-use efficiency. In plants, as in other eukaryotes and many prokaryotes, trehalose is synthesized via a phosphorylated intermediate, trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P). A meta-analysis revealed that the levels of Tre6P change in parallel with sucrose, which is the major product of photosynthesis and the main transport sugar in plants. We propose the existence of a bi-directional network, in which Tre6P is a signal of sucrose availability and acts to maintain sucrose concentrations within an appropriate range. Tre6P influences the relative amounts of sucrose and starch that accumulate in leaves during the day, and regulates the rate of starch degradation at night to match the demand for sucrose. Mutants in Tre6P metabolism have highly pleiotropic phenotypes, showing defects in embryogenesis, leaf growth, flowering, inflorescence branching and seed set. It has been proposed that Tre6P influences plant growth and development via inhibition of the SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK1). However, current models conflict with some experimental data, and do not completely explain the pleiotropic phenotypes exhibited by mutants in Tre6P metabolism. Additional explanations for the diverse effects of alterations in Tre6P metabolism are discussed.

  20. Low Spillage Metabolic Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, JuliAnn (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor); Harper, Jennifer S. (Inventor); Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Skundberg, Thomas L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An animal feeder for use in a metabolic cage is introduced. The feeder includes a confined passageway and an adjustable notched gate proceeding a food cup. The gate is adjusted so that the entry area to the food cup approximates the cross sectional head area of the animal. Food ejected from the food cup by a caged animal is dropped through a grate into a spill tray.

  1. Diseases of Phenylalanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Charles E.

    1979-01-01

    Continuing investigation of the system that hydroxylates phenylalanine to tyrosine has led to new insights into diseases associated with the malfunction of this system. Good evidence has confirmed that phenylketonuria (PKU) is not caused by a simple lack of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Dihydropteridine reductase deficiency as well as defects in biopterin metabolism may also cause the clinical features of phenylketonuria. Furthermore, these diseases do not respond to the standard treatment for phenylketonuria. PMID:388868

  2. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  3. Teratogen metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.G.

    1983-01-31

    This study indicates Thalidomide is metabolized by a classic cytochrome P450 monoxygenase system to a product which inhibits attachment of cells to concanavalin A coated dishes. Hydrolysis products of Thalidomide and its active metabolite do not inhibit attachement. We have initiated additional studies with methylene chloride extracts of particulate and of volatile hydrocarbon emissions of a domestic oil burner. These studies show low levels of inhibitory activity are uniformly present in these extracts.

  4. Genetics of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stančáková, Alena; Laakso, Markku

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic traits associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS. The MetS has a significant genetic component, and therefore linkage analysis, candidate gene approach, and genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been applied in the search of gene variants for the MetS. A few variants have been identified, located mostly in or near genes regulating lipid metabolism. GWA studies for the individual components of the MetS have reported several loci having pleiotropic effects on multiple MetS-related traits. Genetic studies have provided so far only limited evidence for a common genetic background of the MetS. Epigenetic factors (DNA methylation and histone modification) are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS, and they might mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the risk of the MetS. Further research is needed to clarify the role of genetic variation and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of the MetS.

  5. Hypothalamic Hormones and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Thio, Liu Lin

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for medically intractable epilepsy and may have antiepileptogenic, neuroprotective, and antitumor properties. While on a ketogenic diet, the body obtains most of its calories from fat rather than carbohydrates. This dramatic change in caloric composition results in a unique metabolic state. In turn, these changes in caloric composition and metabolism alter some of the neurohormones that participate in the complex neuronal network regulating energy homeostasis. Two observed changes are an increase in serum leptin and a decrease in serum insulin. These opposing changes in leptin and insulin are unique compared to other metabolic stimuli and may modify the activity of several cell signaling cascades including phosphoinositidyl-3 kinase (PI3K), adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These cell signaling pathways may mediate the anticonvulsant and other beneficial effects of the diet, though the neurohormonal changes induced by the ketogenic diet and the physiological consequences of these changes remain poorly characterized. PMID:21856125

  6. Hepatitic inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, May; Crawford, James M

    2006-01-01

    Primary metabolic disorders are a disparate group of diseases that may or may not be accompanied by hepatic manifestations. Those with liver involvement may show a range of histopathologic changes. Proper histologic diagnosis requires correlation with clinical and laboratory data, including evaluation for mutations either via serum protein electrophoresis or through formal genetic analysis. This article is a review of the three most common inherited metabolic disorders which may present with a hepatitic pattern. In alpha1-antitrypsin disorder, there is a broad range of clinical presentations, age at presentation, and histological features ranging from "neonatal hepatitis" to a chronic progressive hepatitis in later childhood and adulthood. Hence, this disorder must be in the differential diagnosis of liver disease of the very young, and in older children and adults, with or without coexistent overt pulmonary symptoms. In Wilson disease, presentation tends to be in older childhood or the adult, with a progressive chronic hepatitis. Cystic fibrosis may feature a characteristic obstructive biliary syndrome, coexisting with the many extrahepatic manifestations of this debilitating disease. Lastly, the progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) syndromes are given as examples of inherited metabolic conditions in which relentlessly progressive cholestatic liver disease eventuates over years in end-stage cholestatic liver disease with cirrhosis. Distinguishing features include absence of elevated serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) in PFIC-1 and PFIC-2, and elevated GGT in PFIC-3. However, molecular studies are required for a confident diagnosis of the rare PFIC syndromes.

  7. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney.

  8. Deprescription: The prescription metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanam, Gurusamy

    2016-01-01

    Deprescribing is a structured approach to drug discontinuation. An alternative suggested term is “prescription metabolism.” The major aim of deprescription is to purge the drug(s) considered unwanted in a given patient, especially in the elderly patients with multiple comorbidities or in those suffering from chronic disease. Like drug metabolism, prescription metabolism is a way of eliminating unwanted, troublesome, or cost-ineffective medications. The removal of such drugs has been found to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions and improves the rate of medication adherence, thereby reducing the economic burden on the patient as well as on the health care providers. Certain categories of drugs are to be tapered rather than abruptly stopped. Despite the availability of many tools to minimize drug therapy-related problems, there is little guidance for the process of deprescribing in general clinical practice. Various methods to reduce the risks of polypharmacy include patient education, physician education, and regulatory intervention. The suggested S and S approach (seek and screen, save and severe, sensitize and supervise) may be tried for deprescribing in general practice. More research on deprescribing is the need of the hour in almost all branches of clinical medicine which may pave the way for the betterment of health care. PMID:27651709

  9. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  10. Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Lemieux, Isabelle

    2006-12-14

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with abdominal obesity, blood lipid disorders, inflammation, insulin resistance or full-blown diabetes, and increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Proposed criteria for identifying patients with metabolic syndrome have contributed greatly to preventive medicine, but the value of metabolic syndrome as a scientific concept remains controversial. The presence of metabolic syndrome alone cannot predict global cardiovascular disease risk. But abdominal obesity - the most prevalent manifestation of metabolic syndrome - is a marker of 'dysfunctional adipose tissue', and is of central importance in clinical diagnosis. Better risk assessment algorithms are needed to quantify diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk on a global scale.

  11. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  12. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic engineering of the plant primary-secondary metabolism interface.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Asaph; Galili, Gad

    2011-04-01

    Plants synthesize a myriad of secondary metabolites (SMs) that are derived from central or primary metabolism. While these so-called natural products have been targets for plant metabolic engineering attempts for many years, the immense value of manipulating the interface between committed steps in secondary metabolism pathways and those in primary metabolism pathways has only recently emerged. In this review we discuss a few of the major issues that should be taken into consideration in attempts to engineer the primary to secondary metabolism interface. The availability of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur resources will have a major impact on the production of specific classes of primary metabolites (PMs) and consequently on the levels and composition of SMs derived from these PMs. Recent studies have shown that transcription factors associated with the synthesis of a given class of SMs coactivate the expression of genes encoding metabolic enzymes associated with primary pathways that supply precursors to these SMs. In addition, metabolic engineering approaches, which alter post-transcriptional feedback and feedforward regulatory mechanisms of the primary-secondary metabolism interface, have been highly fruitful in Taylormade enhancements of the content of specific beneficial SMs. Lastly, the evolution of pathways of secondary metabolism from pathways of primary metabolism highlights the need to consider cases in which common enzymatic reactions and pathways take place between the two. Taken together, the available information indicates a supercoordinated gene expression networks connecting primary and secondary metabolism in plants, which should be taken into consideration in future attempts to metabolically engineer the various classes of plant SMs.

  14. Contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to human metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Bain, M D; Jones, M; Borriello, S P; Reed, P J; Tracey, B M; Chalmers, R A; Stacey, T E

    1988-05-14

    Metronidazole, an antibiotic with specific activity against anaerobic bacteria, was of clinical and biochemical benefit in two patients with methylmalonic aciduria. The virtual elimination of propionic acid from the stool suggested that propionic acid derived from faecal bacterial metabolism contributes substantially to methylmalonate production. These findings point to a novel avenue of treatment for these disorders of intermediary metabolism, and indicate the importance of microbial gut flora in normal human metabolism.

  15. Elements of metabolic evolution.

    PubMed

    Huber, Claudia; Kraus, Florian; Hanzlik, Marianne; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wächtershäuser, Günter

    2012-02-13

    Research into the origin of evolution is polarized between a genetics-first approach, with its focus on polymer replication, and a metabolism-first approach that takes aim at chemical reaction cycles. Taking the latter approach, we explored reductive carbon fixation in a volcanic hydrothermal setting, driven by the chemical potential of quenched volcanic fluids for converting volcanic C1 compounds into organic products by transition-metal catalysts. These catalysts are assumed to evolve by accepting ever-new organic products as ligands for enhancing their catalytic power, which in turn enhances the rates of synthetic pathways that give rise to ever-new organic products, with the overall effect of a self-expanding metabolism. We established HCN, CO, and CH(3)SH as carbon nutrients, CO and H(2) as reductants, and iron-group transition metals as catalysts. In one case, we employed the "cyano-system" [Ni(OH)(CN)] with [Ni(CN)(4)](2-) as the dominant nickel-cyano species. This reaction mainly produced α-amino acids and α-hydroxy acids as well as various intermediates and derivatives. An organo-metal-catalyzed mechanism is suggested that mainly builds carbon skeletons by repeated cyano insertions, with minor CO insertions in the presence of CO. The formation of elemental nickel (Ni(0)) points to an active reduced-nickel species. In another case, we employed the mercapto-carbonyl system [Co(2)(CO)(8)]/Ca(OH)(2)/CO for the double-carbonylation of mercaptans. In a "hybrid system", we combined benzyl mercaptan with the cyano system, in which [Ni(OH)(CN)] was the most productive for the double-carbon-fixation reaction. Finally, we demonstrated that the addition of products of the cyano system (Gly, Ala) to the hybrid system increased productivity. These results demonstrate the chemical possibility of metabolic evolution through rate-promotion of one synthetic reaction by the products of another.

  16. Connecting Myokines and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ of the body in non-obese individuals and is now considered to be an endocrine organ. Hormones (myokines) secreted by skeletal muscle mediate communications between muscle and liver, adipose tissue, brain, and other organs. Myokines affect muscle mass and myofiber switching, and have profound effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation, thus contributing to energy homeostasis and the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the biology of myokines and provide an assessment of their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26248861

  17. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.

  18. Topiramate and metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Wilner, A; Raymond, K; Pollard, R

    1999-06-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a novel antiepileptic medication (AED) with at least three mechanisms of action. A possible fourth mechanism, that of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, also may contribute to its antiepileptic properties. We report a patient with intractable epilepsy and normal renal function who developed a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, which worsened during elective surgery for temporal lobectomy. We believe this side effect of TPM can become clinically significant during surgery, concomitant use of another carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and potentially with the ketogenic diet.

  19. Metabolism of camphanediols

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. S.; Solomon, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the camphane-2,3-diols and camphane was investigated in rabbits. All the compounds increased the content of glucuronide in the urine. 2. Both trans- and cis-diols gave rise to ketols; the cis-diols gave rise to trans-diols, but not vice versa; camphorquinone gave cis-diol, ketols and trans-diol; camphane did not give rise to diols. 3. The possibility is discussed that an enediol is the intermediate for ketol interconversions in the present series of compounds and in other series such as hydroxyoestrones and hydroxyindanones. PMID:5119786

  20. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  1. Microsomal metabolism of picene.

    PubMed

    Platt, K L; Petrovic, P; Seidel, A; Beermann, D; Oesch, F

    1988-01-01

    Picene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) of environmental relevance has recently been predicted to be carcinogenic, based on quantum mechanical calculation, although in several animal studies no carcinogenicity could be detected. In order to find out if the metabolism of this PAH can provide an explanation for its lack of carcinogenicity, picene was incubated with the hepatic microsomal fraction of Sprague-Dawley rats, which had been pretreated with Aroclor 1254. Sixteen ethyl acetate-extractable metabolites could be separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Comparison of the chromatographic behavior and the UV and mass spectral properties of the metabolites with those of synthetic derivatives of picene allowed the identification of trans-1,2-, -3,4-, -5,6-dihydrodiol as well as 2- and 4-phenol as microsomal metabolites of picene. At a substrate concentration of 2.7 microM and an amount of 68 micrograms microsomal protein per ml incubation volume, 4-picenol was the main microsomal metabolite with 32.2% of total metabolic conversion, followed by the 1,2-(bay-region)dihydrodiol with 16.7%, the 3,4-(M-region)dihydrodiol with 15.9%, 2-picenol with 9.1% and the 5,6-(K-region)dihydrodiol with 1.6%. In this respect the metabolism of picene is not significantly different from that of the carcinogenic PAH benzo[a]pyrene and dibenz[a,h]anthracene. The M-region dihydrodiols, potential precursors of electrophilically reactive dihydrodiol bay-region epoxides, are formed from all three PAHs at 11-16% of total metabolic conversion. From the 2.8- to 4.4-fold lower amounts of polar and water-soluble metabolites of picene as compared to dibenz[a,h]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene it is deduced that dihydrodiol epoxides are generated from picene to a much smaller extent than from the two carcinogenic PAHs. The lacking carcinogenicity of picene could therefore result from the inability of microsomal enzymes to transform its M-region dihydrodiol to

  2. Niche metabolism in parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L

    2006-01-29

    Complete or partial genome sequences have recently become available for several medically and evolutionarily important parasitic protozoa. Through the application of bioinformatics complete metabolic repertoires for these parasites can be predicted. For experimentally intractable parasites insight provided by metabolic maps generated in silico has been startling. At its more extreme end, such bioinformatics reckoning facilitated the discovery in some parasites of mitochondria remodelled beyond previous recognition, and the identification of a non-photosynthetic chloroplast relic in malarial parasites. However, for experimentally tractable parasites, mapping of the general metabolic terrain is only a first step in understanding how the parasite modulates its streamlined, yet still often puzzlingly complex, metabolism in order to complete life cycles within host, vector, or environment. This review provides a comparative overview and discussion of metabolic strategies used by several different parasitic protozoa in order to subvert and survive host defences, and illustrates how genomic data contribute to the elucidation of parasite metabolism.

  3. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  4. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions.

  5. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    PubMed

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of olanzapine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Mao Mao; Dahl, Marja-Liisa

    2013-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, display large interindividual variation leading to multiple-fold differences in drug exposure between patients at a given dose. This variation in turn gives rise to the need for individualized dosing in order to avoid concentration-dependent adverse effects or therapeutic failure. Genetically determined differences in olanzapine metabolism represent a less studied source of variability in comparison to environmental and physiological factors. In this review, we summarize available in vitro and in vivo data addressing the influence of polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes on olanzapine serum exposure. The polymorphic CYP2D6 enzyme appears to have no significant influence on olanzapine steady-state serum concentrations. The formation of the various olanzapine metabolites is influenced by polymorphisms in the genes coding for CYP1A2, CYP1A expression regulator AHR, UGT1A4 and UGT2B10, as well as FMO3. An impact on steady-state olanzapine serum concentrations has been suggested for variants of CYP1A2 and UGT1A4, with somewhat conflicting findings. The potential involvement of FMO1 and CYP3A43 in olanzapine disposition has also been suggested but needs future validation.

  7. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  8. [Sleep duration and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Viot-Blanc, V

    2015-12-01

    Sleep duration has gradually diminished during the last decade while obesity and type 2 diabetes have become epidemics. Experimental sleep curtailment leads to increased appetite, hormonal disturbances and, especially, insulin resistance. Numerous epidemiological studies have therefore examined whether habitual short sleep is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. A large majority of cross-sectional studies have confirmed an association between short, and also long sleep duration and obesity in adults more than in the elderly. Short sleep is strongly associated to obesity in children and adolescents. Prospective studies, including studies in children, are not conclusive with regard to the effect of short sleep on the incidence of obesity. Both short and long sleep durations are associated with diabetes, but only short sleep duration seems predictive of future diabetes. Insomnia seems to be a strong contributor to short sleep duration but the association of insomnia with obesity is not clear. Insomnia is associated with type 2 diabetes and also predictive of a higher incidence. Other studies have shown that short sleep duration and insomnia are associated with, and sometime predictive of, other components of the metabolic syndrome, especially hypertension and the risk of coronary disease. The treatment of short sleep duration and insomnia with regard to their effects on the metabolic syndrome merits further study.

  9. Metabolic regulation by lactate.

    PubMed

    Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2008-09-01

    For more than a century, the metabolic role of lactate has intrigued physiologists and biochemists. Yet, for the first half of the last century lactate had been designated as a waste product, and assigned no additional significance besides its controversial role in muscle fatigue. The decline of the lactate hypothesis for the onset of muscle fatigue and the defining of some modulatory properties attributed to lactate have increased the interest on this molecule. The present critical review aimed at evaluating some recent publications concerned with unveiling the regulatory actions of lactate in cellular function. Lactate has been described to modulate enzymes catalytic properties to affect hormonal release and responsiveness, and to control body homeostasis. Moreover, these properties are directly related to the genesis and the sustainability of pathological conditions, such as diabetes and cancer. In the end, we concluded that lactate should not be regarded as simply an anaerobic metabolite, but should be considered as a regulatory molecule that modulates the integration of metabolism.

  10. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  11. T cell metabolism drives immunity

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Michael D.; O’Sullivan, David

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes must adapt to a wide array of environmental stressors as part of their normal development, during which they undergo a dramatic metabolic remodeling process. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings on the roles of diverse metabolic pathways and metabolites, which have been found to regulate lymphocyte signaling and influence differentiation, function and fate. In this review, we integrate the latest findings in the field to provide an up-to-date resource on lymphocyte metabolism. PMID:26261266

  12. Mammalian Polyamine Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play multiple essential roles in mammalian physiology. Their cellular content is highly regulated and there is convincing evidence that altered metabolism is involvement in many disease states. Drugs altering polyamine levels may therefore have a variety of important targets. This review will summarize the current state of understanding of polyamine metabolism and function, the regulation of polyamine content, and heritable pathological conditions that may be derived from altered polyamine metabolism. PMID:19603518

  13. Regulatory Biology: Depressed Metabolic States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, E. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Exobiological aspects of depressed metabolism and thermoregulation are discussed for subsequent development of biological space flight experiments. Included is a brief description of differential hypothermia in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  15. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  16. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  17. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2008-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the 'post-weaned/adult' brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain's capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation.

  18. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  19. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  20. Olfaction Under Metabolic Influences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recently published work and emerging research efforts have suggested that the olfactory system is intimately linked with the endocrine systems that regulate or modify energy balance. Although much attention has been focused on the parallels between taste transduction and neuroendocrine controls of digestion due to the novel discovery of taste receptors and molecular components shared by the tongue and gut, the equivalent body of knowledge that has accumulated for the olfactory system, has largely been overlooked. During regular cycles of food intake or disorders of endocrine function, olfaction is modulated in response to changing levels of various molecules, such as ghrelin, orexins, neuropeptide Y, insulin, leptin, and cholecystokinin. In view of the worldwide health concern regarding the rising incidence of diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders, we present a comprehensive review that addresses the current knowledge of hormonal modulation of olfactory perception and how disruption of hormonal signaling in the olfactory system can affect energy homeostasis. PMID:22832483

  1. Metabolism during hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Physical immobilization, inaction due to space travel, a sedentary occupation, or bed confinement due to a chronic illness elicit similar alternations in the metabolism of man and animals (rat, rabbit, dog, mouse). After a preliminary period of weight loss, there is eventually weight gain due to increased lipid storage. Protein catabolism is enhanced and anabolism depressed, with elevated urinary excretion of amino acids, creatine, and ammonia. Glycogen stores are depleted and glyconeogenesis is accelerated. Polyuria develops with subsequent redistribution of body fluids in which the blood volume of the systemic circulation is decreased and that of pulmonary circulation increased. This results in depressed production of vasopressin by the posterior pituitary which further enhances urinary water and salt loss.

  2. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The effect of several environmental parameters on previously developed life detection systems is explored. Initial attempts were made to conduct all the experiments in a moist mode (high soil volume to water volume ratio). However, only labeled release and measurement of ATP were found to be feasible under conditions of low moisture. Therefore, these two life detection experiments were used for most of the environmental effects studies. Three soils, Mojave (California desert), Wyaconda (Maryland, sandy loam) and Victoria Valley (Antarctic desert) were generally used throughout. The environmental conditions studied included: incubation temperature 3 C to 80 C, ultraviolet irradiation of soils, variations in soil/liquid ratio, specific atmospheric gases, various antimetabolites, specific substrates, and variation in pH. An experiment designed to monitor nitrogen metabolism was also investigated.

  3. Metabolism and the UPRmt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Fan; Haynes, Cole M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY During mitochondrial dysfunction or the accumulation of unfolded proteins within mitochondria, cells employ a transcriptional response known as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to promote cell survival along with the repair and recovery of defective mitochondria. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how cells monitor mitochondrial function and activate the response, as well as in identifying scenarios where the UPRmt plays a protective role such as during bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem cell maintenance or general aging. To date, much of the focus has been on the role of the UPRmt in maintaining or re-establishing protein homeostasis within mitochondria by transcriptionally inducing mitochondrial molecular chaperone and protease genes. In this review, we focus on the metabolic adaptations or rewiring mediated by the UPRmt and how this may contribute to the resolution of mitochondrial unfolded protein stress and cell type-specific physiology. PMID:26942672

  4. Metabolism and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by which cells inherit information are, to a large extent, enabled by DNA methylation and posttranslational modifications of histone proteins. These modifications operate both to influence the structure of chromatin per se and to serve as recognition elements for proteins with motifs dedicated to binding particular modifications. Each of these modifications results from an enzyme that consumes one of several important metabolites during catalysis. Likewise, the removal of these marks often results in the consumption of a different metabolite. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic marks have the capacity to integrate the expression state of chromatin with the metabolic state of the cell. This review focuses on the central roles played by acetyl-CoA, S-adenosyl methionine, NAD+, and a growing list of other acyl-CoA derivatives in epigenetic processes. We also review how metabolites that accumulate as a result of oncogenic mutations are thought to subvert the epigenetic program. PMID:26359776

  5. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolysis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  6. Metabolism of proteinoid microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The literature of metabolism in proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres is reviewed and criticized from a biochemical and experimental point of view. Closely related literature is also reviewed in order to understand the function of proteinoids and proteinoid microspheres. Proteinoids or proteinoid microspheres have many activities. Esterolyis, decarboxylation, amination, deamination, and oxidoreduction are catabolic enzyme activities. The formation of ATP, peptides or oligonucleotides is synthetic enzyme activities. Additional activities are hormonal and inhibitory. Selective formation of peptides is an activity of nucleoproteinoid microspheres; these are a model for ribosomes. Mechanisms of peptide and oligonucleotide syntheses from amino acids and nucleotide triphosphate by proteinoid microspheres are tentatively proposed as an integrative consequence of reviewing the literature.

  7. [Metabolic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Jakob, F

    2007-10-01

    Osteomalacia is caused by impaired vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling, calcium deficiency, and altered bone mineralization. This can be due to insufficient sunlight exposure, malabsorption, reduced D hormone activation in chronic kidney disease, and rare alterations of VDR signaling and phosphate metabolism. Leading symptoms are bone pain, muscular cramps, and increased incidence of falls in the elderly. The adequate respective countermeasures are to optimize the daily intake of calcium and vitamin D3 and to replace active D hormone and phosphate if deficient. Osteoporosis is characterized by bone fragility fractures upon minor physical impact. Indications for diagnosis and treatment can be established by estimating the absolute fracture risk, taking into account bone mineral density, age, gender, and individual risk factors. Exercise, intervention programs to avoid falls, and specific drugs are capable of substantially reducing fracture risk even in the elderly. Secondary osteoporosis primarily requires both bone-altering medications and effective treatment of underlying diseases.

  8. Tryptophan metabolism in depression

    PubMed Central

    Curzon, G.; Bridges, P. K.

    1970-01-01

    Psychiatric patients suffering from endogenous depression and a control group without endogenous depression were given oral loads of L-tryptophan and urinary excretion determined of the tryptophan metabolites on the pyrrolase pathway: kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Female endogenously depressed subjects excreted significantly more kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine but not the subsequent metabolite 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid than did female control subjects. Variability of excretion of kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine at different times by the same subject was much greater in the endogenously depressed than in the control group. There was no consistent temporal relationship between excretion of metabolites and severity of the depressive illness. The possible significance of the findings in relation to defective tryptophan metabolism in the brain in endogenous depression is commented upon. PMID:5478953

  9. Metabolism of Hydrazine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AFAMRL-TR-81-264•D /𔃺/ f-v-q I METABOLISM OF HYDRAZINE F. N. DOST D. J. BRODERICK B . N. KRIVAK DEPAR TMENT OF A GRICUL TURAL CHEMISTRY D. J. REED...25-- 20 - A 10-- Figure 6. Reaction of hydrazine 5- Hb 12.1 - 13.8 GM/100 ML in vitro with, (A) whole blood, S I I I I I I I I I I 1 ( B ) hemoglobin in...solution. S25 •J AHb -1.34 GM/I00 ML 20 ýM~~ b --6.7 ýM O ý 10 -- 1. I I I I I I I I I I I I 10 20 30 40 50 60 REACTION TIME, MINUTES 8 The data on

  10. Salicylate Metabolism in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Daniel E.; Gupta, Niroo; Paulus, Harold E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of genetic influences on the individual variation in plateau serum salicylate levels, salicylate metabolism was studied in seven pairs of identical and six pairs of fraternal twins. Under the conditions of this study, after a single i.v. dose (40 mg/kg) of sodium salicylate, the serum salicylate concentration versus time curve approximated a straight line on linear coordinates (appeared approximately zero order). The slopes of the decay curves ranged between 0.64 and 1.02. The intrapair variation for identical twin pairs was significantly less than for fraternal twin pairs (P = 0.044). Likewise pleateau serum salicylic acid concentrations (milligrams/deciliter) and total salicylic acid excretion rate after multiple doses demonstrated significantly less intrapair variation for identical twins than for fraternal twins (P = 0.043 and 0.006). Plateau salicylurate excretion (milligram/kilogram per hour) differences after multiple dosing had a P = 0.067. Michaelis-Menton constant for salicylurate formation and hours to 50% excretion after the i.v. dose were not different when comparing identical and nonidentical twins. Salicylurate formation rates were increased after 3 days of oral therapy, and this induction phenomenon may account for much of the apparent discrepancy between genetic influences on salicylurate formation rates observed after single and multiple dose salicylate administration. This study suggests that the plateau concentration of serum salicylate varies among individuals given the same weight-adjusted dose in part because of genetically determined variations in their metabolism of salicylate. PMID:559691

  11. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  12. Metabolism of Monoterpenes 1

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney; El-Bialy, Hamdy; Dehal, Shangara S.

    1987-01-01

    The bicyclic monoterpene ketone (+)-camphor undergoes lactonization to 1,2-campholide in mature sage (Salvia officinalis L.) leaves followed by conversion to the β-d-glucoside-6-O-glucose ester of the corresponding hydroxy acid (1-carboxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2,2,3-trimethyl cyclopentane). Analysis of the disposition of (+)-[G-3H]camphor applied to midstem leaves of intact flowering plants allowed the kinetics of synthesis of the bis-glucose derivative and its transport from leaf to root to be determined, and gave strong indication that the transport derivative was subsequently metabolized in the root. Root extracts were shown to possess β-glucosidase and acyl glucose esterase activities, and studies with (+)-1,2[U-14C]campholide as substrate, using excised root segments, revealed that the terpenoid was converted to lipid materials. Localization studies confirmed the radiolabeled lipids to reside in the membranous fractions of root extracts, and analysis of this material indicated the presence of labeled phytosterols and labeled fatty acids (C14 to C20) of acyl lipids. Although it was not possible to detail the metabolic steps between 1,2-campholide and the acyl lipids and phytosterols derived therefrom because of the lack of readily detectable intermediates, it seemed likely that the monoterpene lactone was degraded to acetyl CoA which was reincorporated into root membrane components via standard acyl lipid and isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways. Monoterpene catabolism thus appears to represent a salvage mechanism for recycling mobile carbon from senescing oil glands on the leaves to the roots. PMID:16665495

  13. Cell metabolism: Growth and environment. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, T.A.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes: Protein metabolism in relation to secondary biosynthesis; nucleic acid metabolism in relation to growth; the spatial organization of secondary metabolism in microbial and plant cells; aflatoxin bioysynthesis; role of oxygenases in the metabolism of phenolic compounds; regulation of secondary metabolism by trace metals; and index.

  14. Clinical Disorders of Phosphorus Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, George C.; Lee, David B. N.

    1987-01-01

    Deranged phosphorus metabolism is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. Disturbances in phosphate intake, excretion and transcellular shift account for the abnormal serum levels. As a result of the essential role played by phosphate in intracellular metabolism, the clinical manifestations of hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia are extensive. An understanding of the pathophysiology of various phosphate disorders is helpful in guiding therapeutic decisions. Images PMID:3321712

  15. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arifin, Syamsul A.; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA) family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis. PMID:26784247

  16. Selected Metabolic Responses to Skateboarding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; Hunt, Ian; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the popularity of skateboarding worldwide, the authors believe that no previous studies have investigated the metabolic demands associated with recreational participation in the sport. Although metabolic equivalents (METs) for skateboarding were published in textbooks, the source of these values is unclear. Therefore, the rise in…

  17. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  18. Women in Metabolism: Part IV

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The “Rosies” of Cell Metabolism are wrapping up 2016 with a fourth installment of the “Women in Metabolism” series. We are delighted to present ten women scientists who are leaders in the metabolism field, with their words on the value of perseverance, passion, ingenuity, and a bit of serendipity. PMID:27974174

  19. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Drug-induced metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; King, Deborah S; Harrell, T Kristopher

    2006-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Based on data from 1988 to 1994, it is estimated that 24% of adults in the United States meet the criteria for diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. The use of certain medications may increase the risk of the metabolic syndrome by either promoting weight gain or altering lipid or glucose metabolism. Health providers should recognize and understand the risk associated with certain medications and appropriately monitor for changes related to the metabolic syndrome. Careful attention to drug choices should be paid in patients who are overweight or have other risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

  1. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  2. Metabolic effects of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Costas; Spanoudi, Filio; Kyriazis, Ioannis; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2013-08-01

    In the present review article we address the issue of the potential effect of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) on metabolic states associated with resistant hypertension. So far, there is an established pathophysiological background denoting that abnormalities in glucose metabolism especially in obese patients and in those with sleep apnea are constantly accompanied by increased sympathetic firing, as assessed by markers of sympathetic activity. Since resistant hypertension is also characterized by enhanced sympathetic activity, it seems logical and biologically plausible, that RSD might favorably influence impaired glucose metabolism, sleep disorders and increased body adiposity beyond BP lowering. Despite the limited evidence from clinical trials, there are promising data suggesting that RSD indeed ameliorates glucose metabolism-related measures in resistant hypertension. Well-designed randomized trials recruiting a larger number of patients with hypertension, and focused on metabolic parameters, may refine the role of RSD as a potential intervention to treat dysmetabolic states associated with hypertension.

  3. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  4. Ethnic Considerations for Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Morton, John Magaña

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent twin health concerns in the developed world. Metabolic surgery has emerged as an established and enduring treatment for both obesity and diabetes. As the burden of obesity and diabetes varies upon the basis of ethnicity, it is also apparent that there may be differences for indications and outcomes for different ethnic groups after metabolic surgery. Whereas there appears to be evidence for variation in weight loss and complications for different ethnic groups, comorbidity remission particularly for diabetes appears to be free of ethnic disparity after metabolic surgery. The impacts of access, biology, culture, genetics, procedure, and socioeconomic status upon metabolic surgery outcomes are examined. Further refinement of the influence of ethnicity upon metabolic surgery outcomes is likely imminent.

  5. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC.

  7. Microbial metabolism of tholin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Boston, P. J.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Segal, W.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, we show that a wide variety of common soil bacteria are able to obtain their carbon and energy needs from tholin (a class of complex organic heteropolymers thought to be widely distributed through the solar system; in this case tholin was produced by passage of electrical discharge through a mixture of methane, ammonia, and water vapor). We have isolated aerobic, anaerobic, and facultatively anaerobic bacteria which are able to use tholin as a sole carbon source. Organisms which metabolize tholin represent a variety of bacterial genera including Clostridium, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Paracoccus, Alcaligenes, Micrococcus, Cornebacterium, Aerobacter, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium,and Actinomyces. Aerobic tholin-using bacteria were firrst isolated from soils containing unusual or sparse carbon sources. Some of these organisms were found to be facultatively anaerobic. Strictly anaerobic tholin-using bacteria were isolated from both carbon-rich and carbon-poor anaerobic lake muds. In addition, both aerobic and anaerobic tholin-using bacteria were isolated from common soil collected outside the laboratory building. Some, but not all, of the strains that were able to obtain carbon from tholin were also able to obtain their nitrogen requirements from tholin. Bacteria isolated from common soils were tested for their ability to obtain carbon from the water-soluble fraction, the ethanol-soluble fraction, and the water/ethanol-insoluble fraction of the tholin. Of the 3.5 × 10 7 bacteria isolated per gram of common soils, 1.7 0.5, and 0.2%, respectively, were able to obtaib their carbon requirements from the water-soluble fraction, the ethanol-soluble fraction and the water/ethanol-insoluble fraction of the tholin. The palatability of tholins to modern microbes may have implications for the early evolution of microbial life on Earth. Tholins may have formed the base of the food chain for an early heterotrophic biosphere before the evolution of

  8. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-09

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission

  9. Carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilo; Knopp, Robert H.; Freinkel, Norbert

    1969-01-01

    The effects of late pregnancy on metabolic fuels, liver composition, gluconeogenesis, and nitrogen metabolism have been examined in fed and fasted rats. Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) are greater and glucose and ketones are lower in fed 19-day pregnant than they are in agematched virgin rats. A 48 hr fast elicits greater increases in FFA and ketones and more profound reductions in glucose in the pregnant rats and obliterates the differences in IRI. Fetal weight is not modified by such fasting but maternal weight losses exceed that of the nongravid rats. Livers from rats 19 days pregnant contain more and larger hepatocytes. Per μmole hepatic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-phosphorus, water and protein are more abundant, whereas glycogen is unaffected. Livers from fed pregnant rats contain more lipid phosphorus and less neutral lipid fatty acid. After a 48 hr fast, hepatic steatosis supervenes in gravid animals due to accumulated neutral fat. The contents of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and citric acid are not different in fed pregnant and virgin rats but are greater in the pregnant rats after fasting. Formation of glucose-14C and glycogen-14C from administered pyruvate-14C are the same in fed pregnant and virgin rats, but greater in the pregnant ones after a 24 or 48 hr fast. Pregnancy does not affect creatinine excretion, and urinary urea is not different in fed pregnant, virgin, and postpartum animals. Contrariwise, more nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus are excreted by the pregnant animals during a 2 day fast. The increment in urinary nitrogen is due largely to urea on the 1st day, whereas heightened ammonia accounts for half the increase on the 2nd and correlates with the enhanced ketonuria. Muscle catabolism, gluconeogenesis, and diversion to fat are activated more rapidly and to a greater degree when food is withheld during late gestation in the rat. These catabolic propensities are restrained in the fed state. The capacity

  10. Stoichiometric modelling of cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Llaneras, Francisco; Picó, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    There are several methodologies based on representations of cell metabolism that share two characteristics: the use of a metabolic network and the assumption of pseudosteady state. These methodologies have different purposes, employ different mathematical tools and are based on different assumptions; however, they all exploit the properties of a similar mathematical description. In this article we use the term stoichiometric modelling to encompass all these methodologies and to describe them within a common framework. Although the information about reaction stoichiometry embedded in metabolic networks is highly important, the framework encompasses methodologies not limited to the use of stoichiometric information. To highlight this fact, the definition of the framework is approached from a constraint-based perspective. One of the reasons for the success of stoichiometric modelling is that it avoids the difficulties that arise in the development of kinetic models: a consequence of the lack of intracellular experimental measurements. Thus, it makes it possible to exploit the knowledge about the structure of cell metabolism, without considering the still not very well known intracellular kinetic processes. Stoichiometric models have been used to estimate the metabolic flux distribution under given circumstances in the cell at some given moment (metabolic flux analysis), to predict it on the basis of some optimality hypothesis (flux balance analysis), and as tools for the structural analysis of metabolism providing information about systemic characteristics of the cell under investigation (network-based pathway analysis).

  11. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  12. Metabolic cost of extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The data on metabolic rates during Skylab extravehicular activities are presented and compared with prior experience during Gemini and Apollo. Difficulties experienced with Gemini extravehicular activities are reviewed. The effect of a pressure suit on metabolic rate is discussed and the life support equipment capabilities of each life support system are reviewed. The methods used to measure metabolic rate, utilizing bioinstrumentation and operational data on the life support system, are described. Metabolic rates are correlated with different activities. Metabolic rates in Skylab were found to be within the capacities of the life support systems and to be similar to the metabolic rates experienced during Apollo lunar 1/6-g extravehicular activities. They were found to range from 100 kcal/h to 500 kcal/h, during both 1/6-g and zero-g extravehicular activities. The average metabolic rates measured during long extravehicular activities were remarkably consistent and appeared to be a function of crew pacing of activity rather than to the effort involved in individual tasks.

  13. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anubhav; Srinivasan, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome) in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs) also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends. PMID:27695034

  14. Metabolic profiling of praziquantel enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haina; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zheng, Yang; Zhou, Kun; Hu, Changyan; Krausz, Kristopher W; Sun, Dequn; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-07-15

    Praziquantel (PZQ), prescribed as a racemic mixture, is the most readily available drug to treat schistosomiasis. In the present study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS) based metabolomics was employed to decipher the metabolic pathways and enantioselective metabolic differences of PZQ. Many phase I and four new phase II metabolites were found in urine and feces samples of mice 24h after dosing, indicating that the major metabolic reactions encompassed oxidation, dehydrogenation, and glucuronidation. Differences in the formation of all these metabolites were observed between (R)-PZQ and (S)-PZQ. In an in vitro phase I incubation system, the major involvement of CYP3A, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 in the metabolism of PZQ, and CYP3A, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 exhibited different catalytic activity toward the PZQ enantiomers. Apparent Km and Vmax differences were observed in the catalytic formation of three mono-oxidized metabolites by CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 further supporting the metabolic differences for PZQ enantiomers. Molecular docking showed that chirality resulted in differences in substrate location and conformation, which likely accounts for the metabolic differences. In conclusion, in silico, in vitro, and in vivo methods revealed the enantioselective metabolic profile of praziquantel.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Poh, Stanley; Mohamed Abdul, Riswana Banu Binte; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming a worldwide medical and public health challenge as it has been seen increasing in prevalence over the years. Age-related eye diseases, the leading cause of blindness globally and visual impairment in developed countries, are also on the rise due to aging of the population. Many of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been shown to be associated with these eye diseases. However, the association of metabolic syndrome with eye diseases is not clear. In this review, we reviewed the evidence for associations between metabolic syndrome and certain ocular diseases in populations. We also reviewed the association of individual metabolic syndrome components with ocular diseases due to a paucity of research in this area. Besides, we also summarised the current understanding of etiological mechanisms of how metabolic syndrome or the individual components lead to these ocular diseases. With increasing evidence of such associations, it may be important to identify patients who are at risk of developing metabolic syndrome as prompt treatment and intervention may potentially decrease the risk of developing certain ocular diseases.

  16. Liver fibrogenesis and metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Anty, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Maud

    2011-06-01

    Mechanisms of liver fibrosis are complex and varied. Among them, metabolic factors are particularly important in the development of fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). These factors are some of the "multiple parallel hits" responsible for liver damage during NASH. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Major profibrogenic protagonists, such as hepatic stellate cells and Kupffer cells, are activated by insulin resistance, apoptosis and local inflammation. Relations between steatosis, insulin resistance and fibrosis are complex. Initially, simple steatosis may be a way to store deleterious free fatty acid in neutral triglycerides. If the lipid storage threshold is exceeded, steatosis may become associated with lipotoxicity. Similarly, interindividual variations of adipose tissue expandability might explain various phenotypes, ranging from "metabolically obese patients with normal weight" to "metabolically normal morbidly obese patients". The metabolic abnormalities in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue are insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, which are associated with increased release of free fatty acid flux and changes in adipocytokines production such as leptin, adiponectin and interleukin 6. The nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the endocannabinoid system might have important roles in liver fibrogenesis and are potential therapeutic targets. Finally, with the development of new molecular tools, gut microbiota has been recently identified for its pleiotropic functions, including metabolism regulation. Better knowledge of these mechanisms should lead to new strategies for the treatment of metabolic factors that play a key role in liver injuries.

  17. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  18. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  19. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  20. Circahoralian (ultradian) metabolic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y

    2014-06-01

    This review presents data concerning metabolic rhythms with periods close to one hour (20 to 120 min): their occurrence, biochemical organization, nature, and significance for adaptations and age-related changes of cells and organs. Circahoralian (ultradian) rhythms have been detected for cell mass and size, protein synthesis, enzyme activities, concentration of ATP and hormones, cell respiration, and cytoplasm pH. Rhythms have been observed in bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa, as well as in many cells of metazoans, including mammals, in vivo and in cell cultures. In cell populations, the rhythms are organized by direct cell-cell communication. The biochemical mechanism involves membrane signal factors and cytoplasmic processes resulting in synchronization of individual oscillations to a common rhythm. Phosphorylation of proteins is the key process of coordination of protein synthesis and enzyme activity kinetics. The fractal nature of circahoralian rhythms is discussed as well as the involvement of these rhythms in adaptations of the cells and organs. Senescent decrease in rhythm amplitudes and correspondingly in cell-cell communication has been observed. The possibility of remodeling these changes through the intercellular medium has been predicted and experimentally shown. Perspectives for studies of the organizers and disorganizers of cell-cell communication in the intercellular medium along with appropriate receptors are discussed with special emphasis on aging and pathology. One perspective can be more precise definition of the range of normal biochemical and physiological state with the goal of correction of cellular functions.

  1. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

  2. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  3. Disorders of pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Meirleir, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency are the most common disorders in pyruvate metabolism. Diagnosis is made by enzymatic and DNA analysis after basic biochemical tests in plasma, urine, and CSF. Pyruvate dehydrogenase has three main subunits, an additional E3-binding protein and two complex regulatory enzymes. Most frequent are deficiencies in PDH-E1α. There is a spectrum of clinical presentations in E1α deficiency, ranging in boys from severe neonatal lactic acidosis, Leigh encephalopathy, to later onset of neurological disease such as intermittent ataxia or dystonia. Females tend to have a more uniform presentation resembling nonprogressive cerebral palsy. Neuroradiological abnormalities such as corpus callosum agenesis are seen more frequently in girls, basal ganglia and midbrain disturbances in boys. Deficiencies in the other subunits have also been described, but in a smaller number of patients. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency has three clinical phenotypes. The infantile type is characterized mainly by severe developmental delay, failure to thrive, and seizures. The second type is characterized by neonatal onset of severe lactic acidosis with rigidity and hypokinesia. A third form is rarer with intermittent episodes of lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis. Neuroradiological findings such as cystic periventricular leukomalacia have been described.

  4. Physics of metabolic organization.

    PubMed

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2017-03-01

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  5. Lipid metabolism during fasting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ekberg, K; Landau, B R

    2001-10-01

    These studies were conducted to understand the relationship between measures of systemic free fatty acid (FFA) reesterification and regional FFA, glycerol, and triglyceride metabolism during fasting. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure fatty acid oxidation in six men after a 60-h fast. Systemic and regional (splanchnic, renal, and leg) FFA ([(3)H]palmitate) and glycerol ([(3)H]glycerol) kinetics, as well as splanchnic triglyceride release, were measured. The rate of systemic FFA reesterification was 366 +/- 93 micromol/min, which was greater (P < 0.05) than splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output (64 +/- 6 micromol/min), a measure of VLDL triglyceride fatty acid export. The majority of glycerol uptake occurred in the splanchnic and renal beds, although some leg glycerol uptake was detected. Systemic FFA release was approximately double that usually present in overnight postabsorptive men, yet the regional FFA release rates were of the same proportions previously observed in overnight postabsorptive men. In conclusion, FFA reesterification at rest during fasting far exceeds splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output. This indicates that nonhepatic sites of FFA reesterification are important, and that peripheral reesterification of FFA exceeds the rate of simultaneous intracellular triglyceride fatty acid oxidation.

  6. Physics of metabolic organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2017-03-01

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  7. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  8. Equine metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  9. Ketones: metabolism's ugly duckling.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B; Nufert, Thomas H

    2003-10-01

    Ketones were first discovered in the urine of diabetic patients in the mid-19th century; for almost 50 years thereafter, they were thought to be abnormal and undesirable by-products of incomplete fat oxidation. In the early 20th century, however, they were recognized as normal circulating metabolites produced by liver and readily utilized by extrahepatic tissues. In the 1920s, a drastic "hyperketogenic" diet was found remarkably effective for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in children. In 1967, circulating ketones were discovered to replace glucose as the brain's major fuel during the marked hyperketonemia of prolonged fasting. Until then, the adult human brain was thought to be entirely dependent upon glucose. During the 1990s, diet-induced hyperketonemia was found therapeutically effective for treatment of several rare genetic disorders involving impaired neuronal utilization of glucose or its metabolic products. Finally, growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced bioenergetic efficiency occur in brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because ketones are efficiently used by mitochondria for ATP generation and may also help protect vulnerable neurons from free radical damage, hyperketogenic diets should be evaluated for ability to benefit patients with PD, AD, and certain other neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. [Disorders of sodium metabolism].

    PubMed

    Pizarro-Torres, D

    1991-08-01

    We do not know why sodium was chosen to fill the extracellular space while potassium occupies the intracellular area. The sodium/potassium pump was placed in charge of maintaining this separation. The usual sodium blood concentration, in vertebrates, and in all ages, ranges from 135 to 145 mmol/L, although it may decrease with age. The maintenance of its concentration within these limits, as well as the total amount locally deposited are regulated by an intertwined net of sensors and effectors found in the Central Nervous System, in the cardiovascular apparatus including the right auricle, in the kidneys and adrenal glands, or indirectly due to a number of factors which act on the sodium/potassium pump--for examples the thyroid hormone, the digestive system and the skin. The changes in the metabolism and regulation of water and sodium may cause an excess (hypernatremia) or a deficit (hyponatremia) in the concentration of sodium in plasma--either extreme can be fatal. The prompt correction of these changes should include treating the causes while taking into consideration the time they took to occur. The most frequent cause of these changes in children is diarrheal disease and its inadequate treatment. The correct administration of the oral rehydrating solution recommended by the World Health Organization can prevent fatal endings.

  11. Equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; Keen, J; McGowan, C

    2015-08-15

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management.

  12. Metabolic Inflexibility: When Mitochondrial Indecision Leads to Metabolic Gridlock

    PubMed Central

    Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Normal energy metabolism is characterized by periodic shifts in glucose and fat oxidation, as the mitochondrial machinery responsible for carbon combustion switches freely between alternative fuels according to physiological and nutritional circumstances. These transitions in fuel choice are orchestrated by an intricate network of metabolic and cell signaling events that enable exquisite crosstalk and cooperation between competing substrates to maintain energy and glucose homeostasis. By contrast, obesity-related cardiometabolic diseases are increasingly recognized as disorders of metabolic inflexibility, in which nutrient overload and heightened substrate competition result in mitochondrial indecision, impaired fuel switching, and energy dysregulation. This Perspective offers a speculative view on the molecular origins and pathophysiological consequences of metabolic inflexibility. PMID:25480291

  13. Cancer as a metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that impaired cellular energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of nearly all cancers regardless of cellular or tissue origin. In contrast to normal cells, which derive most of their usable energy from oxidative phosphorylation, most cancer cells become heavily dependent on substrate level phosphorylation to meet energy demands. Evidence is reviewed supporting a general hypothesis that genomic instability and essentially all hallmarks of cancer, including aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), can be linked to impaired mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. A view of cancer as primarily a metabolic disease will impact approaches to cancer management and prevention. PMID:20181022

  14. Metabolic effects of artificial environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of diluent gases on the metabolism of animals breathing nitrogen-oxygen, argon-oxygen, and helium-oxygen mixtures were studied. Results show that helium actually affected the mean free path of oxygen across the alveoli and increased metabolic rate. It is speculated that it might be necessary to keep an astronaut in a depressed metabolic state during prolonged space flight by using an argon-oxygen or a xenon-nitrogen mixture for breathing. Replacement of the depressant gases during periods requiring critical spacecraft maneuvers by neon-oxygen mixtures would insure maximal performance.

  15. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance. PMID:28029023

  16. 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, W

    2001-07-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using 13C-labeled substrates has become an important tool in metabolic engineering. It allows the detailed quantification of all intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of a microorganism. The method has strongly evolved in recent years by the introduction of new experimental procedures, measurement techniques, and mathematical data evaluation methods. Many of these improvements require advanced skills in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques on the one hand and computational and statistical experience on the other hand. This minireview summarizes these recent developments and sketches the major practical problems. An outlook to possible future developments concludes the text.

  17. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Kim, Min Seon

    2016-12-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance.

  18. Human metabolic atlas: an online resource for human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pornputtapong, Natapol; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) provide comprehensive understanding of human metabolism, which is of great value to the biomedical research community. To make this kind of data easily accessible to the public, we have designed and deployed the human metabolic atlas (HMA) website (http://www.metabolicatlas.org). This online resource provides comprehensive information about human metabolism, including the results of metabolic network analyses. We hope that it can also serve as an information exchange interface for human metabolism knowledge within the research community. The HMA consists of three major components: Repository, Hreed (Human REaction Entities Database) and Atlas. Repository is a collection of GEMs for specific human cell types and human-related microorganisms in SBML (System Biology Markup Language) format. The current release consists of several types of GEMs: a generic human GEM, 82 GEMs for normal cell types, 16 GEMs for different cancer cell types, 2 curated GEMs and 5 GEMs for human gut bacteria. Hreed contains detailed information about biochemical reactions. A web interface for Hreed facilitates an access to the Hreed reaction data, which can be easily retrieved by using specific keywords or names of related genes, proteins, compounds and cross-references. Atlas web interface can be used for visualization of the GEMs collection overlaid on KEGG metabolic pathway maps with a zoom/pan user interface. The HMA is a unique tool for studying human metabolism, ranging in scope from an individual cell, to a specific organ, to the overall human body. This resource is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  19. Redox biocatalysis and metabolism: molecular mechanisms and metabolic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Blank, Lars M; Ebert, Birgitta E; Buehler, Katja; Bühler, Bruno

    2010-08-01

    Whole-cell biocatalysis utilizes native or recombinant enzymes produced by cellular metabolism to perform synthetically interesting reactions. Besides hydrolases, oxidoreductases represent the most applied enzyme class in industry. Oxidoreductases are attributed a high future potential, especially for applications in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, as they enable highly interesting chemistry (e.g., the selective oxyfunctionalization of unactivated C-H bonds). Redox reactions are characterized by electron transfer steps that often depend on redox cofactors as additional substrates. Their regeneration typically is accomplished via the metabolism of whole-cell catalysts. Traditionally, studies towards productive redox biocatalysis focused on the biocatalytic enzyme, its activity, selectivity, and specificity, and several successful examples of such processes are running commercially. However, redox cofactor regeneration by host metabolism was hardly considered for the optimization of biocatalytic rate, yield, and/or titer. This article reviews molecular mechanisms of oxidoreductases with synthetic potential and the host redox metabolism that fuels biocatalytic reactions with redox equivalents. The tools discussed in this review for investigating redox metabolism provide the basis for studies aiming at a deeper understanding of the interplay between synthetically active enzymes and metabolic networks. The ultimate goal of rational whole-cell biocatalyst engineering and use for fine chemical production is discussed.

  20. Plant metabolic modeling: achieving new insight into metabolism and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-10-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology.

  1. Redesigned Human Metabolic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Lange, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A design has been formulated for a proposed improved version of an apparatus that simulates atmospheric effects of human respiration by introducing controlled amounts of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and heat into the air. Denoted a human metabolic simulator (HMS), the apparatus is used for testing life-support equipment when human test subjects are not available. The prior version of the HMS, to be replaced, was designed to simulate the respiratory effects of as many as four persons. It exploits the catalytic combustion of methyl acetate, for which the respiratory quotient (the molar ratio of carbon dioxide produced to oxygen consumed) is very close to the human respiratory quotient of about 0.86. The design of the improved HMS provides for simulation of the respiratory effects of as many as eight persons at various levels of activity. The design would also increase safety by eliminating the use of combustion. The improved HMS (see figure) would include a computer that would exert overall control. The computer would calculate the required amounts of oxygen removal, carbon dioxide addition, water addition, and heat addition by use of empirical equations for metabolic profiles of respiration and heat. A blower would circulate air between the HMS and a chamber containing a life-support system to be tested. With the help of feedback from a mass flowmeter, the blower speed would be adjusted to regulate the rate of flow according to the number of persons to be simulated and to a temperature-regulation requirement (the air temperature would indirectly depend on the rate of flow, among other parameters). Oxygen would be removed from the circulating air by means of a commercially available molecular sieve configured as an oxygen concentrator. Oxygen, argon, and trace amounts of nitrogen would pass through a bed in the molecular sieve while carbon dioxide, the majority of nitrogen, and other trace gases would be trapped by the bed and subsequently returned to the chamber. If

  2. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  3. The metabolism of tetralin

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, T. H.; Hanam, J.

    1968-01-01

    1. [1-14C]Tetralin was synthesized and fed to rabbits. 2. Of the radioactivity, 87–90% was excreted in the urine within two days and 0·5–3·7% on the third day. The faeces contained 0·6–1·8%. No radioactivity was found in the breath and negligible amounts were retained in the tissues. About 90–99% of an administered dose was accounted for. 3. The main metabolite in the urine was the glucuronide of α-tetralol (52·4%). Other conjugated metabolites were β-tetralol (25·3%), 4-hydroxy-α-tetralone (6·1%), cis-tetralin-1,2-diol (0·4%) and trans-tetralin-1,2-diol (0·6%). 4. β-Tetralone, α-naphthol, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene and naphthalene, previously reported as metabolites, are artifacts, and tetralin, α-tetralone, β-naphthol, 5-hydroxytetralin, and 6-hydroxytetralin are not metabolites. 5. The major metabolite of tetralin, α-tetralol and α-tetralone is the glucuronide of α-tetralol, which was isolated as methyl (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl tri-O-acetyl-β-d-glucosid)uronate; the major metabolite of β-tetralol and β-tetralone is the glucuronide of β-tetralol, which was characterized as methyl (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl tri-O-acetyl-β-d-glucosid)uronate. 5-Hydroxytetralin is conjugated with glucuronic acid, and was characterized as methyl (5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl tri-O-acetyl-β-d-glucosid)uronate. 6-Hydroxytetralin is conjugated with glucuronic acid, and was characterized as methyl (5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl tri-O-acetyl-β-d-glucosid)uronate. 6. A metabolic sequence accounting for the observed biological transformation products is proposed. PMID:4875412

  4. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  5. Metabolism of Monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney; Martinkus, Charlott

    1979-01-01

    (−)-Menthone, the major monoterpene component of the essential oil of maturing peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) leaves (6 micromoles per leaf) is rapidly metabolized at the onset of flowering with a concomitant rise in the level of (−)-menthol (to about 2 micromoles per leaf). Exogenous (−)-[G-3H]menthone is converted into (−)-[3H]menthol as the major steam-volatile product in leaf discs in flowering peppermint (10% of incorporated tracer); however, the major portion of the incorporated tracer (86%) resided in the nonvolatile metabolites of (−)-[G-3H]menthone. Acid hydrolysis of the nonvolatile material released over half of the radioactivity to the steamvolatile fraction, and the major component of this fraction was identified as (+)-neomenthol by radiochromatographic analysis and by synthesis of crystalline derivatives, thus suggesting the presence of a neomenthyl glycoside. Thin layer chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and gel permeation chromatography on Bio-Gel P-2 allowed the purification of the putative neomenthyl glycoside, and these results suggested that the glycoside contained a single, neutral sugar residue. Hydrolysis of the purified glycoside, followed by reduction of the resulting sugar moiety with NaB3H4, generated a single labeled product that was subsequently identified as glucitol by radio gas-liquid chromatography of both the hexatrimethylsilyl ether and hexaacetate derivative, and by crystallization to constant specific radioactivity of both the alditol and the corresponding hexabenzoate. These results, along with studies on the hydrolysis of the glycoside by specific glycosidases, strongly suggest that (+)-neomenthyl-β-d-glucoside is a major metabolite of (−)-menthone in flowering peppermint. This is the first report on the occurrence of a neomenthyl glycoside, and the first evidence implicating glycosylation as an early step in monoterpene catabolism. PMID:16660926

  6. Metabolism of Monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney; Hooper, Caroline Lee

    1978-01-01

    The essential oil from mature leaves of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) contains up to 15% (—)-menthyl acetate, and leaf discs converted exogenous (—)-[G-3H]menthol into this ester in approximately 15% yield of the incorporated precursor. Leaf extracts catalyzed the acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation of (—)-[G-3H]menthol and the product of this transacetylase reaction was identified by radiochromatographic techniques. Transacetylase activity was located mainly in the 100,000g supernatant fraction, and the preparation was partially purified by combination of Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and chromatography on O-diethylaminoethyl-cellulose. The transacetylase had a molecular weight of about 37,000 as judged by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, and a pH optimum near 9. The apparent Km and velocity for (—)-menthol were 0.3 mm and 16 nmol/hr· mg of protein, respectively. The saturation curve for acetyl coenzyme A was sigmoidal, showing apparent saturation near 0.1 mm. Dithioerythritol was required for maximum activity and stability of the enzyme, and the enzyme was inhibited by thiol directed reagents such as p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Diisopropylfluorophosphate also inhibited transacylation suggesting the involvement of a serine residue in catalysis. The transacylase was highly specific for acetyl coenzyme A; propionyl coenzyme A and butyryl coenzyme A were not nearly as efficient as acyl donors (11% and 2%, respectively). However, the enzyme was much less selective with regard to the alcohol substrate, suggesting that the nature of the acetate ester synthesized in mint is more dependent on the type of alcohol available than on the specificity of the transacetylase. This is the first report on an enzyme involved in monoterpenol acetylation in plants. A very similar enzyme, catalyzing this key reaction in the metabolism of menthol, was also isolated from the flowers of peppermint. PMID:16660375

  7. Metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Nidhi; Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2013-01-01

    To review the data with respect to prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its correlates in schizophrenia. For this review, electronic search engines PUBMED, Sciencedirect, and Google Scholar were used. Available data suggests that most of the studies have been of cross-sectional design. Prevalence rates of MetS have varied from 11% to 69% in medicated patients, and 4-26% in drug naive patients in cross-sectional evaluations. Longitudinal studies have shown the prevalence rates to range from 0% to 14% at the baseline in drug naive patients, which increase to as high as 52.4% by 3 months of antipsychotic medication treatment. The prevalence rates of MetS in patients with schizophrenia are much higher than that seen in general population or healthy controls. Though there is no causal association with any demographic or clinical variables, the risk increases with increase in age. Among antipsychotics, there seems to be an association between MetS and atypical antipsychotics like clozapine and olanzapine. Therefore, the psychiatrists should be more vigilant regarding the presence of MetS in these high risk groups. Research on biological correlates of MetS in schizophrenia is still in its primitive stage, however, these is some evidence to suggest an association of MetS with adiponectin levels, hematological indices, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and Alpha-1A adrenergic receptor (ADRA1A) gene. These areas hold promise, and targeting these with appropriate interventions may help us to prevent the occurrence of MetS in patients with schizophrenia in future. PMID:24249923

  8. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2009-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of various cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia) that imply additional cardiovascular morbidity that is greater than the sum of the risks associated with each individual component. Herein, the authors review the rheumatological diseases in which metabolic syndrome has been studied: gout, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and ankylosing spondylitis. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in these disorders varies from 14% to 62.8%. The great majority of these studies demonstrated that this frequency was higher in rheumatological diseases than in the control populations, suggesting that either the presence or the treatment of those diseases seems to influence the risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

  9. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  10. Can you boost your metabolism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can boost your metabolism. Eating foods like green tea, caffeine, or hot chili peppers will not help ... Randell RK, Jeukendrup AE. The effect of green tea extract on fat oxidation at rest and during ...

  11. Deep epistasis in human metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imielinski, Marcin; Belta, Calin

    2010-06-01

    We extend and apply a method that we have developed for deriving high-order epistatic relationships in large biochemical networks to a published genome-scale model of human metabolism. In our analysis we compute 33 328 reaction sets whose knockout synergistically disables one or more of 43 important metabolic functions. We also design minimal knockouts that remove flux through fumarase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to play an important role in human cancer. Most of these knockout sets employ more than eight mutually buffering reactions, spanning multiple cellular compartments and metabolic subsystems. These reaction sets suggest that human metabolic pathways possess a striking degree of parallelism, inducing "deep" epistasis between diversely annotated genes. Our results prompt specific chemical and genetic perturbation follow-up experiments that could be used to query in vivo pathway redundancy. They also suggest directions for future statistical studies of epistasis in genetic variation data sets.

  12. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  13. Systems genetics of mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fleet, James C; Replogle, Rebecca; Salt, David E

    2011-03-01

    Minerals are essential and toxic elements that have an impact on human health. Although we have learned a tremendous amount about the metabolism, biological roles, and health effects of minerals with the tools of biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular genetics, there are gaps in our knowledge of mineral biology that will benefit from new approaches. Forward genetics, whereby variations in phenotypes are mapped to natural genetic variation in the genome, has been successfully used to increase our understanding of many biologically important traits but has not yet been used extensively for mineral metabolism. In addition, the well-appreciated existence of interactions between minerals justifies a broader, systems approach to the study of mineral metabolism, i.e., ionomics. This short review will explain the value of forward genetics and ionomics as tools for exploring mammalian mineral metabolism.

  14. Alzheimer's as a metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd A; Driver, Jane

    2013-12-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of almost all cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence is reviewed supporting the general hypothesis that the up-regulation of OxPhos activity, a metabolic response to mitochondrial dysregulation, drives the cascade of events leading to AD. This mode of metabolic alteration, called the Inverse Warburg effect, is postulated as an essential compensatory mechanism of energy production to maintain the viability of impaired neuronal cells. This article appeals to the inverse comorbidity of cancer and AD to show that the amyloid hypothesis, a genetic and neuron-centric model of the origin of sporadic forms of AD, is not consistent with epidemiological data concerning the age-incidence rates of AD. A view of Alzheimer's as a metabolic disease-a condition consistent with mitochondrial dysregulation and the Inverse Warburg effect, will entail a radically new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  15. Metabolic control of renin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin–angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91. PMID:22729752

  16. Metabolic control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2013-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91.

  17. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    PubMed Central

    Mamidala, Praveen; Jones, Susan C.; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc.) through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases) towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance) with more emphasis on metabolic resistance. PMID:26467498

  18. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical condition causing the dementia may include: Ammonia level in the blood Blood chemistry , electrolytes Blood ... Liver disease Low blood sugar Low sodium level Metabolism Pellagra Pheochromocytoma Porphyria Prerenal azotemia Vitamin B12 Review ...

  19. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to Earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  20. Metabolic energy required for flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.

    1994-11-01

    This paper reviews data available from U.S. and U.S.S.R. studies on energy metabolism in the microgravity of space flight. Energy utilization and energy availability in space seem to be similar to those on Earth. However, negative nitrogen balances in space in the presence of adequate energy and protein intakes and in-flight exercise, suggest that lean body mass decreases in space. Metabolic studies during simulated (bed rest) and actual microgravity have shown changes in blood glucose, fatty acids, and insulin levels, suggesting that energy metabolism may be altered during flight. Future research should focus on the interactions of lean body mass, diet, and exercise in space and their roles in energy metabolism during space flight.

  1. Complex systems in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Winkler, James D; Erickson, Keesha; Choudhury, Alaksh; Halweg-Edwards, Andrea L; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic engineers manipulate intricate biological networks to build efficient biological machines. The inherent complexity of this task, derived from the extensive and often unknown interconnectivity between and within these networks, often prevents researchers from achieving desired performance. Other fields have developed methods to tackle the issue of complexity for their unique subset of engineering problems, but to date, there has not been extensive and comprehensive examination of how metabolic engineers use existing tools to ameliorate this effect on their own research projects. In this review, we examine how complexity affects engineering at the protein, pathway, and genome levels within an organism, and the tools for handling these issues to achieve high-performing strain designs. Quantitative complexity metrics and their applications to metabolic engineering versus traditional engineering fields are also discussed. We conclude by predicting how metabolic engineering practices may advance in light of an explicit consideration of design complexity.

  2. Metabolic energy required for flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews data available from U.S. and U.S.S.R. studies on energy metabolism in the microgravity of space flight. Energy utilization and energy availability in space seem to be similar to those on Earth. However, negative nitrogen balances in space in the presence of adequate energy and protein intakes and in-flight exercise, suggest that lean body mass decreases in space. Metabolic studies during simulated (bed rest) and actual microgravity have shown changes in blood glucose, fatty acids, and insulin levels, suggesting that energy metabolism may be altered during flight. Future research should focus on the interactions of lean body mass, diet, and exercise in spaced and their roles in energy metabolism during space flight.

  3. Microbial regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Charusanti, Pep; Herrgård, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2007-08-01

    Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is the foundation of large-scale microbial systems and synthetic biology. An enormous amount of information including the annotated genomic sequences and the genomic locations of DNA-binding regulatory proteins can be used to define metabolic and regulatory networks in cells. In particular, advances in experimental methods to map regulatory networks in microbial cells have allowed reliable data-driven reconstruction of these networks. Recent work on metabolic engineering and experimental evolution of microbes highlights the key role of global regulatory networks in controlling specific metabolic processes and the need to consider the integrated function of multiple types of networks for both scientific and engineering purposes.

  4. Metabolic depression: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Withers, Philip C; Cooper, Christine E

    2010-01-01

    An extended period of inactivity and reduced metabolic rate of many animals and plants, as well as unicellular organisms, has long been recognized by natural historians, e.g., Aristotle and Pliny. Biologists have studied this phenomenon since the 1550s (Gessner) and 1700s (Van Leeuwenhoek, Buffon). The period of inactivity can be less than a day, a few consecutive days or weeks, an entire season, or even many years. It can involve very different physiological states in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as extreme temperatures or unavailability of food or water. These periods of inactivity have been described and classified according to the group of organisms in question, extent and duration of the metabolic depression, ambient and body temperatures, state of body water (frozen or hyperosmotic), or availability of oxygen. Cryptobiosis, or "hidden life," is an extreme form of inactivity, with often complete cessation of metabolism. It was first described in the 1700s, was further characterized in the 1800s, and in the 1900s physiological studies delineated the extent of metabolic depression. Molecular mechanisms for cryptobiosis have been sought since the late 1900s. Cryptobiosis includes three physiological states, anhydrobiosis (desiccation), osmobiosis (high osmotic concentration), and cryobiosis (freezing), where metabolic depression is associated with an altered physical state of cell water and often involves accumulation of compatible solutes, and one physiological state, anoxybiosis (anoxia), where metabolic depression occurs at the normal cellular hydration state. Dormancy (torpor) is a less extreme form of inactivity, associated with a moderate reduction in metabolic rate (hypometabolism). Although first described by Aristotle and Pliny, studies in the 1900s delineated the basic physiological changes that accompany dormancy. Dormancy allows avoidance of unfavorable short- or long-term climatic conditions and conservation of energy and

  5. Energy Metabolism of Monocytic Ehrlichia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Security Classification) Energy metabolism of monocytic Ehrlichia 12. PERSONAL AU1TOR(S) Weiss E, Williams JC, Dasch GA, Kang Y 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b...monocytic Ehrlichia (intracellular bacteria/animal pathogens/human pathogens) EMILIO WEISS*t, JIM C. WILLIAMSO§, GREGORY A. DASCH*, AND YUAN-HSU KANG...by Carl R. Woese, December 1, 1988 ABSTRACT We investigated if the monocytic Ehrlichia some ATP from the metabolism of glutamine. as is the case are

  6. Liver glucose metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Pérez-Felpete, Noemi; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Pazos-García, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Information about normal hepatic glucose metabolism may help to understand pathogenic mechanisms underlying obesity and diabetes mellitus. In addition, liver glucose metabolism is involved in glycosylation reactions and connected with fatty acid metabolism. The liver receives dietary carbohydrates directly from the intestine via the portal vein. Glucokinase phosphorylates glucose to glucose 6-phosphate inside the hepatocyte, ensuring that an adequate flow of glucose enters the cell to be metabolized. Glucose 6-phosphate may proceed to several metabolic pathways. During the post-prandial period, most glucose 6-phosphate is used to synthesize glycogen via the formation of glucose 1-phosphate and UDP–glucose. Minor amounts of UDP–glucose are used to form UDP–glucuronate and UDP–galactose, which are donors of monosaccharide units used in glycosylation. A second pathway of glucose 6-phosphate metabolism is the formation of fructose 6-phosphate, which may either start the hexosamine pathway to produce UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or follow the glycolytic pathway to generate pyruvate and then acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA may enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to be oxidized or may be exported to the cytosol to synthesize fatty acids, when excess glucose is present within the hepatocyte. Finally, glucose 6-phosphate may produce NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate through the pentose phosphate pathway. Glucose metabolism supplies intermediates for glycosylation, a post-translational modification of proteins and lipids that modulates their activity. Congenital deficiency of phosphoglucomutase (PGM)-1 and PGM-3 is associated with impaired glycosylation. In addition to metabolize carbohydrates, the liver produces glucose to be used by other tissues, from glycogen breakdown or from de novo synthesis using primarily lactate and alanine (gluconeogenesis). PMID:27707936

  7. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  8. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    weighted and unweighted walking metabolic rates can be estimated in field settings using simple, inexpensive wearable technologies. Metabolic rates...our walking model and to continue to work toward the final algorithm and publication of a walking test for predicting aerobic fitness . The...number of subjects tested in the last year was limited and targeted toward enrolling highly aerobically fit subjects needed for objective two

  9. [Arterial hypertension and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Dzherieva, I S; Volkova, N I

    2010-01-01

    Combination of arterial hypertension (AH) and metabolic disorders accelerates development of organic lesions in target organs. As shown in recent prospective studies, myocardial hypertrophy rate closely correlated with severity of metabolic disturbance. The thickness of interventricular septum and posterior wall show stronger dependence of severity of metabolic disorders than left ventricular density while left atrial enlargement is correlates with fasting glycemia and excess body mass. There is close relationship between microalbuminurea and hyperinsulinemia and the number of metabolic syndrome components is linearly correlated with glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. It is shown that rigidity of arteries is a new independent risk factor of cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Moreover, metabolic disturbances cause affective disorders that impair quality of life and therapy motivation. Combination of AH, metabolic disturbances, and borderline psychic disorders dictated consideration of abnormal melatonin secretion as a condition developing as a consequence of disturbed adaptive circadian rhythms. This hypothesis was prompted by the discovery of the so-called "clock genes" in the central nervous system and practically all peripheral organs including heart, vessels, and adipose tissue.

  10. Energy metabolism in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome resulting from the inability of the cardiac pump to meet the energy requirements of the body. Despite intensive work, the pathogenesis of the cardiac intracellular abnormalities that result from HF remains incompletely understood. Factors that lead to abnormal contraction and relaxation in the failing heart include metabolic pathway abnormalities that result in decreased energy production, energy transfer and energy utilization. Heart failure also affects the periphery. Patients suffering from heart failure always complain of early muscular fatigue and exercise intolerance. This is linked in part to intrinsic alterations of skeletal muscle, among which decreases in the mitochondrial ATP production and in the transfer of energy through the phosphotransfer kinases play an important role. Alterations in energy metabolism that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles argue for a generalized metabolic myopathy in heart failure. Recent evidence shows that decreased expression of mitochondrial transcription factors and mitochondrial proteins are involved in mechanisms causing the energy starvation in heart failure. This review will focus on energy metabolism alterations in long-term chronic heart failure with only a few references to compensated hypertrophy when necessary. It will briefly describe the energy metabolism of normal heart and skeletal muscles and their alterations in chronic heart failure. It is beyond the scope of this review to address the metabolic switches occurring in compensated hypertrophy; readers could refer to well-documented reviews on this subject. PMID:14660709

  11. Targeting Phospholipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Menglin; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    All cancers tested so far display abnormal choline and ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism, which has been detected with numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) approaches in cells, animal models of cancer, as well as the tumors of cancer patients. Since the discovery of this metabolic hallmark of cancer, many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular origins of deregulated choline metabolism, to identify targets for cancer treatment, and to develop MRS approaches that detect choline and ethanolamine compounds for clinical use in diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Several enzymes in choline, and recently also ethanolamine, phospholipid metabolism have been identified, and their evaluation has shown that they are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several already established enzymes as well as a number of emerging enzymes in phospholipid metabolism can be used as treatment targets for anticancer therapy, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic approaches. This review summarizes the current knowledge of established and relatively novel targets in phospholipid metabolism of cancer, covering choline kinase α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D1, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelinases, choline transporters, glycerophosphodiesterases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, and ethanolamine kinase. These enzymes are discussed in terms of their roles in oncogenic transformation, tumor progression, and crucial cancer cell properties such as fast proliferation, migration, and invasion. Their potential as treatment targets are evaluated based on the current literature. PMID:28083512

  12. Catabolic metabolism during cancer EMT.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yong Hoon; Yook, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Sil; Kim, Nam Hee

    2015-03-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is widely accepted as the glucose metabolism for production of biomass such as nucleotides, amino acids, and fatty acids which underlie the anabolic process of cancer cell proliferation. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex cellular mechanism for invasion and metastatic progression in cancer cells. While Snail-mediated EMT regulated by major oncogenic signaling has been well-studied over the last decade, metabolic reprogramming during the EMT has not. In this work, we emphasize the importance of catabolic metabolism for cancer cell survival during cancer cell EMT. Because specific catabolic processes such as autophage and fatty acid oxidation have been well explained, we mainly focus on the general aspects of energy metabolism promoting cancer cell survival under metabolic stress. We also revisit the role of mitochondria in catabolism as oxidative phosphorylation in cancer has long been underestimated. Considering the highly inefficient process of metastatic progression and profound metabolic stress following matrix detachment of solid cancer, catabolic reprogramming during the EMT may play an important role in overcoming metastatic inefficiency of cancer cells.

  13. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  14. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems.

  15. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems. PMID:27213120

  16. Analysis of metabolic flux using dynamic labelling and metabolic modelling.

    PubMed

    Fernie, A R; Morgan, J A

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes and the capacity to modulate them are a crucial component of the ability of the plant cell to react to environmental perturbations. Our ability to quantify them and to attain information concerning the regulatory mechanisms that control them is therefore essential to understand and influence metabolic networks. For all but the simplest of flux measurements labelling methods have proven to be the most informative. Both steady-state and dynamic labelling approaches have been adopted in the study of plant metabolism. Here the conceptual basis of these complementary approaches, as well as their historical application in microbial, mammalian and plant sciences, is reviewed, and an update on technical developments in label distribution analyses is provided. This is supported by illustrative cases studies involving the kinetic modelling of secondary metabolism. One issue that is particularly complex in the analysis of plant fluxes is the extensive compartmentation of the plant cell. This problem is discussed from both theoretical and experimental perspectives, and the current approaches used to address it are assessed. Finally, current limitations and future perspectives of kinetic modelling of plant metabolism are discussed.

  17. Unfamiliar metabolic links in the central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Georg; Berg, Ivan A

    2014-12-20

    The central carbon metabolism of all organisms is considered to follow a well established fixed scheme. However, recent studies of autotrophic carbon fixation in prokaryotes revealed unfamiliar metabolic links. A new route interconnects acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) via 3-hydroxypropionate with succinyl-CoA. Succinyl-CoA in turn may be metabolized via 4-hydroxybutyrate to two molecules of acetyl-CoA; a reversal of this route would result in the assimilation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA into C4 compounds. C5-dicarboxylic acids are a rather neglected class of metabolites; yet, they play a key role not only in one of the CO2 fixation cycles, but also in two acetate assimilation pathways that replace the glyoxylate cycle. C5 compounds such as ethylmalonate, methylsuccinate, methylmalate, mesaconate, itaconate and citramalate or their CoA esters are thereby linked to the acetyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA, glyoxylate and pyruvate pools. A novel carboxylase/reductase converts crotonyl-CoA into ethylmalonyl-CoA; similar reductive carboxylations apply to other alpha-beta-unsaturated carboxy-CoA thioesters. These unfamiliar metabolic links may provide useful tools for metabolic engineering.

  18. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants), this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our results show that DNA

  19. [Lead compound optimization strategy (1)--changing metabolic pathways and optimizing metabolism stability].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Liu, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Lead compound optimization plays an important role in new drug discovery and development. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways can modulate pharmacokinetic properties, prolong the half life, improve metabolism stability and bioavailability of lead compounds. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways and improving metabolism stability are reviewed. These methods include blocking metabolic site, reduing lipophilicity, changing ring size, bioisosterism, and prodrug.

  20. Response to trauma and metabolic changes: posttraumatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Turgay; Şimşek, Hayal Uzelli; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Stress response caused by events such as surgical trauma includes endocrine, metabolic and immunological changes. Stress hormones and cytokines play a role in these reactions. More reactions are induced by greater stress, ultimately leading to greater catabolic effects. Cuthbertson reported the characteristic response that occurs in trauma patients: protein and fat consumption and protection of body fluids and electrolytes because of hypermetabolism in the early period. The oxygen and energy requirement increases in proportion to the severity of trauma. The awareness of alterations in amino acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism changes in surgical patients is important in determining metabolic and nutritional support. The main metabolic change in response to injury that leads to a series of reactions is the reduction of the normal anabolic effect of insulin, i.e. the development of insulin resistance. Free fatty acids are primary sources of energy after trauma. Triglycerides meet 50 to 80 % of the consumed energy after trauma and in critical illness. Surgical stress and trauma result in a reduction in protein synthesis and moderate protein degradation. Severe trauma, burns and sepsis result in increased protein degradation. The aim of glucose administration to surgical patients during fasting is to reduce proteolysis and to prevent loss of muscle mass. In major stress such as sepsis and trauma, it is important both to reduce the catabolic response that is the key to faster healing after surgery and to obtain a balanced metabolism in the shortest possible time with minimum loss. For these reasons, the details of metabolic response to trauma should be known in managing these situations and patients should be treated accordingly.

  1. Metabolic Reprograming in Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Peña, Silvia; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates, however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase carbohydrate kinase-like protein is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect. PMID:25228902

  2. Metabolic Cost of Experimental Exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the type and duration of activity during decompression was well documented, the metabolic cost of 1665 subject-exposures with 8 activity profiles from 17 altitude decompression sickness (DCS) protocols at Brooks City-Base, TX from 1983-2005 was not determined. Female and male human volunteers (30 planned, 4 completed) performed activity profiles matching those 8 activity profiles at ground level with continuous monitoring of metabolic cost. A Cosmed K4b2 Cardio Pulmonary Exercise Testing device was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2) during the profiles. The results show levels of metabolic cost to the females for the profiles tested varied from 4.3 to 25.5 ml/kg/min and from 3.0 to 12.0 ml/kg/min to the males. The increase in VO2 from seated rest to the most strenuous of the 8 activity profiles was 3.6-fold for the females and 2.8-fold for the males. These preliminary data on 4 subjects indicate close agreement of oxygen uptake for activity performed during many subject-exposures as published earlier. The relatively low average oxygen uptake required to perform the most strenuous activity may imply the need for adjustment of modeling efforts using metabolic cost as a risk factor. Better definition of metabolic cost during exposure to altitude, a critical factor in DCS risk, may allow refinement of DCS prediction models.

  3. MPW : the metabolic pathways database.

    SciTech Connect

    Selkov, E., Jr.; Grechkin, Y.; Mikhailova, N.; Selkov, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Russian Academy of Sciences

    1998-01-01

    The Metabolic Pathways Database (MPW) (www.biobase.com/emphome.html/homepage. html.pags/pathways.html) a derivative of EMP (www.biobase.com/EMP) plays a fundamental role in the technology of metabolic reconstructions from sequenced genomes under the PUMA (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/PUMA/Production/ ReconstructedMetabolism/reconstruction.html), WIT (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/WIT/wit.html ) and WIT2 (beauty.isdn.msc.anl.gov/WIT2.pub/CGI/user.cgi) systems. In October 1997, it included some 2800 pathway diagrams covering primary and secondary metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction pathways, intracellular traffic, translation and transcription. In the current public release of MPW (beauty.isdn.mcs.anl.gov/MPW), the encoding is based on the logical structure of the pathways and is represented by the objects commonly used in electronic circuit design. This facilitates drawing and editing the diagrams and makes possible automation of the basic simulation operations such as deriving stoichiometric matrices, rate laws, and, ultimately, dynamic models of metabolic pathways. Individual pathway diagrams, automatically derived from the original ASCII records, are stored as SGML instances supplemented by relational indices. An auxiliary database of compound names and structures, encoded in the SMILES format, is maintained to unambiguously connect the pathways to the chemical structures of their intermediates.

  4. Genetics of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groop, L

    2000-03-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance in the same persons has been called the metabolic or insulin-resistance syndrome. In 1998 WHO proposed a unifying definition for the syndrome and chose to call it the metabolic syndrome rather than the insulin-resistance syndrome. Although insulin resistance has been considered as a common denominator for the different components of the syndrome, there is still debate as to whether it is pathogenically involved in all of the different components of the syndrome. Clustering of the syndrome in families suggests a genetic component. It is plausible that so-called thrifty genes, which have ensured optimal storage of energy during periods of fasting, could contribute to the phenotype of the metabolic syndrome. Common variants in a number of candidate genes influencing fat and glucose metabolism can probably, together with environmental triggers, increase susceptibility to the syndrome. Among these, the genes for beta 3-adrenergic receptor, hormone-sensitive lipase, lipoprotein lipase, IRS-1, PC-1, skeletal muscle glycogen synthase, etc. appear to increase the risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, novel genes may be identified by genome-wide searches.

  5. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  6. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal “superorganism” seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host’s immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of “metabolic endotoxemia”, leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use. PMID:25473159

  7. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Bolego, Chiara; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches. PMID:17319458

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  10. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment.

  11. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  12. Leucine metabolism in human newborns

    SciTech Connect

    Denne, S.C.; Kalhan, S.C. )

    1987-12-01

    The present study was designed to (1) determine whether a relationship exists between newborn birth weight and leucine metabolism and (2) compare leucine and energy metabolism in a period of rapid growth and development (i.e., newborn) with a constant nongrowth period (i.e., adult). Leucine kinetics and energy expenditure were measured in the postabsorptive state in 12 normal full-term newborns in early neonatal life and in 11 normal adults using a primed constant L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine infusion combined with respiratory calorimetry. A significant positive correlation between newborn birth weight and leucine flux was observed. These data suggest the following. (1) A relationship exists between newborn birth weight and protein metabolism, as reflected by the correlation between leucine flux when expressed as micromoles per kilogram per hour and birth weight. (2) The high rate of leucine flux measured in newborns probably reflects the rapid remodeling of protein that occurs in this period of development, even during fasting. (3) The similar values in newborns and adults of leucine kinetics and energy expenditure when normalized to metabolic body weight and the nearly equivalent allometric exponents relating body weight to leucine flux and energy expenditure support a close relationship between leucine and energy metabolism, at least at the extremes of human growth.

  13. Sirtuin and metabolic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wakino, Shu; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Sirtuin is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase. One of its isoforms, Sirt1, is a key molecule in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism. The renal protective effects of Sirt1 are found in various models of renal disorders with metabolic impairment, such as diabetic nephropathy. Protective effects include the maintenance of glomerular barrier function, anti-fibrosis effects, anti-oxidative stress effects, and regulation of mitochondria function and energy metabolism. Various target molecules subject to direct deacetylation or epigenetic gene regulation have been identified as effectors of the renal protective function of sirtuin. Recently, it was demonstrated that Sirt1 expression decreases in proximal tubules before albuminuria in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy, and that albuminuria is suppressed in proximal tubule-specific mice overexpressing Sirt1. These findings suggest that decreased Sirt1 expression in proximal tubular cells causes abnormal nicotine metabolism and reduces the supply of nicotinamide mononucleotide from renal tubules to glomeruli. This further decreases expression of Sirt1 in glomerular podocytes and increases expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-1, which results in albuminuria. Activators of the sirtuin family of proteins, including resveratrol, may be important in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating metabolic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Metabolic turnover of myelin glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Morell, P; Ousley, A H

    1994-08-01

    The apparent half life for metabolic turnover of glycerophospholipids in the myelin sheath, as determined by measuring the rate of loss of label in a myelin glycerophospholipid following radioactive precursor injection, varies with the radioactive precursor used, age of animal, and time after injection during which metabolic turnover is studied. Experimental strategies for resolving apparent inconsistencies consequent to these variables are discussed. Illustrative data concerning turnover of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in myelin of rat brain are presented. PC of the myelin membrane exhibits heterogeneity with respect to metabolic turnover rates. There are at least two metabolic pools of PC in myelin, one with a half life of the order of days, and another with a half life of the order of weeks. To a significant extent biphasic turnover is due to differential turnover of individual molecular species (which differ in acyl chain composition). The two predominant molecular species of myelin PC turnover at very different rates (16:0, 18:1 PC turning over several times more rapidly than 18:0, 18:1 PC). Therefore, within the same membrane, individual molecular species of a phospholipid class are metabolized at different rates. Possible mechanisms for differential turnover of molecular species are discussed, as are other factors that may contribute to a multiphasic turnover of glycerophospholipids.

  15. Energy metabolism during human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Forsum, Elisabet; Löf, Marie

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes information regarding how human energy metabolism is affected by pregnancy, and current estimates of energy requirements during pregnancy are presented. Such estimates can be calculated using either increases in basal metabolic rate (BMR) or increases in total energy expenditure (TEE). The two modes of calculation give similar results for a complete pregnancy but different distributions of energy requirements in the three trimesters. Recent information is presented regarding the effect of pregnancy on BMR, TEE, diet-induced thermogenesis, and physical activity. The validity of energy intake (EI) data recently assessed in well-nourished pregnant women was evaluated using information regarding energy metabolism during pregnancy. The results show that underreporting of EI is common during pregnancy and indicate that additional longitudinal studies, taking the total energy budget during pregnancy into account, are needed to satisfactorily define energy requirements during the three trimesters of gestation.

  16. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  17. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  18. Videofluorometer for imaging tissue metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Rorvik, Dawn A.; Richmond, Keith N.; Barlow, Clyde H.

    1989-11-01

    A videofluorometer is described that directly acquires digital metabolic images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in tissue. NADH fluorescence provides an intrinsic indicator of the state of tissue mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The device combines a computer-controlled fluorescence excitation system with digital image acquisition to quantify tissue bioenergetics in both spatial and time domains. Localized ischemia following coronary artery ligation in a perfused rat heart (model for a coronary artery occlusion heart attack) is used as an example to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. This videofluorometer permits monitoring changes in physiological state of organs and tissue without interfering with tissue metabolism. The digital nature of the acquired image allows detailed analysis of physiological features and their time dependence.

  19. Complexity of vitamin E metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schmölz, Lisa; Birringer, Marc; Lorkowski, Stefan; Wallert, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bioavailability of vitamin E is influenced by several factors, most are highlighted in this review. While gender, age and genetic constitution influence vitamin E bioavailability but cannot be modified, life-style and intake of vitamin E can be. Numerous factors must be taken into account however, i.e., when vitamin E is orally administrated, the food matrix may contain competing nutrients. The complex metabolic processes comprise intestinal absorption, vascular transport, hepatic sorting by intracellular binding proteins, such as the significant α-tocopherol-transfer protein, and hepatic metabolism. The coordinated changes involved in the hepatic metabolism of vitamin E provide an effective physiological pathway to protect tissues against the excessive accumulation of, in particular, non-α-tocopherol forms. Metabolism of vitamin E begins with one cycle of CYP4F2/CYP3A4-dependent ω-hydroxylation followed by five cycles of subsequent β-oxidation, and forms the water-soluble end-product carboxyethylhydroxychroman. All known hepatic metabolites can be conjugated and are excreted, depending on the length of their side-chain, either via urine or feces. The physiological handling of vitamin E underlies kinetics which vary between the different vitamin E forms. Here, saturation of the side-chain and also substitution of the chromanol ring system are important. Most of the metabolic reactions and processes that are involved with vitamin E are also shared by other fat soluble vitamins. Influencing interactions with other nutrients such as vitamin K or pharmaceuticals are also covered by this review. All these processes modulate the formation of vitamin E metabolites and their concentrations in tissues and body fluids. Differences in metabolism might be responsible for the discrepancies that have been observed in studies performed in vivo and in vitro using vitamin E as a supplement or nutrient. To evaluate individual vitamin E status, the analytical procedures used for

  20. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  1. Mitochondrial metabolism in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Flomenberg, Neal; Birbe, Ruth C; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Howell, Anthony; Philp, Nancy J; Pestell, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    We have recently proposed a new two-compartment model for understanding the Warburg effect in tumor metabolism. In this model, glycolytic stromal cells produce mitochondrial fuels (L-lactate and ketone bodies) that are then transferred to oxidative epithelial cancer cells, driving OXPHOS and mitochondrial metabolism. Thus, stromal catabolism fuels anabolic tumor growth via energy transfer. We have termed this new cancer paradigm the “reverse Warburg effect,” because stromal cells undergo aerobic glycolysis, rather than tumor cells. To assess whether this mechanism also applies during cancer cell metastasis, we analyzed the bioenergetic status of breast cancer lymph node metastases, by employing a series of metabolic protein markers. For this purpose, we used MCT4 to identify glycolytic cells. Similarly, we used TOMM20 and COX staining as markers of mitochondrial mass and OXPHOS activity, respectively. Consistent with the “reverse Warburg effect,” our results indicate that metastatic breast cancer cells amplify oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and that adjacent stromal cells are glycolytic and lack detectable mitochondria. Glycolytic stromal cells included cancer-associated fibroblasts, adipocytes and inflammatory cells. Double labeling experiments with glycolytic (MCT4) and oxidative (TOMM20 or COX) markers directly shows that at least two different metabolic compartments co-exist, side-by-side, within primary tumors and their metastases. Since cancer-associated immune cells appeared glycolytic, this observation may also explain how inflammation literally “fuels” tumor progression and metastatic dissemination, by “feeding” mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. Finally, MCT4(+) and TOMM20(-) “glycolytic” cancer cells were rarely observed, indicating that the conventional “Warburg effect” does not frequently occur in cancer-positive lymph node metastases. PMID:22395432

  2. MR spectroscopy of metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Kim M

    2006-02-01

    The application of MR spectroscopy (MRS) in pediatric brain disorders yields valued information on pathologic processes, such as ischemia, demyelination, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Because these processes manifest in inborn errors of metabolism, the purposes of this article are to (1) describe the spectral changes that are associated with the relatively common metabolic disorders, with summaries of known spectroscopic features of these disorders; (2) offer suggestions for recognition and distinction of disorders; and (3) provide general guidelines for MRS implementation. Although many conditions have a similar presentation, MRS offers valuable information for the individual patient in diagnosis and therapy when integrated fully into the clinical setting.

  3. Exercise, muscle, and CHO metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, M

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrates (CHO) are a key source of energy for contracting skeletal muscle during strenuous exercise and fatigue during such exercise often coincides with CHO depletion. Our current understanding of the importance of CHO for exercise metabolism has its foundations in classic studies in the early 20th century by Scandinavian physiologists and Bengt Saltin contributed significantly to that tradition. This brief review summarizes our contemporary understanding of key aspects of muscle glycogen and glucose metabolism during exercise, through the lens of seminal studies by Bengt Saltin.

  4. ADMET: ADipocyte METabolism mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Micheloni, Alessio; Orsi, Gianni; De Maria, Carmelo; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    White fat cells have an important physiological role in maintaining triglyceride and free fatty acid levels due to their fundamental storage property, as well as determining insulin resistance. ADipocyte METabolism is a mathematical model that mimics the main metabolic pathways of human white fat cell, connecting inputs (composition of culture medium) to outputs (glycerol and free fatty acid release). It is based on a set of nonlinear differential equations, implemented in Simulink® and controlled by cellular energetic state. The validation of this model is based on a comparison between the simulation results and a set of experimental data collected from the literature.

  5. Gene Therapy for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Randy J.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene therapy has recently shown great promise as an effective treatment for a number of metabolic diseases caused by genetic defects in both animal models and human clinical trials. Most of the current success has been achieved using a viral mediated gene addition approach, but gene-editing technology has progressed rapidly and gene modification is being actively pursued in clinical trials. This review focuses on viral mediated gene addition approaches, because most of the current clinical trials utilize this approach to treat metabolic diseases. PMID:27853673

  6. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  7. Cancer metabolism: current perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Pinedo, C; El Mjiyad, N; Ricci, J-E

    2012-01-12

    Cellular metabolism influences life and death decisions. An emerging theme in cancer biology is that metabolic regulation is intricately linked to cancer progression. In part, this is due to the fact that proliferation is tightly regulated by availability of nutrients. Mitogenic signals promote nutrient uptake and synthesis of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids. Therefore, it seems straight-forward that oncogenes, that often promote proliferation, also promote metabolic changes. In this review we summarize our current understanding of how 'metabolic transformation' is linked to oncogenic transformation, and why inhibition of metabolism may prove a cancer's 'Achilles' heel'. On one hand, mutation of metabolic enzymes and metabolic stress sensors confers synthetic lethality with inhibitors of metabolism. On the other hand, hyperactivation of oncogenic pathways makes tumors more susceptible to metabolic inhibition. Conversely, an adequate nutrient supply and active metabolism regulates Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibits susceptibility to apoptosis. Here, we provide an overview of the metabolic pathways that represent anti-cancer targets and the cell death pathways engaged by metabolic inhibitors. Additionally, we will detail the similarities between metabolism of cancer cells and metabolism of proliferating cells.

  8. Computational Approaches for Understanding Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A; Barker, Brandon; Gu, Zhenglong; Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in understanding the regulation of metabolic networks involved in disease in recent years. Quantitative models are increasingly being used to i nterrogate the metabolic pathways that are contained within this complex disease biology. At the core of this effort is the mathematical modeling of central carbon metabolism involving glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (referred to as energy metabolism). Here we discuss several approaches used to quantitatively model metabolic pathways relating to energy metabolism and discuss their formalisms, successes, and limitations. PMID:23897661

  9. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-11-16

    Metabolic engineering emerged 20 years ago as the discipline occupied with the directed modification of metabolic pathways for the microbial synthesis of various products. As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. The two fields, however, only partially overlap in their interest in pathway engineering. While fabrication of biobricks, synthetic cells, genetic circuits, and nonlinear cell dynamics, along with pathway engineering, have occupied researchers in the field of synthetic biology, the sum total of these areas does not constitute a coherent definition of synthetic biology with a distinct intellectual foundation and well-defined areas of application. This paper reviews the origins of the two fields and advances two distinct paradigms for each of them: that of unit operations for metabolic engineering and electronic circuits for synthetic biology. In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits.

  10. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  11. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Oxidative metabolism in radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Kultanov, B Zh; Edil'baeva, T T; Turmukhambetova, A A; Dosmagambetova, R S

    2014-01-01

    The article represents results of studies concerning influence of ionizing radiation on experimental animals under absolutely lethal doses of 8 Gy. In single total irradiation the rats demonstrate changes in lipoperoxic cascade products and suppressed activity of anioxidant defence enzymes in generative cells--that causes metabolic disorders.

  13. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasin...

  14. Metabolic rate meter and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. I.; Ruderman, I. W. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the dynamic metabolic rate of a human or animal. The ratio of the exhaled carbon dioxide to a known amount of C(13)02 introduced into the exhalation is determined by mass spectrometry. This provides an instantaneous measurement of the carbon dioxide generated.

  15. Metabolic networks: beyond the graph.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Andrés; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Drugs are devised to enter into the metabolism of an organism in order to produce a desired effect. From the chemical point of view, cellular metabolism is constituted by a complex network of reactions transforming metabolites one in each other. Knowledge on the structure of this network could help to develop novel methods for drug design, and to comprehend the root of known unexpected side effects. Many large-scale studies on the structure of metabolic networks have been developed following models based on different kinds of graphs as the fundamental image of the reaction network. Graphs models, however, comport wrong assumptions regarding the structure of reaction networks that may lead into wrong conclusions if they are not taken into account. In this article we critically review some graph-theoretical approaches to the analysis of centrality, vulnerability and modularity of metabolic networks, analyzing their limitations in estimating these key network properties, consider some proposals explicit or implicitly based on directed hypergraphs regarding their ability to overcome these issues, and review some recent implementation improvements that make the application of these models in increasingly large networks a viable option.

  16. “Micromanaging” metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or enzymes to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators of metabolic homeostasis, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) in the post-transcriptional regulation of a number of genes, and their involvement in many pathological states, such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer. Of note is microRNA-33 (miR-33), an intronic microRNA (miRNA) located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, one of the master regulators of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. We have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) formation, as well as fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling. These results describe a model in which miR-33 works in concert with its host genes to ensure that the cell's metabolic state is balanced, thus highlighting the clinical potential of miRNAs as novel therapeutic targets for treating cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:21946517

  17. Motherhood, metabolic changes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Pecorari, D

    2002-06-01

    The most important metabolic changes in pregnancy are facilitated anabolism when food is available and accelerated catabolism during fasting. In combination with the acquisition of haemochorial placenta, bipedalism and obligatory prematurity at birth these evolutionary choices have been the prerequisite conditions for the rapid growth of the fetal brain and its further postnatal development.

  18. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  19. Does Metabolically Healthy Obesity Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Cornejo-Pareja, Isabel; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and other metabolic diseases have been deeply studied. However, there are clinical inconsistencies, exceptions to the paradigm of “more fat means more metabolic disease”, and the subjects in this condition are referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO).They have long-standing obesity and morbid obesity but can be considered healthy despite their high degree of obesity. We describe the variable definitions of MHO, the underlying mechanisms that can explain the existence of this phenotype caused by greater adipose tissue inflammation or the different capacity for adipose tissue expansion and functionality apart from other unknown mechanisms. We analyze whether these subjects improve after an intervention (traditional lifestyle recommendations or bariatric surgery) or if they stay healthy as the years pass. MHO is common among the obese population and constitutes a unique subset of characteristics that reduce metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors despite the presence of excessive fat mass. The protective factors that grant a healthier profile to individuals with MHO are being elucidated. PMID:27258304

  20. [Metabolic bone and joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Endo, Itsuro

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic bone and joint diseases in adults include osteomalacia, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis. Recently, the newest molecular biology procedures and the clinical observation studies can produce good results for understanding of these diseases. From this perspective, the author introduced updated information of the pathophysiology, the latest diagnostic criteria and the therapy of these diseases.

  1. Metabolic Consequences after Urinary Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Raimund; Rubenwolf, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances are well-known, but sometimes neglected immediate consequences or late sequelae following urinary diversion (UD) using bowel segments. Whereas subclinical disturbances appear to be quite common, clinically relevant metabolic complications, however, are rare. Exclusion of bowel segments for UD results in loss of absorptive surface for its physiological function. Previous studies demonstrated that at least some of the absorptive and secreting properties of the bowel are preserved when exposed to urine. For each bowel segment typical consequences and complications have been reported. The use of ileal and/or colonic segments may result in hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, which can be prevented if prophylactic treatment with alkali supplementation is started early. The resection of ileal segments may be responsible for malabsorption of vitamin B12 and bile acids with subsequent neurological and hematological late sequelae as well as potential worsening of the patient’s bowel habits. Hence, careful patient and procedure selection, meticulous long-term follow-up, and prophylactic treatment of subclinical acidosis is of paramount importance in the prevention of true metabolic complications. PMID:24653981

  2. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  3. PATHWAY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remarkable aspect of the metabolism of inorganic arsenic in humans is its conversion to methylated metabolites. These metabolites account for most of the arsenic found in urine after exposure to inorganic arsenic. At least some of the adverse health effects attributed to inor...

  4. Sex Hormones and Macronutrient Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Comitato, Raffaella; Saba, Anna; Turrini, Aida; Arganini, Claudia; Virgili, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The biological differences between males and females are determined by a different set of genes and by a different reactivity to environmental stimuli, including the diet, in general. These differences are further emphasized and driven by the exposure to a different hormone flux throughout the life. These differences have not been taken into appropriate consideration by the scientific community. Nutritional sciences are not immune from this “bias” and when nutritional needs are concerned, females are considered only when pregnant, lactating or when their hormonal profile is returning back to “normal,” i.e., to the male-like profile. The authors highlight some of the most evident differences in aspects of biology that are associated with nutrition. This review presents and describes available data addressing differences and similarities of the “reference man” vs. the “reference woman” in term of metabolic activity and nutritional needs. According to this assumption, available evidences of sex-associated differences of specific biochemical pathways involved in substrate metabolism are reported and discussed. The modulation by sexual hormones affecting glucose, amino acid and protein metabolism and the metabolization of nutritional fats and the distribution of fat depots, is considered targeting a tentative starting up background for a gender concerned nutritional science. PMID:24915409

  5. Alcohol Metabolism and Epigenetics Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zakhari, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Metabolites, including those generated during ethanol metabolism, can impact disease states by binding to transcription factors and/or modifying chromatin structure, thereby altering gene expression patterns. For example, the activities of enzymes involved in epigenetic modifications such as DNA and histone methylation and histone acetylation, are influenced by the levels of metabolites such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Chronic alcohol consumption leads to significant reductions in SAM levels, thereby contributing to DNA hypomethylation. Similarly, ethanol metabolism alters the ratio of NAD+ to reduced NAD (NADH) and promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and acetate, all of which impact epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. In addition to altered carbohydrate metabolism, induction of cell death, and changes in mitochondrial permeability transition, these metabolism-related changes can lead to modulation of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Understanding the nature of these epigenetic changes will help researchers design novel medications to treat or at least ameliorate alcohol-induced organ damage. PMID:24313160

  6. Absorption and Metabolism of Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, have attracted significant attention because of their characteristic biological activities, including anti-allergic, anti-cancer, and anti-obese actions. Although no less than forty carotenoids are ingested under usual dietary habits, only six carotenoids and their metabolites have been found in human tissues, suggesting selectivity in the intestinal absorption of carotenoids. Recently, facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion has been reported to mediate the intestinal absorption of carotenoids in mammals. The selective absorption of carotenoids may be caused by uptake to the intestinal epithelia by the facilitated diffusion and an unknown excretion to intestinal lumen. It is well known that β-carotene can be metabolized to vitamin A after intestinal absorption of carotenoids, but little is known about the metabolic transformation of non provitamin A xanthophylls. The enzymatic oxidation of the secondary hydroxyl group leading to keto-carotenoids would occur as a common pathway of xanthophyll metabolism in mammals. This paper reviews the absorption and metabolism of xanthophylls by introducing recent advances in this field. PMID:21747746

  7. Metabolism of acrylonitrile and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hogy, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic activation by liver microsomes is necessary for the covalent binding to DNA of acrylonitrile, a widely used industrial chemical. However, tumor formation is localized in the brain, not in the liver. The reasons for such target organ specificity and the mechanism of carcinogenicity are unknown, and studies were performed to provide insights into these events. The metabolism of acrylonitrile was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes to establish the quantitative relationship between oxidative and conjugative metabolism. Approximately 85% of the acrylonitrile reacted with glutathione to form S-(2-cyanoethyl)glutathione while another 5% alkylated protein, especially by cyanoethylation of sulfhydryl groups. About 10% of the acrylonitrile was metabolized to the relatively stable epoxide, 2-cyanoethylene oxide. Further experiments were carried out to study in vivo any genetic damage by acrylonitrile and assess the role of 2-cyanoethylene oxide. Unscheduled DNA synthesis was observed in the livers, but not the brains of acrylonitrile-treated rats. When perfused rat livers were treated with acrylonitrile, 2-cyanoethylene oxide accumulated in the perfusate. 2-Cyano-(2,3-/sup 14/C)-ethylene oxide administered to rats intraperitoneally was found to label both liver and brain protein, but no covalent binding to nucleic acids was detected. These results demonstrate that acrylonitrile has some limited potential for genotoxicity in vivo and that the epoxide can circulate from the liver to the brain to alkylate macromolecules in a carcinogenic target organ generally less capable of DNA repair.

  8. Dihydroxyacetone metabolism in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Matthew; Makkay, Andrea M; Papke, R Thane

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) is a ketose sugar that can be produced by oxidizing glycerol. DHA in the environment is taken up and phosphorylated to DHA-phosphate by glycerol kinase or DHA kinase. In hypersaline environments, it is hypothesized that DHA is produced as an overflow product from glycerol utilization by organisms such as Salinibacter ruber. Previous research has demonstrated that the halobacterial species Haloquadratum walsbyi can use DHA as a carbon source, and putative DHA kinase genes were hypothesized to be involved in this process. However, DHA metabolism has not been demonstrated in other halobacterial species, and the role of the DHA kinase genes was not confirmed. In this study, we examined the metabolism of DHA in Haloferax volcanii because putative DHA kinase genes were annotated in its genome, and it has an established genetic system to assay growth of mutant knockouts. Experiments in which Hfx. volcanii was grown on DHA as the sole carbon source demonstrated growth, and that it is concentration dependent. Three annotated DHA kinase genes (HVO_1544, HVO_1545, and HVO_1546), which are homologous to the putative DHA kinase genes present in Hqm. walsbyi, as well as the glycerol kinase gene (HVO_1541), were deleted to examine the effect of these genes on the growth of Hfx. volcanii on DHA. Experiments demonstrated that the DHA kinase deletion mutant exhibited diminished, but not absence of growth on DHA compared to the parent strain. Deletion of the glycerol kinase gene also reduced growth on DHA, and did so more than deletion of the DHA kinase. The results indicate that Hfx. volcanii can metabolize DHA and that DHA kinase plays a role in this metabolism. However, the glycerol kinase appears to be the primary enzyme involved in this process. BLASTp analyses demonstrate that the DHA kinase genes are patchily distributed among the Halobacteria, whereas the glycerol kinase gene is widely distributed, suggesting a widespread capability for DHA metabolism.

  9. Folate metabolic pathways in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Tim J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasitic protozoans of the genus Leishmania are autotrophic for both folate and unconjugated pteridines. Leishmania salvage these metabolites from their mammalian hosts and insect vectors through multiple transporters. Within the parasite, folates are reduced by a bifunctional DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase)-TS (thymidylate synthase) and by a novel PTR1 (pteridine reductase 1), which reduces both folates and unconjugated pteridines. PTR1 can act as a metabolic bypass of DHFR inhibition, reducing the effectiveness of existing antifolate drugs. Leishmania possess a reduced set of folate-dependent metabolic reactions and can salvage many of the key products of folate metabolism from their hosts. For example, they lack purine synthesis, which normally requires 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, and instead rely on a network of purine salvage enzymes. Leishmania elaborate at least three pathways for the synthesis of the key metabolite 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, required for the synthesis of thymidylate, and for 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, whose presumptive function is for methionyl-tRNAMet formylation required for mitochondrial protein synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that the synthesis of methionine using 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is dispensable, as is the activity of the glycine cleavage complex, probably due to redundancy with serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Although not always essential, the loss of several folate metabolic enzymes results in attenuation or loss of virulence in animal models, and a null DHFR-TS mutant has been used to induce protective immunity. The folate metabolic pathway provides numerous opportunities for targeted chemotherapy, with strong potential for 'repurposing' of compounds developed originally for treatment of human cancers or other infectious agents.

  10. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  11. Urban metabolism: a review of research methodologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Urban metabolism analysis has become an important tool for the study of urban ecosystems. The problems of large metabolic throughput, low metabolic efficiency, and disordered metabolic processes are a major cause of unhealthy urban systems. In this paper, I summarize the international research on urban metabolism, and describe the progress that has been made in terms of research methodologies. I also review the methods used in accounting for and evaluating material and energy flows in urban metabolic processes, simulation of these flows using a network model, and practical applications of these methods. Based on this review of the literature, I propose directions for future research, and particularly the need to study the urban carbon metabolism because of the modern context of global climate change. Moreover, I recommend more research on the optimal regulation of urban metabolic systems.

  12. Ketone body metabolism and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Ketone bodies are metabolized through evolutionarily conserved pathways that support bioenergetic homeostasis, particularly in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle when carbohydrates are in short supply. The metabolism of ketone bodies interfaces with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, sterol biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, hormonal signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the microbiome. Here we review the mechanisms through which ketone bodies are metabolized and how their signals are transmitted. We focus on the roles this metabolic pathway may play in cardiovascular disease states, the bioenergetic benefits of myocardial ketone body oxidation, and prospective interactions among ketone body metabolism, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Ketone body metabolism is noninvasively quantifiable in humans and is responsive to nutritional interventions. Therefore, further investigation of this pathway in disease models and in humans may ultimately yield tailored diagnostic strategies and therapies for specific pathological states. PMID:23396451

  13. Toward systems metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Juan; Gudmundsson, Steinn; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-01

    We recently assessed the metabolism of Synechocystis sp PCC6803 through a constraints-based reconstruction and analysis approach and identified its main metabolic properties. These include reduced metabolic robustness, in contrast to a high photosynthetic robustness driving the optimal autotrophic metabolism. Here, we address how these metabolic features affect biotechnological capabilities of this bacterium. The search for growth-coupled overproducer strains revealed that the carbon flux re-routing, but not the electron flux, is significantly more challenging under autotrophic conditions than under mixo- or heterotrophic conditions. We also found that the blocking of the light-driven metabolism was required for carbon flux re-routing under mixotrophic conditions. Overall, our analysis, which represents the first systematic evaluation of the biotechnological capabilities of a photosynthetic organism, paradoxically suggests that the light-driven metabolism itself and its unique metabolic features are the main bottlenecks in harnessing the biotechnological potential of Synechocystis. PMID:23138691

  14. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells can affect numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The potential dependence of cancer cells on the deregulated lipid metabolism suggests that enzymes and regulating factors involved in this process are promising targets for cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on the features associated with the lipid metabolic pathways in cancer, and highlight recent advances on the therapeutic targets of specific lipid metabolic enzymes or regulating factors and target-directed small molecules that can be potentially used as anticancer drugs. PMID:28053954

  15. SIMULATING METABOLISM TO ENHANCE EFFECTS MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major uncertainty that has long been recognized in evaluating chemical toxicity is accounting for metabolic activation of chemicals resulting in increased toxicity. The proposed research will develop a capability for forecasting the metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals of EPA int...

  16. SFA 2.0- Metabolic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jill; Beller, Harry

    2015-02-17

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientists Jill Banfield and Harry Beller explain the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project's research on metabolic potential—or how metabolic lifestyles of microbial communities modulate in response to as well as influence environmental change.

  17. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... This is an amino acid that helps remove ammonia from the blood. Babies with HCY may need ...

  18. Quantum metabolism explains the allometric scaling of metabolic rates

    PubMed Central

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A general model explaining the origin of allometric laws of physiology is proposed based on coupled energy-transducing oscillator networks embedded in a physical d-dimensional space (d = 1, 2, 3). This approach integrates Mitchell's theory of chemi-osmosis with the Debye model of the thermal properties of solids. We derive a scaling rule that relates the energy generated by redox reactions in cells, the dimensionality of the physical space and the mean cycle time. Two major regimes are found corresponding to classical and quantum behaviour. The classical behaviour leads to allometric isometry while the quantum regime leads to scaling laws relating metabolic rate and body size that cover a broad range of exponents that depend on dimensionality and specific parameter values. The regimes are consistent with a range of behaviours encountered in micelles, plants and animals and provide a conceptual framework for a theory of the metabolic function of living systems. PMID:19734187

  19. Quantum metabolism explains the allometric scaling of metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Tuszynski, J A

    2010-03-06

    A general model explaining the origin of allometric laws of physiology is proposed based on coupled energy-transducing oscillator networks embedded in a physical d-dimensional space (d = 1, 2, 3). This approach integrates Mitchell's theory of chemi-osmosis with the Debye model of the thermal properties of solids. We derive a scaling rule that relates the energy generated by redox reactions in cells, the dimensionality of the physical space and the mean cycle time. Two major regimes are found corresponding to classical and quantum behaviour. The classical behaviour leads to allometric isometry while the quantum regime leads to scaling laws relating metabolic rate and body size that cover a broad range of exponents that depend on dimensionality and specific parameter values. The regimes are consistent with a range of behaviours encountered in micelles, plants and animals and provide a conceptual framework for a theory of the metabolic function of living systems.

  20. Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    metabolism . SA2. NMR-based Investigations of Metabolic Reprogramming in TNBC. The objective is to use NMR-based metabolomic analysis in TNBC models to...resulting metastases. Together, the applications of NMR for metabolite analysis with the molecular studies on metabolic signaling from Aim 1 create a...opportunity to classify TNBC and with future applications to MRI/MRS imaging. Our NMR-based metabolic analysis provides an excellent entry for

  1. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure.

  2. Metabolism and Metabolic Inhibition of Xanthotoxol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianbao; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome p450 (CYP450) enzymes are predominantly involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics. In this study, the CYP450 isoforms involved in xanthotoxol metabolism were identified using recombinant CYP450s. In addition, the inhibitory effects of xanthotoxol on eight CYP450 isoforms and its pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using human liver microsomes. CYP1A2, one of CYP450s, played a key role in the metabolism of xanthotoxol compared to other CYP450s. Xanthotoxol showed stronger inhibition on CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 compared to other isoenzymes with the IC50 of 7.43 μM for CYP3A4 and 27.82 μM for CYP1A2. The values of inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki) were 21.15 μM and 2.22 μM for CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, respectively. The metabolism of xanthotoxol obeyed the typical monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Vmax, Km, and CLint values were calculated as 0.55 nmol·min−1·mg−1, 8.46 μM, and 0.06 mL·min−1·mg−1. In addition, the results of molecular docking showed that xanthotoxol was bound to CYP1A2 with hydrophobic and π-π bond and CYP3A4 with hydrogen and hydrophobic bond. We predicted the hepatic clearance (CLH) and the CLH value was 15.91 mL·min−1·kg−1 body weight. These data were significant for the application of xanthotoxol and xanthotoxol-containing herbs. PMID:27034690

  3. Metabolism strikes back: metabolic flux regulates cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on growth factor signaling to take up nutrients; however, coordination of glucose and glutamine uptake has been a mystery. In this issue of Genes & Development, Wellen and colleagues (pp. 2784–2799) show that glucose flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway regulates growth factor receptor glycosylation and enables glutamine consumption. This mechanism ensures that cells do not engage in anabolic metabolism when nutrients are limiting, and highlights how substrate availability for protein modifications can modulate cell signaling. PMID:21159812

  4. Thoughts on the Teaching of Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    Systems biology, metabolomics, metabolic engineering, and other recent developments in biochemistry suggest that future biochemists will require a detailed familiarity with the compounds and pathways of intermediary metabolism and their biochemical control. The challenge to the biochemistry instructor is the presentation of metabolic pathways in a…

  5. Opportunities for genetic improvement of metabolic diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic disorders are disturbances to one or more of the metabolic processes in dairy cattle. Dysfunction of any of these processes is associated with the manifestation of metabolic diseases or disorders. In this review, data recording, incidences, genetic parameters, predictors and status of gene...

  6. Targeting metabolic scavenging in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor metabolism is rewired to facilitate survival and growth in a nutrient-depleted environment. This leads to a unique dependence on metabolic recycling and scavenging pathways, including NAD salvage. Targeting this pathway in pancreatic cancer disrupts metabolic homeostasis and impairs tumor growth.

  7. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  8. Targeting cellular metabolism to improve cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Butler, E B; Tan, M

    2013-03-07

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells diverge significantly from those of normal cells. Energy production in cancer cells is abnormally dependent on aerobic glycolysis. In addition to the dependency on glycolysis, cancer cells have other atypical metabolic characteristics such as increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows that many features characteristic to cancer cells, such as dysregulated Warburg-like glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis and glutaminolysis are linked to therapeutic resistance in cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting cellular metabolism may improve the response to cancer therapeutics and the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with cellular metabolism inhibitors may represent a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, several review articles have summarized the anticancer targets in the metabolic pathways and metabolic inhibitor-induced cell death pathways, however, the dysregulated metabolism in therapeutic resistance, which is a highly clinical relevant area in cancer metabolism research, has not been specifically addressed. From this unique angle, this review article will discuss the relationship between dysregulated cellular metabolism and cancer drug resistance and how targeting of metabolic enzymes, such as glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, fatty acid synthase and glutaminase can enhance the efficacy of common therapeutic agents or overcome resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  9. Metabolic pathway resources at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two maize metabolic networks are available at MaizeGDB: MaizeCyc (http://maizecyc.maizegdb.org, also at Gramene) and CornCyc (http://corncyc.maizegdb.org, also at the Plant Metabolic Network). MaizeCyc was developed by Gramene, and CornCyc by the Plant Metabolic Network, both in collaboration with M...

  10. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise induces adaptations in metabolism considered beneficial for health. Athletic performance is linked to adaptations, training, and correct nutrition in individuals with genetic traits that can facilitate such adaptations. Intense and continuous exercise, training, and competitions, however, can induce changes in the serum concentrations of numerous laboratory parameters. When these modifications, especially elevated laboratory levels, result outside the reference range, further examinations are ordered or participation in training and competition is discontinued or sports practice loses its appeal. In order to correctly interpret commonly used laboratory data, laboratory professionals and sport physicians need to know the behavior of laboratory parameters during and after practice and competition. We reviewed the literature on liver, kidney, muscle, heart, energy, and bone parameters in athletes with a view to increase the knowledge about clinical chemistry applied to sport and to stimulate studies in this field. In liver metabolism, the interpretation of serum aminotransferases concentration in athletes should consider the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from muscle and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) mainly from the liver, when bilirubin can be elevated because of continuous hemolysis, which is typical of exercise. Muscle metabolism parameters such as creatine kinase (CK) are typically increased after exercise. This parameter can be used to interpret the physiological release of CK from muscle, its altered release due to rhabdomyolysis, or incomplete recovery due to overreaching or trauma. Cardiac markers are released during exercise, and especially endurance training. Increases in these markers should not simply be interpreted as a signal of cardiac damage or wall stress but rather as a sign of regulation of myocardial adaptation. Renal function can be followed in athletes by measuring serum creatinine concentration, but it should

  11. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  12. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  13. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  14. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  15. RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamel; Giegé, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the eukaryotic cell and are derived from the endosymbiosis of an α-proteobacterial ancestor. Compared to other eukaryotes, RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria is complex and combines bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. These complex RNA processes are regulated by families of nucleus-encoded RNA-binding proteins. Transcription is particularly relaxed and is initiated from multiple promoters covering the entire genome. The variety of RNA precursors accumulating in mitochondria highlights the importance of post-transcriptional processes to determine the size and abundance of transcripts. Here we review RNA metabolism in plant mitochondria, from RNA transcription to translation, with a special focus on their unique features that are controlled by trans-factors.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in children (Review).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-E; Zhang, Chong-Lin; Zhen, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and increased blood pressure. The prevalence of MetS is on the increase worldwide owing to the epidemic of overweight and obesity. The risk of prevalence of MetS greatly increases during adulthood for those children exposed to cardiometabolic risk factors in their early lives. MetS has also been associated with liver fat accumulation in children. Elevated levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase have been associated with liver fat accumulation. The present review aimed to expand knowledge on the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors responsible for the widespread occurrence of metabolic disease in children.

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  18. Toward Engineering Synthetic Microbial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, George H.; Fong, Stephen S.

    2010-01-01

    The generation of well-characterized parts and the formulation of biological design principles in synthetic biology are laying the foundation for more complex and advanced microbial metabolic engineering. Improvements in de novo DNA synthesis and codon-optimization alone are already contributing to the manufacturing of pathway enzymes with improved or novel function. Further development of analytical and computer-aided design tools should accelerate the forward engineering of precisely regulated synthetic pathways by providing a standard framework for the predictable design of biological systems from well-characterized parts. In this review we discuss the current state of synthetic biology within a four-stage framework (design, modeling, synthesis, analysis) and highlight areas requiring further advancement to facilitate true engineering of synthetic microbial metabolism. PMID:20037734

  19. Cholesterol metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Karasinska, Joanna M; Hayden, Michael R

    2011-09-06

    The CNS is rich in cholesterol, which is essential for neuronal development and survival, synapse maturation, and optimal synaptic activity. Alterations in brain cholesterol homeostasis are linked to neurodegeneration. Studies have demonstrated that Huntington disease (HD), a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, is associated with changes in cellular cholesterol metabolism. Emerging evidence from human and animal studies indicates that attenuated brain sterol synthesis and accumulation of cholesterol in neuronal membranes represent two distinct mechanisms occurring in the presence of mutant huntingtin that influence neuronal survival. Increased knowledge of how changes in intraneuronal cholesterol metabolism influence the pathogenesis of HD will provide insights into the potential application of brain cholesterol regulation as a therapeutic strategy for this devastating disease.

  20. Spontaneous emergence of a metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, R.J.; Farmer, J.D. Santa Fe Inst., NM )

    1990-01-01

    Networks of catalyzed reactions with nonlinear feedback have been proposed to play an important role in the origin of life. We investigate this possibility in a polymer chemistry with catalyzed cleavage and condensation reactions. We study the properties of a well-stirred reactor driven away from equilibrium by the flow of mass. Under appropriate non-equilibrium conditions. The nonlinear feedback of the reaction network focuses the material of the system into a few specific polymer species. The network of catalytic reactions digests'' the material of its environment, incorporating it into its own form. We call the result an autocatalytic metabolism. Under some variations it persists almost unchanged, while in other cases it dies. We argue that the dynamical stability of autocatalytic metabolisms gives them regenerative properties that allow them to repair themselves and to propagate through time. 43 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Metabolic potential of endophytic bacteria☆

    PubMed Central

    Brader, Günter; Compant, Stéphane; Mitter, Birgit; Trognitz, Friederike; Sessitsch, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic microbiome promotes plant growth and health and beneficial effects are in many cases mediated and characterized by metabolic interactions. Recent advances have been made in regard to metabolite production by plant microsymbionts showing that they may produce a range of different types of metabolites. These substances play a role in defense and competition, but may also be needed for specific interaction and communication with the plant host. Furthermore, few examples of bilateral metabolite production are known and endophytes may modulate plant metabolite synthesis as well. We have just started to understand such metabolic interactions between plants and endophytes, however, further research is needed to more efficiently make use of beneficial plant-microbe interactions and to reduce pathogen infestation as well as to reveal novel bioactive substances of commercial interest. PMID:24863894

  2. Peroxisome Metabolism and Cellular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The essential role of peroxisomes in fatty acid oxidation, anaplerotic metabolism, and hydrogen peroxide turnover is well established. Recent findings suggest these and other related biochemical processes governed by the organelle may also play a critical role in regulating cellular aging. The goal of this review is to summarize and integrate into a model, the evidence that peroxisome metabolism actually helps define the replicative and chronological age of a eukaryotic cell. In this model, peroxisomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are seen as altering organelle biogenesis and function, and eliciting changes in the dynamic communication networks that exist between peroxisomes and other cellular compartments. At low levels, peroxisomal ROS activate an anti-aging program in the cell; at concentrations beyond a specific threshold, a pro-aging course is triggered. PMID:21083858

  3. Isoprenoid metabolism in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include some of the most prevalent and deadly human pathogens. Novel antiparasitic drugs are urgently needed. Synthesis and metabolism of isoprenoids may present multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The apicoplast-localized methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis is distinct from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway used by the mammalian host, and this pathway is apparently essential in most Apicomplexa. In this review, we discuss the current field of research on production and metabolic fates of isoprenoids in apicomplexan parasites, including the acquisition of host isoprenoid precursors and downstream products. We describe recent work identifying the first MEP pathway regulator in apicomplexan parasites, and introduce several promising areas for ongoing research into this well-validated antiparasitic target. PMID:25893156

  4. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level1. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice. PMID:23727729

  5. Metabolic syndrome in children (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue-E; Zhang, Chong-Lin; Zhen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and increased blood pressure. The prevalence of MetS is on the increase worldwide owing to the epidemic of overweight and obesity. The risk of prevalence of MetS greatly increases during adulthood for those children exposed to cardiometabolic risk factors in their early lives. MetS has also been associated with liver fat accumulation in children. Elevated levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase have been associated with liver fat accumulation. The present review aimed to expand knowledge on the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors responsible for the widespread occurrence of metabolic disease in children. PMID:27698739

  6. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenyu; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of the genetic basis for circadian rhythms has expanded our knowledge of the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. The observations that the circadian gene network is present in most living organisms from eubacteria to humans, that most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks, and that disruption of clock genes results in metabolic dysregulation have revealed interactions between metabolism and circadian rhythms at neural, molecular, and cellular levels. A major challenge remains in understanding the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks and in determining how these interactions promote energy homeostasis across the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we evaluate how investigation of molecular timing may create new opportunities to understand and develop therapies for obesity and diabetes.

  7. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages.

  8. Hypothalamic control of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Kunal; Yadav, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Bones are structures in vertebrates that provide support to organs, protect soft organs, and give them shape and defined features, functions that are essential for their survival. To perform these functions, bones are constantly renewed throughout life. The process through which bones are renewed is known as bone remodeling, an energy demanding process sensitive to changes in energy homeostasis of the organism. A close interplay takes place between the diversity of nutritional cues and metabolic signals with different elements of the hypothalamic circuits to co-ordinate energy metabolism with the regulation of bone mass. In this review, we focus on how mouse and human genetics have elucidated the roles of hormonal signals and neural circuits that originate in, or impinge on, the hypothalamus in the regulation of bone mass. This will help to understand the mechanisms whereby regulation of bone is gated and dynamically regulated by the hypothalamus.

  9. Autophagy and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lozy, Fred; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving lysosomal turnover of proteins and organelles for maintenance of cellular homeostasis and mitigation of metabolic stress. Autophagy defects are linked to diseases, such as liver failure, neurodegeneration, inflammatory bowel disease, aging and cancer. The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex and likely context-dependent. Human breast, ovarian and prostate cancers have allelic deletions of the essential autophagy regulator BECN1 and Becn1(+/-) and other autophagy-deficient transgenic mice are tumor-prone, whereas tumors with constitutive Ras activation, including human pancreatic cancers, upregulate basal autophagy and are commonly addicted to this pathway for survival and growth; furthermore, autophagy suppression by Fip200 deletion compromises PyMT-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The double-edged sword function of autophagy in cancer has been attributed to both cell- and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms, as autophagy defects promote cancer progression in association with oxidative and ER stress, DNA damage accumulation, genomic instability and persistence of inflammation, while functional autophagy enables cancer cell survival under stress and likely contributes to treatment resistance. In this review, we will focus on the intimate link between autophagy and cancer cell metabolism, a topic of growing interest in recent years, which has been recognized as highly clinically relevant and has become the focus of intense investigation in translational cancer research. Many tumor-associated conditions, including intermittent oxygen and nutrient deprivation, oxidative stress, fast growth and cell death suppression, modulate, in parallel and in interconnected ways, both cellular metabolism and autophagy to enable cancer cells to rapidly adapt to environmental stressors, maintain uncontrolled proliferation and evade the toxic effects of radiation and/or chemotherapy. Elucidating the interplay between autophagy and tumor cell

  10. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    testing our walking model in overground outdoor trials and 4 additional subjects were tested . Thus far, 16 subjects have completed a three- speed ... speeds from 0.4 to 1.9 meters per second. At this juncture, 21 subjects have completed a three- speed protocol on level asphalt with metabolic...subjects) at three walking speeds : 1.0, 1.3 and 1.6 meters per second. The predictions provided by our stature-based model on the over- ground

  11. Epinephrine and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Michael G; Elayan, Hamzeh; Milic, Milos; Sun, Ping; Gharaibeh, Munir

    2012-02-01

    Epinephrine is the prototypical stress hormone. Its stimulation of all α and β adrenergic receptors elicits short-term systolic hypertension, hyperglycemia, and other aspects of the metabolic syndrome. Acute epinephrine infusion increases cardiac output and induces insulin resistance, but removal of the adrenal medulla has no consistent effect on blood pressure. Epinephrine is the most effective endogenous agonist at the β2 receptor. Transgenic mice that cannot make epinephrine and mice that lack the β2 receptor become hypertensive during exercise, presumably owing to the absence of β2-mediated vasodilatation. Epinephrine-deficient mice also have cardiac remodeling and poor cardiac responses to stress, but do not develop resting hypertension. Mice that cannot make epinephrine have a normal metabolism on a regular 14% fat diet but become hyperglycemic and insulin resistant when they eat a high fat diet. Vigorous exercise prevents diabetes in young mice and humans that overeat. However, exercise is a less effective treatment in older type 2 human diabetics and had no effect on glucose or insulin responses in older, diabetic mice. Sensitivity of the β2 receptor falls sharply with advancing age, and adrenal epinephrine release also decreases. However, treatment of older diabetic mice with a β2 adrenergic agonist improved insulin sensitivity, indicating that β2 subsensitivity can be overcome pharmacologically. Recent studies show that over the long term, epinephrine prevents hypertension during stress and improves glucose tolerance. The hyperglycemic influence of epinephrine is short-lived. Chronic administration of epinephrine and other β2 agonists improves cellular glucose uptake and metabolism. Overall, epinephrine counteracts the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Metabolic Studies in Military Nutrition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    The Surgeon General’s Office over a period of years has undertaken an extensive research program into the chemistry, nutrition , and wholesomeness of...Research and Nutrition Laboratory has undertaken the studies of the wholesomeness of food preserved by ionizing radiation. Work on radiated food has been...physiological, metabolic, and nutritional research in normal young adult men has been going on making use of volunteer human test subjects.

  13. Renal ammonia metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2013-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4(+) and 2 HCO3(-) for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3(-)-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4(+) trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4(+)-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K(+), and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis.

  14. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Surgical treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sharon; Cunningham, Emily; Pories, Walter J

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the surprising finding that bariatric surgery can produce full and durable remission of the metabolic syndrome as well as other comorbidities of obesity including type II diabetes, hypertension, polycystic ovary syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonalcoholic steatotic hepatitis, adult asthma and improvement in weight-bearing arthropathy. Such an outcome was previously deemed impossible. One effect of the surgery is the correction of hyperinsulinemia, a common denominator in the various expressions of the metabolic syndrome. Basal insulin levels return to normal levels within a matter of days following surgery, allowing a return of the first phase of insulin secretion. This effect is 'dose related' to the extent of the reduction of contact between food and the gut. The resolution of the spectrum of diseases that comprise the metabolic syndrome following bariatric surgery suggests that hyperinsulinemia may be the common cause that is corrected by lowering contact between food and the gut. If this concept is true, then the cause of the syndrome, including diabetes, could be a diabetogenic signal from the gut that forces the islets to produce excessive and harmful levels of insulin, or the cause could be the removal of a signal that blocks excessive insulin secretion. If either of these mechanisms is proven correct, the current treatment of diabetes with long-term insulin administration deserves review.

  16. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  17. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  18. Citrate Metabolism by Pediococcus halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Kanbe, Chiyuki; Uchida, Kinji

    1987-01-01

    Several strains of non-citrate-metabolizing Pediococcus halophilus have previously been isolated from soy sauce mash or moromi. The factors controlling the metabolism of citrate in soy pediococci were studied. All the soy pediococcal strains tested which failed to decompose citrate did not possess citrate lyase [citrate (pro-3S)-lyase; EC 4.1.3.6] activity. In P. halophilus, citrate lyase was an inducible enzyme, and the optimum pH for activity was 7.0. The metabolism of citrate in P. halophilus was different from that observed in lactic streptococci. The main products from citrate were acetate and formate, and this bacterium produced no acetoin or diacetyl. Formate production from citrate was greatly reduced in the presence of glucose. P. halophilus 7117 (Cit+) was proved to contain citrate lyase, pyruvate formate-lyase (EC 2.3.1.54) phosphotransacetylase (phosphate acetyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.8), and acetate kinase (EC 2.7.2.1), i.e., all the enzymes necessary to convert citrate to acetate and formate. PMID:16347358

  19. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  20. Matrix metalloproteinases in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is commonly accompanied by an elevated cardiovascular risk with high morbidity and mortality. The alterations of the arterial vasculature begin with endothelial dysfunction and lead to micro- and macrovascular complications. The remodeling of the endothelial basal membrane, that promotes erosion and thrombosis, has a multifactorial pathogenesis that includes leukocyte activation, increased oxidative stress and also an altered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression. MMPs are endopeptidases which degrade extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, gelatins, fibronectin and laminin. They can be secreted by several cells within the vascular wall, but macrophages are determinant in the atherosclerotic plaques. Their activity is regulated by tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMPs) and also by other molecules, such as plasmin. MMPs could be implicated in plaque instability predisposing to vascular complications. It has been demonstrated that an impaired MMP or TIMP expression is associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality. A large number of studies evaluated MMPs pattern in obesity, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia, all of which define metabolic syndrome according to several Consensus Statement (i.e. IDF, ATP III, AHA). However, few research have been carried out on subjects with metabolic syndrome. The evidences of an improvement in MMP/TIMP ratio with diet, exercise and medical therapy should encourage further investigations with the intent to contrast the atherosclerotic process and to reduce morbidity and mortality of this kind of patients.

  1. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems. PMID:26904095

  2. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  3. Sirtuins in glucose and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Li, Meiting; Hou, Tianyun; Gao, Tian; Zhu, Wei-guo; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved protein, serving as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylases or adenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferases. The mammalian sirtuins family, including SIRT1~7, is involved in many biological processes such as cell survival, proliferation, senescence, stress response, genome stability and metabolism. Evidence accumulated over the past two decades has indicated that sirtuins not only serve as important energy status sensors but also protect cells against metabolic stresses. In this review, we summarize the background of glucose and lipid metabolism concerning sirtuins and discuss the functions of sirtuins in glucose and lipid metabolism. We also seek to highlight the biological roles of certain sirtuins members in cancer metabolism. PMID:27659520

  4. Altered Mitochondrial Signalling and Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Esita; Roy, Bidyut

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria being the central organelle for metabolism and other cell signalling pathways have remained the topic of interest to tumour biologists. In spite of the wide acceptance of Warburg’s hypothesis, role of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer is still unclear. Uncontrolled growth and proliferation, hallmarks of tumour cells, are maintained when the cells adapt to metabolic reprogramming with the help of altered metabolism of mitochondria. This review has focussed on different aspects of mitochondrial metabolism and inter-related signalling pathways which have been found to be modified in cancer. PMID:28373964

  5. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Róisín M.; Finlay, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  6. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and infertility in men.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher D; Brannigan, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a compilation of symptoms including central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Initially used to predict cardiovascular disease, it is now clear that the molecular and physiologic abnormalities seen in metabolic syndrome extend well beyond the cardiovascular system. Growing evidence has linked metabolic syndrome and its individual symptoms to the increasing prevalence of male infertility. This manuscript reviews the recent evidence connecting metabolic syndrome to male infertility as well as the underlying pathophysiology. Currently, there are limited prospective studies examining the effects of treating metabolic syndrome on male reproduction and these relationships will need to be a focus of further investigation.

  8. Complementary PET studies of striatal neuronal function in the differential diagnosis between multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, A; Leenders, K L; Vontobel, P; Maguire, R P; Missimer, J; Psylla, M; Günther, I

    1997-12-01

    We used PET with the tracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), [18F]fluorodopa (FDOPA) and [11C]raclopride (RACLO) to study striatal glucose and dopa metabolism, and dopamine D2 receptor binding, respectively, in nine patients with multiple system atrophy. Ten patients with classical Parkinson's disease were investigated with the same three PET tracers' and three separate groups, each of 10 healthy subjects, served as control populations. We found that striatal FDOPA values separated all healthy subjects from patients with parkinsonism but they were not useful in distinguishing multiple system atrophy from Parkinson's disease. Conversely, striatal RACLO as well as FDG values discriminated all multiple system atrophy from Parkinson's disease patients as well as from healthy control subjects. Metabolic and receptor binding decrements in the putamen of multiple system atrophy patients were significantly correlated. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that a linear combination of putamen RACLO and FDOPA values accurately predicted clinical measures of disease severity in the multiple system atrophy group. Our findings suggest that striatal FDG and particularly RACLO are sensitive and effective measures of striatal function and may help characterizing patients with multiple system atrophy. In contrast, FDOPA measurements are accurate in detecting abnormalities of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system but may not distinguish among different forms of parkinsonism.

  9. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  10. Thyroid Hormones, Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components.

    PubMed

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Pes, Giovanni M; Maioli, Margherita; Delitala, Giuseppe

    2017-03-20

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of various metabolic parameters, which included diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, abdominal obesity, and hypertension. It has merged as a worldwide epidemic and a major public health care concern. However, due to the different criteria used for the assessment, the frequency of metabolic syndrome in the general population is variable but it more common in the older people. Metabolic syndrome is closely linked to cardiovascular risk and increases cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality. Recent evidences showed that alterations of the thyroid function could have an impact on the components of the metabolic syndrome, suggesting that thyroid hormones have a variety of effects on energy homeostasis, lipid and glucose metabolism, and blood pressure. In this review we summarize available data on the action of thyroid hormone on the components of metabolic syndrome.

  11. Interplay between oxidant species and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Celia; Trujillo, Madia; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that energy metabolism is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and critical enzymes allied to metabolic pathways can be affected by redox reactions. This interplay between energy metabolism and ROS becomes most apparent during the aging process and in the onset and progression of many age-related diseases (i.e. diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases). As such, the capacity to identify metabolic pathways involved in ROS formation, as well as specific targets and oxidative modifications is crucial to our understanding of the molecular basis of age-related diseases and for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Herein we review oxidant formation associated with the cell's energetic metabolism, key antioxidants involved in ROS detoxification, and the principal targets of oxidant species in metabolic routes and discuss their relevance in cell signaling and age-related diseases. PMID:26741399

  12. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Simeonidis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information—an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering—and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration. PMID:25578304

  13. Metabolism pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Barzilai, Merav; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell metabolism have been studied by several investigators. Unlike normal B lymphocytes or other leukemia cells, CLL cells, like adipocytes, store lipids and utilize free fatty acids (FFA) to produce chemical energy. None of the recently identified mutations in CLL directly affects metabolic pathways, suggesting that genetic alterations do not directly contribute to CLL cells' metabolic reprogramming. Conversely, recent data suggest that activation of STAT3 or downregulation of microRNA-125 levels plays a crucial role in the utilization of FFA to meet the CLL cells' metabolic needs. STAT3, known to be constitutively activated in CLL, increases the levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) that mediates lipoprotein uptake and shifts the CLL cells' metabolism towards utilization of FFA. Herein, we review the evidence for altered lipid metabolism, increased mitochondrial activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CLL cells, and discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to inhibit lipid metabolism pathways in patient with CLL.

  14. Current perspectives between metabolic syndrome and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Micucci, Carla; Valli, Debora; Matacchione, Giulia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies linked metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer. Although metabolic syndrome may not necessarily cause cancer, it is linked to poorer cancer outcomes including increased risk of recurrence and overall mortality. This review tends to discuss the major biological and physiological alterations involved in the increase of incidence and mortality of cancer patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We focus on metabolic syndrome-associated visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) pathway as well as estrogen signaling and inflammation. Several of these factors are also involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer may provide new insight about oncogenesis. Moreover, prevention of metabolic syndrome – related alterations may be an important aspect in the management of cancer patients during simultaneous palliative care. PMID:27029038

  15. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  16. Current perspectives between metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Micucci, Carla; Valli, Debora; Matacchione, Giulia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies linked metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer. Although metabolic syndrome may not necessarily cause cancer, it is linked to poorer cancer outcomes including increased risk of recurrence and overall mortality. This review tends to discuss the major biological and physiological alterations involved in the increase of incidence and mortality of cancer patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We focus on metabolic syndrome-associated visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) pathway as well as estrogen signaling and inflammation. Several of these factors are also involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer may provide new insight about oncogenesis. Moreover, prevention of metabolic syndrome - related alterations may be an important aspect in the management of cancer patients during simultaneous palliative care.

  17. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  18. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... mostly carbohydrates and fats) to release energy. This energy release provides fuel for anabolism, heats the body, and enables the ... apple, so it provides the body with more energy — and sometimes that can be ... it is needed to fuel the engine, the body stores calories — primarily as ...

  19. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  20. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  1. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  2. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M.; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J.; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sweet, Ian R.; Hurley, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5′-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. PMID:26677218

  3. Structural correlations in bacterial metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolution of metabolism occurs through the acquisition and loss of genes whose products acts as enzymes in metabolic reactions, and from a presumably simple primordial metabolism the organisms living today have evolved complex and highly variable metabolisms. We have studied this phenomenon by comparing the metabolic networks of 134 bacterial species with known phylogenetic relationships, and by studying a neutral model of metabolic network evolution. Results We consider the 'union-network' of 134 bacterial metabolisms, and also the union of two smaller subsets of closely related species. Each reaction-node is tagged with the number of organisms it belongs to, which we denote organism degree (OD), a key concept in our study. Network analysis shows that common reactions are found at the centre of the network and that the average OD decreases as we move to the periphery. Nodes of the same OD are also more likely to be connected to each other compared to a random OD relabelling based on their occurrence in the real data. This trend persists up to a distance of around five reactions. A simple growth model of metabolic networks is used to investigate the biochemical constraints put on metabolic-network evolution. Despite this seemingly drastic simplification, a 'union-network' of a collection of unrelated model networks, free of any selective pressure, still exhibit similar structural features as their bacterial counterpart. Conclusions The OD distribution quantifies topological properties of the evolutionary history of bacterial metabolic networks, and lends additional support to the importance of horizontal gene transfer during bacterial metabolic evolution where new reactions are attached at the periphery of the network. The neutral model of metabolic network growth can reproduce the main features of real networks, but we observe that the real networks contain a smaller common core, while they are more similar at the periphery of the network. This suggests

  4. Metabolic cost of rope training.

    PubMed

    Fountaine, Charles J; Schmidt, Brad J

    2015-04-01

    Rope training, consisting of vigorously undulating a rope with the upper body, has become a popular cardiovascular training choice in fitness centers and athletic performance enhancement facilities. Despite widespread use and growing popularity, little is known about the metabolic demands of rope training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the cardiovascular and metabolic cost from an acute 10-minute bout of rope training. Eleven physically active participants used a 15.2-m rope anchored by a post, resulting in the participant holding 7.6 m of rope in each hand. The 10-minute protocol consisted of 15 seconds of vertical double-arm waves followed by 45 seconds of rest for 10 total repetitions. The metabolic cost was estimated from heart rate, lactate, resting O2 uptake, exercise O2 uptake, and excess postexercise O2 consumption measurements. The average heart rate for the workout was 163 ± 11 b·min with peak (Equation is included in full-text article.) of 35.4 ± 5.4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), and peak METs were 10.1 ± 1.6. Total energy expenditure was 467.3 ± 161.0 kJ. When expressed per unit of time, EE was 41.3 ± 14.1 kJ·min(-1). The results of this study suggest an acute 10-minute bout of rope training in a vigorous-intensity workout, resulting in high heart rates and energy expenditure, which meet previously established thresholds known to increase cardiorespiratory fitness.

  5. Dyslipidemic drugs in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sheelu S.; Misbahuddin; Ahmad, Farida; Rahman, Syed Z.; Khan, Asad U.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Metabolic syndrome predisposes to diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Statins reduce cardiovascular events, so all metabolic syndrome patients should be evaluated for dyslipidemia. Many patients fail to achieve lipid goals with statin monotherapy. Co-administration of ezetimibe (EZE) and atorvastatin (ATV) may enable more patients to achievelow-density lipoproteincholesterol (LDL-C) goal while avoiding risks of high-dose statin monotherapy. Materials and Methods: The present study compares rosuvastatin (Rsv) with a combination of (Atv) and (Eze). Metabolic syndrome patients, 30-70 years with LDL-C ≥130 mg/dl and a 10-year CHD risk score of 10% were randomized to double-blind treatment with (Rsv) 5 mg (n = 67) or (Atv) 10 mg+(Eze) 10 mg (n = 68) for 12 weeks. Results: LDL-C reduced significantly; (32.3% and 30.3%, P < 0.001) in (Atv)+(Eze) and (Rsv), respectively, but there was no significant difference between two arms. More patients achieved LDL-C goal of ≤100 mg/dl with (Atv)+(Eze) compared to (Rsv) (65% vs. 58%, P < 0.05). Triglycerides (TG) were reduced more with (Atv)+(Eze) compared to (Rsv) (28.1% and 21.4%, P < 0.001). Greater increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was observed with (Atv)+(Eze). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion: This study shows that the combination of (Atv)+(Eze) has more efficacy and comparable safety to that of (Rsv). PMID:23869305

  6. Polyamine Metabolism Changes in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Broshtilova, Valentina; Lozanov, Valentina; Miteva, Ljubka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Polyamines – putrescine, spermidine and spermine are polycationic compounds ubiquitous for all living organisms. They are essential for the cell growth and differentiation, the control of cell cycle progress, apoptosis, and cancerogenesis. Accumulated scientific evidence suggests the central role of polyamines in the process of keratinocytic proliferation, differentiation, and regulation. Objective: To elucidate the polyamine metabolic changes that occur in benign keratinocytic proliferation. Fifty eight patients were enrolled in the study, 31 with plaque-form of psoriasis vulgaris, which had been referred to as a model of benign keratinocytic proliferation, and 27-healthy controls. Materials and Methods: An original, innovative chromatographic method was used to detect the levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine in all skin samples. Results: Were significantly proven (P < 0.05). No difference was found between the polyamines levels of non-lesional psoriatic skin and healthy controls. Psoriatic lesions showed a two-time higher concentration of all polyamines in lesional, compared to non-lesional skin. Spermine had the highest concentration and highest proliferation trend, which demonstrated the importance of propylamine synthesis in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Spermine highest concentrations suggested the leading role of adenosine methionine decarboxylase (AMDC) in the pathogenesis of benign keratinocytic proliferations. Conclusions: Non-lesional skin in psoriatic patients did not show latent changes in polyamine metabolism. Psoriatic lesions demontrated two-time higher levels of the most essential biogenic polyamines compared to healthy controls. The highest level of spermine proved the crucial role of AMDC in the polyamine metabolism changes in psoriasis. Future therapeutic approaches should be focused on reduction of exogenic spermine intake, utilizing new spermine blockers, and synthesis of AMDC inhibitors. PMID:23919004

  7. Anaerobic metabolism in Brassica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Germination typically depends on oxidative respiration. The lack of convection under space conditions may create hypoxic or conditions during seed germination. We investigated the effect of reduced oxygen on seed germination and metabolism to understand how metabolic constraints affect seed growth and responsiveness to reorientation. Germination was completely inhibited when seeds were imbibed in the absence of oxygen; germination occurred at 5% oxygen and higher levels. Adding oxygen after 72 h resulted in immediate germination (protrusion of the radicle). Hypoxia typically activates alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) which produce ethanol and/or L-lactate, respectively. We report on the expression of ADH1 and LDH1, and changes in total soluble sugars, starch, pH, and L-lactate in seedlings grown at 28°C in 0, 2.5, 5, 10% and ambient (21%) oxygen conditions as controls. The highest consumption (lowest level) of sugars was seen at 0% oxygen but the lowest level of starch occurred 24 h after imbibition under ambient condition. Expression levels of ADH1 in ambient oxygen condition increased within 24 h but increased threefold under hypoxic conditions; LDH1 increased up to 8-fold under hypoxia compared to controls but ADH1 and LDH1 were less expressed as the oxygen levels increased. The intracellular pH of seeds decreased as the content of L-lactate increased for all oxygen concentrations. These results indicate that germination of Brassica is sensitive to oxygen levels and that oxygen availability during germination is an important factor for metabolic activities. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  8. [Locomotive syndrome and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-10-01

    The Japanese Orthopedic Association coined the term locomotive syndrome (LS) to designate a condition of elderly people in high risk groups of requiring nursing care because of problems with their musculoskeletal diseases. LS is a socioeconomic concept, and closely associated with osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and sarcopenia. Recent studies have revealed that metabolic syndrome (MS), a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, has been related with LS. For example, individuals with MS have a greater risk of osteoarthritis and sarcopenia. Secreted factors from adipose tissue and skeletal muscles, namely, adipokines and myokines, are involved in the association of LS and MS.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Aguilar, VM; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adanm; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Tovar-Rodriguez, JM

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, progressive, currently, are classified according to in pattern of gene expression luminal A, luminal B, basal and HER-2neu + and Triple-negative, 75% to 80% have receptors positive hormonal and 15% to 20% are positive for hER-2neu and 10% to 20% are triple negative, with hormone receptor negative and HER2-neu and their diagnostic is made by exclusion, the Metabolic Syndrome is related to a higher incidence of these cancers where the insulin-leptin axis-adiponectin are implicated in carcinogenesis. PMID:25083463

  10. Glutathione metabolism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smeyne, Michelle; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition in which the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism, and functional interactions of glutathione and discuss how these relate to the protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson disease.

  11. Novel drugs targeting sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bhabak, Krishna P; Arenz, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    While the evidence for an involvement of sphingolipids (SLs) in a variety of diseases is rapidly increasing, the development of sphingolipid-related drugs is still in its infancy. In fact, the recently FDA-approved fingolimod or FTY-720 (see chapter by J. Pfeilschifter for more information) is the first drug on the market to interfere with sphingolipid signaling. The reasons for this lagging are manifold and within this chapter we try to name some of them. Ceramide is in the center of sphingolipid metabolism. We describe the most important and most recent inhibitors for enzymes controlling cellular ceramide levels.

  12. Metabolic analyzer. [for Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water vapor. Circuits responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure, and timing signals compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume, and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for readout of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  13. Metabolism of pentachlorophenol by fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Interspecies variability in the metabolism of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated by exposing rainbow trout, fathead minnows, sheepshead minnow, firemouth, and goldfish to water-borne super(14)C-PCP for 64 h. The amounts of metabolites in bile and exposure water were species-dependent; all of the metabolites excreted into the water were sulphate conjugates while bile was enriched in glucuronide conjugates. Biliary excretion accounted for less than 30% of the total PCP metabolites. Biliary metabolites alone were a poor indication of the metabolites produced and of the major routes of elimination.

  14. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  15. Inborn errors of copper metabolism

    PubMed Central

    KALER, STEPHEN G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Wilson disease, Menkes disease, occipital horn syndrome, and X-linked distal hereditary motor neuropathy are genetic disorders of copper metabolism that span a broad spectrum of neurological dysfunction (Table 180.1). The occurrence of these disorders indicates the fundamental importance of ATP7A and ATP7B. Further research to clarify the mechanisms suggested by these clinical and biochemical phenotypes may yield insight about the roles of ATP7A and ATP7B in neuronal cells, and lead to improved treatments. PMID:23622398

  16. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans metabolic gene regulatory networks govern the cellular economy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-10-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here, we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by miRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators.

  18. Modeling of Zymomonas mobilis central metabolism for novel metabolic engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnenieks, Uldis; Pentjuss, Agris; Rutkis, Reinis; Stalidzans, Egils; Fell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of metabolism is essential for rational metabolic engineering. The present work focuses on several types of modeling approach to quantitative understanding of central metabolic network and energetics in the bioethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis. Combined use of Flux Balance, Elementary Flux Mode, and thermodynamic analysis of its central metabolism, together with dynamic modeling of the core catabolic pathways, can help to design novel substrate and product pathways by systematically analyzing the solution space for metabolic engineering, and yields insights into the function of metabolic network, hardly achievable without applying modeling tools. PMID:24550906

  19. Chinese Herbs Interfering with Cancer Reprogramming Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhangfeng; Qiang, William W.; Tan, Wen; Zhang, Haotian; Wang, Shengpeng; Wang, Chunming; Qiang, Wenan; Wang, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence promotes a reassessment of metabolic reprogramming regulation in cancer research. Although there exists a long history of Chinese herbs applied in cancer treatment, few reports have addressed the effects of Chinese herbal components on metabolic reprogramming, which is a central cancer hallmark involved in the slowing or prevention of chemoresistance in cancer cells. In this review, we have focused on four core elements altered by metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells. These include glucose transport, glycolysis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid synthesis. With this focus, we have summarized recent advances in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells in response to specific Chinese herbal components. We propose that exploring Chinese herbal interference in cancer metabolic reprogramming might identify new therapeutic targets for cancer and more ways in which to approach metabolism-related diseases. PMID:27242914

  20. Effects of Interferons and Viruses on Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Stephanie Deborah; Weichhart, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are potent pleiotropic cytokines that broadly alter cellular functions in response to viral and other infections. These alterations include changes in protein synthesis, proliferation, membrane composition, and the nutritional microenvironment. Recent evidence suggests that antiviral responses are supported by an IFN-induced rewiring of the cellular metabolism. In this review, we discuss the roles of type I and type II IFNs in regulating the cellular metabolism and biosynthetic reactions. Furthermore, we give an overview of how viruses themselves affect these metabolic activities to promote their replication. In addition, we focus on the lipid as well as amino acid metabolisms, through which IFNs exert potent antiviral and immunomodulatory activities. Conversely, the expression of IFNs is controlled by the nutrient sensor mammalian target of rapamycin or by direct reprograming of lipid metabolic pathways. These findings establish a mutual relationship between IFN production and metabolic core processes. PMID:28066439

  1. Relationship between antihypertensive drugs and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; King, Deborah S

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Based on data from 1988 to 1994, it is estimated that 24% of adults in the United States meet the criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. The use of certain medications increases the risk for metabolic syndrome by either promoting weight gain or the development of changes in lipid or glucose metabolism. Diuretics and beta-blockers are among the agents recommended for first-line therapy for hypertension, yet these medications increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. Healthcare providers should recognize and understand the risk associated with antihypertensive agents and should appropriately monitor for changes related to metabolic syndrome. Careful attention to drug choices should be given with patients who are overweight or have other risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

  2. Metabolism of xenobiotics of human environments.

    PubMed

    Croom, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotics have been defined as chemicals to which an organism is exposed that are extrinsic to the normal metabolism of that organism. Without metabolism, many xenobiotics would reach toxic concentrations. Most metabolic activity inside the cell requires energy, cofactors, and enzymes in order to occur. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes can be divided into phase I, phase II, and transporter enzymes. Lipophilic xenobiotics are often first metabolized by phase I enzymes, which function to make xenobiotics more polar and provide sites for conjugation reactions. Phase II enzymes are conjugating enzymes and can directly interact with xenobiotics but more commonly interact with metabolites produced by phase I enzymes. Through both passive and active transport, these more polar metabolites are eliminated. Most xenobiotics are cleared through multiple enzymes and pathways. The relationship between chemical concentrations, enzyme affinity and quantity, and cofactor availability often determine which metabolic reactions dominate in a given individual.

  3. Metabolic model for diversity-generating biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tianero, Ma. Diarey; Pierce, Elizabeth; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Sardar, Debosmita; McIntosh, John A.; Heemstra, John R.; Schonrock, Zachary; Covington, Brett C.; Maschek, J. Alan; Cox, James E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Ruffner, Duane E.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A conventional metabolic pathway leads to a specific product. In stark contrast, there are diversity-generating metabolic pathways that naturally produce different chemicals, sometimes of great diversity. We demonstrate that for one such pathway, tru, each ensuing metabolic step is slower, in parallel with the increasing potential chemical divergence generated as the pathway proceeds. Intermediates are long lived and accumulate progressively, in contrast with conventional metabolic pathways, in which the first step is rate-limiting and metabolic intermediates are short-lived. Understanding these fundamental differences enables several different practical applications, such as combinatorial biosynthesis, some of which we demonstrate here. We propose that these principles may provide a unifying framework underlying diversity-generating metabolism in many different biosynthetic pathways. PMID:26831074

  4. Some metabolic effects of overeating in man.

    PubMed

    Welle, S L; Seaton, T B; Campbell, R G

    1986-12-01

    Metabolic responses to 20 days of overeating were examined in five healthy volunteers. Overfeeding caused a variable increase (1-18%) in basal metabolic rate but no change in metabolic rate during light exercise. Postprandial resting metabolic rate was 8-40% higher (mean 18%) during overeating. The increase in oxygen consumption during a norepinephrine infusion was the same before (20 +/- 2%) and after (17 +/- 3%) overfeeding. Overfeeding elevated basal insulin concentrations in all subjects and increased the insulin response to intravenous glucose in four of five subjects. Overfeeding did not significantly alter mean serum T3 concentrations or erythrocyte 86Rb uptake (an index of Na+,K+-ATPase activity). These data do not confirm reports that overfeeding increases metabolic rate more during exercise than during rest. They also suggest that the increase in resting metabolic rate during overfeeding is not caused by increased responsiveness to norepinephrine or increased serum T3 concentrations.

  5. Fetal origins of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xita, Nektaria; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2010-09-01

    The natural history of metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which shares many components of metabolic syndrome, may originate in intrauterine life. Evidence from epidemiological observations, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest that the nutritional, hormonal, and metabolic environment afforded by the mother may permanently program differentiating target tissues of the offspring toward the development of metabolic syndrome/PCOS phenotype in adult life. The mechanisms of fetal programming are not well understood. Thus, the altered tissue differentiation may be the result of fetal adaptive responses representing homeostatic adaptations due to alterations in fetal nutrition. Also, tissues under the influence of androgen excess may be directed toward a more masculine phenotype with regard to reproductive, neuroendocrine, and metabolic traits, while the importance of epigenetics in fetal origin of metabolic syndrome/PCOS cannot be overlooked.

  6. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  7. Deciphering transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine metabolism during Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Fait, Aaron; Zhu, Xiaohong; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Feldmesser, Ester; Fernie, Alisdair R; Galili, Gad

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine (Lys) metabolism, we utilized developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds as a system in which Lys synthesis could be stimulated developmentally without application of chemicals and coupled this to a T-DNA insertion knockout mutation impaired in Lys catabolism. This seed-specific metabolic perturbation stimulated Lys accumulation starting from the initiation of storage reserve accumulation. Our results revealed that the response of seed metabolism to the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was relatively minor; however, that which was observable operated in a modular manner. They also demonstrated that Lys metabolism is strongly associated with the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle while largely disconnected from other metabolic networks. In contrast, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was strongly associated with gene networks, stimulating the expression of hundreds of genes controlling anabolic processes that are associated with plant performance and vigor while suppressing a small number of genes associated with plant stress interactions. The most pronounced effect of the developmentally inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was an induction of expression of a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins as well as genes encoding translation initiation and elongation factors, all of which are associated with protein synthesis. With respect to metabolic regulation, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was primarily associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids and sugar metabolism. The combined data are discussed within the context of network interactions both between and within metabolic and transcriptional control systems.

  8. Representations of metabolic knowledge: Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, P.D.; Paley, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The automatic generation of drawings of metabolic pathways is a challenging problem that depends intimately on exactly what information has been recorded for each pathway, and on how that information is encoded. The chief contributions of the paper are a minimized representation for biochemical pathways called the predecessor list, and inference procedures for converting the predecessor list into a pathway-graph representation that can serve as input to a pathway-drawing algorithm. The predecessor list has several advantages over the pathway graph, including its compactness and its lack of redundancy. The conversion between the two representations can be formulated as both a constraint-satisfaction problem and a logical inference problem, whose goal is to assign directions to reactions, and to determine which are the main chemical compounds in the reaction. We describe a set of production rules that solves this inference problem. We also present heuristics for inferring whether the exterior compounds that are substrates of reactions at the periphery of a pathway are side or main compounds. These techniques were evaluated on 18 metabolic pathways from the EcoCyc knowledge base.

  9. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain.

  10. Multicopy Suppression Underpins Metabolic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Wayne M.; Quandt, Erik M.; Swartzlander, Dan B.; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the origins of new metabolic functions is based upon anecdotal genetic and biochemical evidence. Some auxotrophies can be suppressed by overexpressing substrate-ambiguous enzymes (i.e., those that catalyze the same chemical transformation on different substrates). Other enzymes exhibit weak but detectable catalytic promiscuity in vitro (i.e., they catalyze different transformations on similar substrates). Cells adapt to novel environments through the evolution of these secondary activities, but neither their chemical natures nor their frequencies of occurrence have been characterized en bloc. Here, we systematically identified multifunctional genes within the Escherichia coli genome. We screened 104 single-gene knockout strains and discovered that many (20%) of these auxotrophs were rescued by the overexpression of at least one noncognate E. coli gene. The deleted gene and its suppressor were generally unrelated, suggesting that promiscuity is a product of contingency. This genome-wide survey demonstrates that multifunctional genes are common and illustrates the mechanistic diversity by which their products enhance metabolic robustness and evolvability. PMID:17884825

  11. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-08-04

    Kinetic probabilities of state are usually based on empirical measurements, while thermodynamic state probabilities are based on the assumption that chemical species are distributed to according to a multinomial Boltzmann distribution. While the use of kinetic simulations is desirable, obtaining all the mass action rate constants necessary to carry out kinetic simulations is an overwhelming challenge. Here, the kinetic probability of a state is compared in depth to the thermodynamic probability of a state for sets of coupled reactions. The entropic and energetic contributions to thermodynamic stable states are described and compared to entropic and energetic contributions of kinetic steady states. It is shown that many kinetic steady states are possible for a system of coupled reactions depending on the relative values of the mass action rate constants, but only one of these corresponds to a thermodynamically stable state. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stable state corresponds to a minimum free energy state. The use of thermodynamic simulations of state to model metabolic processes is attractive, since metabolite levels and energy requirements of pathways can be evaluated using only standard free energies of formation as parameters in the probability distribution. In chemical physics, the assumption of a Boltzmann distribution is the basis of transition state theory for modeling transitory species. Application to stable species, such as those found in metabolic processes, is a less severe assumption that would enable the use of simulations of state.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2011-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are major global health issues. Current clinical markers used to reflect renal injury include albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Given the same eGFR level, urine albumin might be a better risk marker to predict progression of CKD and future development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Serum Cystatin C is emerging as a new biomarker for early detection of renal injury associated with MetS and cardiovascular risk. In addition to each component, MetS per se influences the incidence and prognosis of renal injury and the odds ratios increased with the increase in the number of metabolic abnormalities. Hyperinsulinemia, activation of rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increase of oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokines are proposed to be the plausible biological link between MetS and CKD. Weight control, stick control of blood pressure, glucose, and lipids disorders may lead to lessening renal injury and even the subsequent CVD. PMID:21461396

  14. Bacterial metabolism of 4-chlorophenoxyacetate

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W. C.; Smith, B. S. W.; Moss, P.; Fernley, H. N.

    1971-01-01

    1. A pseudomonad capable of utilizing 4-chlorophenoxyacetate (CPA) as sole source of organic carbon was isolated from soil. 2. The organism was grown in liquid culture and the following compounds were isolated and identified in culture extracts: 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate, 4-chlorocatechol, β-chloromuconate probably the cis–trans isomer and γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide. 3. Cells grown on 4-chlorophenoxyacetate were able to metabolize 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate, 4-chlorocatechol and γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide without a lag period. They were not adapted to 4-chlorophenol, or to either culture isolated or synthetic β-chloromuconate, possibly because of stereospecificity towards the cis–cis isomer. 4. On the basis of isolation and induction evidence, the following metabolic pathway is proposed for the breakdown of 4-chlorophenoxyacetate by this organism: 4-chlorophenoxyacetate → 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate → 4-chlorocatechol → cis–cis-β-chloromuconate → γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide → maleylacetate and fumarylacetate → fumarate and acetate. PMID:5123884

  15. The origin of intermediary metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, H. J.; Kostelnik, J. D.; Yang, J.; Cody, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO(2) and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique.

  16. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed. PMID:25089525

  17. Chronic metabolic acidosis destroys pancreas.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Peter; Melamed, Felix

    2014-11-28

    One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis. The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum's walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful tool for pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3(-) capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  18. Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential but potentially hazardous biometal. Mammalian cells require sufficient amounts of iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions. Iron is delivered to tissues by circulating transferrin, a transporter that captures iron released into the plasma mainly from intestinal enterocytes or reticuloendothelial macrophages. The binding of iron-laden transferrin to the cell-surface transferrin receptor 1 results in endocytosis and uptake of the metal cargo. Internalized iron is transported to mitochondria for the synthesis of haem or iron–sulfur clusters, which are integral parts of several metalloproteins, and excess iron is stored and detoxified in cytosolic ferritin. Iron metabolism is controlled at different levels and by diverse mechanisms. The present review summarizes basic concepts of iron transport, use and storage and focuses on the IRE (iron-responsive element)/IRP (iron-regulatory protein) system, a well known post-transcriptional regulatory circuit that not only maintains iron homoeostasis in various cell types, but also contributes to systemic iron balance. PMID:21348856

  19. Metabolic responses during postprandial exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jie; Raines, Emily; Rosenberg, Joseph; Ratamess, Nicholas; Naclerio, Fernando; Faigenbaum, Avery

    2013-01-01

    To examine metabolic interaction between meal and exercise, 10 men and 10 women completed three trials: (1) exercise (E), (2) consumption of a meal (M), and (3) consumption of a meal followed by exercise (M+E). All trials commenced after an overnight fast and were preceded by a rest period in which resting metabolic rate (RMR) was determined. The meal contained 721 kilocalories composed of 41%, 36%, and 23% of carbohydrate, lipids, and protein, respectively. Exercise protocol consisted of three continuous 10-minute cycling at 50%, 60%, and 70% VO2peak. Measurement began 60 min after the start of the meal and included VO2 that was used to determine meal-induced thermogenesis (MIT). VO2 was greater (p < .05) in M+E than in E at 50% and 60% VO2peak. MIT was higher (p < .05) during exercise at 50% VO2peak than at rest. It appears that postprandial exercise of mild intensities can potentiate MIT, thereby provoking a greater increase in energy expenditure.

  20. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  1. Simulating metabolism with statistical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cannon, William R

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed.

  2. Ammonia metabolism and hyperammonemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Walker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Human adults produce around 1000 mmol of ammonia daily. Some is reutilized in biosynthesis. The remainder is waste and neurotoxic. Eventually most is excreted in urine as urea, together with ammonia used as a buffer. In extrahepatic tissues, ammonia is incorporated into nontoxic glutamine and released into blood. Large amounts are metabolized by the kidneys and small intestine. In the intestine, this yields ammonia, which is sequestered in portal blood and transported to the liver for ureagenesis, and citrulline, which is converted to arginine by the kidneys. The amazing developments in NMR imaging and spectroscopy and molecular biology have confirmed concepts derived from early studies in animals and cell cultures. The processes involved are exquisitely tuned. When they are faulty, ammonia accumulates. Severe acute hyperammonemia causes a rapidly progressive, often fatal, encephalopathy with brain edema. Chronic milder hyperammonemia causes a neuropsychiatric illness. Survivors of severe neonatal hyperammonemia have structural brain damage. Proposed explanations for brain edema are an increase in astrocyte osmolality, generally attributed to glutamine accumulation, and cytotoxic oxidative/nitrosative damage. However, ammonia neurotoxicity is multifactorial, with disturbances also in neurotransmitters, energy production, anaplerosis, cerebral blood flow, potassium, and sodium. Around 90% of hyperammonemic patients have liver disease. Inherited defects are rare. They are being recognized increasingly in adults. Deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, citrin, and pyruvate carboxylase demonstrate the roles of isolated pathways in ammonia metabolism. Phenylbutyrate is used routinely to treat inherited urea cycle disorders, and its use for hepatic encephalopathy is under investigation.

  3. The origin of intermediary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morowitz, Harold J.; Kostelnik, Jennifer D.; Yang, Jeremy; Cody, George D.

    2000-01-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO2 and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique. PMID:10859347

  4. Bacterial metabolism of hydroxylated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Higson, F K; Focht, D D

    1989-01-01

    Isolates able to grow on 3- or 4-hydroxybiphenyl (HB) as the sole carbon source were obtained by enrichment culture. The 3-HB degrader Pseudomonas sp. strain FH12 used an NADPH-dependent monooxygenase restricted to 3- and 3,3'-HBs to introduce an ortho-hydroxyl. The 4-HB degrader Pseudomonas sp. strain FH23 used either a mono- or dioxygenase to generate a 2,3-diphenolic substitution pattern which allowed meta-fission of the aromatic ring. By using 3-chlorocatechol to inhibit catechol dioxygenase activity, it was found that 2- and 3-HBs were converted by FH23 to 2,3-HB, whereas biphenyl and 4-HB were attacked by dioxygenation. 4-HB was metabolized to 2,3,4'-trihydroxybiphenyl. Neither organism attacked chlorinated HBs. The degradation of 3- and 4-HBs by these strains is therefore analogous to the metabolism of biphenyl, 2-HB, and naphthalene in the requirement for 2,3-catechol formation. PMID:2729993

  5. Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Warburg- like metabolic reprogramming. The Warburg effect is characterized by increased glycolytic flux with increased biosynthesis of amino acids...HBP1 KD tumors and have used the gene expression and NMR analysis to discover an alteration in lipid metabolism . The results are summarized in...execute a multi- disciplinary analysis and discover new aspects to metabolic regulation by HBP1 and by Wnt signaling. Some recent studies have

  6. The Evolution of Fungal Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rokas, Antonis

    2014-01-01

    Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters

  7. Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N EL MDISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS rN4 MRI PROJECT NO. 4266-B FINAL REPORT By Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...documents. Ii I DISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS [RI PROJECT NO. 4266-B [FINAL REPORT BY Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...the Army, Contract No. DAMD-17-76-C-6059, MRI Project No. 4266-B, "Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs ." The work was supported by

  8. The evolution of fungal metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Slot, Jason C; Rokas, Antonis

    2014-12-01

    Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters

  9. Metabolic Flexibility: Hibernation, Torpor, and Estivation.

    PubMed

    Staples, James F

    2016-03-15

    Many environmental conditions can constrain the ability of animals to obtain sufficient food energy, or transform that food energy into useful chemical forms. To survive extended periods under such conditions animals must suppress metabolic rate to conserve energy, water, or oxygen. Amongst small endotherms, this metabolic suppression is accompanied by and, in some cases, facilitated by a decrease in core body temperature-hibernation or daily torpor-though significant metabolic suppression can be achieved even with only modest cooling. Within some ectotherms, winter metabolic suppression exceeds the passive effects of cooling. During dry seasons, estivating ectotherms can reduce metabolism without changes in body temperature, conserving energy reserves, and reducing gas exchange and its inevitable loss of water vapor. This overview explores the similarities and differences of metabolic suppression among these states within adult animals (excluding developmental diapause), and integrates levels of organization from the whole animal to the genome, where possible. Several similarities among these states are highlighted, including patterns and regulation of metabolic balance, fuel use, and mitochondrial metabolism. Differences among models are also apparent, particularly in whether the metabolic suppression is intrinsic to the tissue or depends on the whole-animal response. While in these hypometabolic states, tissues from many animals are tolerant of hypoxia/anoxia, ischemia/reperfusion, and disuse. These natural models may, therefore, serve as valuable and instructive models for biomedical research.

  10. Neuroprotection in Metabolism-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism-based therapy has been used successfully in the treatment of seizures but study of its use in other neurodegenerative disorders is growing. Data demonstrating the use of different forms of metabolism-based therapy in human trials of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease are discussed. Animal and in vitro studies have shed light on metabolism-based therapy’s mechanisms in these diseases, as well as ALS, aging, ischemia, trauma and mitochondrial cytopathies. Additional insights may be obtained by considering the role of metabolism-based therapy in cell disability and death (specifically apoptosis, excitotoxicity, and autophagy). PMID:21872441

  11. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-03-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  12. Cascading failure and robustness in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Smart, Ashley G; Amaral, Luis A N; Ottino, Julio M

    2008-09-09

    We investigate the relationship between structure and robustness in the metabolic networks of Escherichia coli, Methanosarcina barkeri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using a cascading failure model based on a topological flux balance criterion. We find that, compared to appropriate null models, the metabolic networks are exceptionally robust. Furthermore, by decomposing each network into rigid clusters and branched metabolites, we demonstrate that the enhanced robustness is related to the organization of branched metabolites, as rigid cluster formations in the metabolic networks appear to be consistent with null model behavior. Finally, we show that cascading in the metabolic networks can be described as a percolation process.

  13. Energy metabolism in neurodevelopment and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tech, Katherine; Gershon, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    New, less toxic therapies are needed for medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Like many cancers, medulloblastomas demonstrate metabolic patterns that are markedly different from the surrounding non-neoplastic tissue and are highly organized to support tumor growth. Key aspects of medulloblastoma metabolism, including increased lipogenesis and aerobic glycolysis are derived from the metabolic programs of neural progenitors. During neural development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling induces lipogenesis and aerobic glycolysis in proliferating progenitors to support rapid growth. Shh-regulated transcription induces specific genes, including hexokinase 2 (Hk2) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) that mediate these metabolic patterns. Medulloblastomas co-opt these developmentally-regulated patterns of metabolic gene expression for sustained tumor growth. Additionally, medulloblastomas limit protein translation through activation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), to restrict energy expenditure. The activation of eEF2K reduces the need to generate ATP, enabling reduced dependence on oxidative phosphorylation and increased metabolism of glucose through aerobic glycolysis. Lipogenesis, aerobic glycolysis and restriction of protein translation operate in a network of metabolic processes that is integrated by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to maintain homeostasis. The homeostatic effect of AMPK has the potential to limit the impact of metabolically targeted interventions. Through combinatorial targeting of lipogenesis, glycolysis and eEF2K, however, this homeostatic effect may be overcome. We propose that combinatorial targeting of medulloblastoma metabolism may produce the synergies needed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

  14. [Transcriptome platforms and applications to metabolic engineering].

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Xueming

    2010-09-01

    Omics technologies have profoundly promoted development and applications of metabolic engineering by analysis of cell metabolism at a system level. Whole genome transcription profiles have provided researchers more rigorous evaluation of cell phenotype and an increased understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis can conduce to identification of effective gene targets for strain improvement, and consequently accelerates rational design and construction of microbial cell factories for desired product. In this review, we briefly introduced the principle of three main platforms of transcriptome, and reviewed the recent applications of the transcriptome to metabolic engineering, finally provided conclusions and future prospects.

  15. Epigenetic methylations and their connections with metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chiacchiera, Fulvio; Piunti, Andrea; Pasini, Diego

    2013-05-01

    Metabolic pathways play fundamental roles in several processes that regulate cell physiology and adaptation to environmental changes. Altered metabolic pathways predispose to several different pathologies ranging from diabetes to cancer. Specific transcriptional programs tightly regulate the enzymes involved in cell metabolism and dictate cell fate regulating the differentiation into specialized cell types that contribute to metabolic adaptation in higher organisms. For these reasons, it is of extreme importance to identify signaling pathways and transcription factors that positively and negatively regulate metabolism. Genomic organization allows a plethora of different strategies to regulate transcription. Importantly, large evidence suggests that the quality of diet and the caloric regimen can influence the epigenetic state of our genome and that certain metabolic pathways are also epigenetically controlled reveling a tight crosstalk between metabolism and epigenomes. Here we focus our attention on methylation-based epigenetic reactions, on how different metabolic pathways control these activities, and how these can influence metabolism. Altogether, the recent discoveries linking these apparent distant areas reveal that an exciting field of research is emerging.

  16. Influence of Metabolism on Epigenetics and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaelin, William G.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications of histones and DNA, such as histone methylation, histone acetylation, and DNA methylation, play critical roles in epigenetic gene regulation. Many of the enzymes that add or remove such chemical modifications are known, or might be suspected, to be sensitive to changes in intracellular metabolism. This knowledge provides a conceptual foundation for understanding how mutations in the metabolic enzymes SDH, FH, and IDH can result in cancer and, more broadly, for how alterations in metabolism and nutrition might contribute to disease. Here, we review literature pertinent to hypothetical connections between metabolic and epigenetic states in eukaryotic cells. PMID:23540690

  17. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  18. Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Pitch, Nancy D.; Lewis, Mark E.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lichter, Michael J.; Stuk, Peter M.; Diedrick, Dale M.; Valentine, Russell W.; Pettegrew, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis (PUMA) is an instrument that measures several quantities indicative of human metabolic function. Specifically, this instrument makes time-resolved measurements of temperature, pressure, flow, and the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in breath during both inhalation and exhalation. Portable instruments for measuring these quantities have been commercially available, but the response times of those instruments are too long to enable temporal resolution of phenomena on the time scales of human respiration cycles. In contrast, the response time of the PUMA is significantly shorter than characteristic times of human respiration phenomena, making it possible to analyze varying metabolic parameters, not only on sequential breath cycles but also at successive phases of inhalation and exhalation within the same breath cycle. In operation, the PUMA is positioned to sample breath near the subject s mouth. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors are used for three of the measurements: a miniature pressure transducer for pressure, a thermistor for temperature, and an ultrasonic sensor for flow. Sensors developed at Glenn Research Center are used for measuring the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide: The carbon dioxide sensor exploits the relatively strong absorption of infrared light by carbon dioxide. Light from an infrared source passes through the stream of inhaled or exhaled gas and is focused on an infrared- sensitive photodetector. The oxygen sensor exploits the effect of oxygen in quenching the fluorescence of ruthenium-doped organic molecules in a dye on the tip of an optical fiber. A blue laser diode is used to excite the fluorescence, and the optical fiber carries the fluorescent light to a photodiode, the temporal variation of the output of which bears a known relationship with the rate of quenching of fluorescence and, hence, with the partial pressure of oxygen. The outputs of the sensors are digitized

  19. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  20. Drug discovery strategies in the field of tumor energy metabolism: Limitations by metabolic flexibility and metabolic resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Obre, E; Rossignol, R

    2017-02-16

    The search for new drugs capable of blocking the metabolic vulnerabilities of human tumors has now entered the clinical evaluation stage, but several projects already failed in phase I or phase II. In particular, very promising in vitro studies could not be translated in vivo at preclinical stage and beyond. This was the case for most glycolysis inhibitors that demonstrated systemic toxicity. A more recent example is the inhibition of glutamine catabolism in lung adenocarcinoma that failed in vivo despite a strong addiction of several cancer cell lines to glutamine in vitro. Such contradictory findings raised several questions concerning the optimization of drug discovery strategies in the field of cancer metabolism. For instance, the cell culture models in 2D or 3D might already show strong limitations to mimic the tumor micro- and macro-environment. The microenvironment of tumors is composed of cancer cells of variegated metabolic profiles, supporting local metabolic exchanges and symbiosis, but also of immune cells and stroma that further interact with and reshape cancer cell metabolism. The macroenvironment includes the different tissues of the organism, capable of exchanging signals and fueling the tumor 'a distance'. Moreover, most metabolic targets were identified from their increased expression in tumor transcriptomic studies, or from targeted analyses looking at the metabolic impact of particular oncogenes or tumor suppressors on selected metabolic pathways. Still, very few targets were identified from in vivo analyses of tumor metabolism in patients because such studies are difficult and adequate imaging methods are only currently being developed for that purpose. For instance, perfusion of patients with [(13)C]-glucose allows deciphering the metabolomics of tumors and opens a new area in the search for effective targets. Metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography and other techniques that do not involve [(13)C] can also be used to evaluate tumor

  1. A compendium of inborn errors of metabolism mapped onto the human metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Swagatika; Franzson, Leifur; Jonsson, Jon J; Thiele, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are hereditary metabolic defects, which are encountered in almost all major metabolic pathways occurring in man. Many IEMs are screened for in neonates through metabolomic analysis of dried blood spot samples. To enable the mapping of these metabolomic data onto the published human metabolic reconstruction, we added missing reactions and pathways involved in acylcarnitine (AC) and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) metabolism. Using literary data, we reconstructed an AC/FAO module consisting of 352 reactions and 139 metabolites. When this module was combined with the human metabolic reconstruction, the synthesis of 39 acylcarnitines and 22 amino acids, which are routinely measured, was captured and 235 distinct IEMs could be mapped. We collected phenotypic and clinical features for each IEM enabling comprehensive classification. We found that carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolism were most affected by the IEMs, while the brain was the most commonly affected organ. Furthermore, we analyzed the IEMs in the context of metabolic network topology to gain insight into common features between metabolically connected IEMs. While many known examples were identified, we discovered some surprising IEM pairs that shared reactions as well as clinical features but not necessarily causal genes. Moreover, we could also re-confirm that acetyl-CoA acts as a central metabolite. This network based analysis leads to further insight of hot spots in human metabolism with respect to IEMs. The presented comprehensive knowledge base of IEMs will provide a valuable tool in studying metabolic changes involved in inherited metabolic diseases.

  2. Metabolic distance estimation based on principle component analysis of metabolic turnover.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yasumune; Putri, Sastia P; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-09-01

    Visualization of metabolic dynamism is important for various types of metabolic studies including studies on optimization of bio-production processes and studies of metabolism-related diseases. Many methodologies have been developed for metabolic studies. Among these, metabolic turnover analysis (MTA) is often used to analyze metabolic dynamics. MTA involves observation of changes in the isotopomer ratio of metabolites over time following introduction of isotope-labeled substrates. MTA has several advantages compared with (13)C-metabolic flux analysis, including the diversity of applicable samples, the variety of isotope tracers, and the wide range of target pathways. However, MTA produces highly complex data from which mining useful information becomes difficult. For easy understanding of MTA data, a new approach was developed using principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting PCA score plot visualizes the metabolic distance, which is defined as distance between metabolites on the real metabolic map. And the score plot gives us some hints of interesting metabolism for further study. We used this method to analyze the central metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under moderated aerobic conditions, and time course data for 77 isotopomers of 14 metabolites were obtained. The PCA score plot for this dataset represented a metabolic map and indicated interesting phenomena such as activity of fumarate reductase under aerated condition. These findings show the importance of a multivariate analysis to MTA. In addition, because the approach is not biased, this method has potential application for analysis of less-studied pathways and organisms.

  3. [Metabolic fitness: physical activity and health].

    PubMed

    Saltin, Bengt; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2002-04-15

    Physical inactivity is strongly associated with an increased risk of premature disease and death, and the falling level of physical activity in Denmark (as in many other countries) makes physical inactivity a major life-style risk factor in many western countries today. Both aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake) and metabolic capacity of the muscles are important in this matter. The present paper focuses on the role of the metabolic capacity/fitness of muscle, because this appears to be especially critical for the development of metabolic-related diseases and thus for the health of the individual. A definition of metabolic fitness is proposed as the ratio between mitochondrial capacity for substrate utilisation and maximum oxygen uptake of the muscle. Indirect means of determining this parameter are discussed. Skeletal muscle is an extraordinarily plastic tissue and metabolic capacity/fitness changes quickly when the level of physical activity is altered. High metabolic fitness includes an elevated use of fat at rest and during exercise. The capacity for glucose metabolism is also enhanced in trained muscle. Some of these adaptations to physical activity are explained. Exercise-induced activation of genes coding for proteins involved in metabolism is described as an underlying mechanism for some of these adaptations. The increased gene expression is of relatively short duration, which implies that a certain regularity of physical activity is required to maintain high metabolic fitness. Thus, metabolic fitness is directly related to how much the muscle is used, but even low levels of physical activity have a beneficial effect on metabolic fitness and the overall health of the individual.

  4. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    This grant focused on the mechanisms of metabolic changes associated with unweighting atrophy and reduced growth of hind limb muscles of juvenile rats. Metabolic studies included a number of different areas. Amino acid metabolic studies placed particular emphasis on glutamine and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. These studies were an outgrowth of understanding stress effects and the role of glucocorticoids in these animals. Investigations on protein metabolism were largely concerned with selective loss of myofibrillar proteins and the role of muscle proteolysis. These investigations lead to finding important differences from denervation and atrophy and to define the roles of cytosolic versus lysosomal proteolysis in these atrophy models. A major outgrowth of these studies was demonstrating an ability to prevent atrophy of the unweighted muscle for at least 24 hours. A large amount of work concentrated on carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation by insulin and catecholamines. Measurements focused on glucose transport, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation. The grant was used to develop an important new in situ approach for studying protein metabolism, glucose transport, and hormonal effects which involves intramuscular injection of various agents for up to 24 hours. Another important consequence of this project was the development and flight of Physiological-Anatomical Rodent Experiment-1 (PARE-1), which was launched aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in September 1991. Detailed descriptions of these studies can be found in the 30 peer-reviewed publications, 15 non-reviewed publications, 4 reviews and 33 abstracts (total 82 publications) which were or are scheduled to be published as a result of this project. A listing of these publications grouped by area (i.e. amino acid metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and space flight studies) are included.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally affects people between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients with RA have a significantly higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) compared to the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) associated with RA places this disease among the most widely studied. The duration of RA was associated with MS, implicating the role of inflammation in MS development. The presence of MS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis. A positive correlation between prevalence of MS and worsening of functional status was found in patients with RA. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk and a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the rheumatologist should be aware of those MS risk factors and attempt to modify them. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of MS in RA.

  6. Metabolic properties of phosphonate esters.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, G; Buchwald, P; Bodor, N

    2004-05-01

    The object of the present work was to investigate the difference in the metabolism of the phosphonate derivatives of primary or secondary hydroxyl groups. To study the phosphorolytic cleavage of such P-O bonds, zidovudine (AZT) hexanoyloxymethyl-methylphosphonate (HOM-AZT-P), an ester of a primary OH functionality, and methyl-pivaloyloxymethyl-testosterylphosphonate (POM-T-P), an ester of a secondary OH functionality, were prepared. The actions of pure enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase and phosphodiesterase on the corresponding phosphonate compounds (AZT-P and T-P) were investigated at various pH values. The phosphonate derivative of the secondary hydroxyl group of testosterone proved completely resistant to such phosphorolytic attacks, and release of free testosterone could not be detected. The phosphonate derivative of the primary hydroxyl group of zidovudine proved resistant to phosphodiesterase, but not to alkaline phosphatase, and in this second case, release of free zidovudine could be detected.

  7. Metabolic hypothesis for human altriciality.

    PubMed

    Dunsworth, Holly M; Warrener, Anna G; Deacon, Terrence; Ellison, Peter T; Pontzer, Herman

    2012-09-18

    The classic anthropological hypothesis known as the "obstetrical dilemma" is a well-known explanation for human altriciality, a condition that has significant implications for human social and behavioral evolution. The hypothesis holds that antagonistic selection for a large neonatal brain and a narrow, bipedal-adapted birth canal poses a problem for childbirth; the hominin "solution" is to truncate gestation, resulting in an altricial neonate. This explanation for human altriciality based on pelvic constraints persists despite data linking human life history to that of other species. Here, we present evidence that challenges the importance of pelvic morphology and mechanics in the evolution of human gestation and altriciality. Instead, our analyses suggest that limits to maternal metabolism are the primary constraints on human gestation length and fetal growth. Although pelvic remodeling and encephalization during hominin evolution contributed to the present parturitional difficulty, there is little evidence that pelvic constraints have altered the timing of birth.

  8. Humanoid Flight Metabolic Simulator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) has identified several areas of technology that will require significant improvements in terms of performance, capacity, and efficiency, in order to make a manned mission to Mars possible. These include crew vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), EVA suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and Information Systems, autonomous environmental monitoring, radiation exposure monitoring and protection, and vehicle thermal control systems (TCS). (MADMACS) in a Suit can be configured to simulate human metabolism, consuming crew resources (oxygen) in the process. In addition to providing support for testing Life Support on unmanned flights, MADMACS will also support testing of suit thermal controls, and monitor radiation exposure, body zone temperatures, moisture, and loads.

  9. Metabolic treatments for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Sarah A; Hartman, Adam L

    2011-09-01

    When a child on anticonvulsant medications continues to have seizures, what other options should be considered? Over the past 100 years, dietary therapies for the treatment of intractable epilepsy have become more widely recognized, and their use has continued to expand throughout the world. An increasing number of studies has shown efficacy of these metabolic treatments in improving seizure control. Currently, 4 types of dietary therapy are available in the clinic: the classic long chain fatty acid "ketogenic" diet, the medium chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, and the low glycemic index treatment. These therapies should be considered earlier in the treatment of intractable epilepsy because they offer a different approach to treatment that has proven efficacious, tolerable, and cost-effective.

  10. Metabolic effects of smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kindred K.; Zopey, Mohan; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking continues to be the leading cause of preventable death in the USA, despite the vast and widely publicized knowledge about the negative health effects of tobacco smoking. Data show that smoking cessation is often accompanied by weight gain and an improvement in insulin sensitivity over time. However, paradoxically, post-cessation-related obesity might contribute to insulin resistance. Furthermore, post-cessation weight gain is reportedly the number one reason why smokers, especially women, fail to initiate smoking cessation or relapse after initiating smoking cessation. In this Review, we discuss the metabolic effects of stopping smoking and highlight future considerations for smoking cessation programs and therapies to be designed with an emphasis on reducing post-cessation weight gain. PMID:26939981

  11. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Metabolism of hydroanthracenones in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. S.; Dunstan, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    1. The metabolism of 1-oxo-octahydro- and 2- and 9-oxoperhydro-anthracenes was investigated in rabbits. All compounds increased the urinary glucuronide content. 2. The 1-oxo and 2-oxo compounds were reduced to the corresponding alcohols whereas the 9-oxo compound was hydroxylated. 3. The reduction in vitro of these compounds and related ketones was investigated with three different enzyme systems (liver alcohol dehydrogenase, hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase, aromatic aldehyde–ketone reductase) in an attempt to explain the results in vivo. 4. Successful reduction of many ketones with aromatic aldehyde–ketone reductase suggests that the kidney may be of importance in the reduction in vivo of certain cyclic carbonyl compounds. PMID:5073736

  13. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  14. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gylling, Helena; Simonen, Piia

    2015-09-17

    The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%-10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a) or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein particles will be

  15. PCB metabolism by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, P.K.; Fletcher, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Since 1976 the use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been banned in the U.S. Prior to this, commercial mixtures (Aroclors) had been used extensively as an industrial lubricant because of their nonflammable, nonreactive properties. These same properties are responsible for their persistent in the environment where they bind to soil particles and resist biodegradation. Decontamination of PCB-laden soil is expensive with excavation followed by either storage or incineration as the primary means of remediation. The use of microorganisms for PCB bioremediation has been gaining popularity in the past few years. Bacteria and/or fungi isolated from environmental samples have been used to degrade PCBs under laboratory conditions, but in field trials they have not been as effective. The most common explanation for the poor performance of PCB-degrading organisms introduced at contaminated sites is that they do not compete well with the existing populations. Plant-ectomycorrhizal systems may overcome this problem. Introduction and cultivation of a known host plant at a contaminated site has the potential of providing a survival advantage for ectomycorrhizal fungi that normally colonize the roots of the introduced plant. Ectomycorrhizal fungi exist naturally in the soil and normally grow in association with the roots of a host plant in a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. Preliminary in vitro examination of this group of fungi for their ability to enzymatically degrade xenobiotics is very promising. In vivo studies have shown that some of these fungi have the ability to degrade chlorinated, aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-D and atrazine. The aspect of ectomycorrhizal metabolism was investigated further in the current study by determining the ability of 21 different fungi to metabolize 19 different PCB congeners with varying chlorine content and substitution patterns. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Boosting bacterial metabolism to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Prerna; Collins, James J

    2015-02-03

    The metabolic state of a bacterial cell influences its susceptibility to antibiotics. In this issue, Peng et al. (2015) show that resistant bacteria can be sensitized to antibiotic treatment through the addition of exogenous metabolites that stimulate central metabolic pathways and increase drug uptake.

  17. Miniaturized, Portable Sensors Monitor Metabolic Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    In order to measure astronauts' metabolic rates in space, Glenn Research Center partnered with Case Western University and the Cleveland Clinic to develop the Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis (PUMA). Cleveland-based Orbital Research licensed and then modified PUMA to help the US Navy assess pilot oxygen problems and is now designing a device that can be used in hospitals.

  18. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-03-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease.

  19. Textbook Errors & Misconceptions in Biology: Cell Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The idea that errors and misconceptions in biology textbooks are often slow to be discovered and corrected is discussed. Selected errors, misconceptions, and topics of confusion about cell metabolism are described. Fermentation, respiration, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, uniformity of catabolism, and metabolic pathways as models are…

  20. Predictors of metabolic risk in childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Anita; Maffeis, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Most of the complications of juvenile obesity are due to metabolic disturbances induced by an excessive accumulation of fat which leads to chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Finding effective ways of identifying obese paediatric patients who are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular and metabolic complications has been recognised to be a promising strategy to improve prevention of complications of early obesity. Moreover, correctly identifying obese children who are already affected by metabolic co-morbidities should be a clinical priority. According to the state of the art summarised in this review, traditional metabolic variables included in the definitions of metabolic syndrome (MS), pre-diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis and, in obese girls, the presence of polycystic ovary syndrome are the best available longitudinal predictors of CVD and T2DM among obese children and adolescents. In clinical practice, traditional metabolic variables included in the definitions of MS should be assessed in all obese children and adolescents; fasting metabolic variables have been proposed to identify obese patients likely to be affected by impaired glucose tolerance or T2DM, and ultrasound has proved to be a valid surrogate for biopsy in the diagnosis of NAFLD. Further large longitudinal and cross-sectional studies are needed to improve our chances of identifying obese youth at the highest metabolic risk.

  1. Correlated FLIM and PLIM for cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Breymayer, J.; Kalinina, S.

    2016-03-01

    Correlated imaging of phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetime parameters of metabolic markers is a challenge for direct investigating mechanisms related to cell metabolism and oxygen tension. A large variety of clinical phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial defects accomplished with changes in cell metabolism. In many cases the hypoxic microenvironment of cancer cells shifts metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to anaerobic or aerobic glycolysis, a process known as "Warburg" effect. Also during stem cell differentiation a switch in cell metabolism is observed. A defective mitochondrial function associated with hypoxia has been invoked in many complex disorders such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimers disease, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, tissue inflammation and cancer. Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively, optical imaging techniques based on time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to detect the underlying metabolic mechanisms are therefore of prominent interest. They offer the possibility by inspecting fluorescence decay characteristics of intrinsic coenzymes to directly image metabolic pathways. Moreover oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescent probe. The combination of both fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of coenzymes like NADH and FAD and phosphorescence lifetime (PLIM) of phosphorescent dyes could provide valuable information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension.

  2. Tracking the pathway of arsenic metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the toxic and carcinogenic properties of arsenic have been recognized for centuries, only in the past few decades has research focused on understanding the metabolic fate of arsenic in humans and relating metabolism to adverse health effects. In humans, conversion of in...

  3. Paternal epigenetic programming: evolving metabolic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Hur, Suzy S J; Cropley, Jennifer E; Suter, Catherine M

    2017-04-01

    Parental health or exposures can affect the lifetime health outcomes of offspring, independently of inherited genotypes. Such 'epigenetic' effects occur over a broad range of environmental stressors, including defects in parental metabolism. Although maternal metabolic effects are well documented, it has only recently been established that that there is also an independent paternal contribution to long-term metabolic health. Both paternal undernutrition and overnutrition can induce metabolic phenotypes in immediate offspring, and in some cases, the induced phenotype can affect multiple generations, implying inheritance of an acquired trait. The male lineage transmission of metabolic disease risk in these cases implicates a heritable factor carried by sperm. Sperm-based transmission provides a tractable system to interrogate heritable epigenetic factors influencing metabolism, and as detailed here, animal models of paternal programming have already provided some significant insights. Here, we review the evidence for paternal programming of metabolism in humans and animal models, and the available evidence on potential underlying mechanisms. Programming by paternal metabolism can be observed in multiple species across animal phyla, suggesting that this phenomenon may have a unique evolutionary significance.

  4. Elements of the cellular metabolic structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, which are able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by specific input stimuli. Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in covalent post-translational modulation, so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. The metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes), as well as the enzymatic covalent modifications of specific molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell. PMID:25988183

  5. An Advance Organizer for Teaching Bacterial Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Heloiza R.; Marques, Marilis V.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic versatility of bacteria is a source of learning difficulty for students in classical microbiology courses. To facilitate the learning process, the authors developed an advance organizer. It consists of a set of six diagrams of metabolic pathways describing the basic living requirements of several types of bacteria: energy, carbon…

  6. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, Jessica M.; Chiang, John Y.L.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease. PMID:26579436

  7. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 REPORT...Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Dr. Lynne Cassimeris lc07@lehigh.edu Lehigh University 526 Brodhead Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 U.S...tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation

  8. [Severe metabolic acidosis in an alcoholic].

    PubMed

    Sonne, Morten Egede; Rudolph, Søren Finnemann; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-09-29

    Severe metabolic acidosis is associated with poor prognosis. We present a patient with profound alcohol and starvation-related combined lactic and keto acidosis (lactate = 29 mM; pH = 6.83) who made a good recovery following 18 hours of intensive care therapy. A brief summary of the proposed mechanism by which these metabolic derangements develop is presented.

  9. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  10. SFA 2.0- Metabolic Potential

    ScienceCinema

    Banfield, Jill; Beller, Harry

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientists Jill Banfield and Harry Beller explain the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project's research on metabolic potential—or how metabolic lifestyles of microbial communities modulate in response to as well as influence environmental change.

  11. Metabolism profiling of amino-noscapine.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hua-Jun; Qian, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Amino-noscapine is a promising noscapine derivative undergoing R&D as an efficient anti-tumor drug. In vitro phase I metabolism incubation system was employed. In vitro samples were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In vitro recombinant CYP isoforms screening was used to identify the drug-metabolizing enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino-noscapine. Multiple metabolics were formed, including the formation of metabolite undergoing cleavage of methylenedioxy group, hydroxylated metabolites, demethylated metabolites, and metabolites undergoing C-C cleavage. Nearly, all the CYP isoforms were involved in the metabolism of metabolites II, III, VII, IX, and X. CYP1A1 was demonstrated to be the major CYP isoform for the formation of metabolites IV and V. CYP1A1 and CYP3A4 mainly catalyzed the formation of metabolite VI. The metabolic formation of VIII was mainly catalyzed by CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. CYP3A4 was the main enzyme for the formation of XI. CYP2C9 mainly catalyzed the generation of metabolite XII. In conclusion, the metabolic pathway of amino-noscapine was elucidated in the present study using in vitro phase I incubation experiment, including the structural elucidation of metabolites and involved phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes. This information was helpful for the R&D of amino-noscapine.

  12. Ontogenetic and interspecific metabolic scaling in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Design constraints imposed by increasing size cause metabolic rate in animals to increase more slowly than mass. This ubiquitous biological phenomenon is referred to as metabolic scaling. However, mechanistic explanations for interspecific metabolic scaling do not apply to ontogenetic size changes within a species, implying different mechanisms for scaling phenomena. Here, we show that the dynamic energy budget theory approach of compartmentalizing biomass into reserve and structural components provides a unified framework for understanding ontogenetic and interspecific metabolic scaling. We formulate the theory for insects and show that it can account for ontogenetic metabolic scaling during the embryonic and larval phases, as well as the U-shaped respiration curve during pupation. After correcting for the predicted ontogenetic scaling effects, which we show to follow universal curves, the scaling of respiration between species is approximated by a three-quarters power law, supporting past empirical studies on insect metabolic scaling and our theoretical predictions. The ability to explain ontogenetic and interspecific metabolic scaling effects under one consistent framework suggests that the partitioning of biomass into reserve and structure is a necessary foundation to a general metabolic theory.

  13. Light regulation of metabolic pathways in fungi.

    PubMed

    Tisch, Doris; Schmoll, Monika

    2010-02-01

    Light represents a major carrier of information in nature. The molecular machineries translating its electromagnetic energy (photons) into the chemical language of cells transmit vital signals for adjustment of virtually every living organism to its habitat. Fungi react to illumination in various ways, and we found that they initiate considerable adaptations in their metabolic pathways upon growth in light or after perception of a light pulse. Alterations in response to light have predominantly been observed in carotenoid metabolism, polysaccharide and carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, nucleotide and nucleoside metabolism, and in regulation of production of secondary metabolites. Transcription of genes is initiated within minutes, abundance and activity of metabolic enzymes are adjusted, and subsequently, levels of metabolites are altered to cope with the harmful effects of light or to prepare for reproduction, which is dependent on light in many cases. This review aims to give an overview on metabolic pathways impacted by light and to illustrate the physiological significance of light for fungi. We provide a basis for assessment whether a given metabolic pathway might be subject to regulation by light and how these properties can be exploited for improvement of biotechnological processes.

  14. Genotype networks in metabolic reaction spaces

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A metabolic genotype comprises all chemical reactions an organism can catalyze via enzymes encoded in its genome. A genotype is viable in a given environment if it is capable of producing all biomass components the organism needs to survive and reproduce. Previous work has focused on the properties of individual genotypes while little is known about how genome-scale metabolic networks with a given function can vary in their reaction content. Results We here characterize spaces of such genotypes. Specifically, we study metabolic genotypes whose phenotype is viability in minimal chemical environments that differ in their sole carbon sources. We show that regardless of the number of reactions in a metabolic genotype, the genotypes of a given phenotype typically form vast, connected, and unstructured sets -- genotype networks -- that nearly span the whole of genotype space. The robustness of metabolic phenotypes to random reaction removal in such spaces has a narrow distribution with a high mean. Different carbon sources differ in the number of metabolic genotypes in their genotype network; this number decreases as a genotype is required to be viable on increasing numbers of carbon sources, but much less than if metabolic reactions were used independently across different chemical environments. Conclusions Our work shows that phenotype-preserving genotype networks have generic organizational properties and that these properties are insensitive to the number of reactions in metabolic genotypes. PMID:20302636

  15. L-Fucose metabolism in camplobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a gastrointestinal pathogen once considered asaccharolytic, but now known to metabolize fucose. Strains with the fuc locus encode enzymes for fucose uptake and metabolism and show a competitive colonization advantage in the piglet disease model. C. jejuni NCTC11168 shows redu...

  16. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  17. Nutrient sensing and inflammation in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Erbay, Ebru

    2008-12-01

    The proper functioning of the pathways that are involved in the sensing and management of nutrients is central to metabolic homeostasis and is therefore among the most fundamental requirements for survival. Metabolic systems are integrated with pathogen-sensing and immune responses, and these pathways are evolutionarily conserved. This close functional and molecular integration of the immune and metabolic systems is emerging as a crucial homeostatic mechanism, the dysfunction of which underlies many chronic metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. In this Review we provide an overview of several important networks that sense and manage nutrients and discuss how they integrate with immune and inflammatory pathways to influence the physiological and pathological metabolic states in the body.

  18. Mathematical optimization applications in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Zomorrodi, Ali R; Suthers, Patrick F; Ranganathan, Sridhar; Maranas, Costas D

    2012-11-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are increasingly becoming available for a variety of microorganisms. This has spurred the development of a wide array of computational tools, and in particular, mathematical optimization approaches, to assist in fundamental metabolic network analyses and redesign efforts. This review highlights a number of optimization-based frameworks developed towards addressing challenges in the analysis and engineering of metabolic networks. In particular, three major types of studies are covered here including exploring model predictions, correction and improvement of models of metabolism, and redesign of metabolic networks for the targeted overproduction of a desired compound. Overall, the methods reviewed in this paper highlight the diversity of queries, breadth of questions and complexity of redesigns that are amenable to mathematical optimization strategies.

  19. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Randomizing Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Areejit; Martin, Olivier C.

    2011-01-01

    Networks coming from protein-protein interactions, transcriptional regulation, signaling, or metabolism may appear to have “unusual” properties. To quantify this, it is appropriate to randomize the network and test the hypothesis that the network is not statistically different from expected in a motivated ensemble. However, when dealing with metabolic networks, the randomization of the network using edge exchange generates fictitious reactions that are biochemically meaningless. Here we provide several natural ensembles of randomized metabolic networks. A first constraint is to use valid biochemical reactions. Further constraints correspond to imposing appropriate functional constraints. We explain how to perform these randomizations with the help of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and show that they allow one to approach the properties of biological metabolic networks. The implication of the present work is that the observed global structural properties of real metabolic networks are likely to be the consequence of simple biochemical and functional constraints. PMID:21779409

  1. Macromolecular crowding explains overflow metabolism in cells

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alexei; Oltvai, Zoltán N.

    2016-01-01

    Overflow metabolism is a metabolic phenotype of cells characterized by mixed oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) and fermentative glycolysis in the presence of oxygen. Recently, it was proposed that a combination of a protein allocation constraint and a higher proteome fraction cost of energy generation by OxPhos relative to fermentation form the basis of overflow metabolism in the bacterium, Escherichia coli. However, we argue that the existence of a maximum or optimal macromolecular density is another essential requirement. Here we re-evaluate our previous theory of overflow metabolism based on molecular crowding following the proteomic fractions formulation. We show that molecular crowding is a key factor in explaining the switch from OxPhos to overflow metabolism. PMID:27484619

  2. Bone scan in metabolic bone diseases. Review.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazek, Saeid; Szumowski, Piotr; Rogowski, Franciszek; Kociura-Sawicka, Agnieszka; Mojsak, Małgorzata; Szorc, Małgorzata

    2012-08-25

    Metabolic bone disease encompasses a number of disorders that tend to present a generalized involvement of the whole skeleton. The disorders are mostly related to increased bone turnover and increased uptake of radiolabelled diphosphonate. Skeletal uptake of 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate depends primarily upon osteoblastic activity, and to a lesser extent, skeletal vascularity. A bone scan image therefore presents a functional display of total skeletal metabolism and has valuable role to play in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disorders. However, the bone scan appearances in metabolic bone disease are often non-specific, and their recognition depends on increased tracer uptake throughout the whole skeleton. It is the presence of local lesions, as in metastatic disease, that makes a bone scan appearance obviously abnormal. In the early stages, there will be difficulty in evaluating the bone scans from many patients with metabolic bone disease. However, in the more severe cases scan appearances can be quite striking and virtually diagnostic.

  3. Regulation of pyruvate metabolism and human disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lawrence R; Tompkins, Sean C; Taylor, Eric B

    2014-07-01

    Pyruvate is a keystone molecule critical for numerous aspects of eukaryotic and human metabolism. Pyruvate is the end-product of glycolysis, is derived from additional sources in the cellular cytoplasm, and is ultimately destined for transport into mitochondria as a master fuel input undergirding citric acid cycle carbon flux. In mitochondria, pyruvate drives ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation and multiple biosynthetic pathways intersecting the citric acid cycle. Mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is regulated by many enzymes, including the recently discovered mitochondria pyruvate carrier, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate carboxylase, to modulate overall pyruvate carbon flux. Mutations in any of the genes encoding for proteins regulating pyruvate metabolism may lead to disease. Numerous cases have been described. Aberrant pyruvate metabolism plays an especially prominent role in cancer, heart failure, and neurodegeneration. Because most major diseases involve aberrant metabolism, understanding and exploiting pyruvate carbon flux may yield novel treatments that enhance human health.

  4. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  5. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  6. New research developments and insights from Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Camp, Michelle; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    In a field of great importance to daily life and clinical care, metabolic-related research covers a wealth of information and knowledge. This broad field encompasses a number of physical states that are increasingly critical to study, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, the impacts of diet, nutrition, and exercise on these physical states are an area of ever-important and expanding research. With the latest advances in metabolic research, much knowledge has been gained. Here, we present the newest findings from research published in Metabolism. We hope that these results provide not only critical knowledge needed for clinical care and daily life, but also a platform for the continuing expansion of research into metabolic-related issues. PMID:25549908

  7. Metabolic syndrome and cancer: holistic or reductionist?

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Capuano, Annalisa; Giugliano, Dario

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome has become a major public health problem worldwide and represents a common clinical condition in countries with a high incidence of obesity and western dietary patterns. Metabolic syndrome associates with common cancers at many sites, including liver, colorectal, and bladder cancers in men, and endometrial, pancreatic, breast post-menopausal, and colorectal cancers in women. However, the role played by each single component of the syndrome on cancer risk is still unclear. For endometrial cancer, obesity and/or high circumference waist explain all the risk associated with the full metabolic syndrome, while for post-menopausal breast cancer, the risk conveyed by metabolic syndrome appears to be greater than its parts, as no single component explains the full risk associated with the syndrome. Future research should cover other avenues in order to elucidate the complexity of biological processes linking metabolic syndrome and cancer.

  8. Theoretical description of metabolism using queueing theory.

    PubMed

    Evstigneev, Vladyslav P; Holyavka, Marina G; Khrapatiy, Sergii V; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical description of the process of metabolism has been developed on the basis of the Pachinko model (see Nicholson and Wilson in Nat Rev Drug Discov 2:668-676, 2003) and the queueing theory. The suggested approach relies on the probabilistic nature of the metabolic events and the Poisson distribution of the incoming flow of substrate molecules. The main focus of the work is an output flow of metabolites or the effectiveness of metabolism process. Two simplest models have been analyzed: short- and long-living complexes of the source molecules with a metabolizing point (Hole) without queuing. It has been concluded that the approach based on queueing theory enables a very broad range of metabolic events to be described theoretically from a single probabilistic point of view.

  9. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  10. Chemical approaches to study metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-01

    One of the more provocative realizations that have come out of the genome sequencing projects is that organisms possess a large number of uncharacterized or poorly characterized enzymes. This finding belies the commonly held notion that our knowledge of cell metabolism is nearly complete, underscoring the vast landscape of unannotated metabolic and signaling networks that operate under normal physiological conditions, let alone in disease states where metabolic networks may be rewired, dysregulated, or altered to drive disease progression. Consequently, the functional annotation of enzymatic pathways represents a grand challenge for researchers in the post-genomic era. This review will highlight the chemical technologies that have been successfully used to characterize metabolism, and put forth some of the challenges we face as we expand our map of metabolic pathways.

  11. Systems metabolic engineering for chemicals and materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Kim, Tae Yong; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sol; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-08-01

    Metabolic engineering has contributed significantly to the enhanced production of various value-added and commodity chemicals and materials from renewable resources in the past two decades. Recently, metabolic engineering has been upgraded to the systems level (thus, systems metabolic engineering) by the integrated use of global technologies of systems biology, fine design capabilities of synthetic biology, and rational-random mutagenesis through evolutionary engineering. By systems metabolic engineering, production of natural and unnatural chemicals and materials can be better optimized in a multiplexed way on a genome scale, with reduced time and effort. Here, we review the recent trends in systems metabolic engineering for the production of chemicals and materials by presenting general strategies and showcasing representative examples.

  12. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  13. Determinants of metabolic cost during submaximal cycling.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, J; Durstine, J L; Hand, G A; Martin, J C

    2002-09-01

    The metabolic cost of producing submaximal cycling power has been reported to vary with pedaling rate. Pedaling rate, however, governs two physiological phenomena known to influence metabolic cost and efficiency: muscle shortening velocity and the frequency of muscle activation and relaxation. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative influence of those two phenomena on metabolic cost during submaximal cycling. Nine trained male cyclists performed submaximal cycling at power outputs intended to elicit 30, 60, and 90% of their individual lactate threshold at four pedaling rates (40, 60, 80, 100 rpm) with three different crank lengths (145, 170, and 195 mm). The combination of four pedaling rates and three crank lengths produced 12 pedal speeds ranging from 0.61 to 2.04 m/s. Metabolic cost was determined by indirect calorimetery, and power output and pedaling rate were recorded. A stepwise multiple linear regression procedure selected mechanical power output, pedal speed, and pedal speed squared as the main determinants of metabolic cost (R(2) = 0.99 +/- 0.01). Neither pedaling rate nor crank length significantly contributed to the regression model. The cost of unloaded cycling and delta efficiency were 150 metabolic watts and 24.7%, respectively, when data from all crank lengths and pedal speeds were included in a regression. Those values increased with increasing pedal speed and ranged from a low of 73 +/- 7 metabolic watts and 22.1 +/- 0.3% (145-mm cranks, 40 rpm) to a high of 297 +/- 23 metabolic watts and 26.6 +/- 0.7% (195-mm cranks, 100 rpm). These results suggest that mechanical power output and pedal speed, a marker for muscle shortening velocity, are the main determinants of metabolic cost during submaximal cycling, whereas pedaling rate (i.e., activation-relaxation rate) does not significantly contribute to metabolic cost.

  14. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  15. METABOLIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE GENUS BRUCELLA III.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Margaret E.

    1961-01-01

    Meyer, Margaret E. (University of California, Davis). Metabolic characterization of the genus Brucella. III. Oxidative metabolism of strains that show anomalous characteristics by conventional determinative methods. J. Bacteriol. 82:401–410. 1961.—The oxidative metabolic patterns were determined on 83 strains of brucellae that had been described as “atypical” because they differed in one or more characteristics or because they had been isolated from an abnormal host (other than the natural reservoir for that species). Of the 83 strains examined, 44 displayed the metabolic pattern for Brucella melitensis. A comparison was then made between the results of identifying these strains metabolically and by the conventional methods. It was found that a few strains of B. melitensis showed a decreased tolerance to basic fuchsin and thionin, but none of the strains that was identified metabolically as B. melitensis produced H2S or required CO2. No biotypes have been reported for this species, since only slight quantitative variation in dye tolerances occurs among strains of B. melitensis, and no metabolic variants were found. It is concluded that B. melitensis is a homogenous species and can be identified with certainty by its oxidative metabolic pattern, irrespective of its host or geographic source. Of the remaining strains, 38 displayed the metabolic pattern singular for Brucella abortus. Evidence was presented to support the conclusion that in this species the characteristics of dye tolerance, H2S production, and CO2 required for initial growth vary independently of each other, and strains that differ from the species description by these criteria can be identified correctly by their oxidative metabolic pattern. Of the 83 atypical strains examined, 24 were strains of Brucella described as a new species, Brucella intermedia (Renoux). Of these 24 strains, 10 were identified as Brucella melitensis, 13 as Brucella abortus, and one as Brucella suis. Evidence was

  16. Precision metabolic engineering: The design of responsive, selective, and controllable metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    McNerney, Monica P; Watstein, Daniel M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed "precision metabolic engineering," involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful.

  17. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  18. Pyruvate kinase triggers a metabolic feedback loop that controls redox metabolism in respiring cells.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bluemlein, Katharina; Mülleder, Michael; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Lehrach, Hans; Jakobs, Cornelis; Breitenbach, Michael; Ralser, Markus

    2011-09-07

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism when respiration is activated. Low PYK activity activated yeast respiration. However, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not increase, and cells gained resistance to oxidants. This adaptation was attributable to accumulation of the PYK substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). PEP acted as feedback inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). TPI inhibition stimulated the pentose phosphate pathway, increased antioxidative metabolism, and prevented ROS accumulation. Thus, a metabolic feedback loop, initiated by PYK, mediated by its substrate and acting on TPI, stimulates redox metabolism in respiring cells. Originating from a single catalytic step, this autonomous reconfiguration of central carbon metabolism prevents oxidative stress upon shifts between fermentation and respiration.

  19. Emerging evidence of ozone metabolic effects and potential mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2014 Abstract: Invitational Emerging evidence of ozone metabolic effects and potential mechanisms U.P. Kodavanti NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC Recent evidence suggests that air pollutants are linked to metabolic syndrome and impact several key metabolic proce...

  20. A diagnostic algorithm for metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). Fig. 1 Clinical algorithm for patients with exercise intolerance in whom a metabolic myopathy is suspected. CK-creatine kinase; COX-cytochrome c oxidase; CPT-carnitine palmitoyl transferase; cyt b-cytochrome b; mtDNA-mitochondrial DNA; nDNA-nuclear DNA; PFK-phosphofructokinase; PGAM-phosphoglycerate mutase; PGK-phosphoglycerate kinase; PPL-myophosphorylase; RRF-ragged red fibers; TFP-trifunctional protein deficiency; VLCAD-very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase.