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Sample records for 6-cys protein family

  1. Genetic diversity and natural selection of three blood-stage 6-Cys proteins in Plasmodium vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Ma, An; Chen, Shen-Bo; Yang, Ying-Chao; Chen, Jun-Hu; Yin, Ming-Bo

    2014-12-01

    Pv12, Pv38 and Pv41, the three 6-Cys family proteins which are expressed in the blood-stage of vivax malaria, might be involved in merozoite invasion activity and thus be potential vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax. However, little information is available concerning the genetic diversity and natural selection of these three proteins. In the present study, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys family proteins in comparison with the homologue proteins of Plasmodium cynomolgi strain B using bioinformatic methods. We also investigated genetic polymorphisms and natural selection of these three genes in P. vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border. The three P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys proteins were shown to possess a signal peptide at the N-terminus, containing two s48/45 domains, and Pv12 and Pv38 have a GPI-anchor motif at the C-terminus. Then, 22, 21 and 29 haplotypes of pv12, pv38 and pv41 were identified out of 45, 38 and 40 isolates, respectively. The dN/dS values for Domain II of pv38 and pv41 were 3.33880 and 5.99829, respectively, suggesting positive balancing selection for these regions. Meanwhile, the C-terminus of pv41 showed high nucleotide diversity, and Tajima's D test suggested that this fragment could be under positive balancing selection. Overall, our results have significant implications, providing a genetic basis for blood-stage malaria vaccine development based on these three 6-Cys proteins.

  2. Expression of 6-Cys Gene Superfamily Defines Babesia bovis Sexual Stage Development within Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Alzan, Heba F.; Herndon, David R.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Scoles, Glen A.; Kappmeyer, Lowell S.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) where their orthologues in Plasmodium parasite have been shown to encode for proteins required for the development of sexual stages. The current study identified four additional 6-Cys genes (G, H, I, J) in the B. bovis genome. These four genes are described in the context of the complete ten 6-Cys gene superfamily. The proteins expressed by this gene family are predicted to be secreted or surface membrane directed. Genetic analysis comparing the 6-Cys superfamily among five distinct B. bovis strains shows limited sequence variation. Additionally, A, B, E, H, I and J genes were transcribed in B. bovis infected tick midgut while genes A, B and E were also transcribed in the subsequent B. bovis kinete stage. Transcription of gene C was found exclusively in the kinete. In contrast, transcription of genes D, F and G in either B. bovis infected midguts or kinetes was not detected. None of the 6-Cys transcripts were detected in B. bovis blood stages. Subsequent protein analysis of 6-Cys A and B is concordant with their transcript profile. The collective data indicate as in Plasmodium parasite, certain B. bovis 6-Cys family members are uniquely expressed during sexual stages and therefore, they are likely required for parasite reproduction. Within B. bovis specifically, proteins encoded by 6-Cys genes A and B are markers for sexual stages and candidate antigens for developing novel vaccines able to interfere with the development of B. bovis within the tick vector. PMID:27668751

  3. Expression of 6-Cys gene superfamily defines babesia bovis sexual stage development within rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) and t...

  4. The Hedgehog protein family.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is one of the fundamental signal transduction pathways in animal development and is also involved in stem-cell maintenance and carcinogenesis. The hedgehog (hh) gene was first discovered in Drosophila, and members of the family have since been found in most metazoa. Hh proteins are composed of two domains, an amino-terminal domain HhN, which has the biological signal activity, and a carboxy-terminal autocatalytic domain HhC, which cleaves Hh into two parts in an intramolecular reaction and adds a cholesterol moiety to HhN. HhC has sequence similarity to the self-splicing inteins, and the shared region is termed Hint. New classes of proteins containing the Hint domain have been discovered recently in bacteria and eukaryotes, and the Hog class, of which Hh proteins comprise one family, is widespread throughout eukaryotes. The non-Hh Hog proteins have carboxy-terminal domains (the Hog domain) highly similar to HhC, although they lack the HhN domain, and instead have other amino-terminal domains. Hog proteins are found in many protists, but the Hh family emerged only in early metazoan evolution. HhN is modified by cholesterol at its carboxyl terminus and by palmitate at its amino terminus in both flies and mammals. The modified HhN is released from the cell and travels through the extracellular space. On binding its receptor Patched, it relieves the inhibition that Patched exerts on Smoothened, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The resulting signaling cascade converges on the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), or its mammalian counterparts, the Gli proteins, which activate or repress target genes.

  5. The coronin family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Clemen, Christoph S; Rybakin, Vasily; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    The coronins, first described in Dictyostelium discoideum in 1991, have meanwhile been detected in all eukaryotes except plants. They belong to the superfamily of WD40-repeat proteins and represent a large family of proteins, which are often involved in cytoskeletal functions. Phylogenetic studies clearly distinguish 12 subfamilies of which six exclusively occur in vertebrates. In the present book we have made a sincere attempt to provide a comprehensive overview on all aspects of coronin proteins including history, structure, subcellular localization and function in different organisms. In addition, we also included a general overview on the WD40 family of proteins and the structurally related Kelch family. The book should be of interest for scientists outside the field, but is more importantly intended as a fast and competent guide for newcomers as well as doctoral and postdoctoral scientists to coronin research in all its facets.

  6. Protein families in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Copley, R R; Schultz, J; Ponting, C P; Bork, P

    1999-06-01

    The complete sequence of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans contains the genetic machinery that is required to undertake the core biological processes of single cells. However, the genome also encodes proteins that are associated with multicellularity, as well as others that are lineage-specific expansions of phylogenetically widespread families and yet more that are absent in non-nematodes. Ongoing analysis is beginning to illuminate the similarities and differences among human proteins and proteins that are encoded by the genomes of the multicellular worm and the unicellular yeast, and will be essential in determining the reliability of transferring experimental data among phylogenetically distant species. PMID:10361098

  7. The Pfam protein families database.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Birney, Ewan; Cerruti, Lorenzo; Durbin, Richard; Etwiller, Laurence; Eddy, Sean R; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Howe, Kevin L; Marshall, Mhairi; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2002-01-01

    Pfam is a large collection of protein multiple sequence alignments and profile hidden Markov models. Pfam is available on the World Wide Web in the UK at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Pfam/, in Sweden at http://www.cgb.ki.se/Pfam/, in France at http://pfam.jouy.inra.fr/ and in the US at http://pfam.wustl.edu/. The latest version (6.6) of Pfam contains 3071 families, which match 69% of proteins in SWISS-PROT 39 and TrEMBL 14. Structural data, where available, have been utilised to ensure that Pfam families correspond with structural domains, and to improve domain-based annotation. Predictions of non-domain regions are now also included. In addition to secondary structure, Pfam multiple sequence alignments now contain active site residue mark-up. New search tools, including taxonomy search and domain query, greatly add to the functionality and usability of the Pfam resource.

  8. Pfam: the protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Bateman, Alex; Clements, Jody; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y.; Eddy, Sean R.; Heger, Andreas; Hetherington, Kirstie; Holm, Liisa; Mistry, Jaina; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Tate, John; Punta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pfam, available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/) and the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/), is a widely used database of protein families, containing 14 831 manually curated entries in the current release, version 27.0. Since the last update article 2 years ago, we have generated 1182 new families and maintained sequence coverage of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) at nearly 80%, despite a 50% increase in the size of the underlying sequence database. Since our 2012 article describing Pfam, we have also undertaken a comprehensive review of the features that are provided by Pfam over and above the basic family data. For each feature, we determined the relevance, computational burden, usage statistics and the functionality of the feature in a website context. As a consequence of this review, we have removed some features, enhanced others and developed new ones to meet the changing demands of computational biology. Here, we describe the changes to Pfam content. Notably, we now provide family alignments based on four different representative proteome sequence data sets and a new interactive DNA search interface. We also discuss the mapping between Pfam and known 3D structures. PMID:24288371

  9. The Pfam protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Mistry, Jaina; Tate, John; Coggill, Penny; Heger, Andreas; Pollington, Joanne E.; Gavin, O. Luke; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Ceric, Goran; Forslund, Kristoffer; Holm, Liisa; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Eddy, Sean R.; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Pfam is a widely used database of protein families and domains. This article describes a set of major updates that we have implemented in the latest release (version 24.0). The most important change is that we now use HMMER3, the latest version of the popular profile hidden Markov model package. This software is ∼100 times faster than HMMER2 and is more sensitive due to the routine use of the forward algorithm. The move to HMMER3 has necessitated numerous changes to Pfam that are described in detail. Pfam release 24.0 contains 11 912 families, of which a large number have been significantly updated during the past two years. Pfam is available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/), the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/) and Sweden (http://pfam.sbc.su.se/). PMID:19920124

  10. Computational Study on Hemoglobin Protein Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, Dana; Isvoran, Adriana; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed 19 proteins belonging to hemoglobin protein family: 3 for plants, 4 for invertebrates and the others for vertebrates. For every protein we have determined the following parameters: the fractal dimension of its backbone, the fractal dimension of its surface, the radius of gyration, the area of its molecular surface and the area of the surface of its cavities. At global level, we did not notice significant differences for the fractal parameters for proteins belonging to different organisms and it underlines that all these proteins perform the same biological function. We have obtained different values of the local and global surface fractal dimensions reflecting distinct roughness of protein pockets in comparison to the entire surface, also in good correlation with the biological function. The geometric characteristics are distinct for the three investigated families of proteins.

  11. The lipocalin protein family: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, D R

    1996-01-01

    The lipocalin protein family is a large group of small extracellular proteins. The family demonstrates great diversity at the sequence level; however, most lipocalins share three characteristic conserved sequence motifs, the kernel lipocalins, while a group of more divergent family members, the outlier lipocalins, share only one. Belying this sequence dissimilarity, lipocalin crystal structures are highly conserved and comprise a single eight-stranded continuously hydrogen-bonded antiparallel beta-barrel, which encloses an internal ligand-binding site. Together with two other families of ligand-binding proteins, the fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and the avidins, the lipocalins form part of an overall structural superfamily: the calycins. Members of the lipocalin family are characterized by several common molecular-recognition properties: the ability to bind a range of small hydrophobic molecules, binding to specific cell-surface receptors and the formation of complexes with soluble macromolecules. The varied biological functions of the lipocalins are mediated by one or more of these properties. In the past, the lipocalins have been classified as transport proteins; however, it is now clear that the lipocalins exhibit great functional diversity, with roles in retinol transport, invertebrate cryptic coloration, olfaction and pheromone transport, and prostaglandin synthesis. The lipocalins have also been implicated in the regulation of cell homoeostasis and the modulation of the immune response, and, as carrier proteins, to act in the general clearance of endogenous and exogenous compounds. PMID:8761444

  12. The SYSTERS Protein Family Database in 2005.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Thomas; Krause, Antje; Luz, Hannes; Vingron, Martin; Staub, Eike

    2005-01-01

    The SYSTERS project aims to provide a meaningful partitioning of the whole protein sequence space by a fully automatic procedure. A refined two-step algorithm assigns each protein to a family and a superfamily. The sequence data underlying SYSTERS release 4 now comprise several protein sequence databases derived from completely sequenced genomes (ENSEMBL, TAIR, SGD and GeneDB), in addition to the comprehensive Swiss-Prot/TrEMBL databases. The SYSTERS web server (http://systers.molgen.mpg.de) provides access to 158 153 SYSTERS protein families. To augment the automatically derived results, information from external databases like Pfam and Gene Ontology are added to the web server. Furthermore, users can retrieve pre-processed analyses of families like multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees. New query options comprise a batch retrieval tool for functional inference about families based on automatic keyword extraction from sequence annotations. A new access point, PhyloMatrix, allows the retrieval of phylogenetic profiles of SYSTERS families across organisms with completely sequenced genomes.

  13. FIGfams : yet another set of protein families.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.; Overbeek, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes

    2009-11-01

    We present FIGfams, a new collection of over 100,000 protein families that are the product of manual curation and close strain comparison. Using the Subsystem approach the manual curation is carried out, ensuring a previously unattained degree of throughput and consistency. FIGfams are based on over 950,000 manually annotated proteins and across many hundred Bacteria and Archaea. Associated with each FIGfam is a two-tiered, rapid, accurate decision procedure to determine family membership for new proteins. FIGfams are freely available under an open source license. These can be downloaded at ftp://ftp.theseed.org/FIGfams/. The web site for FIGfams is http://www.theseed.org/wiki/FIGfams/.

  14. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  15. TIGRFAMS: The TIGRFAMs database of protein families

    DOE Data Explorer

    TIGRFAMs are protein families based on Hidden Markov Models or HMMs. Use this page to see the curated seed alignmet for each TIGRFam, the full alignment of all family members and the cutoff scores for inclusion in each of the TIGRFAMs. Also use this page to search through the TIGRFAMs and HMMs for text in the TIGRFAMs Text Search or search for specific sequences in the TIGRFAMs Sequence Search.[Copied from the Overview at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/tigrfams/overview/] See also TIGRFAMs ordered by the roles they play at http://cmr.jcvi.org/tigr-scripts/CMR/shared/EvidenceList.cgi?ev_type=TIGRFAM&order_type=role.

  16. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  17. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  18. Correlated rigid modes in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, D. A.; Wojtowicz, D.; Przytycka, T. M.; Periwal, V.

    2016-04-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets.

  19. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  20. The peripheral myelin protein 22 and epithelial membrane protein family.

    PubMed

    Jetten, A M; Suter, U

    2000-01-01

    The peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) and the epithelial membrane proteins (EMP-1, -2, and -3) comprise a subfamily of small hydrophobic membrane proteins. The putative four-transmembrane domain structure as well as the genomic structure are highly conserved among family members. PMP22 and EMPs are expressed in many tissues, and functions in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis have been reported. EMP-1 is highly up-regulated during squamous differentiation and in certain tumors, and a role in tumorigenesis has been proposed. PMP22 is most highly expressed in peripheral nerves, where it is localized in the compact portion of myelin. It plays a crucial role in normal physiological and pathological processes in the peripheral nervous system. Progress in molecular genetics has revealed that genetic alterations in the PMP22 gene, including duplications, deletions, and point mutations, are responsible for several forms of hereditary peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DDS), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The natural mouse mutants Trembler and Trembler-J contain a missense mutation in different hydrophobic domains of PMP22, resulting in demyelination and Schwann cell proliferation. Transgenic mice carrying many copies of the PMP22 gene and PMP22-null mice display a variety of defects in the initial steps of myelination and/or maintenance of myelination, whereas no pathological alterations are detected in other tissues normally expressing PMP22. Further characterization of the interactions of PMP22 and EMPs with other proteins as well as their regulation will provide additional insight into their normal physiological function and their roles in disease and possibly will result in the development of therapeutic tools. PMID:10697408

  1. New dimension in therapeutic targeting of BCL-2 family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Samaher; Mirshahi, Massoud; Pocard, Marc; Billard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the BCL-2 family control the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Targeting these proteins proves to be an attractive strategy for anticancer therapy. The biological context is based on the fact that BH3-only members of the family are specific antagonists of prosurvival members. This prompted the identification of “BH3 mimetic” compounds. These small peptides or organic molecules indeed mimic the BH3 domain of BH3-only proteins: by selectively binding and antagonizing prosurvival proteins, they can induce apoptosis in malignant cells. Some small-molecule inhibitors of prosurvival proteins have already entered clinical trials in cancer patients and two of them have shown significant therapeutic effects. The latest developments in the field of targeting BCL-2 family proteins highlight several new antagonists of prosurvival proteins as well as direct activators of proapoptotic proteins. These compounds open up novel prospects for the development of BH3 mimetic anticancer drugs. PMID:25970783

  2. PIRSF family classification system for protein functional and evolutionary analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikolskaya, Anastasia N; Arighi, Cecilia N; Huang, Hongzhan; Barker, Winona C; Wu, Cathy H

    2006-01-01

    The PIRSF protein classification system (http://pir.georgetown.edu/pirsf/) reflects evolutionary relationships of full-length proteins and domains. The primary PIRSF classification unit is the homeomorphic family, whose members are both homologous (evolved from a common ancestor) and homeomorphic (sharing full-length sequence similarity and a common domain architecture). PIRSF families are curated systematically based on literature review and integrative sequence and functional analysis, including sequence and structure similarity, domain architecture, functional association, genome context, and phyletic pattern. The results of classification and expert annotation are summarized in PIRSF family reports with graphical viewers for taxonomic distribution, domain architecture, family hierarchy, and multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree. The PIRSF system provides a comprehensive resource for bioinformatics analysis and comparative studies of protein function and evolution. Domain or fold-based searches allow identification of evolutionarily related protein families sharing domains or structural folds. Functional convergence and functional divergence are revealed by the relationships between protein classification and curated family functions. The taxonomic distribution allows the identification of lineage-specific or broadly conserved protein families and can reveal horizontal gene transfer. Here we demonstrate, with illustrative examples, how to use the web-based PIRSF system as a tool for functional and evolutionary studies of protein families.

  3. Defining the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tran, Kim My; Aziz, Kathryn E; Sorokin, Alexey V; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Wenqi

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which plays a vital role in a variety of human cellular processes, is coordinated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Genomic studies provide compelling evidence that PTPs are frequently mutated in various human cancers, suggesting that they have important roles in tumor suppression. However, the cellular functions and regulatory machineries of most PTPs are still largely unknown. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the protein-protein interaction network of the human PTP family, we performed a global proteomic study. Using a Minkowski distance-based unified scoring environment (MUSE) for the data analysis, we identified 940 high confidence candidate-interacting proteins that comprise the interaction landscape of the human PTP family. Through a gene ontology analysis and functional validations, we connected the PTP family with several key signaling pathways or cellular functions whose associations were previously unclear, such as the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway, the Hippo-YAP pathway, and cytokinesis. Our study provides the first glimpse of a protein interaction network for the human PTP family, linking it to a number of crucial signaling events, and generating a useful resource for future studies of PTPs.

  4. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  5. The family of major royal jelly proteins and its evolution.

    PubMed

    Albert, S; Bhattacharya, D; Klaudiny, J; Schmitzová, J; Simúth, J

    1999-08-01

    A cDNA encoding a new member of the gene family of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, was isolated and sequenced. Royal jelly (RJ) is a secretion of the cephalic glands of nurse bees. The origin and biological function of the protein component (12.5%, w/w) of RJ is unknown. We show that the MRJP gene family encodes a group of closely related proteins that share a common evolutionary origin with the yellow protein of Drosophila melanogaster. Yellow protein functions in cuticle pigmentation in D. melanogaster. The MRJPs appear to have evolved a novel nutritional function in the honeybee.

  6. Bcl-2 family proteins: master regulators of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hatok, Jozef; Racay, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The most prominent function of proteins of the Bcl-2 family is regulation of the initiation of intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathways of apoptosis. However, recent research has revealed that in addition to regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, proteins of the Bcl-2 family play important roles in regulating other cellular pathways with a strong impact on cell survival like autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, intracellular calcium dynamics, cell cycle progression, mitochondrial dynamics and energy metabolism. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about functions of Bcl-2 family proteins that are related to cell survival. PMID:27505095

  7. Genome Pool Strategy for Structural Coverage of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszewski, L.; Slabinski, L.; Wooley, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Lesley, S.A.; Wilson, I.A.; Godzik, A.

    2009-05-18

    Even closely homologous proteins often have different crystallization properties and propensities. This observation can be used to introduce an additional dimension into crystallization trials by simultaneous targeting multiple homologs in what we call a 'genome pool' strategy. We show that this strategy works because protein physicochemical properties correlated with crystallization success have a surprisingly broad distribution within most protein families. There are also easy and difficult families where this distribution is tilted in one direction. This leads to uneven structural coverage of protein families, with more easy ones solved. Increasing the size of the genome pool can improve chances of solving the difficult ones. In contrast, our analysis does not indicate that any specific genomes are easy or difficult. Finally, we show that the group of proteins with known 3D structures is systematically different from the general pool of known proteins and we assess the structural consequences of these differences.

  8. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  9. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  10. TSEMA: interactive prediction of protein pairings between interacting families.

    PubMed

    Izarzugaza, José M G; Juan, David; Pons, Carles; Ranea, Juan A G; Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    2006-07-01

    An entire family of methodologies for predicting protein interactions is based on the observed fact that families of interacting proteins tend to have similar phylogenetic trees due to co-evolution. One application of this concept is the prediction of the mapping between the members of two interacting protein families (which protein within one family interacts with which protein within the other). The idea is that the real mapping would be the one maximizing the similarity between the trees. Since the exhaustive exploration of all possible mappings is not feasible for large families, current approaches use heuristic techniques which do not ensure the best solution to be found. This is why it is important to check the results proposed by heuristic techniques and to manually explore other solutions. Here we present TSEMA, the server for efficient mapping assessment. This system calculates an initial mapping between two families of proteins based on a Monte Carlo approach and allows the user to interactively modify it based on performance figures and/or specific biological knowledge. All the explored mappings are graphically shown over a representation of the phylogenetic trees. The system is freely available at http://pdg.cnb.uam.es/TSEMA. Standalone versions of the software behind the interface are available upon request from the authors.

  11. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  12. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuncong; Edlund, Anna; Yang, Youngik; McLean, Jeffrey S; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-07-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  13. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  14. Protein folds and families: sequence and structure alignments.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1999-01-01

    Dali and HSSP are derived databases organizing protein space in the structurally known regions. We use an automatic structure alignment program (Dali) for the classification of all known 3D structures based on all-against-all comparison of 3D structures in the Protein Data Bank. The HSSP database associates 1D sequences with known 3D structures using a position-weighted dynamic programming method for sequence profile alignment (MaxHom). As a result, the HSSP database not only provides aligned sequence families, but also implies secondary and tertiary structures covering 36% of all sequences in Swiss-Prot. The structure classification by Dali and the sequence families in HSSP can be browsed jointly from a web interface providing a rich network of links between neighbours in fold space, between domains and proteins, and between structures and sequences. In particular, this results in a database of explicit multiple alignments of protein families in the twilight zone of sequence similarity. The organization of protein structures and families provides a map of the currently known regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The databases are available from http://www.embl-ebi.ac.uk/dali/

  15. Protein families: implications for allergen nomenclature, standardisation and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Breiteneder, Heimo

    2009-01-01

    Allergens are embedded into the protein universe as members of large families and superfamilies of related proteins which is a direct consequence of their shared evolution. The classification of allergens by protein families offers a valuable frame of reference that allows the design of experiments to study cross-reactivity and allergenic potency of proteins. Information on protein family membership also complements the current official IUIS allergen nomenclature. All presently known allergens belong to one of 140 (1.4%) of the 10,340 protein families currently described by version 23.0 of the Pfam database. This is indicative of a strong bias among allergens towards certain protein architectures that are able to induce an IgE response in an atopic immune system. However, even small variations in the structure of a protein alter its immunological characteristics. Various isoforms of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were shown to possess highly variant immunogenic and allergenic properties. Ber e 1 and SFA8, two 2S albumins, were revealed to display differential capacities to polarise an immune response. Such data will be exploited in the future for the design of allergy vaccines.

  16. Increased coverage of protein families with the blocks database servers.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Greene, E A; Pietrokovski, S; Henikoff, S

    2000-01-01

    The Blocks Database WWW (http://blocks.fhcrc.org ) and Email (blocks@blocks.fhcrc.org ) servers provide tools to search DNA and protein queries against the Blocks+ Database of multiple alignments, which represent conserved protein regions. Blocks+ nearly doubles the number of protein families included in the database by adding families from the Pfam-A, ProDom and Domo databases to those from PROSITE and PRINTS. Other new features include improved Block Searcher statistics, searching with NCBI's IMPALA program and 3D display of blocks on PDB structures.

  17. Multiple degradation pathways for Fos family proteins.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Claire; Bossis, Guillaume; Ferrara, Patrizia; Brockly, Frederique; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2002-11-01

    c-Fos protooncoprotein is a short-lived transcription factor with oncogenic potential. It is massively degraded by the proteasome in vivo under various experimental conditions. Those include consititutive expression in exponentially growing cells and transient induction in cells undergoing the G0/G1 phase transition upon stimulation by serum. Though there is evidence that c-Fos can be ubiquitinylated in vitro, the unambigous demonstration that prior ubiquitinylation is necessary for degradation by the proteasome in vivo is still lacking. c-Jun, one of the main dimerization partners of c-Fos within the AP-1 transcription complex, is also an unstable protein. Its degradation is clearly proteasome dependent. However, several lines of evidence indicate that the mechanisms by which it addresses the proteasome are different from those operating on c-Fos. Moreover, genetic analysis has indicated that c-Fos is addressed to the proteasome via pathways that differ depending on the conditions of expression. c-Fos has been transduced by two murine osteosarcomatogenic retroviruses in mutated forms, which are more stable and more oncogenic. The stabilization is not simply accounted for by simple deletion of one of the main c-Fos destabilizers but, rather, by a complex balance between opposing destabilizing and stabilizing mutations. However, although viral Fos proteins have acquired full resistance to proteasomal degradation, stabilization is limited because the mutations they have accumulated, during or after c-fos gene transduction, confer sensitivity to an unidentified proteolytic system(s). This observation is consistent with the idea that fos-expressing viruses have evolved expression machineries to ensure controlled protein levels in order to maintain an optimal balance between prooncogenic and proapoptotic activities of v-Fos proteins.

  18. Functions and Regulation of the APOBEC Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold C.; Bennett, Ryan P.; Kizilyer, Ayse; McDougall, William M.; Prohaska, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC1 is a cytidine deaminase that edits messenger RNAs and was the first enzyme in the APOBEC family to be functionally characterized. Under appropriate conditions APOBEC1 also deaminates deoxycytidine in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The other ten members of the APOBEC family have not been fully characterized however several have deoxycytidine deaminase activity on ssDNAs. Despite the nucleic acid substrate preferences of different APOBEC proteins, a common feature appears to be their intrinsic ability to bind to RNA as well as to ssDNA. RNA binding to APOBEC proteins together with protein-protein interactions, post-translation modifications and subcellular localization serve as biological modulators controlling the DNA mutagenic activity of these potentially genotoxic proteins. PMID:22001110

  19. The neuronal calcium sensor family of Ca2+-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, R D; Weiss, J L

    2001-01-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in the function of neurons as the trigger for neurotransmitter release, and many aspects of neuronal activity, from rapid modulation to changes in gene expression, are controlled by Ca(2+). These actions of Ca(2+) must be mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including calmodulin, which is involved in Ca(2+) regulation, not only in neurons, but in most other cell types. A large number of other EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins are known. One family of these, the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, has a restricted expression in retinal photoreceptors or neurons and neuroendocrine cells, suggesting that they have specialized roles in these cell types. Two members of the family (recoverin and guanylate cyclase-activating protein) have established roles in the regulation of phototransduction. Despite close sequence similarities, the NCS proteins have distinct neuronal distributions, suggesting that they have different functions. Recent work has begun to demonstrate the physiological roles of members of this protein family. These include roles in the modulation of neurotransmitter release, control of cyclic nucleotide metabolism, biosynthesis of polyphosphoinositides, regulation of gene expression and in the direct regulation of ion channels. In the present review we describe the known sequences and structures of the NCS proteins, information on their interactions with target proteins and current knowledge about their cellular and physiological functions. PMID:11115393

  20. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  1. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  2. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Graether, Steffen P.; Boddington, Kelly F.

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  3. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  4. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution. PMID:26327816

  5. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  6. Key residues approach to the definition of protein families and analysis of sparse family signatures.

    PubMed

    Ison, J C; Blades, M J; Bleasby, A J; Daniel, S C; Parish, J H; Findlay, J B

    2000-08-01

    We extend the concept of the motif as a tool for characterizing protein families and explore the feasibility of a sparse "motif" that is the length of the protein sequence itself. The type of motif discussed is a sparse family signature consisting of a set of N key residue positions (A1, A2...AN) preceded by gaps (G) thus G1A1G2A2. ...GNAN. Both a residue and gap can be variable. A signature is matched to a protein sequence and scored using a dynamic programming algorithm which permits variability in gap distance and residue type. Generating a signature involves identifying residues associated with points of contact in interactions between secondary structure elements. A raw signature consists of a set of positions with potential key structural roles sampled from a sequence alignment constructed with reference to this contact data. Raw signatures are refined by sampling different gap-residue pairs until the specificity of a signature for the family cannot be further improved. We summarize signatures for nine families of protein of diverse fold and function and present results of scans against the OWL protein sequence database. The implications of such signatures are discussed.

  7. HOMSTRAD: a database of protein structure alignments for homologous families.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Deane, C M; Blundell, T L; Overington, J P

    1998-11-01

    We describe a database of protein structure alignments for homologous families. The database HOMSTRAD presently contains 130 protein families and 590 aligned structures, which have been selected on the basis of quality of the X-ray analysis and accuracy of the structure. For each family, the database provides a structure-based alignment derived using COMPARER and annotated with JOY in a special format that represents the local structural environment of each amino acid residue. HOMSTRAD also provides a set of superposed atomic coordinates obtained using MNYFIT, which can be viewed with a graphical user interface or used for comparative modeling studies. The database is freely available on the World Wide Web at: http://www-cryst.bioc.cam. ac.uk/-homstrad/, with search facilities and links to other databases.

  8. Tet family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Shi, Yujiang Geno

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic modification that plays essential roles in development, aging and disease. However, the mechanisms controlling 5mC dynamics remain elusive. Recent studies have shown that ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze 5mC oxidation and generate 5mC derivatives, including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The exciting discovery of these novel 5mC derivatives has begun to shed light on the dynamic nature of 5mC, and emerging evidence has shown that Tet family proteins and 5hmC are involved in normal development as well as in many diseases. In this Primer we provide an overview of the role of Tet family proteins and 5hmC in development and cancer. PMID:22569552

  9. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  10. Molecular modeling of pathogenesis-related proteins of family 5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Fernandes, Cláudia L; de Souza, Osmar N; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2006-01-01

    The family of pathogenesis-related (PR) 5 proteins have diverse functions, and some of them are classified as thaumatins, osmotins, and inhibitors of alpha-amylase or trypsin. Although the specific function of many PR5 in plants is unknown, they are involved in the acquired systemic resistance and response to biotic stress, causing the inhibition of hyphal growth and reduction of spore germination, probably by a membrane permeabilization mechanism or by interaction with pathogen receptors. We have constructed three-dimensional models of four proteins belonging to the Rosaceae and Fagaceae botanical families by using the technique of comparative molecular modelling by homology. There are four main structural differences between all the PR5, corresponding to regions with replacements of amino acids. Folding and the secondary structures are very similar for all of them. However, the isoelectric point and charge distributions differ for each protein.

  11. Sensory properties of the PII signalling protein family.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl; Lüddecke, Jan

    2016-02-01

    PII signalling proteins constitute one of the largest families of signalling proteins in nature. An even larger superfamily of trimeric sensory proteins with the same architectural principle as PII proteins appears in protein structure databases. Large surface-exposed flexible loops protrude from the intersubunit faces, where effector molecules are bound that tune the conformation of the loops. Via this mechanism, PII proteins control target proteins in response to cellular ATP/ADP levels and the 2-oxoglutarate status, thereby coordinating the cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. The antagonistic (ATP versus ADP) and synergistic (2-oxoglutarate and ATP) mode of effector molecule binding is further affected by PII -receptor interaction, leading to a highly sophisticated signalling network organized by PII . Altogether, it appears that PII is a multitasking information processor that, depending on its interaction environment, differentially transmits information on the energy status and the cellular 2-oxoglutarate level. In addition to the basic mode of PII function, several bacterial PII proteins may transmit a signal of the cellular glutamine status via covalent modification. Remarkably, during the evolution of plant chloroplasts, glutamine signalling by PII proteins was re-established by acquisition of a short sequence extension at the C-terminus. This plant-specific C-terminus makes the interaction of plant PII proteins with one of its targets, the arginine biosynthetic enzyme N-acetyl-glutamate kinase, glutamine-dependent.

  12. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated. PMID:27283515

  13. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  14. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated.

  15. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  16. In-silico characterization of Formin Binding Protein 4 Family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Bhattacharya, Simanti; Bagchi, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Rakhi

    2015-03-01

    Members of the Formin Binding Protein 4 Family or the FNBP4 were indirectly reported to be associated with many of the biological processes. These proteins possess two WW domains. So far there are practically no reports regarding the characterization and classification of the protein by any means. Keeping in mind the importance of the proteins from this FNBP4 family, we have tried an in silico approach to come up with a comprehensive analysis of the proteins. We have analyzed the proteins by considering their sequence conservation, their phylogenetic distributions among the different organisms. We have also investigated the functional properties of the WW domains in the proteins. Finally, we have made an attempt to elucidate the structural details of the domains and predicted the possible modes of their interactions. Our findings show that FNBP4 is eukaryotic in its distribution and follows a trend of evolution where animal and plant homologues have evolved in an independent manner. While the WW domain is the only common motif present across the FNBP4 family of proteins, there are different classes (mainly two) of WW domains that are found among different FNBP4 proteins. Structure function predictions indicate a possible role of FNBP4 in either protein stabilization control or transcript processing. Our study on FNBP4 may therefore open up new avenues to generate new interest in this highly important but largely unexplored class of proteins. Future studies with proteins from this family may answer many important questions of protein-protein interactions in different biologically important processes.

  17. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT.

  18. The APSES family proteins in fungi: Characterizations, evolution and functions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Su, Hao; Zhou, Jing; Feng, Huihua; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2015-08-01

    The APSES protein family belongs to transcriptional factors of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, the originally described members (APSES: Asm1p, Phd1p, Sok2p, Efg1p and StuAp) are used to designate this group of proteins, and they have been identified as key regulators of fungal development and other biological processes. APSES proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (APSES domain) of about 100 amino acids, whose central domain is predicted to form a typical bHLH structure. Besides APSES domain, several APSES proteins also contain additional domains, such as KilA-N and ankyrin repeats. In recent years, an increasing number of APSES proteins have been identified from diverse fungi, and they involve in numerous biological processes, such as sporulation, cellular differentiation, mycelial growth, secondary metabolism and virulence. Most fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Candida albicans, Fusarium graminearum, and Neurospora crassa, contain five APSES proteins. However, Cryptococcus neoformans only contains two APSES proteins, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six APSES proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed the APSES domains from different fungi were grouped into four clades (A, B, C and D), which is consistent with the result of homologous alignment of APSES domains using DNAman. The roles of APSES proteins in clade C have been studied in detail, while little is known about the roles of other APSES proteins in clades A, B and D. In this review, the biochemical properties and functional domains of APSES proteins are predicted and compared, and the phylogenetic relationship among APSES proteins from various fungi are analyzed based on the APSES domains. Moreover, the functions of APSES proteins in different fungi are summarized and discussed.

  19. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  20. Vaccinia Virus N1l Protein Resembles a B Cell Lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) Family Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, M.; Zhai, D.; Jin, C.; Aleshin, A.E.; Stec, B.; Reed, J.C.; Liddington, R.C.; /Burnham Inst.

    2007-07-03

    Poxviruses encode immuno-modulatory proteins capable of subverting host defenses. The poxvirus vaccinia expresses a small 14-kDa protein, N1L, that is critical for virulence. We report the crystal structure of N1L, which reveals an unexpected but striking resemblance to host apoptotic regulators of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family. Although N1L lacks detectable Bcl-2 homology (BH) motifs at the sequence level, we show that N1L binds with high affinity to the BH3 peptides of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in vitro, consistent with a role for N1L in modulating host antiviral defenses.

  1. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  2. Characterization of the Roco protein family in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Wouter N; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2010-05-01

    The Roco family consists of multidomain Ras-GTPases that include LRRK2, a protein mutated in familial Parkinson's disease. The genome of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum encodes 11 Roco proteins. To study the functions of these proteins, we systematically knocked out the roco genes. Previously described functions for GbpC, Pats1, and QkgA (Roco1 to Roco3) were confirmed, while novel developmental defects were identified in roco4- and roco11-null cells. Cells lacking Roco11 form larger fruiting bodies than wild-type cells, while roco4-null cells show strong developmental defects during the transition from mound to fruiting body; prestalk cells produce reduced levels of cellulose, leading to unstable stalks that are unable to properly lift the spore head. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of four slime mold species reveals that QkgA and Roco11 evolved relatively late by duplication of an ancestor roco4 gene (later than approximately 300 million years ago), contrary to the situation with other roco genes, which were already present before the split of the common ancestor of D. discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum (before approximately 600 million years ago). Together, our data show that the Dictyostelium Roco proteins serve a surprisingly diverse set of functions and highlight Roco4 as a key protein for proper stalk cell formation. PMID:20348387

  3. Nonagonal cadherins: A new protein family found within the Stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kyle I G; van West, Pieter; Gachon, Claire M M

    2016-11-15

    Cadherins, a group of molecules typically associated with planar cell polarity and Wnt signalling, have been little reported outside of the animal kingdom. Here, we identify a new family of cadherins in the Stramenopiles, termed Nonagonal after their 9 transmembrane passes, which contrast to the one or seven passes found in other known cadherin families. Manual curation and experimental validation reveal two subclasses of nonagonal cadherins, depending on the number of uninterrupted extracellular cadherin (EC) modules presented. Firstly, shorter mono-exonic, unimodular, protein models, with 3 to 12 EC domains occur as duplicate paralogs in the saprotrophic Labyrinthulomycetes Aurantiochytrium limanicum and Schizochytrium aggregatum, the gastrointestinal Blastocystis hominis (Blastocystae) and as a single copy gene in the autotrophic Pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferens. Larger, single copy, multi-exonal, tri-modular protein models, with up to 72 EC domain in total, are found in the Oomycete genera Albugo, Phytophthora, Pythium and Eurychasma. No homolog was found in the closely related autotrophic Phaeophyceae (brown algae) or Bacillariophyceae (diatoms), nor in several genera of plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes (Aphanomyces, Saprolegnia and Hyaloperonospora). This potential absence was further investigated by synteny analysis of the genome regions flanking the cadherin gene models, which are found to be highly variable. Novel to this new cadherin family is the presence of intercalated laminin and putative carbohydrate binding in tri-modular oomycete cadherins and at the N-terminus of thraustochytrid proteins. As we were unable to detect any homologs of proteins involved in signalling pathways where other cadherin families are involved, we present a conceptual hypothesis on the function of nonagonal cadherin based around the presence of putative carbohydrate binding domains. PMID:27498181

  4. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  5. Role of the prion protein family in the gonads

    PubMed Central

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pailhoux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The prion-gene family comprises four members named PRNP (PRPc), PRND (Doppel), PRNT (PRT), and SPRN (Shadoo). According to species, PRND is located 16–52 kb downstream from the PRNP locus, whereas SPRN is located on another chromosome. The fourth prion-family gene, PRNT, belongs to the same genomic cluster as PRNP and PRND in humans and bovidae. PRNT and PRND possibly resulted from a duplication event of PRND and PRNP, respectively, that occurred early during eutherian species divergence. Although most of the studies concerning the prion-family has been done on PRPc and its involvement in transmissible neurodegenerative disorders, different works report some potential roles of these proteins in the reproductive function of both sexes. Among them, a clear role of PRND, that encodes for the Doppel protein, in male fertility has been demonstrated through gene targeting studies in mice. In other species, Doppel seems to play a role in testis and ovary development but its cellular localization is variable according to the gonadal developmental stage and to the mammalian species considered. For the other three genes, their roles in reproductive function appear ill-defined and/or controversial. The present review aimed to synthesize all the available data on these prion-family members and their relations with reproductive processes, mainly in the gonad of both sexes. PMID:25364761

  6. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  7. An oxysterol-binding protein family identified in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Anniss, Angela M; Apostolopoulos, Jim; Dworkin, Sebastian; Purton, Louise E; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2002-08-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol. They have been shown to influence a variety of biological functions including sterol metabolism, lipid trafficking, and apoptosis. Recently, 12 human OSBP-related genes have been identified. In this study, we have identified a family of 12 oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs) in the mouse. A high level of amino acid identity (88-97%) was determined between mouse and human ORPs, indicating a very high degree of evolutionary conservation. All proteins identified contained the conserved OSBP amino acid sequence signature motif "EQVSHHPP," and most contained a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Using RT-PCR, each mouse ORP gene was found to exhibit a unique tissue distribution with many showing high expression in testicular, brain, and heart tissues. Interestingly, the tissue distribution of ORP-4 and ORP-10 were the most selective within the family. Expression of the various ORP genes was also investigated, specifically in highly purified populations of hemopoietic precursor cells defined by the lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS(+)) and lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(-) (LKS(-)) immunophenotype. Most ORP genes were expressed in both LKS(+) and LKS(-) populations, although ORP-4 appeared to be more highly expressed in the primitive, stem-cell enriched LKS(+) population, whereas ORP-10 was more highly expressed by maturing LKS(-) cells. The identification of a family of ORP proteins in the mouse, the frequently preferred animal model for in vivo studies, should further our understanding of the function of these proteins and their interactions with each other.

  8. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  9. UBXD Proteins: A Family of Proteins with Diverse Functions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The UBXD family is a diverse group of UBX (ubiquitin-regulatory X) domain-containing proteins in mammalian cells. Members of this family contain a UBX domain typically located at the carboxyl-terminal of the protein. In contrast to the UBX domain shared by all members of UBXD family, the amino-terminal domains are diverse and appear to carry out different roles in a subcellular localization-dependent manner. UBXD proteins are principally associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they positively or negatively regulate the ER-associated degradation machinery (ERAD). The distinct protein interaction networks of UBXD proteins allow them to have specific functions independent of the ERAD pathway in a cell type- and tissue context-dependent manner. Recent reports have illustrated that a number of mammalian members of the UBXD family play critical roles in several proliferation and apoptosis pathways dysregulated in selected types of cancer. This review covers recent advances that elucidate the therapeutic potential of selected members of the UBXD family that can contribute to tumor growth. PMID:27754413

  10. Regulation of intestinal microbiota by the NLR protein family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse microbial community consisting of a large number of bacteria and other micro-organisms that have co-evolved with the host intestinal immune system. During this process, microbiota and the host immune system shape one another by various mechanisms to achieve a successful symbiotic relationship. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysbiosis—the breakdown of such harmonized colonization—may result in infectious and inflammatory disorders, and recent advances in our studies indicate that receptors such as Toll-like receptors and NLR (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor; or nucleotide-binding domain- and leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor) proteins that detect micro-organisms and their products play a critical role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the role of NLR proteins in the regulation of intestinal microbiota. NLR proteins belong to a diverse family of cytoplasmic microbial sensors, mutations of which are involved in various disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. Understanding of the different roles of NLR family proteins in the intestine is, therefore, an important step towards the development of therapeutics against digestive diseases. PMID:23325116

  11. Bcl-2 family proteins as regulators of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Susnow, Nathan; Zeng, Liyun; Margineantu, Daciana; Hockenbery, David M

    2009-02-01

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins includes pro- and anti-apoptotic factors acting at mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. An impressive body of published studies, using genetic and physical reconstitution experiments in model organisms and cell lines, supports a view of Bcl-2 proteins as the critical arbiters of apoptotic cell death decisions in most circumstances (excepting CD95 death receptor signaling in Type I cells). Evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer [Hanahan D, Weinberg RA. The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 2000;100:57-70], relevant to tumorigenesis as well as resistance to cytotoxic drugs, and deregulation of Bcl-2 proteins is observed in many cancers [Manion MK, Hockenbery DM. Targeting BCL-2-related proteins in cancer therapy. Cancer Biol Ther. 2003;2:S105-14; Olejniczak ET, Van Sant C, Anderson MG, Wang G, Tahir SK, Sauter G, et al. Integrative genomic analysis of small-cell lung carcinoma reveals correlates of sensitivity to bcl-2 antagonists and uncovers novel chromosomal gains. Mol Cancer Res. 2007;5:331-9]. The rekindled interest in aerobic glycolysis as a cancer trait raises interesting questions as to how metabolic changes in cancer cells are integrated with other essential alterations in cancer, e.g. promotion of angiogenesis and unbridled growth signals. Apoptosis induced by multiple different signals involves loss of mitochondrial homeostasis, in particular, outer mitochondrial membrane integrity, releasing cytochrome c and other proteins from the intermembrane space. This integrative process, controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins, is also influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. In this review, we consider the role of reactive oxygen species, a metabolic by-product, in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, and the relationships between Bcl-2 functions and oxidative stress. PMID:19138742

  12. PipeAlign: A new toolkit for protein family analysis.

    PubMed

    Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Brelivet, Yann; Carles, Annaick; Chalmel, Frédéric; Lecompte, Odile; Mochel, Thiebaut; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Arnaud; Muller, Jean; Prigent, Veronique; Ripp, Raymond; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Thompson, Julie D; Wicker, Nicolas; Poch, Olivier

    2003-07-01

    PipeAlign is a protein family analysis tool integrating a five step process ranging from the search for sequence homologues in protein and 3D structure databases to the definition of the hierarchical relationships within and between subfamilies. The complete, automatic pipeline takes a single sequence or a set of sequences as input and constructs a high-quality, validated MACS (multiple alignment of complete sequences) in which sequences are clustered into potential functional subgroups. For the more experienced user, the PipeAlign server also provides numerous options to run only a part of the analysis, with the possibility to modify the default parameters of each software module. For example, the user can choose to enter an existing multiple sequence alignment for refinement, validation and subsequent clustering of the sequences. The aim is to provide an interactive workbench for the validation, integration and presentation of a protein family, not only at the sequence level, but also at the structural and functional levels. PipeAlign is available at http://igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/PipeAlign/.

  13. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  14. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  15. Diversity and evolution of the small multidrug resistance protein family

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein family are integral membrane proteins characterized by four α-helical transmembrane strands that confer resistance to a broad range of antiseptics and lipophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) in bacteria. Due to their short length and broad substrate profile, SMR proteins are suggested to be the progenitors for larger α-helical transporters such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily. To explore their evolutionary association with larger multidrug transporters, an extensive bioinformatics analysis of SMR sequences (> 300 Bacteria taxa) was performed to expand upon previous evolutionary studies of the SMR protein family and its origins. Results A thorough annotation of unidentified/putative SMR sequences was performed placing sequences into each of the three SMR protein subclass designations, namely small multidrug proteins (SMP), suppressor of groEL mutations (SUG), and paired small multidrug resistance (PSMR) using protein alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Examination of SMR subclass distribution within Bacteria and Archaea taxa identified specific Bacterial classes that uniquely encode for particular SMR subclass members. The extent of selective pressure acting upon each SMR subclass was determined by calculating the rate of synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions using Syn-SCAN analysis. SUG and SMP subclasses are maintained under moderate selection pressure in comparison to integron and plasmid encoded SMR homologues. Conversely, PSMR sequences are maintained under lower levels of selection pressure, where one of the two PSMR pairs diverges in sequence more rapidly than the other. SMR genomic loci surveys identified potential SMR efflux substrates based on its gene association to putative operons that encode for genes regulating amino acid biogenesis and QAC-like metabolites. SMR subclass protein transmembrane domain

  16. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria.

  17. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Perry E.; Tansey, John T.; Welte, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kiloDaltons (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  18. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  19. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  20. Docking validation resources: protein family and ligand flexibility experiments.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Balius, Trent E; Rizzo, Robert C

    2010-11-22

    A database consisting of 780 ligand-receptor complexes, termed SB2010, has been derived from the Protein Databank to evaluate the accuracy of docking protocols for regenerating bound ligand conformations. The goal is to provide easily accessible community resources for development of improved procedures to aid virtual screening for ligands with a wide range of flexibilities. Three core experiments using the program DOCK, which employ rigid (RGD), fixed anchor (FAD), and flexible (FLX) protocols, were used to gauge performance by several different metrics: (1) global results, (2) ligand flexibility, (3) protein family, and (4) cross-docking. Global spectrum plots of successes and failures vs rmsd reveal well-defined inflection regions, which suggest the commonly used 2 Å criteria is a reasonable choice for defining success. Across all 780 systems, success tracks with the relative difficulty of the calculations: RGD (82.3%) > FAD (78.1%) > FLX (63.8%). In general, failures due to scoring strongly outweigh those due to sampling. Subsets of SB2010 grouped by ligand flexibility (7-or-less, 8-to-15, and 15-plus rotatable bonds) reveal that success degrades linearly for FAD and FLX protocols, in contrast to RGD, which remains constant. Despite the challenges associated with FLX anchor orientation and on-the-fly flexible growth, success rates for the 7-or-less (74.5%) and, in particular, the 8-to-15 (55.2%) subset are encouraging. Poorer results for the very flexible 15-plus set (39.3%) indicate substantial room for improvement. Family-based success appears largely independent of ligand flexibility, suggesting a strong dependence on the binding site environment. For example, zinc-containing proteins are generally problematic, despite moderately flexible ligands. Finally, representative cross-docking examples, for carbonic anhydrase, thermolysin, and neuraminidase families, show the utility of family-based analysis for rapid identification of particularly good or bad

  1. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  2. Single-molecule studies of kinesin family motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordyce, Polly

    Kinesin family motor proteins drive many essential cellular processes, including cargo transport and mitotic spindle assembly and regulation. They accomplish these tasks by converting the chemical energy released from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) directly into mechanical motion along microtubules in cells. Optical traps allow us to track and apply force to individual motor proteins, and have already revealed many details of the movement of conventional kinesin, although the precise mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion is unclear. Other kinesin family members remain largely uncharacterized. This dissertation details the use of a novel optical-trapping assay to study Eg5, a Kinesin-5 family member involved in both spindle assembly and pole separation during mitosis. We demonstrate that individual Eg5 dimers are relatively slow and force-insensitive motors that take about 8 steps, on average, before detaching from the microtubule. Key differences in processivity and force-response between Eg5 and conventional kinesin suggest ways in which the two motors might have evolved to perform very different tasks in cells. This dissertation also details efforts to unravel how chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion by simultaneously measuring mechanical transitions (with an optical trap) and nucleotide binding and release (with single-molecule fluorescence) for individual conventional kinesin motors. We constructed a combined instrument, demonstrated its capabilities by unzipping fluorescently-labeled DNA duplexes, and used this instrument to record the motion of individual conventional kinesin motors powered by the hydrolysis of fluorescent nucleotides. Preliminary data reveal the challenges inherent in such measurements and guide proposals for future experimental approaches. Finally, this dissertation includes several chapters intended to serve as practical guides to understanding, constructing, and maintaining

  3. Correlation of gene and protein structures in the FXYD family proteins.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Carla M; Yu, Jinghua; Thai, Khang; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M

    2005-12-01

    The FXYD family proteins are auxiliary subunits of the Na,K-ATPase, expressed primarily in tissues that specialize in fluid or solute transport, or that are electrically excitable. These proteins range in size from about 60 to 160 amino acid residues, and share a core homology of 35 amino acid residues in and around a single transmembrane segment. Despite their relatively small sizes, they are all encoded by genes with six to nine small exons. We show that the helical secondary structures of three FXYD family members, FXYD1, FXYD3, and FXYD4, determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy, reflect the structures of their corresponding genes. The coincidence of helical regions, and connecting segments, with the positions of intron-exon junctions in the genes, support the hypothesis that the FXYD proteins may have been assembled from discrete structural modules through exon shuffling. PMID:16288923

  4. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  5. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    PubMed

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of the VQ Protein Family and VQ Protein Variants from Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xinjian; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing the FxxxVQxhTG or VQ motif interact with WRKY transcription factors. Although VQ proteins have been reported in several plants, knowledge about their structures, functions and evolution is still very limited. Here, we report structural and functional analysis of the VQ protein family from soybean. Like Arabidopsis homologues, soybean VQ proteins bind only Group I and IIc WRKY proteins and a substantial number of their genes are responsive to stress-associated phytohormones. Overexpression of some soybean VQ genes in Arabidopsis had strong effects on plant growth, development, disease resistance and heat tolerance. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence alignment and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the region immediately upstream of the FxxxVQxhTG motif also affects binding to WRKY proteins. Consistent with a larger WRKY-binding VQ domain, soybean VQ22 protein from cultivated soybean contains a 4-amino acid deletion in the region preceding its VQ motif that completely abolishes its binding to WRKY proteins. By contrast, the 4-amino acid deletion is absent in the VQ22 protein from wild soybean species (Glycine soja). Overexpression of wild soybean VQ22 in cultivated soybean inhibited growth, particularly after cold treatment. Thus, the mutation of soybean VQ22 is associated with advantageous phenotypes and may have been positively selected during evolution. PMID:27708406

  7. Dentin noncollagenous matrix proteins in familial hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Céline; Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Septier, Dominique; Jehan, Frédéric; Rowe, Peter S; Garabédian, Michèle; Goldberg, Michel; Chaussain-Miller, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Familial hypophosphatemic rickets is transmitted in most cases as an X-linked dominant trait and results from the mutation of the PHEX gene predominantly expressed in osteoblast and odontoblast. Patients with rickets have been reported to display important dentin defects. Our purpose was to explore the structure, composition and distribution of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) of hypophosphatemic dentin. We collected teeth from 10 hypophosphatemic patients whose mineralization occurred either in a hypophosphatemic environment or in a corrected phosphate and vitamin environment. Teeth were examined by scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. An abnormal distribution (accumulation in interglobular spaces) and cleavage of the NCPs and particularly of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein were observed in deciduous dentin. In contrast, it was close to normal in permanent dentin mineralized under corrected conditions. In conclusion, dentin mineralization in a corrected phosphate and vitamin D environment compensates the adverse effect of PHEX mutation.

  8. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  9. New Functions for the Ancient DedA Membrane Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Rakesh; Kumar, Sujeet; Boughner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The DedA protein family is a highly conserved and ancient family of membrane proteins with representatives in most sequenced genomes, including those of bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. The functions of the DedA family proteins remain obscure. However, recent genetic approaches have revealed important roles for certain bacterial DedA family members in membrane homeostasis. Bacterial DedA family mutants display such intriguing phenotypes as cell division defects, temperature sensitivity, altered membrane lipid composition, elevated envelope-related stress responses, and loss of proton motive force. The DedA family is also essential in at least two species of bacteria: Borrelia burgdorferi and Escherichia coli. Here, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of the family and summarize recent progress toward understanding the functions of the DedA membrane protein family. PMID:23086209

  10. PATtyFams: Protein Families for the Microbial Genomes in the PATRIC Database

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-01-01

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods. PMID:26903996

  11. Nme family of proteins--clues from simple animals.

    PubMed

    Ćetković, Helena; Perina, Dragutin; Harcet, Matija; Mikoč, Andreja; Herak Bosnar, Maja

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinases (Nme/Nm23/NDPK) are evolutionarily conserved enzymes involved in many biological processes in vertebrates. The biochemical mechanisms of these processes are still largely unknown. The Nme family consists of ten members in humans of which Nme1/2 have been extensively studied in the context of carcinogenesis, especially metastasis formation. Lately, it has been proven that the majority of genes linked to human diseases were already present in species distantly related to humans. Most of cancer-related protein domains appeared during the two main evolutionary transitions-the emergence of unicellular eukaryotes and the transition to multicellular metazoans. In spite of these recent insights, current knowledge about cancer and status of cancer-related genes in simple animals is limited. One possible way of studying human diseases relies on analyzing genes/proteins that cause a certain disease by using model organism that represent the evolutionary level at which these genes have emerged. Therefore, basal metazoans are ideal model organisms for gaining a clearer picture how characteristics and functions of Nme genes changed in the transition to multicellularity and increasing complexity in animals, giving us exciting new evidence of their possible functions in potential pathological conditions in humans. PMID:25042404

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of the Argonaute protein family in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-03-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are mediators of gene silencing via recruitment of small regulatory RNAs to induce translational regression or degradation of targeted molecules. Platyhelminths have been reported to express microRNAs but the diversity of AGOs in the phylum has not been explored. Phylogenetic relationships of members of this protein family were studied using data from six platyhelminth genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all cestode and trematode AGOs, along with some triclad planarian AGOs, were grouped into the Ago subfamily and its novel sister clade, here referred to as Cluster 1. These were very distant from Piwi and Class 3 subfamilies. By contrast, a number of planarian Piwi-like AGOs formed a novel sister clade to the Piwi subfamily. Extensive sequence searching revealed the presence of an additional locus for AGO2 in the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and exon expansion in this species and E. multilocularis. The current study suggests the absence of the Piwi subfamily and Class 3 AGOs in cestodes and trematodes and the Piwi-like AGO expansion in a free-living triclad planarian and the occurrence of exon expansion prior to or during the evolution of the most-recent common ancestor of the Echinococcus species studied.

  13. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  14. Uncoupling proteins--a new family of proteins with unknown function.

    PubMed

    Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2002-02-01

    Uncoupling proteins are inner mitochondrial membrane proteins, which dissipate the proton gradient, releasing the stored energy as heat. Five proteins have been cloned, named UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1. These proteins are structurally related but differ in tissue expression. UCP1 is expressed uniquely in the brown adipose tissue, while UCP2 is widely distributed, UCP3 is mainly restricted to skeletal muscle and UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1 expressed in the brain. The properties and regulation of the uncoupling proteins and their exact function has been the focus of an intense research during recent years. This review briefly summarizes the actual knowledge of the properties and function of this new family of proteins. While UCP1 has a clear role in energy homeostasis, the newcomers UCP2-UCP5 may have more delicate physiological importance acting as free radical oxygen scavengers and in the regulation of ATP-dependent processes, such as secretion.

  15. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  16. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  17. The prion protein family: a view from the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Makzhami, Samira; Passet, Bruno; Halliez, Sophie; Castille, Johan; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Duchesne, Amandine; Vilotte, Marthe; Laude, Hubert; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie; Béringue, Vincent; Vaiman, Daniel; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Based on its developmental pattern of expression, early studies suggested the implication of the mammalian Prion protein PrP, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ubiquitously expressed and evolutionary conserved glycoprotein encoded by the Prnp gene, in early embryogenesis. However, gene invalidation in several species did not result in obvious developmental abnormalities and it was only recently that it was associated in mice with intra-uterine growth retardation and placental dysfunction. A proposed explanation for this lack of easily detectable developmental-related phenotype is the existence in the genome of one or more gene (s) able to compensate for the absence of PrP. Indeed, two other members of the Prnp gene family have been recently described, Doppel and Shadoo, and the consequences of their invalidation alongside that of PrP tested in mice. No embryonic defect was observed in mice depleted for Doppel and PrP. Interestingly, the co-invalidation of PrP and Shadoo in two independent studies led to apparently conflicting observations, with no apparent consequences in one report and the observation of a developmental defect of the ectoplacental cone that leads to early embryonic lethality in the other. This short review aims at summarizing these recent, apparently conflicting data highlighting the related biological questions and associated implications in terms of animal and human health. PMID:25364742

  18. Food proteins from different allergen families sensitize Balb/c mice to family-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Na; Zhou, Cui; Zhou, Xin; Lu, Jing; Wang, Cuiyan; Che, Huilian

    2014-01-01

    The classification of food allergens based on the structure and function of proteins contributes to the study of the relationship between bioinformatics and potential allergenicity of allergens. Food allergens always share sequence similarity with the allergens in the same allergen families. For that reason, food proteins from different allergen families may induce different patterns of immune responses in animal models. Female Balb/c mice (3-4-weeks-old) were sensitized with food proteins once per week for 4 weeks, and then challenged 2 weeks later (on Day 42 of study). Blood was collected (to obtain serum levels of histamine and protein-specific IgG1 and IgE antibodies) and measures of vascular permeability were performed 20 min after the challenge. Five food proteins (11S globulin, OVA [ovalbumin], HAS [human serum albumin] and LRP [lysine-responsive storage protein] of different allergen families, and Cry 1Ab/Ac [crystal protein]) were used to assess patterns of immune responses for each allergen family and then bioinformatics and digestive stability in simulated gastric fluid were employed to assess the overall utility of the Balb/c. The assay results indicated that, in this model, histamine and protein-specific IgE antibody levels and vascular permeability could be used to identify allergenicity of 11S globulin, OVA, and PAP (potato acid phosphatase) only. However, the results of the protein-specific IgG1 measures could only distinguish allergic food proteins with negative control. Based on bioinformatic analyses, the five different food proteins clearly induced distinct patterns of immune responses in the Balb/c model.

  19. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  20. Familial prion protein mutants inhibit Hrd1-mediated retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins by depleting misfolded protein sensor BiP.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarah L; Déry, Marc-André; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    Similar to many proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway, cellular prion protein (PrP) partly retrotranslocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in an attempt to alleviate accumulation of cellular misfolded PrP. Surprisingly, familial PrP mutants fail to retrotranslocate and simultaneously block normal cellular PrP retrotranslocation. That impairments in retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins could lead to global disruptions in cellular homeostasis prompted further investigations into PrP mutant retrotranslocation defects. A gain- and loss-of-function approach identified human E3 ubiquitin ligase, Hrd1, as a critical regulator of PrP retrotranslocation in mammalian cells. Expression of familial human PrP mutants, V210I(129V) and M232R(129V), not only abolished PrP retrotranslocation, but also that of Hrd1-dependent ERAD substrates, transthyretin TTR(D18G) and α1-anti-trypsin A1AT(NHK). Mutant PrP expression decreased binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) levels by 50% and attenuated ER stress-induced BiP by increasing BiP turnover 6-fold. Overexpression of BiP with PrP mutants rescued retrotranslocation of PrP, TTR(D18G) and A1AT(NHK). PrP mutants-induced cell death was also rescued by co-expression of BiP. These results show that PrP mutants highjack the Hrd1-dependent ERAD pathway, an action that would result in misfolded protein accumulation especially in terminally differentiated neurons. This could explain the age-dependent neuronal degeneration in familial prion diseases. PMID:26740554

  1. Monoubiquitination of Tob/BTG family proteins competes with degradation-targeting polyubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toru; Kim, Minsoo; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Masato; Oyama, Masaaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Tob/BTG family proteins are monoubiquitinated in the absence of E3s in vitro. {yields} Monoubiquitination sites of Tob are identified by mass spectrometry. {yields} The monoubiquitination event correlates with lower levels of polyubiquitination. -- Abstract: Tob belongs to the anti-proliferative Tob/BTG protein family. The expression level of Tob family proteins is strictly regulated both transcriptionally and through post-translational modification. Ubiquitin (Ub)/proteosome-dependent degradation of Tob family proteins is critical in controlling cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses. Various Ub ligases (E3s) are responsible for degradation of Tob protein. Here, we show that Tob family proteins undergo monoubiquitination even in the absence of E3s in vitro. Determination of the ubiquitination site(s) in Tob by mass spectrometric analysis revealed that two lysine residues (Lys48 and Lys63) located in Tob/BTG homology domain are ubiquitinated. A mutant Tob, in which both Lys48 and Lys63 are substituted with alanine, is more strongly polyubiquitinated than wild-type Tob in vivo. These data suggest that monoubiquitination of Tob family proteins confers resistance against polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for degradation. The strategy for regulating the stability of Tob family proteins suggests a novel role for monoubiquitination.

  2. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  3. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  4. Protein families, natural history and biotechnological aspects of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, D; Oliveira, P F; Prosdocimi, F; Rech, E L

    2012-01-01

    Spiders are exceptionally diverse and abundant organisms in terrestrial ecosystems and their evolutionary success is certainly related to their capacity to produce different types of silks during their life cycle, making a specialized use on each of them. Presenting particularly tandemly arranged amino acid repeats, silk proteins (spidroins) have mechanical properties superior to most synthetic or natural high-performance fibers, which makes them very promising for biotechnology industry, with putative applications in the production of new biomaterials. During the evolution of spider species, complex behaviors of web production and usage have been coupled with anatomical specialization of spinning glands. Spiders retaining ancestral characters, such as the ones belonging to the Mygalomorph group, present simpler sorts of webs used mainly to build burrows and egg sacs, and their silks are produced by globular undifferentiated spinning glands. In contrast, Araneomorphae spiders have a complex spinning apparatus, presenting up to seven morphologically distinct glands, capable to produce a more complex set of silk polymers with different degrees of rigidness and elasticity associated with distinct behaviors. Aiming to provide a discussion involving a number of spider silks' biological aspects, in this review we present descriptions of members from each family of spidroin identified from five spider species of the Brazilian biodiversity, and an evolutionary study of them in correlation with the anatomical specialization of glands and spider's spinning behaviors. Due to the biotechnological importance of spider silks for the production of new biomaterials, we also discuss about the new possible technical and biomedical applications of spider silks and the current status of it. PMID:22911606

  5. Protein families, natural history and biotechnological aspects of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, D; Oliveira, P F; Prosdocimi, F; Rech, E L

    2012-01-01

    Spiders are exceptionally diverse and abundant organisms in terrestrial ecosystems and their evolutionary success is certainly related to their capacity to produce different types of silks during their life cycle, making a specialized use on each of them. Presenting particularly tandemly arranged amino acid repeats, silk proteins (spidroins) have mechanical properties superior to most synthetic or natural high-performance fibers, which makes them very promising for biotechnology industry, with putative applications in the production of new biomaterials. During the evolution of spider species, complex behaviors of web production and usage have been coupled with anatomical specialization of spinning glands. Spiders retaining ancestral characters, such as the ones belonging to the Mygalomorph group, present simpler sorts of webs used mainly to build burrows and egg sacs, and their silks are produced by globular undifferentiated spinning glands. In contrast, Araneomorphae spiders have a complex spinning apparatus, presenting up to seven morphologically distinct glands, capable to produce a more complex set of silk polymers with different degrees of rigidness and elasticity associated with distinct behaviors. Aiming to provide a discussion involving a number of spider silks' biological aspects, in this review we present descriptions of members from each family of spidroin identified from five spider species of the Brazilian biodiversity, and an evolutionary study of them in correlation with the anatomical specialization of glands and spider's spinning behaviors. Due to the biotechnological importance of spider silks for the production of new biomaterials, we also discuss about the new possible technical and biomedical applications of spider silks and the current status of it.

  6. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  7. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    PubMed

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  8. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  9. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  10. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  11. Interaction of Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) with septin family proteins in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Mayu; Shinoda, Yo; Hirano, Touko; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Furuichi, Teiichi; Sadakata, Tetsushi

    2016-03-23

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) protein plays a regulatory role in the dense-core vesicle exocytosis pathway. To clarify the functions of this protein in the brain, we searched for novel interaction partners of CAPS1 by mass spectrometry. We identified a specific interaction of CAPS1 with septin family proteins. We also demonstrated that the C-terminal region of the CAPS1 protein binds to part of the deduced GTP-binding domain of septin proteins. It is possible that a tertiary complex of septin, CAPS, and syntaxin contributes to dense-core vesicle trafficking and exocytosis in neurons.

  12. A family of major royal jelly proteins of the honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Schmitzová, J; Klaudiny, J; Albert, S; Schröder, W; Schreckengost, W; Hanes, J; Júdová, J; Simúth, J

    1998-09-01

    The characterization of major proteins of honeybee larval jelly (49-87 kDa) was performed by the sequencing of new complementary DNAs (cDNAs) obtained from a honeybee head cDNA library, by the determination of N-terminal sequences of the proteins, and by analyses of the newly obtained and known sequence data concerning the proteins. It was found that royal jelly (RJ) and worker jelly (WJ) contain identical major proteins and that all the proteins belong to one protein family designated MRJP (from Major Royal Jelly Proteins). The family consists of five main members (MRJP1, MRJP2, MRJP3, MRJP4, MRJP5). The proteins MRJP3 and MRJP5 are polymorphic. MRJPs account for 82 to 90% of total larval jelly protein, and they contain a relatively high amount of essential amino acids. These findings support the idea that MRJPs play an important role in honeybee nutrition.

  13. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  14. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen.

  15. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  16. The mystery of BCL2 family: Bcl-2 proteins and apoptosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Ahad, Amjid; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis is a critically important biological process that plays an essential role in cell fate and homeostasis. An important component of the apoptotic pathway is the family of proteins commonly known as the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). The primary role of Bcl-2 family members is the regulation of apoptosis. Although the structure of Bcl-2 family of proteins was reported nearly 10 years ago, however, it still surprises us with its structural and functional complexity and diversity. A number of studies have demonstrated that Bcl-2 family influences many other cellular processes beyond apoptosis which are generally independent of the regulation of apoptosis, suggesting additional roles for Bcl-2. The disruption of the regulation of apoptosis is a causative event in many diseases. Since the Bcl-2 family of proteins is the key regulator of apoptosis, the abnormalities in its function have been implicated in many diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia and autoimmune diseases. In the past few years, our understanding of the mechanism of action of Bcl-2 family of proteins and its implications in various pathological conditions has enhanced significantly. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the structure and function of Bcl-2 family of proteins in apoptotic cellular processes. A number of drugs have been developed in the past few years that target different Bcl-2 members. The role of Bcl-2 proteins in the pathogenesis of various diseases and their pharmacological significance as effective molecular therapeutic targets is also discussed.

  17. Poxvirus protein evolution: Family-wide assessment of possible horizontal gene transfer events

    PubMed Central

    Odom, Mary R.; Hendrickson, R. Curtis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the evolutionary origins of proteins encoded by the Poxviridae family of viruses, we examined all poxvirus protein coding genes using a method of characterizing and visualizing the similarity between these proteins and taxonomic subsets of proteins in GenBank. Our analysis divides poxvirus proteins into categories based on their relative degree of similarity to two different taxonomic subsets of proteins such as all eukaryote vs. all virus (except poxvirus) proteins. As an example, this allows us to identify, based on high similarity to only eukaryote proteins, poxvirus proteins that may have been obtained by horizontal transfer from their hosts. Although this method alone does not definitively prove horizontal gene transfer, it allows us to provide an assessment of the possibility of horizontal gene transfer for every poxvirus protein. Potential candidates can then be individually studied in more detail during subsequent investigation. Results of our analysis demonstrate that in general, proteins encoded by members of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae exhibit greater similarity to eukaryote proteins than to proteins of other virus families. In addition, our results reiterate the important role played by host gene capture in poxvirus evolution; highlight the functions of many genes poxviruses share with their hosts; and illustrate which host-like genes are present uniquely in poxviruses and which are also present in other virus families. PMID:19464330

  18. Vaccinia virus protein A49 is an unexpected member of the B-cell Lymphoma (Bcl)-2 protein family.

    PubMed

    Neidel, Sarah; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Mansur, Daniel S; Strnadova, Pavla; Smith, Geoffrey L; Graham, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes several proteins that inhibit activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). VACV protein A49 prevents translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus by sequestering cellular β-TrCP, a protein required for the degradation of the inhibitor of κB. A49 does not share overall sequence similarity with any protein of known structure or function. We solved the crystal structure of A49 from VACV Western Reserve to 1.8 Å resolution and showed, surprisingly, that A49 has the same three-dimensional fold as Bcl-2 family proteins despite lacking identifiable sequence similarity. Whereas Bcl-2 family members characteristically modulate cellular apoptosis, A49 lacks a surface groove suitable for binding BH3 peptides and does not bind proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax or Bak. The N-terminal 17 residues of A49 do not adopt a single well ordered conformation, consistent with their proposed role in binding β-TrCP. Whereas pairs of A49 molecules interact symmetrically via a large hydrophobic surface in crystallo, A49 does not dimerize in solution or in cells, and we propose that this hydrophobic interaction surface may mediate binding to a yet undefined cellular partner. A49 represents the eleventh VACV Bcl-2 family protein and, despite these proteins sharing very low sequence identity, structure-based phylogenetic analysis shows that all poxvirus Bcl-2 proteins are structurally more similar to each other than they are to any cellular or herpesvirus Bcl-2 proteins. This is consistent with duplication and diversification of a single BCL2 family gene acquired by an ancestral poxvirus.

  19. The triterpene cyclase protein family: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Racolta, Silvia; Juhl, P Benjamin; Sirim, Demet; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Triterpene cyclases catalyze a broad range of cyclization reactions to form polycyclic triterpenes. Triterpene cyclases that convert squalene to hopene are named squalene-hopene cyclases (SHC) and triterpene cyclases that convert oxidosqualene are named oxidosqualene cyclases (OSC). Many sequences have been published, but there is only one structure available for each of SHCs and OSCs. Although they catalyze a similar reaction, the sequence similarity between SHCs and OSCs is low. A family classification based on phylogenetic analysis revealed 20 homologous families which are grouped into two superfamilies, SHCs and OSCs. Based on this family assignment, the Triterpene Cyclase Engineering Database (TTCED) was established. It integrates available information on sequence and structure of 639 triterpene cyclases as well as on structurally and functionally relevant amino acids. Family specific multiple sequence alignments were generated to identify the functionally relevant residues. Based on sequence alignments, conserved residues in SHCs and OSCs were analyzed and compared to experimentally confirmed mutational data. Functional schematic models of the central cavities of OSCs and SHCs were derived from structure comparison and sequence conservation analysis. These models demonstrate the high similarity of the substrate binding cavity of SHCs and OSCs and the equivalences of the respective residues. The TTCED is a novel source for comprehensive information on the triterpene cyclase family, including a compilation of previously described mutational data. The schematic models present the conservation analysis in a readily available fashion and facilitate the correlation of residues to a specific function or substrate interaction.

  20. Functional divergence outlines the evolution of novel protein function in NifH/BchL protein family.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Subarna; Bothra, Asim K; Sen, Arnab

    2013-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished by prokaryotes through the catalytic action of complex metalloenzyme, nitrogenase. Nitrogenase is a two-protein component system comprising MoFe protein (NifD and K) and Fe protein (NifH). NifH shares structural and mechanistic similarities as well as evolutionary relationships with light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (BchL), a photosynthesis-related metalloenzyme belonging to the same protein family. We performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the NifH/BchL family in order to elucidate the intrinsic functional diversity and the underlying evolutionary mechanism among the members. To analyse functional divergence in the NifH/ BchL family, we have conducted pair-wise estimation in altered evolutionary rates between the member proteins. We identified a number of vital amino acid sites which contribute to predicted functional diversity. We have also made use of the maximum likelihood tests for detection of positive selection at the amino acid level followed by the structure-based phylogenetic approach to draw conclusion on the ancient lineage and novel characterization of the NifH/BchL protein family. Our investigation provides ample support to the fact that NifH protein and BchL share robust structural similarities and have probably deviated from a common ancestor followed by divergence in functional properties possibly due to gene duplication. PMID:24287653

  1. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Mathur, Shruti; Manjula, Ramu; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and help in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin 'readers': by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by scientific communities worldwide to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins an important therapeutic targets for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases. PMID:27240990

  2. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-02-08

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based functionmore » assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). In conclusion, this new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.« less

  3. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  4. Effects of prodigiosin family compounds from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 1020R on the activities of protein phosphatases and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Soliev, Azamjon B; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 1020R produces prodigiosin and its closely related congeners, which differ in the length of their alkyl side chains. These red-pigmented compounds were found to exhibit cytotoxicity against human leukemia cell lines. The compounds also showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on protein phosphatase 2A and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), while remaining relatively inactive against protein kinases, including protein tyrosine kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinases A and C. Comparative studies of the individual pigmented compounds on PTP1B inhibition showed that as the chain length of the alkyl group at the C-3 position of the compound increased, the inhibitory effect on PTP1B decreased. These results suggest that protein phosphatases but not protein kinases might be involved in the cytotoxicity of the prodigiosin family of compounds against malignant cells.

  5. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages. PMID:25684408

  6. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  7. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages.

  8. The retinoblastoma family of proteins and their regulatory functions in the mammalian cell division cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins are found in organisms as distantly related as humans, plants, and insects. These proteins play a key role in regulating advancement of the cell division cycle from the G1 to S-phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of two important positive regulators of cell cycle entry, E2F transcription factors and cyclin dependent kinases. In growth arrested cells transcriptional activity by E2Fs is repressed by RB proteins. Stimulation of cell cycle entry by growth factor signaling leads to activation of cyclin dependent kinases. They in turn phosphorylate and inactivate the RB family proteins, leading to E2F activation and additional cyclin dependent kinase activity. This propels the cell cycle irreversibly forward leading to DNA synthesis. This review will focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology governing the regulation and activity of mammalian RB family proteins in cell cycle control. PMID:22417103

  9. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co-variation.

    PubMed

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R S K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the conformational propensities of proteins is key to solving many problems in structural biology and biophysics. The co-variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts. This observation paves the way to develop deeper connections between evolutionary fitness landscapes of entire protein families and the corresponding free energy landscapes which determine the conformational propensities of individual proteins. Using statistical energies determined from the Potts model and an alignment of 2896 PDB structures, we predict the propensity for particular kinase family proteins to assume a "DFG-out" conformation implicated in the susceptibility of some kinases to type-II inhibitors, and validate the predictions by comparison with the observed structural propensities of the corresponding proteins and experimental binding affinity data. We decompose the statistical energies to investigate which interactions contribute the most to the conformational preference for particular sequences and the corresponding proteins. We find that interactions involving the activation loop and the C-helix and HRD motif are primarily responsible for stabilizing the DFG-in state. This work illustrates how structural free energy landscapes and fitness landscapes of proteins can be used in an integrated way, and in the context of kinase family proteins, can potentially impact therapeutic design strategies. PMID:27241634

  10. Role of endometrial cancer abnormal MMR protein in screening Lynch-syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qiongxian; Peng, Yong; Tang, Zhirong; Wu, Cailiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify patients with endometrial cancer with potential Lynch-related DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression defects and to explore the role of these defects in screening for LS. Methods: Endometrial cancers from 173 patients recruited to the Nanchong Central Hospital were tested for MMR (MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6) protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In the 173 tumor tissue samples, the expression loss rates of MSH6, MSH2, PMS2 and MLH1 protein were 16.18% (28/173), 12.14% (21/173), 7.51% (13/173) and 5.78% (10/173), respectively. The total loss rate of MMR protein was 29.89% (27/87). There were 19 patients with a family history of cancer, of which 18 patients demonstrated loss of expression of MMR protein. In the 22 abnormal MMR patients without family history, five families were found to have Lynch-associated cancer (colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer) after follow-up for two years. Conclusion: MMR proteins play an important role in the progress of endometrial cancer. The routine testing of MMR proteins in endometrial cancer can contribute to the screening of LS families, especially small families. PMID:25400828

  11. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  12. Adeno-associated virus protects the retinoblastoma family of proteins from adenoviral-induced functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Shammas, Masood A; Wang, Jing Yi; Freeman, John; Rosen, Nancy; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2002-05-15

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to inhibit virally mediated oncogenic transformation. One of the early events of adenovirus (Ad) infection is the functional inactivation of cell cycle regulatory retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins, which consists of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), p107, and p130. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of anti-oncogenic properties of AAV, we studied the effects of AAV expression on these proteins in cells infected with Ad. Western blot analysis showed that AAV interferes with the adenoviral-induced degradation and hyperphosphorylation of the pRB family of proteins in normal human fibroblasts as well as in HeLa and 293 cell lines. RNase protection assay showed enhanced expression of pocket protein gene by AAV expression. We also demonstrate that Rep proteins, the major AAV regulatory proteins, bind to E1A, the immediate early gene of Ad responsible for hyperphosphorylation and dissociation of pRB-E2F complex. This binding of AAV Rep proteins to E1A leads to decreased association between E1A and pRB leading to protection of pocket proteins from degradation, decreased expression of S phase genes and inhibition of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activity of AAV against Ad is mediated, at least in part, by effects of AAV Rep proteins on the Rb family of proteins.

  13. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) family and the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Anna R.; Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology. PMID:26157362

  14. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) family and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Malik, Anna R; Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology.

  15. Fundamental Characteristics of AAA+ Protein Family Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many complex cellular events depend on multiprotein complexes known as molecular machines to efficiently couple the energy derived from adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to the generation of mechanical force. Members of the AAA+ ATPase superfamily (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) are critical components of many molecular machines. AAA+ proteins are defined by conserved modules that precisely position the active site elements of two adjacent subunits to catalyze ATP hydrolysis. In many cases, AAA+ proteins form a ring structure that translocates a polymeric substrate through the central channel using specialized loops that project into the central channel. We discuss the major features of AAA+ protein structure and function with an emphasis on pivotal aspects elucidated with archaeal proteins. PMID:27703410

  16. Molecular Evidence of RNA Editing in Bombyx Chemosensory Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Ning; Bu, Xun; Liu, Yan Yan; Yang, Xue; Liu, Guo Xia; Fan, Zhong Xue; Bi, Yu Ping; Yang, Lian Qun; Lou, Qi Nian; Rajashekar, Balaji; Leppik, Getter; Kasvandik, Sergo; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small scavenger proteins that are mainly known as transporters of pheromone/odor molecules at the periphery of sensory neurons in the insect antennae and in the producing cells from the moth female pheromone gland. Sequencing cDNAs of RNA encoding CSPs in the antennae, legs, head, pheromone gland and wings from five single individual adult females of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori showed that they differed from genomic sequences by subtle nucleotide replacement (RDD). Both intronless and intronic CSP genes expressed RDDs, although in different rates. Most interestingly, in our study the degree of RDDs in CSP genes were found to be tissue-specific. The proportion of CSP-RDDs was found to be significantly much higher in the pheromone gland. In addition, Western blot analysis of proteins in different tissues showed existence of multiple CSP protein variant chains particularly found in the pheromone gland. Peptide sequencing demonstrated the occurrence of a pleiad of protein variants for most of all BmorCSPs from the pheromone gland. Our findings show that RNA editing is an important feature in the expression of CSPs and that a high variety of RDDs is found to expand drastically thus altering the repertoire of CSP proteins in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:24551045

  17. Automatic annotation of protein function based on family identification.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Valencia, Alfonso

    2003-11-15

    Although genomes are being sequenced at an impressive rate, the information generated tells us little about protein function, which is slow to characterize by traditional methods. Automatic protein function annotation based on computational methods has alleviated this imbalance. The most powerful current approach for inferring the function of new proteins is by studying the annotations of their homologues, since their common origin is assumed to be reflected in their structure and function. Unfortunately, as proteins evolve they acquire new functions, so annotation based on homology must be carried out in the context of orthologues or subfamilies. Evolution adds new complications through domain shuffling: homology (or orthology) frequently corresponds to domains rather than complete proteins. Moreover, the function of a protein may be seen as the result of combining the functions of its domains. Additionally, automatic annotation has to deal with problems related to the annotations in the databases: errors (which are likely to be propagated), inconsistencies, or different degrees of function specification. We describe a method that addresses these difficulties for the annotation of protein function. Sequence relationships are detected and measured to obtain a map of the sequence space, which is searched for differentiated groups of proteins (similar to islands on the map), which are expected to have a common function and correspond to groups of orthologues or subfamilies. This mapmaking is done by applying a clustering algorithm based on Normalized cuts in graphs. The domain problem is addressed in a simple way: pairwise local alignments are analyzed to determine the extent to which they cover the entire sequence lengths of the two proteins. This analysis determines both what homologues are preferred for functional inheritance and the level of confidence of the annotation. To alleviate the problems associated with database annotations, the information on all the

  18. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transport Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, Mary Lou; Eide, David

    1999-06-01

    Soils at many DOE sites are contaminated with metals and radionuclides. Such soils obviously pose a risk to human and animal health. Unlike organic wastes, which can be metabolized, metals are immutable and cannot be degraded into harmless constituents. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove toxic materials from soil and water, may prove to be an environmentally friendly and cost effective solution for cleaning up metal contaminated sites. The success of phytoremediation will rely on the availability of plants that absorb, translocate, and tolerate the contaminating metals. However, before we can engineer such plants, we need more basic information on how plants acquire metals. An important long term goal of our research program is to understand how metals such as zinc, cadmium and iron are transported across membranes. Our research is focused on a new family of metal transporters, which we have identified through combined studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We have identified a family of 24 presumptive metal transport genes in a variety of organisms including yeast, trypanosomes, plants, nematodes, and humans. This family, which we have designated the ''ZIP'' genes, provides a rich source of material with which to undertake studies on metal transport in eukar

  19. Control of apoptosis by the BCL-2 protein family: implications for physiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Lessene, Guillaume; Strasser, Andreas; Adams, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family determines the commitment of cells to apoptosis, an ancient cell suicide programme that is essential for development, tissue homeostasis and immunity. Too little apoptosis can promote cancer and autoimmune diseases; too much apoptosis can augment ischaemic conditions and drive neurodegeneration. We discuss the biochemical, structural and genetic studies that have clarified how the interplay between members of the BCL-2 family on mitochondria sets the apoptotic threshold. These mechanistic insights into the functions of the BCL-2 family are illuminating the physiological control of apoptosis, the pathological consequences of its dysregulation and the promising search for novel cancer therapies that target the BCL-2 family.

  20. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  1. The BCL-2 protein family: opposing activities that mediate cell death.

    PubMed

    Youle, Richard J; Strasser, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    BCL-2 family proteins, which have either pro- or anti-apoptotic activities, have been studied intensively for the past decade owing to their importance in the regulation of apoptosis, tumorigenesis and cellular responses to anti-cancer therapy. They control the point of no return for clonogenic cell survival and thereby affect tumorigenesis and host-pathogen interactions and regulate animal development. Recent structural, phylogenetic and biological analyses, however, suggest the need for some reconsideration of the accepted organizational principles of the family and how the family members interact with one another during programmed cell death. Although these insights into interactions among BCL-2 family proteins reveal how these proteins are regulated, a unifying hypothesis for the mechanisms they use to activate caspases remains elusive.

  2. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  3. A diverse family of proteins containing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domains.

    PubMed

    Zapata, J M; Pawlowski, K; Haas, E; Ware, C F; Godzik, A; Reed, J C

    2001-06-29

    We have identified three new tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain-containing proteins in humans using bioinformatics approaches, including: MUL, the product of the causative gene in Mulibrey Nanism syndrome; USP7 (HAUSP), an ubiquitin protease; and SPOP, a POZ domain-containing protein. Unlike classical TRAF family proteins involved in TNF family receptor (TNFR) signaling, the TRAF domains (TDs) of MUL, USP7, and SPOP are located near the NH(2) termini or central region of these proteins, rather than carboxyl end. MUL and USP7 are capable of binding in vitro via their TDs to all of the previously identified TRAF family proteins (TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF4, TRAF5, and TRAF6), whereas the TD of SPOP interacts weakly with TRAF1 and TRAF6 only. The TD of MUL also interacted with itself, whereas the TDs of USP7 and SPOP did not self-associate. Analysis of various MUL and USP7 mutants by transient transfection assays indicated that the TDs of these proteins are necessary and sufficient for suppressing NF-kappaB induction by TRAF2 and TRAF6 as well as certain TRAF-binding TNF family receptors. In contrast, the TD of SPOP did not inhibit NF-kappaB induction. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy indicated that MUL localizes to cytosolic bodies, with targeting to these structures mediated by a RBCC tripartite domain within the MUL protein. USP7 localized predominantly to the nucleus, in a TD-dependent manner. Data base searches revealed multiple proteins containing TDs homologous to those found in MUL, USP7, and SPOP throughout eukaryotes, including yeast, protists, plants, invertebrates, and mammals, suggesting that this branch of the TD family arose from an ancient gene. We propose the moniker TEFs (TD-encompassing factors) for this large family of proteins.

  4. iProClass: an integrated database of protein family, function and structure information.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhan; Barker, Winona C; Chen, Yongxing; Wu, Cathy H

    2003-01-01

    The iProClass database provides comprehensive, value-added descriptions of proteins and serves as a framework for data integration in a distributed networking environment. The protein information in iProClass includes family relationships as well as structural and functional classifications and features. The current version consists of about 830 000 non-redundant PIR-PSD, SWISS-PROT, and TrEMBL proteins organized with more than 36 000 PIR superfamilies, 145 000 families, 4000 domains, 1300 motifs and 550 000 FASTA similarity clusters. It provides rich links to over 50 database of protein sequences, families, functions and pathways, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, protein expressions, structures and structural classifications, genes and genomes, ontologies, literature and taxonomy. Protein and superfamily summary reports present extensive annotation information and include membership statistics and graphical display of domains and motifs. iProClass employs an open and modular architecture for interoperability and scalability. It is implemented in the Oracle object-relational database system and is updated biweekly. The database is freely accessible from the web site at http://pir.georgetown.edu/iproclass/ and searchable by sequence or text string. The data integration in iProClass supports exploration of protein relationships. Such knowledge is fundamental to the understanding of protein evolution, structure and function and crucial to functional genomic and proteomic research.

  5. Structural Features and Chaperone Activity of the NudC Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Janczyk, Pawe; #322; #321; .; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-05-25

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the nud gene family that is involved in the maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF, whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates: NudC, NudC-like (NudCL), and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by structural genomics centers (i.e., NudCL and mouse NudCL2). All proteins share the same core CS domain characteristic of proteins acting either as cochaperones of Hsp90 or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit the aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins is able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies on the cellular functions of the NudC family.

  6. The Pfam protein families database: towards a more sustainable future.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Eddy, Sean R; Mistry, Jaina; Mitchell, Alex L; Potter, Simon C; Punta, Marco; Qureshi, Matloob; Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Salazar, Gustavo A; Tate, John; Bateman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Pfam database (http://pfam.xfam.org) has undergone a substantial reorganisation to reduce the effort involved in making a release, thereby permitting more frequent releases. Arguably the most significant of these changes is that Pfam is now primarily based on the UniProtKB reference proteomes, with the counts of matched sequences and species reported on the website restricted to this smaller set. Building families on reference proteomes sequences brings greater stability, which decreases the amount of manual curation required to maintain them. It also reduces the number of sequences displayed on the website, whilst still providing access to many important model organisms. Matches to the full UniProtKB database are, however, still available and Pfam annotations for individual UniProtKB sequences can still be retrieved. Some Pfam entries (1.6%) which have no matches to reference proteomes remain; we are working with UniProt to see if sequences from them can be incorporated into reference proteomes. Pfam-B, the automatically-generated supplement to Pfam, has been removed. The current release (Pfam 29.0) includes 16 295 entries and 559 clans. The facility to view the relationship between families within a clan has been improved by the introduction of a new tool.

  7. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vilgelm, Anna E.; Washington, Mary K.; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Zaika, Alexander I.

    2010-01-01

    p53, p63 and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation and other critical cellular processes. Here we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family, rather than p53 alone. PMID:20197393

  8. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  9. Molecular evolution of miraculin-like proteins in soybean Kunitz super-family.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Purushotham; Gahloth, Deepankar; Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Sharma, Nidhi; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Miraculin-like proteins (MLPs) belong to soybean Kunitz super-family and have been characterized from many plant families like Rutaceae, Solanaceae, Rubiaceae, etc. Many of them possess trypsin inhibitory activity and are involved in plant defense. MLPs exhibit significant sequence identity (~30-95%) to native miraculin protein, also belonging to Kunitz super-family compared with a typical Kunitz family member (~30%). The sequence and structure-function comparison of MLPs with that of a classical Kunitz inhibitor have demonstrated that MLPs have evolved to form a distinct group within Kunitz super-family. Sequence analysis of new genes along with available MLP sequences in the literature revealed three major groups for these proteins. A significant feature of Rutaceae MLP type 2 sequences is the presence of phosphorylation motif. Subtle changes are seen in putative reactive loop residues among different MLPs suggesting altered specificities to specific proteases. In phylogenetic analysis, Rutaceae MLP type 1 and type 2 proteins clustered together on separate branches, whereas native miraculin along with other MLPs formed distinct clusters. Site-specific positive Darwinian selection was observed at many sites in both the groups of Rutaceae MLP sequences with most of the residues undergoing positive selection located in loop regions. The results demonstrate the sequence and thereby the structure-function divergence of MLPs as a distinct group within soybean Kunitz super-family due to biotic and abiotic stresses of local environment. PMID:22274614

  10. Chlorophyll-binding proteins revisited - a multigenic family of light-harvesting and stress proteins from a brown algal perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlorophyll-binding proteins (CBPs) constitute a large family of proteins with diverse functions in both light-harvesting and photoprotection. The evolution of CBPs has been debated, especially with respect to the origin of the LI818 subfamily, members of which function in non-photochemical quenching and have been found in chlorophyll a/c-containing algae and several organisms of the green lineage, but not in red algae so far. The recent publication of the Ectocarpus siliculosus genome represents an opportunity to expand on previous work carried out on the origin and function of CBPs. Results The Ectocarpus genome codes for 53 CBPs falling into all major families except the exclusively green family of chlorophyll a/b binding proteins. Most stress-induced CBPs belong to the LI818 family. However, we highlight a few stress-induced CBPs from Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Chondrus crispus that belong to different sub-families and are promising targets for future functional studies. Three-dimensional modeling of two LI818 proteins revealed features common to all LI818 proteins that are likely to interfere with their capacity to bind chlorophyll b and lutein, but may enable binding of chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin. In the light of this finding, we examined the possibility that LI818 proteins may have originated in a chlorophyll c/fucoxanthin containing organism and compared this scenario to three alternatives: an independent evolution of LI818 proteins in different lineages, an ancient origin together with the first CBPs, before the separation of the red and the green lineage, or an origin in the green lineage and a transfer to an ancestor of haptophytes and heterokonts during a cryptic endosymbiosis event. Conclusions Our findings reinforce the idea that the LI818 family of CBPs has a role in stress response. In addition, statistical analyses of phylogenetic trees show an independent origin in different eukaryotic lineages or a green algal origin of LI818

  11. Conservation of side-chain dynamics within a protein family.

    PubMed

    Law, Anthony B; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Lee, Andrew L

    2009-05-13

    The question of protein dynamics and its relevance to function is currently a topic of great interest. Proteins are particularly dynamic at the side-chain level on the time scale of picoseconds to nanoseconds. Here, we present a comparison of NMR-monitored side-chain motion between three PDZ domains of approximately 30% sequence identity and show that the side-chain dynamics display nontrivial conservation. Methyl (2)H relaxation was carried out to determine side-chain order parameters (S(2)), which were found to be more similar than naively expected from sequence, local packing, or a combination of the two. Thus, the dynamics of a rather distant homologue appears to be an excellent predictor of a protein's side-chain dynamics and, on average, better than current structure-based methods. Fast side-chain dynamics therefore display a high level of organization associated with global fold. Beyond simple conservation, the analysis herein suggests that the pattern of side-chain flexibility has significant contributions from nonlocal elements of the PDZ fold, such as correlated motions, and that the conserved dynamics may directly support function.

  12. The VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family of Plant-Specific Transcriptional Regulators1

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    The VQ motif-containing proteins (designated as VQ proteins) are a class of plant-specific proteins with a conserved and single short FxxhVQxhTG amino acid sequence motif. VQ proteins regulate diverse developmental processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed development, and photomorphogenesis. In this Update, we summarize and discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation and function of VQ proteins and the role of the VQ motif in mediating transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. Based on the accumulated evidence, we propose a general mechanism of action for the VQ protein family, which likely defines a novel class of transcriptional regulators specific to plants. PMID:26220951

  13. p204, a p200 family protein, as a multifunctional regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yi; Lengyel, Peter; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-inducible p200 family comprises a group of homologous mouse and human proteins. Most of these have an N-terminal DAPIN domain and one or two partially conserved, 200 amino acid long C-terminal domains (designated as 200X domain). These proteins play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, tissue differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. p200 family proteins are involved also in autoimmunity and the control of tumor growth. These proteins function by binding to various target proteins (e.g. transcription factors, signaling proteins, oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins) and modulating target activity. This review concentrates on p204, a murine member of the family and its roles in regulating cell proliferation, cell and tissue differentiation (e.g. of skeletal muscle myotubes, beating cardiac myocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes and macrophages) and signaling by Ras proteins. The expression of p204 in various tissues as promoted by tissue-specific transcription factors, its distribution among subcellular compartments, and the controls of these features are also discussed. PMID:19027346

  14. A practical guide for the computational selection of residues to be experimentally characterized in protein families.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Andrés J

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, numerous biocomputational tools have been designed to extract functional and evolutionary information from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of proteins and genes. Most biologists working actively on the characterization of proteins from a single or family perspective use the MSA analysis to retrieve valuable information about amino acid conservation and the functional role of residues in query protein(s). In MSAs, adjustment of alignment parameters is a key point to improve the quality of MSA output. However, this issue is frequently underestimated and/or misunderstood by scientists and there is no in-depth knowledge available in this field. This brief review focuses on biocomputational approaches complementary to MSA to help distinguish functional residues in protein families. These additional analyses involve issues ranging from phylogenetic to statistical, which address the detection of amino acids pivotal for protein function at any level. In recent years, a large number of tools has been designed for this very purpose. Using some of these relevant, useful tools, we have designed a practical pipeline to perform in silico studies with a view to improving the characterization of family proteins and their functional residues. This review-guide aims to present biologists a set of specially designed tools to study proteins. These tools are user-friendly as they use web servers or easy-to-handle applications. Such criteria are essential for this review as most of the biologists (experimentalists) working in this field are unfamiliar with these biocomputational analysis approaches.

  15. Comparative genomic and proteomic anatomy of Mycobacterium ubiquitous Esx family proteins: implications in pathogenicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyan; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2014-04-01

    Secreted proteins are among the most important molecules involved in host-pathogen interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis (TB). M. tuberculosis encodes five types of VII secretion systems (ESX-1 to ESX-5) responsible for the exportation of many proteins. This system mediated substrates including members of the Esx family implicated in tuberculosis pathogenesis and survival within host cells. However, the distribution and evolution of this family remain elusive. To explore the evolution and distribution of Esx family proteins, we analyzed all available Mycobacteria genomes. Interestingly, amino mutations among M. tuberculosis esx family proteins may relate to their functions. We further analyzed the differences between pathogenic Mycobacteria, the attenuated Mycobacteria and non-pathogenic Mycobacteria. The stability, the globular domains and the phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues of M. tuberculosis esx proteins with their homologies among other Mycoabcteria were analyzed. Our comparative genomic and proteomic analysis found that the change of stability, gain or loss of globular domains and phosphorylation of serine/threonine might be responsible for the difference between the pathogenesis and virulence of the esx proteins and its homolog widespread among Mycobacteria and related species, which may provide clues for novel anti-tuberculosis drug targets.

  16. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  17. Exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in familial inclusion body myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, K; Cervenáková, L; Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M; Isaacson, S H; Nagle, J W; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-08-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (A beta) occurs in some muscle fibers of patients with inclusion body myopathy and resembles the type of amyloid deposits seen in the affected tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. Because mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been identified in patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease and Dutch-type cerebrovascular amyloidosis, we searched for mutations of the same region in patients with familial inclusion body myopathy. Sequencing of both alleles in 8 patients from four unrelated families did not reveal any mutations in these exons. The amyloid deposition in familial forms of inclusion body myopathy may be either due to errors in other gene loci, or it is secondary reflecting altered beta APP metabolism or myocyte degeneration and cell membrane degradation.

  18. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  19. Recent improvements of the ProDom database of protein domain families.

    PubMed

    Corpet, F; Gouzy, J; Kahn, D

    1999-01-01

    The ProDom database contains protein domain families generated from the SWISS-PROT database by automated sequence comparisons. The current version was built with a new improved procedure based on recursive PSI-BLAST homology searches. ProDom can be searched on the World Wide Web to study domain arrangements within either known families or new proteins, with the help of a user-friendly graphical interface (http://www.toulouse.inra.fr/prodom.html). Recent improvements to the ProDom server include: ProDom queries under the SRS Sequence Retrieval System; links to the PredictProtein server; phylogenetic trees and condensed multiple alignments for a better representation of large domain families, with zooming in and out capabilities. In addition, a similar server was set up to display the outcome of whole genome domain analysis as applied to 17 completed microbial genomes (http://www.toulouse.inra.fr/prodomCG.html ).

  20. The Dishevelled Protein Family: Still Rather a Mystery After Over 20 Years of Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Dishevelled (Dsh) is a key component of Wnt-signaling pathways and possibly also has other functional requirements. Dsh appears to be a key factor to interpret Wnt signals coming via the Wnt-receptor family, the Frizzled proteins, from the plasma membrane and route them into the correct intracellular pathways. However, how Dsh is regulated to relay signal flow to specific and distinct cellular responses upon interaction with the same Wnt-receptor family remains very poorly understood. PMID:26969973

  1. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein-lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding abilities. PMID:25431407

  2. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein-lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding abilities.

  3. A Web-based classification system of DNA-binding protein families.

    PubMed

    Karmirantzou, M; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-07-01

    Rational classification of proteins encoded in sequenced genomes is critical for making the genome sequences maximally useful for functional and evolutionary studies. The family of DNA-binding proteins is one of the most populated and studied amongst the various genomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes and the Web-based system presented here is an approach to their classification. The DnaProt resource is an annotated and searchable collection of protein sequences for the families of DNA-binding proteins. The database contains 3238 full-length sequences (retrieved from the SWISS-PROT database, release 38) that include, at least, a DNA-binding domain. Sequence entries are organized into families defined by PROSITE patterns, PRINTS motifs and de novo excised signatures. Combining global similarities and functional motifs into a single classification scheme, DNA-binding proteins are classified into 33 unique classes, which helps to reveal comprehensive family relationships. To maximize family information retrieval, DnaProt contains a collection of multiple alignments for each DNA-binding family while the recognized motifs can be used as diagnostically functional fingerprints. All available structural class representatives have been referenced. The resource was developed as a Web-based management system for online free access of customized data sets. Entries are fully hyperlinked to facilitate easy retrieval of the original records from the source databases while functional and phylogenetic annotation will be applied to newly sequenced genomes. The database is freely available for online search of a library containing specific patterns of the identified DNA-binding protein classes and retrieval of individual entries from our WWW server (http://kronos.biol.uoa.gr/~mariak/dbDNA.html).

  4. Accelerated Disease Onset with Stabilized Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked Mutant TDP-43 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shoji; Kaneko, Kumi; Yamanaka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal protein accumulation is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dominant mutations in the TDP-43 gene are causative for familial ALS; however, the relationship between mutant protein biochemical phenotypes and disease course and their significance to disease pathomechanism are not known. Here, we found that longer half-lives of mutant proteins correlated with accelerated disease onset. Based on our findings, we established a cell model in which chronic stabilization of wild-type TDP-43 protein provoked cytotoxicity and recapitulated pathogenic protein cleavage and insolubility to the detergent Sarkosyl, TDP-43 properties that have been observed in sporadic ALS lesions. Furthermore, these cells showed proteasomal impairment and dysregulation of their own mRNA levels. These results suggest that chronically increased stability of mutant or wild-type TDP-43 proteins results in a gain of toxicity through abnormal proteostasis. PMID:23235148

  5. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression of Xenopus F-Box Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saritas-Yildirim, Banu; Pliner, Hannah A.; Ochoa, Angelica; Silva, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation via the multistep ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway is a rapid way to alter the protein profile and drive cell processes and developmental changes. Many key regulators of embryonic development are targeted for degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases. The most studied family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is the SCF ubiquitin ligases, which use F-box adaptor proteins to recognize and recruit target proteins. Here, we used a bioinformatics screen and phylogenetic analysis to identify and annotate the family of F-box proteins in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. To shed light on the function of the F-box proteins, we analyzed expression of F-box genes during early stages of Xenopus development. Many F-box genes are broadly expressed with expression domains localized to diverse tissues including brain, spinal cord, eye, neural crest derivatives, somites, kidneys, and heart. All together, our genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the Xenopus F-box family of proteins provide a foundation for future research aimed to identify the precise role of F-box dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases and their targets in the regulatory circuits of development. PMID:26327321

  6. Claudins reign: The claudin/EMP/PMP22/γ channel protein family in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Simske, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    The claudin family of integral membrane proteins was identified as the major protein component of the tight junctions in all vertebrates. Since their identification, claudins, and their associated pfam00822 superfamily of proteins have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes. Claudin homologs have been identified in invertebrates as well, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Recent studies demonstrate that the C. elegans claudins, clc-1-clc- 5, and similar proteins in the greater PMP22/EMP/claudin/voltage-gated calcium channel γ subunit family, including nsy-4, and vab-9, while highly divergent at a sequence level from each other and from the vertebrate claudins, in many cases play roles similar to those traditionally assigned to their vertebrate homologs. These include regulating cell adhesion and passage of small molecules through the paracellular space, channel activity, protein aggregation, sensitivity to pore-forming toxins, intercellular signaling, cell fate specification and dynamic changes in cell morphology. Study of claudin superfamily proteins in C. elegans should continue to provide clues as to how claudin family protein function has been adapted to perform diverse functions at specialized cell-cell contacts in metazoans.

  7. The alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Grishin, N V

    1999-08-01

    Lipidation catalyzed by protein prenyltransferases is essential for the biological function of a number of eukaryotic proteins, many of which are involved in signal transduction and vesicular traffic regulation. Sequence similarity searches reveal that the alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases (PTalpha) is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) superfamily. This finding makes the three-dimensional structure of the rat protein farnesyltransferase the first structural model of a TPR protein interacting with its protein partner. Structural comparison of the two TPR domains in protein farnesyltransferase and protein phosphatase 5 indicates that variation in TPR consensus residues may affect protein binding specificity through altering the overall shape of the TPR superhelix. A general approach to evolutionary analysis of proteins with repetitive sequence motifs has been developed and applied to the protein prenyltransferases and other TPR proteins. The results suggest that all members in PTalpha family originated from a common multirepeat ancestor, while the common ancestor of PTalpha and other members of TPR superfamily is likely to be a single repeat protein.

  8. The rheostat in the membrane: BCL-2 family proteins and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, N; Marassi, F M; Newmeyer, D D; Hanein, D

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, a mechanism for programmed cell death, has key roles in human health and disease. Many signals for cellular life and death are regulated by the BCL-2 family proteins and converge at mitochondria, where cell fate is ultimately decided. The BCL-2 family includes both pro-life (e.g. BCL-XL) and pro-death (e.g. BAX, BAK) proteins. Previously, it was thought that a balance between these opposing proteins, like a simple ‘rheostat', could control the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stresses. Later, this rheostat concept had to be extended, when it became clear that BCL-2 family proteins regulate each other through a complex network of bimolecular interactions, some transient and some relatively stable. Now, studies have shown that the apoptotic circuitry is even more sophisticated, in that BCL-2 family interactions are spatially dynamic, even in nonapoptotic cells. For example, BAX and BCL-XL can shuttle between the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Upstream signaling pathways can regulate the cytoplasmic–MOM equilibrium of BAX and thereby adjust the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stimuli. Thus, we can view the MOM as the central locale of a dynamic life–death rheostat. BAX invariably forms extensive homo-oligomers after activation in membranes. However, recent studies, showing that activated BAX monomers determine the kinetics of MOM permeabilization (MOMP), perturb the lipid bilayer and form nanometer size pores, pose questions about the role of the oligomerization. Other lingering questions concern the molecular mechanisms of BAX redistribution between MOM and cytoplasm and the details of BAX/BAK–membrane assemblies. Future studies need to delineate how BCL-2 family proteins regulate MOMP, in concert with auxiliary MOM proteins, in a dynamic membrane environment. Technologies aimed at elucidating the structure and function of the full-length proteins in membranes are needed to illuminate some of these critical issues. PMID

  9. The rheostat in the membrane: BCL-2 family proteins and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, N; Marassi, F M; Newmeyer, D D; Hanein, D

    2014-02-01

    Apoptosis, a mechanism for programmed cell death, has key roles in human health and disease. Many signals for cellular life and death are regulated by the BCL-2 family proteins and converge at mitochondria, where cell fate is ultimately decided. The BCL-2 family includes both pro-life (e.g. BCL-XL) and pro-death (e.g. BAX, BAK) proteins. Previously, it was thought that a balance between these opposing proteins, like a simple 'rheostat', could control the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stresses. Later, this rheostat concept had to be extended, when it became clear that BCL-2 family proteins regulate each other through a complex network of bimolecular interactions, some transient and some relatively stable. Now, studies have shown that the apoptotic circuitry is even more sophisticated, in that BCL-2 family interactions are spatially dynamic, even in nonapoptotic cells. For example, BAX and BCL-XL can shuttle between the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Upstream signaling pathways can regulate the cytoplasmic-MOM equilibrium of BAX and thereby adjust the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stimuli. Thus, we can view the MOM as the central locale of a dynamic life-death rheostat. BAX invariably forms extensive homo-oligomers after activation in membranes. However, recent studies, showing that activated BAX monomers determine the kinetics of MOM permeabilization (MOMP), perturb the lipid bilayer and form nanometer size pores, pose questions about the role of the oligomerization. Other lingering questions concern the molecular mechanisms of BAX redistribution between MOM and cytoplasm and the details of BAX/BAK-membrane assemblies. Future studies need to delineate how BCL-2 family proteins regulate MOMP, in concert with auxiliary MOM proteins, in a dynamic membrane environment. Technologies aimed at elucidating the structure and function of the full-length proteins in membranes are needed to illuminate some of these critical issues.

  10. Horizontal Transfer, Not Duplication, Drives the Expansion of Protein Families in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus), average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae), and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae) to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes—xenologs—persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes—paralogs—are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein–protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families. PMID:21298028

  11. Protein Kinase D family kinases: roads start to segregate.

    PubMed

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lower. In our recent study we report that both kinases control PDAC cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific, but opposing manner. PKD1 selectively mediates anti-migratory/anti-invasive features by preferential regulation of the actin-regulatory Cofilin-phosphatase Slingshot1L (SSH1L). PKD2, on the other hand enhances invasion and angiogenesis of PDAC cells in 3D-ECM cultures and chorioallantois tumor models by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinase 7 and 9 (MMP7/9). MMP9 also enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis releasing extracellular matrix-bound VEGF-A. We thus suggest high PKD2 expression and loss of PKD1 may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In our recent study we demonstrate for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion, in-vitro and in-vivo, defining isoform-specific regulation of PKDs as a major future issue. PMID:24847910

  12. The CPCFC cuticular protein family: Anatomical and cuticular locations in Anopheles gambiae and distribution throughout Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Laura; Bowen, John Hunter; Reed, Tyler W; Willis, Judith H

    2015-10-01

    Arthropod cuticles have, in addition to chitin, many structural proteins belonging to diverse families. Information is sparse about how these different cuticular proteins contribute to the cuticle. Most cuticular proteins lack cysteine with the exception of two families (CPAP1 and CPAP3), recently described, and the one other that we now report on that has a motif of 16 amino acids first identified in a protein, Bc-NCP1, from the cuticle of nymphs of the cockroach, Blaberus craniifer (Jensen et al., 1997). This motif turns out to be present as two or three copies in one or two proteins in species from many orders of Hexapoda. We have named the family of cuticular proteins with this motif CPCFC, based on its unique feature of having two cysteines interrupted by five amino acids (C-X(5)-C). Analysis of the single member of the family in Anopheles gambiae (AgamCPCFC1) revealed that its mRNA is most abundant immediately following ecdysis in larvae, pupae and adults. The mRNA is localized primarily in epidermis that secretes hard cuticle, sclerites, setae, head capsules, appendages and spermatheca. EM immunolocalization revealed the presence of the protein, generally in endocuticle of legs and antennae. A phylogenetic analysis found proteins bearing this motif in 14 orders of Hexapoda, but not in some species for which there are complete genomic data. Proteins were much longer in Coleoptera and Diptera than in other orders. In contrast to the 1 and occasionally 2 copies in other species, a dragonfly, Ladona fulva, has at least 14 genes coding for family members. CPCFC proteins were present in four classes of Crustacea with 5 repeats in one species, and motifs that ended C-X(7)-C in Malacostraca. They were not detected, except as obvious contaminants, in any other arthropod subphyla or in any other phylum. The conservation of CPCFC proteins throughout the Pancrustacea and the small number of copies in individual species indicate that, when present, these proteins are

  13. The HMGN Family of Chromatin-Binding Proteins: Dynamic Modulators of Epigenetic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Jamie E.; Deng, Tao; Bustin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The HMGN family of proteins binds to nucleosomes without any specificity for the underlying DNA sequence. They affect the global and local structure of chromatin, as well as the levels of histone modifications and thus play a role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review focuses on the recent studies that provide new insights on the interactions between HMGN proteins, nucleosomes, and chromatin, and the effects of these interactions on epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. PMID:22326857

  14. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  15. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics. PMID:24230972

  16. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics.

  17. Bcl-2–family proteins and hematologic malignancies: history and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BCL-2 was the first antideath gene dis-covered, a milestone that effectively launched a new era in cell death research. Since its discovery more than 2 decades ago, multiple members of the human Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins have been identified, including 6 antiapoptotic proteins, 3 structurally similar proapoptotic proteins, and several structurally diverse proapoptotic interacting proteins that operate as upstream agonists or antagonists. Bcl-2–family proteins regulate all major types of cell death, including apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. As such, they operate as nodal points at the convergence of multiple pathways with broad relevance to biology and medicine. Bcl-2 derives its name from its original discovery in the context of B-cell lymphomas, where chromosomal translocations commonly activate the BCL-2 protooncogene, endowing B cells with a selective survival advantage that promotes their neoplastic expansion. The concept that defective programmed cell death contributes to malignancy was established by studies of Bcl-2, representing a major step forward in current understanding of tumorigenesis. Experimental therapies targeting Bcl-2 family mRNAs or proteins are currently in clinical testing, raising hopes that a new class of anticancer drugs may be near. PMID:18362212

  18. Recombinant Preparation, Biochemical Analysis, and Structure Determination of Sirtuin Family Histone/Protein Deacylases.

    PubMed

    Suenkel, B; Steegborn, C

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is long known as a regulatory posttranslational modification of histone proteins and is emerging as a ubiquitous intracellular protein modification. Additional lysine acylations such as succinylation and glutarylation have also been found on histones and other proteins. Acylations are reversibly attached through nonenzymatic acylation mechanisms and the action of protein acyl transferases and protein deacylases (PDACs). Sirtuins are an evolutionary defined class of PDACs and act as metabolic sensors by catalyzing a unique deacylation reaction that requires the cosubstrate NAD(+). Sirtuins are found in all domains of life, and the mammalian sirtuin family comprises seven isoforms in different cellular compartments. They regulate a wide range of cellular targets and functions, such as energy metabolism and stress responses, and they have been implicated in aging processes and aging-related diseases. A large body of functional, biochemical, biophysical, and structural work on isolated sirtuins has provided many important insights that complement the many physiological studies on this enzyme family. They enabled the comprehensive structural and biochemical analysis of sirtuin catalysis, substrate selectivity, and regulation. Here, we describe the recombinant production of sirtuin proteins, with an emphasis on the mammalian isoforms. We then describe their application in activity and binding assays and for crystal structure analysis. We provide protocols for these procedures, and we discuss typical pitfalls in studying this enzyme family and how to avoid them. This information will support further molecular studies on sirtuin mechanisms and functions. PMID:27372754

  19. Marked variability in the extent of protein disorder within and between viral families.

    PubMed

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  20. The protein disulphide-isomerase family: unravelling a string of folds.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, D M; Söling, H D

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian protein disulphide-isomerase (PDI) family encompasses several highly divergent proteins that are involved in the processing and maturation of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. These proteins are characterized by the presence of one or more domains of roughly 95-110 amino acids related to the cytoplasmic protein thioredoxin. All but the PDI-D subfamily are composed entirely of repeats of such domains, with at least one domain containing and one domain lacking a redox-active -Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys- tetrapeptide. In addition to their known roles as redox catalysts and isomerases, the last few years have revealed additional functions of the PDI proteins, including peptide binding, cell adhesion and perhaps chaperone activities. Attention is now turning to the non-redox-active domains of the PDIs, which may play an important role in all of the known activities of these proteins. Thus the presence of both redox-active and -inactive domains within these proteins portends a complexity of functions differentially accommodated by the various family members. PMID:10085220

  1. Analysis of the Nse3/MAGE-Binding Domain of the Nse4/EID Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guerineau, Marc; Kriz, Zdenek; Kozakova, Lucie; Bednarova, Katerina; Janos, Pavel; Palecek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nse1, Nse3 and Nse4 proteins form a tight sub-complex of the large SMC5-6 protein complex. hNSE3/MAGEG1, the mammalian ortholog of Nse3, is the founding member of the MAGE (melanoma-associated antigen) protein family and the Nse4 kleisin subunit is related to the EID (E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation) family of proteins. We have recently shown that human MAGE proteins can interact with NSE4/EID proteins through their characteristic conserved hydrophobic pocket. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mutagenesis and protein-protein interaction analyses, we have identified a new Nse3/MAGE-binding domain (NMBD) of the Nse4/EID proteins. This short domain is located next to the Nse4 N-terminal kleisin motif and is conserved in all NSE4/EID proteins. The central amino acid residues of the human NSE4b/EID3 domain were essential for its binding to hNSE3/MAGEG1 in yeast two-hybrid assays suggesting they form the core of the binding domain. PEPSCAN ELISA measurements of the MAGEC2 binding affinity to EID2 mutant peptides showed that similar core residues contribute to the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. In addition, the N-terminal extension of the EID2 binding domain took part in the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. Finally, docking and molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to generate a structure model for EID2-MAGEC2. Combination of our experimental data and the structure modeling showed how the core helical region of the NSE4/EID domain binds into the conserved pocket characteristic of the MAGE protein family. Conclusions/Significance We have identified a new Nse4/EID conserved domain and characterized its binding to Nse3/MAGE proteins. The conservation and binding of the interacting surfaces suggest tight co-evolution of both Nse4/EID and Nse3/MAGE protein families. PMID:22536443

  2. Integration of related sequences with protein three-dimensional structural families in an updated version of PALI database.

    PubMed

    Gowri, V S; Pandit, Shashi B; Karthik, P S; Srinivasan, N; Balaji, S

    2003-01-01

    The database of Phylogeny and ALIgnment of homologous protein structures (PALI) contains three-dimensional (3-D) structure-dependent sequence alignments as well as structure-based phylogenetic trees of protein domains in various families. The latest updated version (Release 2.1) comprises of 844 families of homologous proteins involving 3863 protein domain structures with each of these families having at least two members. Each member in a family has been structurally aligned with every other member in the same family using two proteins at a time. In addition, an alignment of multiple structures has also been performed using all the members in a family. Every family with at least three members is associated with two dendrograms, one based on a structural dissimilarity metric and the other based on similarity of topologically equivalenced residues for every pairwise alignment. Apart from these multi-member families, there are 817 single member families in the updated version of PALI. A new feature in the current release of PALI is the integration, with 3-D structural families, of sequences of homologues from the sequence databases. Alignments between homologous proteins of known 3-D structure and those without an experimentally derived structure are also provided for every family in the enhanced version of PALI. The database with several web interfaced utilities can be accessed at: http://pauling.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/~pali.

  3. Bioinformatic Characterization of the 4-Toluene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) Family of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shlykov, Maksim A.; Zheng, Wei Hao; Chen, Jonathan S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous sequence diverse 4-Toluene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) family contains few characterized members and is believed to catalyze the transport of several sulfur-based compounds. Prokaryotic members of the TSUP family outnumber the eukaryotic members substantially, and in prokaryotes, but not eukaryotes, extensive lateral gene transfer occurred during family evolution. Despite unequal representation, homologues from the three taxonomic domains of life share well-conserved motifs. We show that the prototypical eight TMS topology arose from an intragenic duplication of a four TMS unit. Possibly, a two TMS α-helical hairpin structure was the precursor of the 4 TMS repeat unit. Genome context analyses confirmed the proposal of a sulfur-based compound transport role for many TSUP homologues, but functional outliers appear to be prevalent as well. Preliminary results suggest that the TSUP family is a member of a large novel superfamily that includes rhodopsins, integral membrane chaperone proteins, transmembrane electron flow carriers and several transporter families. All of these proteins probably arose via the same pathway: 2 → 4 → 8 TMSs followed by loss of a TMS either at the N- or C-terminus, depending on the family, to give the more frequent 7 TMS topology. PMID:22192777

  4. Comparative Genomics of Helicobacter pylori: Analysis of the Outer Membrane Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Richard A.; Bina, James; Andrews, Beth M.; Doig, Peter; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Trust, Trevor J.

    2000-01-01

    The two complete genomic sequences of Helicobacter pylori J99 and 26695 were used to compare the paralogous families (related genes within one genome, likely to have related function) of genes predicted to encode outer membrane proteins which were present in each strain. We identified five paralogous gene families ranging in size from 3 to 33 members; two of these families contained members specific for either H. pylori J99 or H. pylori 26695. Most orthologous protein pairs (equivalent genes between two genomes, same function) shared considerable identity between the two strains. The unusual set of outer membrane proteins and the specialized outer membrane may be a reflection of the adaptation of H. pylori to the unique gastric environment where it is found. One subfamily of proteins, which contains both channel-forming and adhesin molecules, is extremely highly related at the sequence level and has likely arisen due to ancestral gene duplication. In addition, the largest paralogous family contained two essentially identical pairs of genes in both strains. The presence and genomic organization of these two pairs of duplicated genes were analyzed in a panel of independent H. pylori isolates. While one pair was present in every strain examined, one allele of the other pair appeared partially deleted in several isolates. PMID:10858232

  5. Expression of Notch Family Proteins in Placentas From Patients With Early-Onset Severe Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei-Xiu; Huang, Tao-Tao; Jiang, Meng; Feng, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study is aimed to identify the expression of Notch family proteins in placentas from patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia. Study Design: The expression of Notch family proteins in placentas was investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The profile of distribution of all Notch family proteins in placentas from patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia is similar to that in normal placentas. All Notch family proteins are expressed in placental trophoblasts. Moreover, Notch1 and Jagged1 (Jag1) are detected in placental endothelial cells. Real-time RT-PCR showed that messenger RNA levels of Notch2 and Delta-like4 (Dll4) in placentas from patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia are lower than that of normal placentas. Western blotting showed a significant increase in Notch3 expression and a significant decrease in Notch2 expression in placentas from patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia relative to those in normal placentas. Conclusion: The results suggest that Notch2 and Notch3 may play some roles in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:24336671

  6. The Bacterial Intimins and Invasins: A Large and Novel Family of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jennifer C.; Yen, Ming-Ren; Castillo, Rostislav; Leyton, Denisse L.; Henderson, Ian R.; Saier, Milton H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gram-negative bacteria have developed a limited repertoire of solutions for secreting proteins from the cytoplasmic compartment to the exterior of the cell. Amongst the spectrum of secreted proteins are the intimins and invasins (the Int/Inv family; TC# 1.B.54) which are characterized by an N-terminal β-barrel domain and a C-terminal surface localized passenger domain. Despite the important role played by members of this family in diseases mediated by several species of the Enterobacteriaceae, there has been little appreciation for the distribution and diversity of these proteins amongst Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the molecular events governing secretion of these proteins to the extracellular milieu. Principal Findings In silico approaches were used to analyze the domain organization and diversity of members of this secretion family. Proteins belonging to this family are predominantly associated with organisms from the γ-proteobacteria. Whilst proteins from the Chlamydia, γ-, β- and ε-proteobacteria possess β-barrel domains and passenger domains of various sizes, Int/Inv proteins from the α-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and chlorobi possess only the predicted β-barrel domains. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that with few exceptions these proteins cluster according to organismal type, indicating that divergence occurred contemporaneously with speciation, and that horizontal transfer was limited. Clustering patterns of the β-barrel domains correlate well with those of the full-length proteins although the passenger domains do so with much less consistency. The modular subdomain design of the passenger domains suggests that subdomain duplication and deletion have occurred with high frequency over evolutionary time. However, all repeated subdomains are found in tandem, suggesting that subdomain shuffling occurred rarely if at all. Topological predictions for the β-barrel domains are presented. Conclusion

  7. Isolation and characterization of an abortifacient protein, momorcochin, from root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis (family cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Yeung, H W; Ng, T B; Wong, N S; Li, W W

    1987-07-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 32,000 as estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and characterized by an abundance of Asp and Glu residues and an absence of Cys residues in its amino acid analysis, was isolated from fresh root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis using a procedure that involved acetone precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. The protein was capable of inducing mid-term abortion in mice. The characteristics of this protein were compared and contrasted with those of the abortifacient proteins isolated from other plants of the Cucurbitaceae family. PMID:3667075

  8. Isolation and characterization of an abortifacient protein, momorcochin, from root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis (family cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Yeung, H W; Ng, T B; Wong, N S; Li, W W

    1987-07-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 32,000 as estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and characterized by an abundance of Asp and Glu residues and an absence of Cys residues in its amino acid analysis, was isolated from fresh root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis using a procedure that involved acetone precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. The protein was capable of inducing mid-term abortion in mice. The characteristics of this protein were compared and contrasted with those of the abortifacient proteins isolated from other plants of the Cucurbitaceae family.

  9. Methuselah/Methuselah-like G protein-coupled receptors constitute an ancient metazoan gene family

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alexandre; Jones, Jeffery W.; Friedrich, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the phylogenetic age of the Methuselah/Methuselah-like (Mth/Mthl) gene family of G protein-coupled receptors, the founding member of which regulates development and lifespan in Drosophila. Here we report the results from a targeted homolog search of 39 holozoan genomes and phylogenetic analysis of the conserved seven transmembrane domain. Our findings reveal that the Mth/Mthl gene family is ancient, has experienced numerous extinction and expansion events during metazoan evolution, and acquired the current definition of the Methuselah ectodomain during its exceptional expansion in arthropods. In addition, our findings identify Mthl1, Mthl5, Mthl14, and Mthl15 as the oldest Mth/Mthl gene family paralogs in Drosophila. Future studies of these genes have the potential to define ancestral functions of the Mth/Mthl gene family. PMID:26915348

  10. Delineation of the Pasteurellaceae-specific GbpA-family of glutathione-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus influenzae is a glutathione auxotroph and acquires the redox-active tripeptide by import. The dedicated glutathione transporter belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter superfamily and displays more than 60% overall sequence identity with the well-studied dipeptide (Dpp) permease of Escherichia coli. The solute binding protein (SBP) that mediates glutathione transport in H. influenzae is a lipoprotein termed GbpA and is 54% identical to E. coli DppA, a well-studied member of family 5 SBP's. The discovery linking GbpA to glutathione import came rather unexpectedly as this import-priming SBP was previously annotated as a heme-binding protein (HbpA), and was thought to mediate heme acquisition. Nonetheless, although many SBP's have been implicated in more than one function, a prominent physiological role for GbpA and its partner permease in heme acquisition appears to be very unlikely. Here, we sought to characterize five representative GbpA homologs in an effort to delineate the novel GbpA-family of glutathione-specific family 5 SBPs and to further clarify their functional role in terms of ligand preferences. Results Lipoprotein and non-lipoprotein GbpA homologs were expressed in soluble form and substrate specificity was evaluated via a number of ligand binding assays. A physiologically insignificant affinity for hemin was observed for all five GbpA homologous test proteins. Three out of five test proteins were found to bind glutathione and some of its physiologically relevant derivatives with low- or submicromolar affinity. None of the tested SBP family 5 allocrites interacted with the remaining two GbpA test proteins. Structure-based sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that the two binding-inert GbpA homologs clearly form a separate phylogenetic cluster. To elucidate a structure-function rationale for this phylogenetic differentiation, we determined the crystal structure of one of the

  11. OmpA family proteins and Pmp-like autotransporter: new adhesins of Waddlia chondrophila.

    PubMed

    Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Domröse, Andreas; Becker, Elisabeth; Cisse, Ousmane H; Hegemann, Johannes H; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, a clade that also includes the well-known classical Chlamydia responsible for a number of severe human and animal diseases. Waddlia is an emerging pathogen associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and abortion in ruminants. Adhesion to the host cell is an essential prerequisite for survival of every strict intracellular bacteria and, in classical Chlamydia, this step is partially mediated by polymorphic outer membrane proteins (Pmps), a family of highly diverse autotransporters that represent about 15% of the bacterial coding capacity. Waddlia chondrophila genome however only encodes one putative Pmp-like protein. Using a proteomic approach, we identified several bacterial proteins potentially implicated in the adhesion process and we characterized their expression during the replication cycle of the bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the Waddlia Pmp-like autotransporter as well as OmpA2 and OmpA3, two members of the extended Waddlia OmpA protein family, exhibit adhesive properties on epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the large diversity of the OmpA protein family is linked to the wide host range of these bacteria that are able to enter and multiply in various host cells ranging from protozoa to mammalian and fish cells.

  12. A new family of β-helix proteins with similarities to the polysaccharide lyases

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Devin W.; D'Angelo, Sara; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2014-09-27

    Microorganisms that degrade biomass produce diverse assortments of carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding modules. Despite tremendous advances in the genomic sequencing of these organisms, many genes do not have an ascribed function owing to low sequence identity to genes that have been annotated. Consequently, biochemical and structural characterization of genes with unknown function is required to complement the rapidly growing pool of genomic sequencing data. A protein with previously unknown function (Cthe_2159) was recently isolated in a genome-wide screen using phage display to identify cellulose-binding protein domains from the biomass-degrading bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. Here, the crystal structure of Cthe_2159 is presentedmore » and it is shown that it is a unique right-handed parallel β-helix protein. Despite very low sequence identity to known β-helix or carbohydrate-active proteins, Cthe_2159 displays structural features that are very similar to those of polysaccharide lyase (PL) families 1, 3, 6 and 9. Cthe_2159 is conserved across bacteria and some archaea and is a member of the domain of unknown function family DUF4353. This suggests that Cthe_2159 is the first representative of a previously unknown family of cellulose and/or acid-sugar binding β-helix proteins that share structural similarities with PLs. More importantly, these results demonstrate how functional annotation by biochemical and structural analysis remains a critical tool in the characterization of new gene products.« less

  13. Variability and Action Mechanism of a Family of Anticomplement Proteins in Ixodes ricinus

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Kathia; Gensale, François; Denis, Valérie; Charloteaux, Benoît; Decrem, Yves; Prévôt, Pierre-Paul; Brossard, Michel; Vanhamme, Luc; Godfroid, Edmond

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are blood feeding arachnids that characteristically take a long blood meal. They must therefore counteract host defence mechanisms such as hemostasis, inflammation and the immune response. This is achieved by expressing batteries of salivary proteins coded by multigene families. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the in-depth analysis of a tick multigene family and describe five new anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus. Compared to previously described Ixodes anticomplement proteins, these segregated into a new phylogenetic group or subfamily. These proteins have a novel action mechanism as they specifically bind to properdin, leading to the inhibition of C3 convertase and the alternative complement pathway. An excess of non-synonymous over synonymous changes indicated that coding sequences had undergone diversifying selection. Diversification was not associated with structural, biochemical or functional diversity, adaptation to host species or stage specificity but rather to differences in antigenicity. Conclusions/Significance Anticomplement proteins from I. ricinus are the first inhibitors that specifically target a positive regulator of complement, properdin. They may provide new tools for the investigation of role of properdin in physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. They may also be useful in disorders affecting the alternative complement pathway. Looking for and detecting the different selection pressures involved will help in understanding the evolution of multigene families and hematophagy in arthropods. PMID:18167559

  14. A new family of β-helix proteins with similarities to the polysaccharide lyases.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; D'Angelo, Sara; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2014-10-01

    Microorganisms that degrade biomass produce diverse assortments of carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding modules. Despite tremendous advances in the genomic sequencing of these organisms, many genes do not have an ascribed function owing to low sequence identity to genes that have been annotated. Consequently, biochemical and structural characterization of genes with unknown function is required to complement the rapidly growing pool of genomic sequencing data. A protein with previously unknown function (Cthe_2159) was recently isolated in a genome-wide screen using phage display to identify cellulose-binding protein domains from the biomass-degrading bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. Here, the crystal structure of Cthe_2159 is presented and it is shown that it is a unique right-handed parallel β-helix protein. Despite very low sequence identity to known β-helix or carbohydrate-active proteins, Cthe_2159 displays structural features that are very similar to those of polysaccharide lyase (PL) families 1, 3, 6 and 9. Cthe_2159 is conserved across bacteria and some archaea and is a member of the domain of unknown function family DUF4353. This suggests that Cthe_2159 is the first representative of a previously unknown family of cellulose and/or acid-sugar binding β-helix proteins that share structural similarities with PLs. Importantly, these results demonstrate how functional annotation by biochemical and structural analysis remains a critical tool in the characterization of new gene products.

  15. A new family of β-helix proteins with similarities to the polysaccharide lyases

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; D'Angelo, Sara; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2014-09-27

    Microorganisms that degrade biomass produce diverse assortments of carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding modules. Despite tremendous advances in the genomic sequencing of these organisms, many genes do not have an ascribed function owing to low sequence identity to genes that have been annotated. Consequently, biochemical and structural characterization of genes with unknown function is required to complement the rapidly growing pool of genomic sequencing data. A protein with previously unknown function (Cthe_2159) was recently isolated in a genome-wide screen using phage display to identify cellulose-binding protein domains from the biomass-degrading bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. Here, the crystal structure of Cthe_2159 is presented and it is shown that it is a unique right-handed parallel β-helix protein. Despite very low sequence identity to known β-helix or carbohydrate-active proteins, Cthe_2159 displays structural features that are very similar to those of polysaccharide lyase (PL) families 1, 3, 6 and 9. Cthe_2159 is conserved across bacteria and some archaea and is a member of the domain of unknown function family DUF4353. This suggests that Cthe_2159 is the first representative of a previously unknown family of cellulose and/or acid-sugar binding β-helix proteins that share structural similarities with PLs. More importantly, these results demonstrate how functional annotation by biochemical and structural analysis remains a critical tool in the characterization of new gene products.

  16. Phenotypic variability in three families with valosin-containing protein mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spina, S.; Van Laar, A. D.; Murrell, J. R.; Hamilton, R. L.; Kofler, J. K.; Epperson, F.; Farlow, M. R.; Lopez, O. L.; Quinlan, J.; DeKosky, S. T.; Ghetti, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The phenotype of IBMPFD [inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (FTD)] associated with valosin-containing protein(VCP) mutation is described in three families. Methods Probands were identified based on a pathological diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions type IV. VCP sequencing was carried out. Clinical data on affected family members were reviewed. Results Ohio family: four subjects presented muscle weakness and wasting. (One subject had both neuropathic and myopathic findings and another subject showed only evidence of myopathy. The etiology of weakness could not be ascertained in the remaining two subjects.) Two individuals also showed Parkinsonism (with associated FTD in one of the two). The proband’s brain displayed FTLD-TDP type IV and Braak stage five Parkinson’s disease (PD). A VCP R191Q mutation was found. Pennsylvania family: 11 subjects developed IBMPFD. Parkinsonism was noted in two mutation carriers, whilst another subject presented with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A novel VCP T262A mutation was found. Indiana family: three subjects developed IBMPFD. FTD was diagnosed in two individuals and suspected in the third one who also displayed muscle weakness. A VCP R159C mutation was found. Conclusions We identified three families with IBMPFD associated with VCP mutations. Clinical and pathological PD was documented for the first time in members of two families. A novel T262A mutation was found. One individual had PPA: an uncommon presentation of IBMPFD. PMID:22900631

  17. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  18. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  19. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  20. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  1. The Nap family proteins, CG5017/Hanabi and Nap1, are essential for Drosophila spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shuhei

    2013-04-01

    Spermiogenesis is a dynamic process leading to alterations in cell morphology. In spermiogenesis, the roles of the histone chaperones are largely unknown. Here, I report the unexpected roles of two Nap family proteins, CG5017/Hanabi and nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) in Drosophila. Hanabi is mainly localized in the cytoplasm, and the hanabi mutant shows fully scattered nuclei and abnormality of nuclear shaping in spermatid elongation. In contrast, Nap1 is localized at the apical tip of the sperm head, and the nap1 mutant exhibits disruption of the nuclear bundle in the later stage. These findings imply that Nap family proteins might individually sustain cytoskeleton-based morphogenesis, rather than histone biogenesis. PMID:23454210

  2. Systematic Identification of Novel Protein Domain Families Associated with Nuclear Functions

    PubMed Central

    Doerks, Tobias; Copley, Richard R.; Schultz, Jörg; Ponting, Chris P.; Bork, Peer

    2002-01-01

    A systematic computational analysis of protein sequences containing known nuclear domains led to the identification of 28 novel domain families. This represents a 26% increase in the starting set of 107 known nuclear domain families used for the analysis. Most of the novel domains are present in all major eukaryotic lineages, but 3 are species specific. For about 500 of the 1200 proteins that contain these new domains, nuclear localization could be inferred, and for 700, additional features could be predicted. For example, we identified a new domain, likely to have a role downstream of the unfolded protein response; a nematode-specific signalling domain; and a widespread domain, likely to be a noncatalytic homolog of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. PMID:11779830

  3. The 'tubulin-like' S1 protein of Spirochaeta is a member of the hsp65 stress protein family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, D.; Obar, R.; Tzertzinis, G.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein (called S1) from Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis was identified as 'tubulin-like' because it cross-reacted with at least four different antisera raised against tubulin and was isolated, with a co-polymerizing 45-kDa protein, by warm-cold cycling procedures used to purify tubulin from mammalian brain. Furthermore, at least three genera of non-cultivable symbiotic spirochetes (Pillotina, Diplocalyx, and Hollandina) that contain conspicuous 24-nm cytoplasmic tubules displayed a strong fluorescence in situ when treated with polyclonal antisera raised against tubulin. Here we summarize results that lead to the conclusion that this 65-kDa protein has no homology to tubulin. S1 is an hsp65 stress protein homologue. Hsp65 is a highly immunogenic family of hsp60 proteins which includes the 65-kDa antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (an active component of Freund's complete adjuvant), Borrelia, Treponema, Chlamydia, Legionella, and Salmonella. The hsp60s, also known as chaperonins, include E. coli GroEL, mitochondrial and chloroplast chaperonins, the pea aphid 'symbionin' and many other proteins involved in protein folding and the stress response.

  4. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  5. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  6. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  7. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  8. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  9. THE RNAissance Family: SR proteins as multifaceted regulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jonathan M.; Sanford, Jeremy R.

    2014-01-01

    Serine and Arginine-rich (SR) proteins play multiple roles in the eukaryotic gene expression pathway. Initially described as constitutive and alternative splicing factors, it is now clear that SR proteins are key determinants of exon identity and function as molecular adaptors, linking the pre-mRNA to the splicing machinery. In addition, SR proteins are now implicated in many aspects of mRNA and ncRNA processing well beyond splicing. These unexpected roles, including RNA transcription, export, translation and decay may prove to be the rule rather than the exception. To simply define this family of RNA binding proteins as splicing factors belies the broader roles of SR proteins in post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:25155147

  10. A conserved family of proteins facilitates nascent lipid droplet budding from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Vineet; Ojha, Namrata; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all cells and play critical roles in lipid metabolism. De novo LD biogenesis occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is not well understood. We imaged early stages of LD biogenesis using electron microscopy and found that nascent LDs form lens-like structures that are in the ER membrane, raising the question of how these nascent LDs bud from the ER as they grow. We found that a conserved family of proteins, fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins, is required for proper budding of LDs from the ER. Elimination or reduction of FIT proteins in yeast and higher eukaryotes causes LDs to remain in the ER membrane. Deletion of the single FIT protein in Caenorhabditis elegans is lethal, suggesting that LD budding is an essential process in this organism. Our findings indicated that FIT proteins are necessary to promote budding of nascent LDs from the ER. PMID:26504167

  11. A bone sialoprotein-binding protein from Staphylococcus aureus: a member of the staphylococcal Sdr family.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, H s; Guss, B; Hellman, U; Persson, L; Rubin, K; Rydén, C

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, isolated from bone and joint infections, specifically interact with bone sialoprotein (BSP), a glycoprotein of bone and dentine extracellular matrix, via a cell-surface protein of M(r) 97000 [Yacoub, Lindahl, Rubin, Wendel, Heinegârd and Rydén, (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 222, 919-925]. Amino acid sequences of seven trypsin fragments from the 97000-M(r) BSP-binding protein were determined. A gene encoding a protein encompassing all seven peptide sequences was identified from chromosomal DNA isolated from S. aureus strain O24. This gene encodes a protein with 1171 amino acids, called BSP-binding protein (Bbp), which displays similarity to recently described proteins of the Sdr family from S. aureus. SdrC, SdrD and SdrE encode putative cell-surface proteins with no described ligand specificity. Bbp also shows similarity to a fibrinogen-binding protein from S. epidermidis called Fbe. A serine-aspartic acid repeat sequence was found close to the cell-wall-anchoring Leu-Pro-Xaa-Thr-Gly sequence in the C-terminal end of the protein. Escherichia coli cells were transformed with an expression vector containing a major part of the bbp gene fused to the gene for glutathione S-transferase. The affinity-purified fusion protein bound radiolabelled native BSP, and inhibited the binding of radiolabelled BSP to staphylococcal cells. Serum from patients suffering from bone and joint infection contained antibodies that reacted with the fusion protein of the BSP-binding protein, indicating that the protein is expressed during an infection and is immunogenic. The S. aureus Bbp protein may be important in the localization of bacteria to bone tissue, and thus might be of relevance in the pathogenicity of osteomyelitis. PMID:10642520

  12. Molecular evolution of the bacterial pseudouridine-5'-phosphate glycosidase protein family.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Keshav; Oja, Terhi; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2014-10-01

    Pseudouridine is a noncanonical C-nucleoside commonly present in RNA, which is not metabolized in mammals, but can be recycled by the unique enzyme family of bacterial pseudouridine glycosidases such as YeiN from Escherichia coli. Here, we present rigorous bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of the protein family in order to find sequences that might code for nonpseudouridine glycosidase activities. To date, the only other function reported for the enzyme family occurs during the biosynthesis of the antibiotic alnumycin A in Streptomyces species, where AlnA functions as an unusual C-glycosynthase. Bioinformatics analysis of 755 protein sequences identified one group of sequences that were unlikely to harbour pseudouridine glycosidase activities. This observation was confirmed in vitro with one representative protein, IdgA from Streptomyces albus, which was unable to synthesize pseudouridine monophosphate, but was able to attach d-ribose-5-phosphate to juglone. Furthermore, our analyses provide evidence for horizontal gene transfer of pseudouridine glycosidases that may have occurred in Streptomyces and Doria species. Inspection of the genomic loci in the vicinity of pseudouridine glycosidases revealed that in 77% of the strains a kinase gene putatively involved in the phosphorylation of pseudouridine was found nearby, whereas the sequences encoding nonpseudouridine glycosidases coexisted with a phosphatase of the haloacid dehalogenase enzyme family. The investigation suggested that these unknown sequences might be involved in the biosynthesis of soluble blue pigments because of the presence of genes homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

  13. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  14. Comparative Study on Sequence–Structure–Function Relationship of the Human Short-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nu Thi Ngoc; Le, Ly

    2014-01-01

    Human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) protein family has been the subject of recent studies for its critical role in human metabolism. Studies also found that single nucleotide polymorphisms of the SDR protein family were responsible for a variety of genetic diseases, including type II diabetes. This study reports the effect of sequence variation on the structural and functional integrities of human SDR protein family using phylogenetics and correlated mutation analysis tools. Our results indicated that (i) tyrosine, serine, and lysine are signature protein residues that have direct contribution to the structural and functional stabilities of the SDR protein family, (ii) subgroups of SDR protein family have their own signature protein combination that represent their unique functionality, and (iii) mutations of the human SDR protein family showed high correlation in terms of evolutionary history. In combination, the results inferred that over evolutionary history, the SDR protein family was able to diverge itself in order to adapt with the changes in human nutritional demands. Our study reveals understanding of structural and functional scaffolds of specific SDR subgroups that may facilitate the design of specific inhibitor. PMID:25374450

  15. Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (HIPP): characterization of a family of proteins exclusive to plants.

    PubMed

    de Abreu-Neto, João Braga; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia C; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2013-04-01

    Metallochaperones are key proteins for the safe transport of metallic ions inside the cell. HIPPs (heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant proteins) are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain (HMA) and a C-terminal isoprenylation motif. In this study, we provide evidence that proteins of this family are found only in vascular plants and may be separated into five distinct clusters. HIPPs may be involved in (a) heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification mechanisms, especially those involved in cadmium tolerance, (b) transcriptional responses to cold and drought, and (c) plant-pathogen interactions. In particular, our results show that the rice (Oryza sativa) HIPP OsHIPP41 gene is highly expressed in response to cold and drought stresses, and its product is localized in the cytosol and the nucleus. The results suggest that HIPPs play an important role in the development of vascular plants and in plant responses to environmental changes.

  16. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  17. A novel family of Apicomplexan glideosome-associated proteins with an inner membrane-anchoring role.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Hayley E; Tonkin, Christopher J; O'Donnell, Rebecca A; Tham, Wai-Hong; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Gould, Sven; Cowman, Alan F; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2009-09-11

    The phylum Apicomplexa are a group of obligate intracellular parasites responsible for a wide range of important diseases. Central to the lifecycle of these unicellular parasites is their ability to migrate through animal tissue and invade target host cells. Apicomplexan movement is generated by a unique system of gliding motility in which substrate adhesins and invasion-related proteins are pulled across the plasma membrane by an underlying actin-myosin motor. The myosins of this motor are inserted into a dual membrane layer called the inner membrane complex (IMC) that is sandwiched between the plasma membrane and an underlying cytoskeletal basket. Central to our understanding of gliding motility is the characterization of proteins residing within the IMC, but to date only a few proteins are known. We report here a novel family of six-pass transmembrane proteins, termed the GAPM family, which are highly conserved and specific to Apicomplexa. In Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii the GAPMs localize to the IMC where they form highly SDS-resistant oligomeric complexes. The GAPMs co-purify with the cytoskeletal alveolin proteins and also to some degree with the actin-myosin motor itself. Hence, these proteins are strong candidates for an IMC-anchoring role, either directly or indirectly tethering the motor to the cytoskeleton.

  18. New functions of the chloroplast Preprotein and Amino acid Transporter (PRAT) family members in protein import.

    PubMed

    Rossig, Claudia; Reinbothe, Christiane; Gray, John; Valdes, Oscar; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells contain distinct compartments such as the nucleus, the endomembrane system comprising the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes, vacuoles, as well as mitochondria and chloroplasts. All of these compartments are surrounded by 1 or 2 limiting membranes and need to import proteins from the cytosol. Previous work led to the conclusion that mitochondria and chloroplasts use structurally different protein import machineries in their outer and inner membranes for the uptake of cytosolic precursor proteins. Our most recent data show that there is some unexpected overlap. Three members of the family of preprotein and amino acid transporters, PRAT, were identified in chloroplasts that mediate the uptake of transit sequence-less proteins into the inner plastid envelope membrane. By analogy, mitochondria contain with TIM22 a related PRAT protein that is involved in the import of transit sequence-less proteins into the inner mitochondrial membrane. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts thus make use of similar import mechanisms to deliver some of their proteins to their final place. Because single homologs of HP20- and HP30-like proteins are present in algae such as Chlamydomonas, Ostreococcus, and Volvox, which diverged from land plants approximately 1 billion years ago, it is likely that the discovered PRAT-mediated mechanism of protein translocation evolved concomitantly with the secondary endosymbiotic event that gave rise to green plants. PMID:24476934

  19. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  20. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family.

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments. PMID:27604321

  1. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  2. A comprehensive survey of the grapevine VQ gene family and its transcriptional correlation with WRKY proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Wang, Gang; Zhong, Yan; Corso, Massimiliano; Cavallini, Erika; Cheng, Zong-Ming (Max)

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are a class of transcription factors (TFs) involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent studies in Arabidopsis have revealed that some WRKY TFs interact with a class of proteins designed as VQ proteins because of their typical conserved motif (FxxxVQxLTG). So far, no information is available about the genomic organization and the function of VQ motif-containing protein in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L). In the current study, we analyzed the 12X V1 prediction of the nearly homozygous PN40024 genotype identifying up to 18 predicted VQ genes (VvVQ). VvVQs phylogenetic and bioinformatic analyses indicated that the intron-exon structures and motif distribution are highly divergent between different members of the grapevine VQ family. Moreover, the analysis of the V. vinifera cv. Corvina expression atlas revealed a tissue- and stage-specific expression of several members of the family which also showed a significant correlation with WRKY TFs. Grapevine VQ genes also exhibited altered expression in response to drought, powdery mildew infection, salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene (ETH) treatments. The present study represents the first characterization of VQ genes in a grapevine genotype and it is a pivotal foundation for further studies aimed at functionally characterizing this mostly unknown grapevine multigenic family. PMID:26124765

  3. Conserved cellular function and stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Alfonso, Julieta; Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C

    2010-05-01

    Chronic stress causes morphological alterations in the hippocampus of rodents and tree shrews, including atrophy of CA3 dendrites and loss of synapses. The molecular mechanisms underlying these structural changes remain largely unknown. We have previously identified M6a as a stress responsive gene and shown that M6a is involved in filopodium/spine outgrowth and, likely, synapse formation. M6a belongs to the proteolipid protein (PLP) family, all of their members having four transmembrane domains that allow their localization at the plasma membrane. In the present work, we analyzed other members of this family, the closely related M6b as well as PLP and its splice variant DM20. We found that chronic restraint stress in mice reduces M6b and DM20, but not PLP, mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, M6b and DM20, but again not PLP, induce filopodium formation in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Several M6b protein isoforms were studied, all of them having similar effects except for the one lacking the transmembrane domains. Our results reveal a conserved cellular function and a stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family, suggesting an involvement of proteolipid proteins in the stress response. PMID:19937804

  4. The InterPro protein families database: the classification resource after 15 years.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Alex; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Daugherty, Louise; Fraser, Matthew; Hunter, Sarah; Lopez, Rodrigo; McAnulla, Craig; McMenamin, Conor; Nuka, Gift; Pesseat, Sebastien; Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Rato, Claudia; Yong, Siew-Yit; Bateman, Alex; Punta, Marco; Attwood, Teresa K; Sigrist, Christian J A; Redaschi, Nicole; Rivoire, Catherine; Xenarios, Ioannis; Kahn, Daniel; Guyot, Dominique; Bork, Peer; Letunic, Ivica; Gough, Julian; Oates, Matt; Haft, Daniel; Huang, Hongzhan; Natale, Darren A; Wu, Cathy H; Orengo, Christine; Sillitoe, Ian; Mi, Huaiyu; Thomas, Paul D; Finn, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The InterPro database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/) is a freely available resource that can be used to classify sequences into protein families and to predict the presence of important domains and sites. Central to the InterPro database are predictive models, known as signatures, from a range of different protein family databases that have different biological focuses and use different methodological approaches to classify protein families and domains. InterPro integrates these signatures, capitalizing on the respective strengths of the individual databases, to produce a powerful protein classification resource. Here, we report on the status of InterPro as it enters its 15th year of operation, and give an overview of new developments with the database and its associated Web interfaces and software. In particular, the new domain architecture search tool is described and the process of mapping of Gene Ontology terms to InterPro is outlined. We also discuss the challenges faced by the resource given the explosive growth in sequence data in recent years. InterPro (version 48.0) contains 36,766 member database signatures integrated into 26,238 InterPro entries, an increase of over 3993 entries (5081 signatures), since 2012.

  5. RTX proteins: a highly diverse family secreted by a common mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Linhartová, Irena; Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Osička, Radim; Kamanová, Jana; Procházková, Kateřina; Adkins, Irena; Hejnová-Holubová, Jana; Sadílková, Lenka; Morová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Repeats-in-toxin (RTX) exoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria form a steadily growing family of proteins with diverse biological functions. Their common feature is the unique mode of export across the bacterial envelope via the type I secretion system and the characteristic, typically nonapeptide, glycine- and aspartate-rich repeats binding Ca2+ ions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the organization of rtx loci and on the biological and biochemical activities of therein encoded proteins. Applying several types of bioinformatic screens on the steadily growing set of sequenced bacterial genomes, over 1000 RTX family members were detected, with the biological functions of most of them remaining to be characterized. Activities of the so far characterized RTX family members are then discussed and classified according to functional categories, ranging from the historically first characterized pore-forming RTX leukotoxins, through the large multifunctional enzymatic toxins, bacteriocins, nodulation proteins, surface layer proteins, up to secreted hydrolytic enzymes exhibiting metalloprotease or lipase activities of industrial interest. PMID:20528947

  6. Moesin: a member of the protein 4.1-talin-ezrin family of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lankes, W T; Furthmayr, H

    1991-01-01

    Moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein, pronounced mó ez in) has previously been isolated from bovine uterus and characterized as a possible receptor protein for heparan sulfate. We now have cloned and sequenced its complete cDNA, which represents a single 4.2-kilobase mRNA encoding a protein of 577 amino acids. It contains no apparent signal peptide or transmembrane domain. In addition, the protein shows significant sequence identity (72%) to ezrin (cytovillin, p81), as well as similarity to protein 4.1 and talin. All of the latter proteins have been postulated to serve as structural links between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. A similar role for moesin is implied by structure and domain predictions derived from the cDNA-deduced peptide sequence. Furthermore, our data indicate that moesin is identical to the 77-kDa band that copurifies with ezrin in its isolation from human placenta [Bretscher, A. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 108, 921-930]. Images PMID:1924289

  7. An Insight into the Triabin Protein Family of American Hematophagous Reduviids: Functional, Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vargas, María J; Santibáñez-López, Carlos E; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-02-15

    A transcriptomic analysis of the saliva of T. pallidipennis together with a short proteomic analysis were carried out to reveal novel primary structures of the lipocalin/triabin protein families in this reduviid. Although triabins share some structural characteristics to lipocalins and they are classified as in the calcyn/lipocalin superfamily, triabins differ from lipocalins in the direction of β-strands in the general conformation of the β-barrel. The triabin protein family encompasses a wide variety of proteins, which disrupt the hemostasis of warm-blooded animals. Likewise, the function of proteins classified as triabins includes proteins that are carriers of small molecules, protease inhibitors, binders of specific cell-surface receptors as well as proteins that form complexes with other macromolecules. For example, triabin and pallidipin from the saliva of T. pallidipennis are thrombin and platelet aggregation inhibitors, respectively; triplatin from T. infestans binds to thromboxane A2; and nitrophorin from Rhodnius prolixus carries nitric oxide. Therefore, based on 42 new transcriptome sequences of triabins from the salivary glands of T. pallidipennis reported at present, and on triabin sequences of other American hematophagous reduviids already reported in the literature, subfamilies of triabins were proposed following phylogenetic analyses and functional characterization of triabin members. Eight subfamilies of proteins were recognized with known functions, which were the nitrophorin and amine binding proteins, Rhodnius prolixus aggregation inhibitor, triafestin, triatin, dipetalodipin and pallidipin, triplatin and infestilin, dimiconin and triabin, and procalin subfamilies. Interestingly, 70% of the analyzed sequences came from these eight subfamilies because there was no biological function associated with them, implying the existence of a vast number of proteins with potential novel biological activities.

  8. An Insight into the Triabin Protein Family of American Hematophagous Reduviids: Functional, Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vargas, María J.; Santibáñez-López, Carlos E.; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    A transcriptomic analysis of the saliva of T. pallidipennis together with a short proteomic analysis were carried out to reveal novel primary structures of the lipocalin/triabin protein families in this reduviid. Although triabins share some structural characteristics to lipocalins and they are classified as in the calcyn/lipocalin superfamily, triabins differ from lipocalins in the direction of β-strands in the general conformation of the β-barrel. The triabin protein family encompasses a wide variety of proteins, which disrupt the hemostasis of warm-blooded animals. Likewise, the function of proteins classified as triabins includes proteins that are carriers of small molecules, protease inhibitors, binders of specific cell-surface receptors as well as proteins that form complexes with other macromolecules. For example, triabin and pallidipin from the saliva of T. pallidipennis are thrombin and platelet aggregation inhibitors, respectively; triplatin from T. infestans binds to thromboxane A2; and nitrophorin from Rhodnius prolixus carries nitric oxide. Therefore, based on 42 new transcriptome sequences of triabins from the salivary glands of T. pallidipennis reported at present, and on triabin sequences of other American hematophagous reduviids already reported in the literature, subfamilies of triabins were proposed following phylogenetic analyses and functional characterization of triabin members. Eight subfamilies of proteins were recognized with known functions, which were the nitrophorin and amine binding proteins, Rhodnius prolixus aggregation inhibitor, triafestin, triatin, dipetalodipin and pallidipin, triplatin and infestilin, dimiconin and triabin, and procalin subfamilies. Interestingly, 70% of the analyzed sequences came from these eight subfamilies because there was no biological function associated with them, implying the existence of a vast number of proteins with potential novel biological activities. PMID:26891325

  9. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Kelly J.; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs. PMID:26594176

  10. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR) Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB) Family.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Carville G; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-29

    In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630), we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB) families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant a-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades.

  11. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane.

  12. How can we understand an entire (super)family of proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how the functional properties of a protein are encoded in its amino acid sequence remains a formidable challenge. We use photoactive yellow protein (PYP) to determine how structure-function relationships can be obtained for an entire (super)family of proteins. PYP is a model system to study fundamental processes in proteins and a prototype for the PAS domain superfamily. It consists of a 100-residue PAS domain with an additional 25-residue N-terminal extension. PYP exhibits a photocycle that is initiated by pCA photoisomerization, followed by proton transfer from Glu46 to the pCA and a subsequent protein quake during formation of the pB intermediate. These structural changes are driven by the electrostatic epicenter formed by the buried ionized Glu46 side chain and involve partial protein unfolding, including the release of the N-terminal region. Deletion of the N-terminal region slows down pB decay 1,000-fold. We report results on family-wide structure function relationships in PYP. (i) Transplanting mutations that alter the properties of a highly studied PYP to a different PYP homolog are only partially successful, implying sequence context dependence of functional properties. (ii) We find a direct correlation between the strength of the hydrogen bonding between the pCA and Glu46 and functional properties of PYPs. The role of Glu46 as the epicenter for driving large conformational changes during pB formation is conserved. (iii) Across the PYP family the N-terminal region is negatively charged while the PAS core is positively charged. The resulting charge-charge interactions are critical for the function the N-terminal region. (iv) We find that residues conserved in the PAS domain superfamily exert their effects through conserved patterns of side chain interactions.

  13. Evolutionary and molecular facts link the WWC protein family to Hippo signaling.

    PubMed

    Wennmann, Dirk Oliver; Schmitz, Jürgen; Wehr, Michael C; Krahn, Michael P; Koschmal, Nora; Gromnitza, Sascha; Schulze, Ulf; Weide, Thomas; Chekuri, Anil; Skryabin, Boris V; Gerke, Volker; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The scaffolding protein KIBRA (also called WWC1) is involved in the regulation of important intracellular transport processes and the establishment of cell polarity. Furthermore, KIBRA/WWC1 is an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls cell proliferation and organ size in animals. KIBRA/WWC1 represents only one member of the WWC protein family that also includes the highly similar proteins WWC2 and WWC3. Although the function of KIBRA/WWC1 was studied intensively in cells and animal models, the importance of WWC2 and WWC3 was not yet elucidated. Here, we describe evolutionary, molecular, and functional aspects of the WWC family. We show that the WWC genes arose in the ancestor of bilateral animals (clades such as insects and vertebrates) from a single founder gene most similar to the present KIBRA/WWC1-like sequence of Drosophila. This situation was still maintained until the common ancestor of lancelet and vertebrates. In fish, a progenitor-like sequence of mammalian KIBRA/WWC1 and WWC2 is expressed together with WWC3. Finally, in all tetrapods, the three family members, KIBRA/WWC1, WWC2, and WWC3, are found, except for a large genomic deletion including WWC3 in Mus musculus. At the molecular level, the highly conserved WWC proteins share a similar primary structure, the ability to form homo- and heterodimers and the interaction with a common set of binding proteins. Furthermore, all WWC proteins negatively regulate cell proliferation and organ growth due to a suppression of the transcriptional activity of YAP, the major effector of the Hippo pathway. PMID:24682284

  14. Transcriptional cofactors of the FOG family interact with GATA proteins by means of multiple zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A H; Liew, C; Holmes, M; Kowalski, K; Mackay, J; Crossley, M

    1999-01-01

    Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) is a zinc finger protein that has been shown to interact physically with the erythroid DNA-binding protein GATA-1 and modulate its transcriptional activity. Recently, two new members of the FOG family have been identified: a mammalian protein, FOG-2, that also associates with GATA-1 and other mammalian GATA factors; and U-shaped, a Drosophila protein that interacts with the Drosophila GATA protein Pannier. FOG proteins contain multiple zinc fingers and it has been shown previously that the sixth finger of FOG-1 interacts specifically with the N-finger but not the C-finger of GATA-1. Here we show that fingers 1, 5 and 9 of FOG-1 also interact with the N-finger of GATA-1 and that FOG-2 and U-shaped also contain multiple GATA-interacting fingers. We define the key contact residues and show that these residues are highly conserved in GATA-interacting fingers. We examine the effect of selectively mutating the four interacting fingers of FOG-1 and show that each contributes to FOG-1's ability to modulate GATA-1 activity. Finally, we show that FOG-1 can repress GATA-1-mediated activation and present evidence that this ability involves the recently described CtBP co-repressor proteins that recognize all known FOG proteins. PMID:10329627

  15. Bcl2 family proteins in carcinogenesis and the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Deregulation of Bcl2 family members is a frequent feature of human malignant diseases and causal for therapy resistance. A number of studies have recently shed light onto the role of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family members in tumour-pathogenesis and in mediating the effects of classical as well as novel front-line anticancer agents, allowing the development of more efficient and more precisely targeted treatment regimens. Most excitingly, recent progress in our understanding of how Bcl2-like proteins maintain or perturb mitochondrial integrity has finally enabled the development of rational-design based anticancer therapies that directly target Bcl2 regulated events at the level of mitochondria. This review aims to give an overview on the most recent findings on the role of the Bcl2 family in tumour development in model systems of cancer, to relate these findings with observations made in human pathologies and drug-action. PMID:19156528

  16. A Drosophila protein family implicated in pheromone perception is related to Tay-Sachs GM2-activator protein.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Elena; Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Heping; Pikielny, Claudio W

    2009-01-01

    Low volatility, lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones produced by Drosophila melanogaster females play an essential role in triggering and modulating mating behavior, but the chemosensory mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that the CheB42a protein, which is expressed in only 10 pheromone-sensing taste hairs on the front legs of males, modulates progression to late stages of male courtship behavior in response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Here we report that expression of all 12 genes in the CheB gene family is predominantly or exclusively gustatory-specific, and occurs in many different, often non-overlapping patterns. Only the Gr family of gustatory receptor genes displays a comparable variety of gustatory-specific expression patterns. Unlike Grs, however, expression of all but one CheB gene is sexually dimorphic. Like CheB42a, other CheBs may therefore function specifically in gustatory perception of pheromones. We also show that CheBs belong to the ML superfamily of lipid-binding proteins, and are most similar to human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP). In particular, GM2-AP residues involved in ligand binding are conserved in CheBs but not in other ML proteins. Finally, CheB42a is specifically secreted into the inner lumen of pheromone-sensing taste hairs, where pheromones interact with membrane-bound receptors. We propose that CheB proteins interact directly with lipid-like Drosophila pheromones and modulate their detection by the gustatory signal transduction machinery. Furthermore, as loss of GM2-AP in Tay-Sachs disease prevents degradation of GM2 gangliosides and results in neurodegeneration, the function of CheBs in pheromone response may involve biochemical mechanisms critical for lipid metabolism in human neurons. PMID:18952610

  17. Characterization of the Deleted in Autism 1 Protein Family: Implications for Studying Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation. PMID

  18. Characterization of a new family of metal transport proteins. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1998-06-01

    'Soils at many DOE sites are contaminated with metals and radionuclides. Such soils obviously pose a risk to human and animal health. Unlike organic wastes which can be metabolized, metals are immutable and cannot be degraded into harmless constituents. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove toxic materials from soil and water, may prove to be an environmentally friendly and cost effective solution for cleaning up metal-contaminated sites. The success of phytoremediation will rely on the availability of plants that absorb, translocate, and tolerate the contaminating metals. However, before the authors can engineer such plants, they need more basic information on how plants acquire metals. An important long term goal of the research program is to understand how metals such as zinc, cadmium and copper are transported across membranes. The research is focused on a new family of metal transporters which they have identified through combined studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They have identified a family of 19 presumptive metal transport genes in a variety of organisms including yeast, trypanosomes, plants, nematodes, and humans. This family, which the authors have designated the ZIP genes, provides a rich source of material with which to undertake studies on metal transport in eukaryotes. The project has three main objectives: Objective 1: Determine the sub-cellular location of the ZIP proteins in Arabidopsis. Objective 2: Carry out a structure/function analysis of the proteins encoded by the ZIP gene family to identify regions of the protein responsible for substrate specificity and affinity. Objective 3: Engineer plants to overexpress and underexpress members of the ZIP gene family and analyze these transgenic plants for alterations in metal accumulation. They now know that manipulation of transporter levels will also require an understanding of post-transcriptional control of ZIP gene expression. They

  19. The La-Related Proteins, a Family with Connections to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Blagden, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily-conserved La-related protein (LARP) family currently comprises Genuine La, LARP1, LARP1b, LARP4, LARP4b, LARP6 and LARP7. Emerging evidence suggests each LARP has a distinct role in transcription and/or mRNA translation that is attributable to subtle sequence variations within their La modules and specific C-terminal domains. As emerging research uncovers the function of each LARP, it is evident that La, LARP1, LARP6, LARP7 and possibly LARP4a and 4b are dysregulated in cancer. Of these, LARP1 is the first to be demonstrated to drive oncogenesis. Here, we review the role of each LARP and the evidence linking it to malignancy. We discuss a future strategy of targeting members of this protein family as cancer therapy. PMID:26501340

  20. Identification of Arabidopsis thaliana NRT1/PTR FAMILY (NPF) proteins capable of transporting plant hormones.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yasutaka; Shimizu, Takafumi; Miyakawa, Shinya; Kanno, Yuri; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori

    2015-07-01

    NRT1/PTR FAMILY (NPF) proteins were originally identified as nitrate or di/tri-peptide transporters. Recent studies revealed that this transporter family also transports the plant hormones auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellin (GA), as well as secondary metabolites (glucosinolates). We developed modified yeast two-hybrid systems with receptor complexes for GA and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), to detect GA and JA-Ile transport activities of proteins expressed in the yeast cells. Using these GA and JA-Ile systems as well as the ABA system that we had introduced previously, we determined the capacities of Arabidopsis NPFs to transport these hormones. Several NPFs induced the formation of receptor complexes under relatively low hormone concentrations. Hormone transport activities were confirmed for some NPFs by direct analysis of hormone uptake of yeast cells by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our results suggest that at least some NPFs could function as hormone transporters.

  1. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  2. Duplication, selection and gene conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis female reproductive protein family.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Erin S; Markow, Therese A

    2009-04-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate-female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein.

  3. Characterization of the Roco Protein Family in Dictyostelium discoideum ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van Egmond, Wouter N.; van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The Roco family consists of multidomain Ras-GTPases that include LRRK2, a protein mutated in familial Parkinson's disease. The genome of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum encodes 11 Roco proteins. To study the functions of these proteins, we systematically knocked out the roco genes. Previously described functions for GbpC, Pats1, and QkgA (Roco1 to Roco3) were confirmed, while novel developmental defects were identified in roco4- and roco11-null cells. Cells lacking Roco11 form larger fruiting bodies than wild-type cells, while roco4-null cells show strong developmental defects during the transition from mound to fruiting body; prestalk cells produce reduced levels of cellulose, leading to unstable stalks that are unable to properly lift the spore head. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of four slime mold species reveals that QkgA and Roco11 evolved relatively late by duplication of an ancestor roco4 gene (later than ∼300 million years ago), contrary to the situation with other roco genes, which were already present before the split of the common ancestor of D. discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum (before ∼600 million years ago). Together, our data show that the Dictyostelium Roco proteins serve a surprisingly diverse set of functions and highlight Roco4 as a key protein for proper stalk cell formation. PMID:20348387

  4. Duplication, Selection and Gene Conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis Female Reproductive Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate–female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein. PMID:19204376

  5. Structure and dynamics of [gamma]-SNAP: Insight into flexibility of proteins from the SNAP family

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein gamma ({gamma}-SNAP) is a member of an eukaryotic protein family involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. The X-ray structure of Brachydanio rerio {gamma}-SNAP was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} and revealed an all-helical protein comprised of an extended twisted-sheet of helical hairpins with a helical-bundle domain on its carboxy-terminal end. Structural and conformational differences between multiple observed {gamma}-SNAP molecules and Sec17, a SNAP family protein from yeast, are analyzed. Conformational variation in {gamma}-SNAP molecules is matched with great precision by the two lowest frequency normal modes of the structure. Comparison of the lowest-frequency modes from {gamma}-SNAP and Sec17 indicated that the structures share preferred directions of flexibility, corresponding to bending and twisting of the twisted sheet motif. We discuss possible consequences related to the flexibility of the SNAP proteins for the mechanism of the 20S complex disassembly during the SNAP receptors recycling.

  6. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  7. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  8. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  9. Testing for DNA Tracking by MOT1, a SNF2/SWI2 Protein Family Member

    PubMed Central

    Auble, David T.; Steggerda, Susanne M.

    1999-01-01

    Proteins in the SNF2/SWI2 family use ATP hydrolysis to catalyze rearrangements in diverse protein-DNA complexes. How ATP hydrolysis is coupled to these rearrangements is unknown, however. One attractive model is that these ATPases are ATP-dependent DNA-tracking enzymes. This idea was tested for the SNF2/SWI2 protein family member MOT1. MOT1 is an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor that uses ATP to dissociate TATA binding protein (TBP) from DNA. By using a series of DNA templates with one or two TATA boxes in combination with binding sites for heterologous DNA binding “roadblock” proteins, the ability of MOT1 to track along DNA was assayed. The results demonstrate that, following ATP-dependent TBP-DNA dissociation, MOT1 dissociates rapidly from the DNA by a mechanism that does not require a DNA end. Template commitment footprinting experiments support the conclusion that ATP-dependent DNA tracking by MOT1 does not occur. These results support a model in which MOT1 drives TBP-DNA dissociation by a mechanism that involves a transient, ATP-dependent interaction with TBP-DNA which does not involve ATP-dependent DNA tracking. PMID:9858565

  10. A mysterious family of calcium-binding proteins from parasitic worms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2016-08-15

    There is a family of proteins from parasitic worms which combine N-terminal EF-hand domains with C-terminal dynein light chain-like domains. Data are accumulating on the biochemistry and cell biology of these proteins. However, little is known about their functions in vivo Schistosoma mansoni expresses 13 family members (SmTAL1-SmTAL13). Three of these (SmTAL1, SmTAL2 and SmTAL3) have been subjected to biochemical analysis which demonstrated that they have different molecular properties. Although their overall folds are predicted to be similar, small changes in the EF-hand domains result in differences in their ion binding properties. Whereas SmTAL1 and SmTAL2 are able to bind calcium (and some other) ions, SmTAL3 appears to be unable to bind any divalent cations. Similar biochemical diversity has been seen in the CaBP proteins from Fasciola hepatica Four family members are known (FhCaBP1-4). All of these bind to calcium ions. However, FhCaBP4 dimerizes in the presence of calcium ions, FhCaBP3 dimerizes in the absence of calcium ions and FhCaBP2 dimerizes regardless of the prevailing calcium ion concentration. In both the SmTAL and FhCaBP families, the proteins also differ in their ability to bind calmodulin antagonists and related drugs. Interestingly, SmTAL1 interacts with praziquantel (the drug of choice for treating schistosomiasis). The pharmacological significance (if any) of this finding is unknown. PMID:27528745

  11. GTP-binding proteins of the Rho/Rac family: regulation, effectors and functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bustelo, Xosé R.; Sauzeau, Vincent; Berenjeno, Inmaculada M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Rho/Rac proteins constitute a subgroup of the Ras superfamily of GTP hydrolases. Although originally implicated in the control of cytoskeletal events, it is currently known that these GTPases coordinate diverse cellular functions, including cell polarity, vesicular trafficking, the cell cycle and transcriptomal dynamics. In this review, we will provide an overview on the recent advances in this field regarding the mechanism of regulation and signaling, and the roles in vivo of this important GTPase family. PMID:17373658

  12. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) family of nucleoside and nucleobase transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Young, J D; Yao, S Y M; Sun, L; Cass, C E; Baldwin, S A

    2008-07-01

    1. The human (h) SLC29 family of integral membrane proteins is represented by four members, designated equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) because of the properties of the first-characterized family member, hENT1. They belong to the widely distributed eukaryotic ENT family of equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside/nucleobase transporter proteins. 2. A predicted topology of eleven transmembrane helices has been experimentally confirmed for hENT1. The best-characterized members of the family, hENT1 and hENT2, possess similar broad permeant selectivities for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, but hENT2 also efficiently transports nucleobases. hENT3 has a similar broad permeant selectivity for nucleosides and nucleobases and appears to function in intracellular membranes, including lysosomes. 3. hENT4 is uniquely selective for adenosine, and also transports a variety of organic cations. hENT3 and hENT4 are pH sensitive, and optimally active under acidic conditions. ENTs, including those in parasitic protozoa, function in nucleoside and nucleobase uptake for salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis and, in humans, are also responsible for the cellular uptake of nucleoside analogues used in the treatment of cancers and viral diseases. 4. By regulating the concentration of adenosine available to cell surface receptors, mammalian ENTs additionally influence physiological processes ranging from cardiovascular activity to neurotransmission.

  13. The CATH extended protein-family database: providing structural annotations for genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Frances M G; Lee, David; Bray, James E; Buchan, Daniel W A; Shepherd, Adrian J; Orengo, Christine A

    2002-02-01

    An automatic sequence search and analysis protocol (DomainFinder) based on PSI-BLAST and IMPALA, and using conservative thresholds, has been developed for reliably integrating gene sequences from GenBank into their respective structural families within the CATH domain database (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath_new). DomainFinder assigns a new gene sequence to a CATH homologous superfamily provided that PSI-BLAST identifies a clear relationship to at least one other Protein Data Bank sequence within that superfamily. This has resulted in an expansion of the CATH protein family database (CATH-PFDB v1.6) from 19,563 domain structures to 176,597 domain sequences. A further 50,000 putative homologous relationships can be identified using less stringent cut-offs and these relationships are maintained within neighbour tables in the CATH Oracle database, pending further evidence of their suggested evolutionary relationship. Analysis of the CATH-PFDB has shown that only 15% of the sequence families are close enough to a known structure for reliable homology modeling. IMPALA/PSI-BLAST profiles have been generated for each of the sequence families in the expanded CATH-PFDB and a web server has been provided so that new sequences may be scanned against the profile library and be assigned to a structure and homologous superfamily.

  14. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bhaskara L.; Saier, Milton H.

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  15. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskara L; Saier, Milton H

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  16. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M; Szabo, Les J; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  17. Hypoxia-Induced Modulation of Apoptosis and BCL-2 Family Proteins in Different Cancer Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Sermeus, Audrey; Genin, Marie; Maincent, Amélie; Fransolet, Maude; Notte, Annick; Leclere, Lionel; Riquier, Hélène; Arnould, Thierry; Michiels, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Moreover, according to the cell lines, hypoxia differently influences cell death. The study of the effects of hypoxia on the apoptosis induced by 5 chemotherapeutic drugs in 7 cancer cell types showed that hypoxia generally inhibited the drug-induced apoptosis. In most cases, the effect of hypoxia was the same for all the drugs in one cell type. The expression profile of 93 genes involved in apoptosis as well as the protein level of BCL-2 family proteins were then investigated. In HepG2 cells that are strongly protected against cell death by hypoxia, hypoxia decreased the abundance of nearly all the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins while none of them are decreased in A549 cells that are not protected against cell death by hypoxia. In HepG2 cells, hypoxia decreased NOXA and BAD abundance and modified the electrophoretic mobility of BIMEL. BIM and NOXA are important mediators of etoposide-induced cell death in HepG2 cells and the hypoxia-induced modification of these proteins abundance or post-translational modifications partly account for chemoresistance. Finally, the modulation of the abundance and/or of the post-translational modifications of most proteins of the BCL-2 family by hypoxia involves p53-dependent and –independent pathways and is cell type-dependent. A better understanding of these cell-to-cell variations is crucial in order to overcome hypoxia-induced resistance and to ameliorate cancer therapy. PMID:23139748

  18. Using Hierarchical Clustering of Secreted Protein Families to Classify and Rank Candidate Effectors of Rust Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G. O.; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M.; Szabo, Les J.; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  19. The CRP/MLP/TLP family of LIM domain proteins: acting by connecting.

    PubMed

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Günther, Kalle

    2003-02-01

    In vertebrates, members of the cysteine-rich protein (CRP) family are characterized by the presence of two LIM domains linked to short glycine-rich repeats. These proteins mediate protein-protein interactions and are of fundamental importance for cell differentiation, cytoskeletal remodeling, and transcriptional regulation. To date, a vast amount of information about vertebrate CRPs has become available, including their biological functions, interacting partners, and three-dimensional structures. Compatible with a molecular adapter role, structural data reveal that the LIM domains within these proteins represent completely independent folded units bridged by flexible linker regions. The physiological roles for individual CRPs was determined by targeted gene disruption analysis and by identification of common and specific binding partners by means of yeast and mammalian two-hybrid screens. Several CRP-like LIM domain proteins with close structural and sequence similarity were identified in arthropods, protozoas and plants, supporting the notion that this subset of LIM domain proteins has been highly conserved over the span of evolution thereby emphasizing the importance of their function.

  20. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Berube, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N. . E-mail: wnf@jax.org

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  1. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L; Bérubé, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  2. The ts111 Mutation of Paramecium tetraurelia Affects a Member of the Protein Palmitoylation Family.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The thermosensitive ts111 mutant of Parameciun tetraurelia carries a recessive mutation which causes cell death after 2-8 divisions at the restrictive temperature of 35 degrees C. Expression at 35 degrees C induces disassembly of the infraciliary lattice (ICL). In this study, we found that the ts111 mutation also results in significant abnormalities in the number and structure of contractile vacuole complexes (CVCs) and in their functioning at the restrictive temperature. In order to characterize the ts111 gene, the complementation cloning was performed by microinjection into the macronucleus of an indexed genomic DNA library. The mutation was complemented by a sequence of 852 bp, which differed from the mutant sequence by a single nucleotide substitution. The deduced protein sequence is 284 amino acids long. It contains a domain referred to as the DHHC domain, associated with 2 trans-membrane helices. The DHHC proteins belong to the Palmitoyl-Acyl Transferases (PATs) protein family, which is implicated in the protein palmitoylation process playing the role in protein addressing. The ts111 mutation induces the amino acid change, localized before the first membrane helix. Transformation of ts111 mutant cells with the TS111-GFP gene fusion showed the expected reparation restoring thermoresistance and also demonstrated a localization of the protein in contractile vacuoles, but not in the ICL. The entire gene silencing in wild type cells at restrictive temperature caused the same effect as the expression of a point mutation in ts111 mutant. The authors propose the following hypotheses: (i) function of CVCs at the restrictive temperature depends in Paramecium on the TS111 protein--a member of the PAT family, and the primary effect of the termosensitive ts111 mutation are morphological abnormalities and dysfunction of CVCs, (ii) disassembly of the ICL is a secondary effect of the ts111 mutation, which results from disturbed regulation of the intracellular concentration

  3. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  4. Functional conservation among members of the Salmonella typhimurium InvA family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Galán, J E

    1995-02-01

    InvA, which is essential for Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells, is a member of a family of proteins involved in either flagellar biosynthesis or the secretion of virulence determinants by a number of plant and mammalian pathogens. The predicted overall secondary structures of these proteins show significant similarities and indicate a modular construction with a hydrophobic amino-terminal half, consisting of six to eight potential transmembrane domains, and a hydrophilic carboxy terminus which is predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. These proteins can be aligned over the entire length of their polypeptide sequences, with the highest degree of homology found in the amino terminus and clusters of conserved residues in the carboxy terminus. We examined the functional conservation among members of this protein family by assessing the ability of MxiA of Shigella flexneri and LcrD of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to restore invasiveness to an invA mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. We found that MxiA was able to complement the entry defect of the invA mutant strain of S. typhimurium. In contrast, LcrD failed to complement the same strain. However, a plasmid carrying a gene encoding a chimeric protein consisting of the amino terminus of LcrD and the carboxy terminus of InvA complemented the defect of the Salmonella invA mutant. These results indicate that the secretory systems in which these proteins participate are functionally similar and that the Salmonella and Shigella systems are very closely related. These data also suggest that determinants of specificity may be located at the carboxy termini of these proteins.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel human neutrophil protein related to the S100 family.

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, F; Mauel, J; Markert, M

    1995-01-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8), a protein of the S100 family, recognized another S100 protein (MRP-14) as well as a protein of 6.5 kDa (p6) in the cytosol of resting neutrophils. p6 was found to be a novel member of the S100 family. It consisted of two isoforms with pI values of 6.2 (the minor form, p6a) and 6.3 (the major form, p6b) and constituted 5% of the total cytosolic proteins. Both isoforms were also demonstrated in the cytosol of monocytes, but not in lymphocytes, as previously shown for MRP-8 and MRP-14. Only the major isoform bound radioactive Ca2+, as also observed for MRP-8, whereas the different variants of MRP-14 were all labelled. On neutrophil activation with opsonized zymosan, a stimulant known to require extracellular Ca2+, 58% of p6a and 42% of p6b was translocated to the membrane. With phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a Ca(2+)-independent stimulant, no translocation was detected. This translocation pattern was similar to that observed with MRP-8 and MRP-14. In addition, p6, MRP-8 and MRP-14 were specifically associated with the cytoskeletal fraction of the membrane. The Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of the novel S100 protein in parallel with MRP-8 and MRP-14 suggests a role for these proteins in regulating the Ca2+ signal to the membrane cytoskeleton and thus in regulating neutrophil activation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626002

  6. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  7. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  8. Stress-Responsive Expression, Subcellular Localization and Protein-Protein Interactions of the Rice Metacaspase Family.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Liu, Shixia; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2015-07-17

    Metacaspases, a class of cysteine-dependent proteases like caspases in animals, are important regulators of programmed cell death (PCD) during development and stress responses in plants. The present study was focused on comprehensive analyses of expression patterns of the rice metacaspase (OsMC) genes in response to abiotic and biotic stresses and stress-related hormones. Results indicate that members of the OsMC family displayed differential expression patterns in response to abiotic (e.g., drought, salt, cold, and heat) and biotic (e.g., infection by Magnaporthe oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani) stresses and stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (a precursor of ethylene), although the responsiveness to these stresses or hormones varies to some extent. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that OsMC1 was solely localized and OsMC2 was mainly localized in the nucleus. Whereas OsMC3, OsMC4, and OsMC7 were evenly distributed in the cells, OsMC5, OsMC6, and OsMC8 were localized in cytoplasm. OsMC1 interacted with OsLSD1 and OsLSD3 while OsMC3 only interacted with OsLSD1 and that the zinc finger domain in OsMC1 is responsible for the interaction activity. The systematic expression and biochemical analyses of the OsMC family provide valuable information for further functional studies on the biological roles of OsMCs in PCD that is related to abiotic and biotic stress responses.

  9. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  10. Macin Family of Antimicrobial Proteins Combines Antimicrobial and Nerve Repair Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sascha; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Hung, Chien-Wen; Tholey, Andreas; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Haeusgen, Wiebke; Gelhaus, Christoph; Desel, Christine; Podschun, Rainer; Waetzig, Vicki; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Leippe, Matthias; Grötzinger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The tertiary structures of theromacin and neuromacin confirmed the macin protein family as a self-contained family of antimicrobial proteins within the superfamily of scorpion toxin-like proteins. The macins, which also comprise hydramacin-1, are antimicrobially active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Despite high sequence identity, the three proteins showed distinct differences with respect to their biological activity. Neuromacin exhibited a significantly stronger capacity to permeabilize the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus megaterium than theromacin and hydramacin-1. Accordingly, it is the only macin that displays pore-forming activity and that was potently active against Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, neuromacin and hydramacin-1 led to an aggregation of bacterial cells that was not observed with theromacin. Analysis of the molecular surface properties of macins allowed confirmation of the barnacle model as the mechanistic model for the aggregation effect. Besides being antimicrobially active, neuromacin and theromacin, in contrast to hydramacin-1, were able to enhance the repair of leech nerves ex vivo. Notably, all three macins enhanced the viability of murine neuroblastoma cells, extending their functional characteristics. As neuromacin appears to be both a functional and structural chimera of hydramacin-1 and theromacin, the putative structural correlate responsible for the nerve repair capacity in leech was located to a cluster of six amino acid residues using the sequence similarity of surface-exposed regions. PMID:22396551

  11. Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of the CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEIN Family1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Roppolo, Daniele; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Pfister, Alexandre; Boutet, Emmanuel; Rubio, Maria C.; Dénervaud-Tendon, Valérie; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Xenarios, Ioannis; Geldner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs) are four-membrane-span proteins that mediate the deposition of Casparian strips in the endodermis by recruiting the lignin polymerization machinery. CASPs show high stability in their membrane domain, which presents all the hallmarks of a membrane scaffold. Here, we characterized the large family of CASP-like (CASPL) proteins. CASPLs were found in all major divisions of land plants as well as in green algae; homologs outside of the plant kingdom were identified as members of the MARVEL protein family. When ectopically expressed in the endodermis, most CASPLs were able to integrate the CASP membrane domain, which suggests that CASPLs share with CASPs the propensity to form transmembrane scaffolds. Extracellular loops are not necessary for generating the scaffold, since CASP1 was still able to localize correctly when either one of the extracellular loops was deleted. The CASP first extracellular loop was found conserved in euphyllophytes but absent in plants lacking Casparian strips, an observation that may contribute to the study of Casparian strip and root evolution. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CASPL showed specific expression in a variety of cell types, such as trichomes, abscission zone cells, peripheral root cap cells, and xylem pole pericycle cells. PMID:24920445

  12. Characterization of the conserved interaction between GATA and FOG family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Kasper; Liew, Chu Kong; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-09-20

    The N-terminal zinc finger (ZnF) from GATA transcription factors mediates interactions with FOG family proteins. In FOG proteins, the interacting domains are also ZnFs; these domains are related to classical CCHH fingers but have an His --> Cys substitution at the final zinc-ligating position. Here we demonstrate that different CCHC fingers in the FOG family protein U-shaped contact the N-terminal ZnF of GATA-1 in the same fashion although with different affinities. We also show that these interactions are of moderate affinity, which is interesting given the presumed low concentrations of these proteins in the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the variant CCHC topology enhances binding affinity, although the His --> Cys change is not essential for the formation of a stably folded domain. To ascertain the structural basis for the contribution of the CCHC arrangement, we have determined the structure of a CCHH mutant of finger nine from U-shaped. The structure is very similar overall to the wild-type domain, with subtle differences at the C terminus that result in loss of the interaction in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the CCHC zinc binding topology is required for the integrity of GATA-FOG interactions and that weak interactions can play important roles in vivo.

  13. PANTHER version 10: expanded protein families and functions, and analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Huaiyu; Poudel, Sagar; Muruganujan, Anushya; Casagrande, John T.; Thomas, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    PANTHER (Protein Analysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships, http://pantherdb.org) is a widely used online resource for comprehensive protein evolutionary and functional classification, and includes tools for large-scale biological data analysis. Recent development has been focused in three main areas: genome coverage, functional information (‘annotation’) coverage and accuracy, and improved genomic data analysis tools. The latest version of PANTHER, 10.0, includes almost 5000 new protein families (for a total of over 12 000 families), each with a reference phylogenetic tree including protein-coding genes from 104 fully sequenced genomes spanning all kingdoms of life. Phylogenetic trees now include inference of horizontal transfer events in addition to speciation and gene duplication events. Functional annotations are regularly updated using the models generated by the Gene Ontology Phylogenetic Annotation Project. For the data analysis tools, PANTHER has expanded the number of different ‘functional annotation sets’ available for functional enrichment testing, allowing analyses to access all Gene Ontology annotations—updated monthly from the Gene Ontology database—in addition to the annotations that have been inferred through evolutionary relationships. The Prowler (data browser) has been updated to enable users to more efficiently browse the entire database, and to create custom gene lists using the multiple axes of classification in PANTHER. PMID:26578592

  14. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  15. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  16. The TITAN5 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a protein related to the ADP ribosylation factor family of GTP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    McElver, J; Patton, D; Rumbaugh, M; Liu, C; Yang, L J; Meinke, D

    2000-08-01

    The titan (ttn) mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit dramatic alterations in mitosis and cell cycle control during seed development. Endosperm development in these mutants is characterized by the formation of giant polyploid nuclei with enlarged nucleoli. Embryo development is accompanied by significant cell enlargement in some mutants (ttn1 and ttn5) but not others (ttn2 and ttn3). We describe here the molecular cloning of TTN5 using a T-DNA-tagged allele. A second allele with a similar phenotype contains a nonsense mutation in the same coding region. The predicted protein is related to ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs), members of the RAS family of small GTP binding proteins that regulate various cellular functions in eukaryotes. TTN5 is most closely related in sequence to the ARL2 class of ARF-like proteins isolated from humans, rats, and mice. Although the cellular functions of ARL proteins remain unclear, the ttn5 phenotype is consistent with the known roles of ARFs in the regulation of intracellular vesicle transport.

  17. Structural characterization of a capping protein interaction motif defines a family of actin filament regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Kim, Taekyung; Kannan, Balakrishnan; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H; Larsson, Mårten; Cooper, John A; Robinson, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) regulates actin dynamics by binding the barbed ends of actin filaments. Removal of CP may be one means to harness actin polymerization for processes such as cell movement and endocytosis. Here we structurally and biochemically investigated a CP interaction (CPI) motif present in the otherwise unrelated proteins CARMIL and CD2AP. The CPI motif wraps around the stalk of the mushroom-shaped CP at a site distant from the actin-binding interface, which lies on the top of the mushroom cap. We propose that the CPI motif may act as an allosteric modulator, restricting CP to a low-affinity, filament-binding conformation. Structure-based sequence alignments extend the CPI motif–containing family to include CIN85, CKIP-1, CapZIP and a relatively uncharacterized protein, WASHCAP (FAM21). Peptides comprising these CPI motifs are able to inhibit CP and to uncap CP-bound actin filaments. PMID:20357771

  18. The inhibitor of apoptosis protein family (IAPs): an emerging therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Nachmias, Boaz; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Ben-Yehuda, Dina

    2004-08-01

    Apoptosis is a crucial biological process that prevents uncontrolled cell proliferation and eliminates harmful cells. Resistance to apoptotic stimuli is a hallmark feature of various cancers. One of the mechanisms through which tumor cells are believed to acquire resistance to apoptosis is by overexpression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). IAPs are a group of structurally related proteins that were initially identified in baculoviruses. Mammalian IAPs block apoptosis either by binding and inhibiting caspases or through caspase-independent mechanisms. This family of proteins has become increasingly prominent in the field of cancer biology. To date, overexpression of several IAPs has been detected in various cancers. This paper reviews the recent advances in the research of IAPs. The differential expression and the biological significance of each IAP in various cancer types will be discussed. Finally, we review the most recent advances in the research efforts aimed at using IAPs as potential targets for cancer therapy.

  19. Comparative biology and expression of TENP, an egg protein related to the bacterial permeability-increasing family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, Lynn; Dunn, Ian C

    2014-03-15

    The 'transiently expressed in neural precursors' (TENP) gene product is a member of the bacterial/permeability-increasing (BPI) family of antimicrobial proteins but was first identified as having a role in an early neurological event occurring in post-mitotic cells. However, recent characterisation of the egg white proteome has shown that TENP is an important egg component constituting ~0.1-0.5% of the total protein and suggesting it is expressed in the adult oviduct. In this study we confirmed quantitatively that the expression of TENP is largely confined to the tubular glands of the magnum of the oviduct, where egg white synthesis occurs, with around 10,000 times more expression than in the embryo where TENP was first identified. TENP expression is significantly increased with the administration of oestrogen or progesterone (P<0.001) and is reduced in regressed oviducts (P<0.001) demonstrating gonadal steroid control, typical of an oviduct and egg specific gene. A putative translational start site for TENP has been characterised and the evidence indicates that it is expressed as one predominant transcript. In comparison with the published sequence, insertion and deletion events have been identified causing a partial frame-shift that results in an altered amino acid sequence to that previously documented. TENP is conserved across divergent avian species being found in chicken, turkey, duck and zebra finch and its expression profile confirmed in both chicken and duck. Similarity searches have shown homology with the BPI-like family of innate immune genes, particularly with palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone (PLUNC) members of this family. We therefore believe that at least in adults the role of TENP is as a major component of egg, particularly the white and it is probable that it contributes to its antimicrobial function.

  20. CYFIP family proteins between autism and intellectual disability: links with Fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abekhoukh, Sabiha; Bardoni, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have in common alterations in some brain circuits and brain abnormalities, such as synaptic transmission and dendritic spines morphology. Recent studies have indicated a differential expression for specific categories of genes as a cause for both types of disease, while an increasing number of genes is recognized to produce both disorders. An example is the Fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1), whose silencing causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of ID and autism, also characterized by physical hallmarks. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the protein encoded by FMR1, is an RNA-binding protein with an important role in translational control. Among the interactors of FMRP, CYFIP1/2 (cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein) proteins are good candidates for ID and autism, on the bases of their genetic implication and functional properties, even if the precise functional significance of the CYFIP/FMRP interaction is not understood yet. CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 represent a link between Rac1, the WAVE (WAS protein family member) complex and FMRP, favoring the cross talk between actin polymerization and translational control. PMID:24733999

  1. Intermediates in the folding equilibrium of repeat proteins from the TPR family.

    PubMed

    González-Charro, Vicente; Rey, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in computational methods and experimental biophysical techniques have improved our understanding of protein folding. Although some of these advances have been remarkable, the structural variability of globular proteins usually encountered makes it difficult to extract general features of their folding processes. To overcome this difficulty, experimental and computational studies of the folding of repeat (or modular) proteins are of interest. Because their native structures can be described as linear arrays of the same, repeated, supersecondary structure unit, it is possible to seek a possibly independent behavior of the different modules without taking into account the intrinsic stability associated with different secondary structure motifs. In this work we have used a Monte Carlo-based simulation to study the folding equilibrium of four repeat proteins belonging to the tetratricopeptide repeat family. Our studies provide new insights into their energy profiles, enabling investigation about the existence of intermediate states and their relative stabilities. We have also performed structural analyses to describe the structure of these intermediates, going through the vast number of conformations obtained from the simulations. In this way, we have tried to identify the regions of each protein in which the modular structure yields a different behavior and, more specifically, regions of the proteins that can stay folded when the rest of the chain has been thermally denatured.

  2. Zebra: a web server for bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    PubMed

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Evgeny; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    During evolution of proteins from a common ancestor, one functional property can be preserved while others can vary leading to functional diversity. A systematic study of the corresponding adaptive mutations provides a key to one of the most challenging problems of modern structural biology - understanding the impact of amino acid substitutions on protein function. The subfamily-specific positions (SSPs) are conserved within functional subfamilies but are different between them and, therefore, seem to be responsible for functional diversity in protein superfamilies. Consequently, a corresponding method to perform the bioinformatic analysis of sequence and structural data has to be implemented in the common laboratory practice to study the structure-function relationship in proteins and develop novel protein engineering strategies. This paper describes Zebra web server - a powerful remote platform that implements a novel bioinformatic analysis algorithm to study diverse protein families. It is the first application that provides specificity determinants at different levels of functional classification, therefore addressing complex functional diversity of large superfamilies. Statistical analysis is implemented to automatically select a set of highly significant SSPs to be used as hotspots for directed evolution or rational design experiments and analyzed studying the structure-function relationship. Zebra results are provided in two ways - (1) as a single all-in-one parsable text file and (2) as PyMol sessions with structural representation of SSPs. Zebra web server is available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/zebra .

  3. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, Judith; Lüthy, Lucas; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Stutzmann Meier, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. PMID:19099556

  4. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  5. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments. PMID:27225826

  6. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments.

  7. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments. PMID:27225826

  8. Structural and functional relationships of the XPF/MUS81 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Alberto; McDonald, Neil; West, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the XPF/MUS81 family play important roles in the repair of DNA lesions caused by UV-light or DNA cross-linking agents. Most eukaryotes have four family members that assemble into two distinct heterodimeric complexes, XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1. Each complex contains one catalytic and one noncatalytic subunit and exhibits endonuclease activity with a variety of 3'-flap or fork DNA structures. The catalytic subunits share a characteristic core containing an excision repair cross complementation group 4 (ERCC4) nuclease domain and a tandem helix-hairpin-helix (HhH)(2) domain. Diverged domains are present in the noncatalytic subunits and may be required for substrate targeting. Vertebrates possess two additional family members, FANCM and Fanconi anemia-associated protein 24 kDa (FAAP24), which possess inactive nuclease domains. Instead, FANCM contains a functional Superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase domain that is required for DNA translocation. Determining how these enzymes recognize specific DNA substrates and promote key repair reactions is an important challenge for the future. PMID:18518821

  9. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of the NAC domain protein family in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Steven G; Saïdi, Mohammed N; Hefer, Charles A; Myburg, Alexander A; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    NAC domain transcription factors regulate many developmental processes and stress responses in plants and vary widely in number and family structure. We analysed the characteristics and evolution of the NAC gene family of Eucalyptus grandis, a fast-growing forest tree in the rosid order Myrtales. NAC domain genes identified in the E. grandis genome were subjected to amino acid sequence, phylogenetic and motif analyses. Transcript abundance in developing tissues and abiotic stress conditions in E. grandis and E. globulus was quantified using RNA-seq and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). One hundred and eighty-nine E. grandis NAC (EgrNAC) proteins, arranged into 22 subfamilies, are extensively duplicated in subfamilies associated with stress response. Most EgrNAC genes form tandem duplicate arrays that frequently carry signatures of purifying selection. Sixteen amino acid motifs were identified in EgrNAC proteins, eight of which are enriched in, or unique to, Eucalyptus. New candidates for the regulation of normal and tension wood development and cold responses were identified. This first description of a Myrtales NAC domain family reveals an unique history of tandem duplication in stress-related subfamilies that has likely contributed to the adaptation of eucalypts to the challenging Australian environment. Several new candidates for the regulation of stress, wood formation and tree-specific development are reported. PMID:25385212

  10. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein

    PubMed Central

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Basak, Ajit K.; Titball, Richard W.; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel. PMID:27048994

  11. The BCL-2 protein family, BH3-mimetics and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delbridge, A R D; Strasser, A

    2015-01-01

    Escape from apoptosis is a key attribute of tumour cells and facilitates chemo-resistance. The ‘BCL-2-regulated' or ‘intrinsic' apoptotic pathway integrates stress and survival signalling to govern whether a cancer cell will live or die. Indeed, many pro-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family have demonstrated tumour-suppression activity in mouse models of cancer and are lost or repressed in certain human cancers. Conversely, overexpression of pro-survival BCL-2 family members promotes tumorigenesis in humans and in mouse models. Many of the drugs currently used in the clinic mediate their therapeutic effects (at least in part) through the activation of the BCL-2-regulated apoptotic pathway. However, initiators of this apoptotic pathway, such as p53, are mutated, lost or silenced in many human cancers rendering them refractory to treatment. To counter such resistance mechanisms, a novel class of therapeutics, ‘BH3-mimetics', has been developed. These drugs directly activate apoptosis by binding and inhibiting select antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members and thereby bypass the requirement for upstream initiators, such as p53. In this review, we discuss the role of the BCL-2 protein family in the development and treatment of cancer, with an emphasis on mechanistic studies using well-established mouse models of cancer, before describing the development and already recognised potential of the BH3-mimetic compounds. PMID:25952548

  12. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G; Naylor, Claire E; Basak, Ajit K; Titball, Richard W; Savva, Christos G

    2016-01-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel. PMID:27048994

  13. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  14. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Basak, Ajit K.; Titball, Richard W.; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-04-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel.

  15. A New Family of Giardial Cysteine-Rich Non-VSP Protein Genes and a Novel Cyst Protein

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Shanda R.; Preheim, Sarah P.; Cipriano, Michael J.; McArthur, Andrew G.; Gillin, Frances D.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, “HCNCp” (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein), that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs) that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many “CxxC” tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple “CxC” motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp) containing ≥20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents, vaccine

  16. Evolutionary Diversification of the Sm Family of RNA-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Sm family of proteins is closely associated with RNA metabolism throughout all life. These proteins form homomorphic and heteromorphic rings consisting of six or seven subunits with a characteristic central pore, the presence of which is critical for binding U-rich regions of single-stranded RNA. Eubacteria and Archaea typically carry one or two forms of Sm proteins and assemble one homomorphic ring per Sm protein. Eukaryotes typically carry 16 or more Sm proteins that assemble to form heteromorphic rings which lie at the center of a number of critical RNA-associated small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). High Sm protein diversity and heteromorphic Sm rings are features stretching back to the origin of eukaryotes; very deep phylogenetic divisions among existing Sm proteins indicate simultaneous evolution across essentially all existing eukaryotic life. Two basic forms of heteromorphic Sm rings are found in eukaryotes. Fixed Sm rings are highly stable and static and are assembled around an RNA cofactor. Flexible Sm rings also stabilize and chaperone RNA but assemble in the absence of an RNA substrate and, more significantly, associate with and dissociate from RNA substrates more freely than fixed rings. This suggests that the conformation of flexible Sm rings might be modified in some specific manner to facilitate association and dissociation with RNA. Diversification of eukaryotic Sm proteins may have been initiated by gene transfers and/or genome clashes that accompanied the origin of the eukaryotic cell itself, with further diversification driven by a greater need for steric specificity within increasingly complex snRNPs. PMID:18687770

  17. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  18. Expression profiling of a complex thaumatin-like protein family in western white pine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Jun; Zamani, Arezoo; Ekramoddoullah, Abul K M

    2010-02-01

    The protein content in the plant apoplast is believed to change dramatically as a result of host defense response upon infection with various pathogens. In this study, six novel thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were identified in western white pine (Pinus monticola) needle apoplast by a proteomic strategy using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sequent cDNA cloning found that ten P. monticola TLP genes (PmTLP-L1 to -L6 and -S1 to -S4) were expressed in various tissues. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these PmTLP genes belong to a large, complex, and highly diverse plant TLP family. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) using gene-specific primer pairs showed that each PmTLP gene exhibited a characteristic pattern of mRNA expression based on their unique organ distribution, seasonal regulation, and response to abiotic and biotic stresses. A time-course analysis at the early stages of infection by white pine blister rust pathogen Cronartium ribicola revealed that a coordinated upregulation of multiple PmTLP genes was involved in P. monticola major gene (Cr2) resistance. The structural and expressional differentiations suggest that the PmTLP family may contribute to host defense as well as other mechanism. PMID:19997927

  19. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui; Cheah, Yew-Hoong; Meenakshii, Nallappan; Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  20. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis.

  1. Regulation of cellulase expression, sporulation, and morphogenesis by velvet family proteins in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuimei; Dong, Yanmei; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Homologs of the velvet protein family are encoded by the ve1, vel2, and vel3 genes in Trichoderma reesei. To test their regulatory functions, the velvet protein-coding genes were disrupted, generating Δve1, Δvel2, and Δvel3 strains. The phenotypic features of these strains were examined to identify their functions in morphogenesis, sporulation, and cellulase expression. The three velvet-deficient strains produced more hyphal branches, indicating that velvet family proteins participate in the morphogenesis in T. reesei. Deletion of ve1 and vel3 did not affect biomass accumulation, while deletion of vel2 led to a significantly hampered growth when cellulose was used as the sole carbon source in the medium. The deletion of either ve1 or vel2 led to the sharp decrease of sporulation as well as a global downregulation of cellulase-coding genes. In contrast, although the expression of cellulase-coding genes of the ∆vel3 strain was downregulated in the dark, their expression in light condition was unaffected. Sporulation was hampered in the ∆vel3 strain. These results suggest that Ve1 and Vel2 play major roles, whereas Vel3 plays a minor role in sporulation, morphogenesis, and cellulase expression.

  2. Molluscan attractins, a family of water-borne protein pheromones with interspecific attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Schein, Catherine H; Xu, Yuan; Braun, Werner; Nagle, Gregg T

    2005-01-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia releases the water-borne pheromone attractin during egg laying. This small protein stimulates the formation and maintenance of mating and egg-laying aggregations. Attractin has been characterized from five Aplysia species: A. californica, A. brasiliana, A. fasciata, A. vaccaria, and A. depilans. We describe here the isolation of attractin from Bursatella leachii, and show that it belongs to the same protein family. The pattern of residue conservation, especially the six invariant cysteines, suggests that all of these attractins have a common fold. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of A. californica attractin contains two antiparallel alpha-helices, the second of which contains the heptapeptide sequence IEECKTS that has been implicated in attractin function. Synthetic peptides containing this IEECKTS region are attractive, and mutating surface exposed charged residues within this region of attractin abolishes attractin activity. This suggests that the second helix is an essential part of the receptor-binding interface. In contrast to the peptide pheromonal attractants in amphibians, which are species specific, the attractins are, to our knowledge, the first water-borne peptide or protein pheromone family in invertebrates and vertebrates that are not species specific.

  3. Structural correlations in the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Paul A; Scott, Paul G; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    The family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans (SLRPs) contains several extracellular matrix molecules that are structurally related by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) flanked by two conserved cysteine-rich regions. The small proteoglycan decorin is the archetypal SLRP. Decorin is present in a variety of connective tissues, typically "decorating" collagen fibrils, and is involved in important biological functions, including the regulation of the assembly of fibrillar collagens and modulation of cell adhesion. Several SLRPs are known to regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and there is evidence that they may share other biological functions. We have recently determined the crystal structure of the protein core of decorin, the first such determination of a member of the SLRP family. This structure has highlighted several correlations: (1) SLRPs have similar internal repeat structures; (2) SLRP molecules are far less curved than an early model of decorin based on the three-dimensional structure of ribonuclease inhibitor; (3) the N-terminal and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions are conserved capping motifs. Furthermore, the structure shows that decorin dimerizes through the concave surface of its LRR domain, which has been implicated previously in its interaction with collagen. We have established that both decorin and opticin, another SLRP, form stable dimers in solution. Conservation of residues involved in decorin dimerization suggests that the mode of dimerization for other SLRPs will be similar. Taken together these results suggest the need for reevaluation of currently accepted models of SLRP interaction with their ligands.

  4. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes.

  5. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. PMID:26341555

  6. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. PMID:26341555

  7. Phylogeny, sequence conservation, and functional complementation of the SBDS protein family.

    PubMed

    Boocock, G R B; Marit, M R; Rommens, J M

    2006-06-01

    The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein family occurs widely in nature, although its function has not been determined. Comprehensive database searches revealed SBDS homologues from 159 species, including examples from all sequenced archaeal and eukaryotic genomes and all eukaryotic kingdoms. Sequence alignment with ClustalX and MUSCLE algorithms led to the identification of conserved residues that occurred predominantly in the amino-terminal FYSH domain where they appeared to contribute to protein folding or stability. Only SBDS residue Gly91 was invariant in all species. Four distantly related protists were found to have two divergent SBDS genes in their genomes. In each case, phylogenetic analyses and the identification of shared sequence features suggested that one gene was derived from lateral gene transfer. We also identified a shared C-terminal zinc finger domain fusion in flowering plants and chromalveolates that may shed light on the function of the protein family and the evolutionary histories of these kingdoms. To assess the extent of SBDS functional conservation, we carried out complementation studies of SBDS homologues and interspecies chimeras in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined that the FYSH domain was widely interchangeable among eukaryotes, while domain 2 imparted species specificity to protein function. Domain 3 was largely dispensable for function in our yeast complementation assay. Overall, the phylogeny of SBDS was shared with a group of proteins that were markedly enriched for RNA metabolism and/or ribosome-associated functions. These findings link Shwachman-Diamond syndrome to other bone marrow failure syndromes with defects in nucleolus-associated processes, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia, cartilage-hair hypoplasia, and dyskeratosis congenita.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  9. Consequences of splice variation on Secretin family G protein-coupled receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Sebastian GB; Wootten, Denise; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    The Secretin family of GPCRs are endocrine peptide hormone receptors that share a common genomic organization and are the subject of a wide variety of alternative splicing. All GPCRs contain a central seven transmembrane domain responsible for transducing signals from the outside of the cell as well as extracellular amino and intracellular carboxyl termini. Members of the Secretin receptor family have a relatively large N-terminus and a variety of lines of evidence support a common mode of ligand binding and a common ligand binding fold. These receptors are best characterized as coupling to intracellular signalling pathways via Gαs and Gαq but are also reported to couple to a multitude of other signalling pathways. The intracellular loops are implicated in regulating the interaction between the receptor and heterotrimeric G protein complexes. Alternative splicing of exons encoding both the extracellular N-terminal domain as well as the extracellular loops of some family members has been reported and as expected these splice variants display altered ligand affinity as well as differential activation by endogenous ligands. Various forms of alternative splicing have also been reported to alter intracellular loops 1 and 3 as well as the C-terminus and as one might expect these display differences in signalling bias towards downstream effectors. These diverse pharmacologies require that the physiological role of these splice variants be addressed but should provide unique opportunities for drug design and development. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Secretin Family (Class B) G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-1 PMID:21718310

  10. Functional specialization among members of Knickkopf family of proteins in insect cuticle organization.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sujata S; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2014-08-01

    Our recent study on the functional analysis of the Knickkopf protein from T. castaneum (TcKnk), indicated a novel role for this protein in protection of chitin from degradation by chitinases. Knk is also required for the laminar organization of chitin in the procuticle. During a bioinformatics search using this protein sequence as the query, we discovered the existence of a small family of three Knk-like genes (including the prototypical TcKnk) in the T. castaneum genome as well as in all insects with completed genome assemblies. The two additional Knk-like genes have been named TcKnk2 and TcKnk3. Further complexity arises as a result of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of transcripts of TcKnk3, leading to the production of three transcripts (and by inference, three proteins) from this gene. These transcripts are named TcKnk3-Full Length (TcKnk3-FL), TcKnk3-5' and TcKnk3-3'. All three Knk-family genes appear to have essential and non-redundant functions. RNAi for TcKnk led to developmental arrest at every molt, while down-regulation of either TcKnk2 or one of the three TcKnk3 transcripts (TcKnk3-3') resulted in specific molting arrest only at the pharate adult stage. All three Knk genes appear to influence the total chitin content at the pharate adult stage, but to variable extents. While TcKnk contributes mostly to the stability and laminar organization of chitin in the elytral and body wall procuticles, proteins encoded by TcKnk2 and TcKnk3-3' transcripts appear to be required for the integrity of the body wall denticles and tracheal taenidia, but not the elytral and body wall procuticles. Thus, the three members of the Knk-family of proteins perform different essential functions in cuticle formation at different developmental stages and in different parts of the insect anatomy.

  11. Silkmoth chorion proteins: sequence analysis of the products of a multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Regier, J C; Kafatos, F C; Goodfliesh, R; Hood, L

    1978-01-01

    Five polypeptide components have been isolated from the eggshell (chorions) of a silkmoth. Two are homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate and isoelectric focusing gels, and three contain predominantly two proteins each. Amino acid analyses show that all five components are similar to each other. These proteins have been sequenced from the amino terminus. Homogeneous components yielded single sequences; heterogeneous components yielded two residues at some positions, consistent with their containing two major electrophoretic components. Striking similarities are apparent among all these sequences. These similarities can be increased dramatically by separating each of the three protein mixtures into two sequences and introducing a small number of gaps or insertions. This is due in part to bringing into register a portion that contains short repeating subunits found in all sequences. All proteins are also characterized by a region of high cysteine content near the amino terminus followed by a longer low-cysteine region. The data suggest that these proteins share a common evolutionary origin and are encoded by a multigene family. Images PMID:272655

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0899 defines a family of membrane proteins widespread in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marassi, Francesca M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane protein Rv0899 confers adaptation of the bacterium to acidic environments. Due to strong sequence homology of its C-terminus to bacterial OmpA-like domains, Rv0899 has been proposed to constitute an outer membrane porin of M. tuberculosis. However, OmpA-like domains are widespread in a wide variety of bacterial proteins with different functions. Furthermore, the three-dimensional structure of Rv0899 does not contain a transmembrane β-barrel, and recent evidence demonstrates that it does not have porin activity. Instead, the rv0899 gene is part of an operon (rv0899-rv0901) that is required for fast ammonia secretion, pH neutralization and growth of M. tuberculosis in acidic environments. The mechanism whereby these functions are accomplished is not known. To gain further functional insights, a targeted search of the genomic databases was performed for proteins with sequence similarity beyond the OmpA-like C-terminus. The results presented here, show that Rv0899-like proteins are widespread in bacteria with functions in nitrogen metabolism, adaptation to nutrient poor environments, and/or establishing symbiosis with the host organism, and appear to form a protein family. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis Rv0899 may also assist similar processes and lend further support to its role in ammonia secretion and M. tuberculosis adaptation to the host environment. PMID:21905117

  13. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  14. Hormone signaling linked to silkmoth sex pheromone biosynthesis involves Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of the insect PAT family protein Bombyx mori lipid storage droplet protein-1(BmLsd)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  15. Characterization of a novel molluscan MyD88 family protein from manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Whang, Ilson; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Choi, Cheol Young; Park, Choul-Ji; Lee, Jehee

    2011-12-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is a universal adaptor protein which is required for signal transduction of TLR/IL-1R family. In this study, a novel molluscan MyD88 family member protein (named as RpMyD88) was identified from manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. It was identified using BLAST algorithm from GS-FLX™ sequencing data. The cDNA of RpMyD88 consists of 1416 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 471 amino acid residues. The RpMyD88 contains death domain and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain which are typical features of MyD88 family proteins. The predicted amino acid sequence of RpMyD88 shares 27% identity with scallop MyD88. The expression level of RpMyD88 mRNA was investigated in healthy and challenged clams by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The RpMyD88 gene expression is ubiquitous in all selected tissues. The RpMyD88 mRNA was strongly expressed in hemocyte, gill and mantle. In contrast, it was weakly expressed in siphon, foot and adductor muscle. RpMyD88 was up-regulated in gill and hemocyte after immune challenge with both Vibrio tapetis and LPS challenge. All results considered, sequence characterization, comparison and gene expression data suggesting that MyD88-dependent signaling pathway is presence in manila clam and RpMyD88 plays an important role in innate immune response against bacteria. PMID:21846503

  16. Novel cyclic di-GMP effectors of the YajQ protein family control bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-qi; Caly, Delphine L; McCarthy, Yvonne; Murdoch, Sarah L; Ward, Joseph; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    Bis-(3',5') cyclic di-guanylate (cyclic di-GMP) is a key bacterial second messenger that is implicated in the regulation of many critical processes that include motility, biofilm formation and virulence. Cyclic di-GMP influences diverse functions through interaction with a range of effectors. Our knowledge of these effectors and their different regulatory actions is far from complete, however. Here we have used an affinity pull-down assay using cyclic di-GMP-coupled magnetic beads to identify cyclic di-GMP binding proteins in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). This analysis identified XC_3703, a protein of the YajQ family, as a potential cyclic di-GMP receptor. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the purified XC_3703 protein bound cyclic di-GMP with a high affinity (K(d)∼2 µM). Mutation of XC_3703 led to reduced virulence of Xcc to plants and alteration in biofilm formation. Yeast two-hybrid and far-western analyses showed that XC_3703 was able to interact with XC_2801, a transcription factor of the LysR family. Mutation of XC_2801 and XC_3703 had partially overlapping effects on the transcriptome of Xcc, and both affected virulence. Electromobility shift assays showed that XC_3703 positively affected the binding of XC_2801 to the promoters of target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by cyclic di-GMP. Genetic and functional analysis of YajQ family members from the human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia showed that they also specifically bound cyclic di-GMP and contributed to virulence in model systems. The findings thus identify a new class of cyclic di-GMP effector that regulates bacterial virulence.

  17. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C) in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D). Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non-chordates to become

  18. 3PFDB+: improved search protocol and update for the identification of representatives of protein sequence domain families.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel P; Shingate, Prashant; Upadhyay, Atul K; Sowdhamini, R

    2014-01-01

    Protein domain families are usually classified on the basis of similarity of amino acid sequences. Selection of a single representative sequence for each family provides targets for structure determination or modeling and also enables fast sequence searches to associate new members to a family. Such a selection could be challenging since some of these domain families exhibit huge variation depending on the number of members in the family, the average family sequence length or the extent of sequence divergence within a family. We had earlier created 3PFDB database as a repository of best representative sequences, selected from each PFAM domain family on the basis of high coverage. In this study, we have improved the database using more efficient strategies for the initial generation of sequence profiles and implement two independent methods, FASSM and HMMER, for identifying family members. HMMER employs a global sequence similarity search, while FASSM relies on motif identification and matching. This improved and updated database, 3PFDB+ generated in this study, provides representative sequences and profiles for PFAM families, with 13 519 family representatives having more than 90% family coverage. The representative sequence is also highlighted in a two-dimensional plot, which reflects the relative divergence between family members. Representatives belonging to small families with short sequences are mainly associated with low coverage. The set of sequences not recognized by the family representative profiles, highlight several potential false or weak family associations in PFAM. Partial domains and fragments dominate such cases, along with sequences that are highly diverged or different from other family members. Some of these outliers were also predicted to have different secondary structure contents, which reflect different putative structure or functional roles for these domain sequences. Database URL: http://caps.ncbs.res.in/3pfdbplus/.

  19. A Database of Plastid Protein Families from Red Algae and Apicomplexa and Expression Regulation of the moeB Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the database of plastid protein families from red algae, secondary and tertiary rhodophyte-derived plastids, and Apicomplexa constructed with the novel method to infer orthology. The families contain proteins with maximal sequence similarity and minimal paralogous content. The database contains 6509 protein entries, 513 families and 278 nonsingletons (from which 230 are paralog-free, and among the remaining 48, 46 contain at maximum two proteins per species, and 2 contain at maximum three proteins per species). The method is compared with other approaches. Expression regulation of the moeB gene is studied using this database and the model of RNA polymerase competition. An analogous database obtained for green algae and their symbiotic descendants, and applications based on it are published earlier. PMID:26114108

  20. A Database of Plastid Protein Families from Red Algae and Apicomplexa and Expression Regulation of the moeB Gene.

    PubMed

    Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2015-01-01

    We report the database of plastid protein families from red algae, secondary and tertiary rhodophyte-derived plastids, and Apicomplexa constructed with the novel method to infer orthology. The families contain proteins with maximal sequence similarity and minimal paralogous content. The database contains 6509 protein entries, 513 families and 278 nonsingletons (from which 230 are paralog-free, and among the remaining 48, 46 contain at maximum two proteins per species, and 2 contain at maximum three proteins per species). The method is compared with other approaches. Expression regulation of the moeB gene is studied using this database and the model of RNA polymerase competition. An analogous database obtained for green algae and their symbiotic descendants, and applications based on it are published earlier.

  1. Photocontrolled Exposure of Pro‐apoptotic Peptide Sequences in LOV Proteins Modulates Bcl‐2 Family Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mart, Robert J.; Meah, Dilruba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract LOV domains act as biomolecular sensors for light, oxygen or the environment's redox potential. Conformational changes upon the formation of a covalent cysteinyl flavin adduct are propagated through hydrogen‐bonding networks in the core of designed hybrid phototropin LOV2 domains that incorporate the Bcl homology region 3 (BH3) of the key pro‐apoptotic protein BH3‐interacting‐domain death agonist (BID). The resulting change in conformation of a flanking amphiphilic α‐helix creates a light‐dependent optogenetic tool for the modulation of interactions with the anti‐apoptotic B‐cell leukaemia‐2 (Bcl‐2) family member Bcl‐xL. PMID:26493687

  2. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  3. Spider Glue Proteins Have Distinct Architectures Compared with Traditional Spidroin Family Members*

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthavada, Keshav; Hu, Xiaoyi; Tuton-Blasingame, Tiffany; Hsia, Yang; Sampath, Sujatha; Pacheco, Ryan; Freeark, Jordan; Falick, Arnold M.; Tang, Simon; Fong, Justine; Kohler, Kristin; La Mattina-Hawkins, Coby; Vierra, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive spider glues are required to perform a variety of tasks, including web construction, prey capture, and locomotion. To date, little is known regarding the molecular and structural features of spider glue proteins, in particular bioadhesives that interconnect dragline or scaffolding silks during three-dimensional web construction. Here we use biochemical and structural approaches to identify and characterize two aggregate gland specific gene products, AgSF1 and AgSF2, and demonstrate that these proteins co-localize to the connection joints of both webs and wrapping silks spun from the black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus. Protein architectures are markedly divergent between AgSF1 and AgSF2, as well as traditional spider silk fibroin family members, suggesting connection joints consist of a complex proteinaceous network. AgSF2 represents a nonglycosylated 40-kDa protein that has novel internal amino acid block repeats with the consensus sequence NVNVN embedded in a glycine-rich matrix. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of AgSF1 reveals pentameric QPGSG iterations that are similar to conserved modular elements within mammalian elastin, a rubber-like elastomeric protein that interfaces with collagen. Wet-spinning methodology using purified recombinant proteins show AgSF1 has the potential to self-assemble into fibers. X-ray fiber diffraction studies performed on these synthetic fibers reveal the presence of noncrystalline domains that resemble classical rubber networks. Collectively, these data support that the aggregate gland serves to extrude a protein mixture that contains substances that allow for the self-assembly of fiber-like structures that interface with dragline silks to mediate prey capture. PMID:22927444

  4. Spider glue proteins have distinct architectures compared with traditional spidroin family members.

    PubMed

    Vasanthavada, Keshav; Hu, Xiaoyi; Tuton-Blasingame, Tiffany; Hsia, Yang; Sampath, Sujatha; Pacheco, Ryan; Freeark, Jordan; Falick, Arnold M; Tang, Simon; Fong, Justine; Kohler, Kristin; La Mattina-Hawkins, Coby; Vierra, Craig

    2012-10-19

    Adhesive spider glues are required to perform a variety of tasks, including web construction, prey capture, and locomotion. To date, little is known regarding the molecular and structural features of spider glue proteins, in particular bioadhesives that interconnect dragline or scaffolding silks during three-dimensional web construction. Here we use biochemical and structural approaches to identify and characterize two aggregate gland specific gene products, AgSF1 and AgSF2, and demonstrate that these proteins co-localize to the connection joints of both webs and wrapping silks spun from the black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus. Protein architectures are markedly divergent between AgSF1 and AgSF2, as well as traditional spider silk fibroin family members, suggesting connection joints consist of a complex proteinaceous network. AgSF2 represents a nonglycosylated 40-kDa protein that has novel internal amino acid block repeats with the consensus sequence NVNVN embedded in a glycine-rich matrix. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of AgSF1 reveals pentameric QPGSG iterations that are similar to conserved modular elements within mammalian elastin, a rubber-like elastomeric protein that interfaces with collagen. Wet-spinning methodology using purified recombinant proteins show AgSF1 has the potential to self-assemble into fibers. X-ray fiber diffraction studies performed on these synthetic fibers reveal the presence of noncrystalline domains that resemble classical rubber networks. Collectively, these data support that the aggregate gland serves to extrude a protein mixture that contains substances that allow for the self-assembly of fiber-like structures that interface with dragline silks to mediate prey capture. PMID:22927444

  5. iLIR: A web resource for prediction of Atg8-family interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalvari, Ioanna; Tsompanis, Stelios; Mulakkal, Nitha C; Osgood, Richard; Johansen, Terje; Nezis, Ioannis P; Promponas, Vasilis J

    2014-05-01

    Macroautophagy was initially considered to be a nonselective process for bulk breakdown of cytosolic material. However, recent evidence points toward a selective mode of autophagy mediated by the so-called selective autophagy receptors (SARs). SARs act by recognizing and sorting diverse cargo substrates (e.g., proteins, organelles, pathogens) to the autophagic machinery. Known SARs are characterized by a short linear sequence motif (LIR-, LRS-, or AIM-motif) responsible for the interaction between SARs and proteins of the Atg8 family. Interestingly, many LIR-containing proteins (LIRCPs) are also involved in autophagosome formation and maturation and a few of them in regulating signaling pathways. Despite recent research efforts to experimentally identify LIRCPs, only a few dozen of this class of-often unrelated-proteins have been characterized so far using tedious cell biological, biochemical, and crystallographic approaches. The availability of an ever-increasing number of complete eukaryotic genomes provides a grand challenge for characterizing novel LIRCPs throughout the eukaryotes. Along these lines, we developed iLIR, a freely available web resource, which provides in silico tools for assisting the identification of novel LIRCPs. Given an amino acid sequence as input, iLIR searches for instances of short sequences compliant with a refined sensitive regular expression pattern of the extended LIR motif (xLIR-motif) and retrieves characterized protein domains from the SMART database for the query. Additionally, iLIR scores xLIRs against a custom position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and identifies potentially disordered subsequences with protein interaction potential overlapping with detected xLIR-motifs. Here we demonstrate that proteins satisfying these criteria make good LIRCP candidates for further experimental verification. Domain architecture is displayed in an informative graphic, and detailed results are also available in tabular form. We anticipate

  6. Facilitation of stress-induced phosphorylation of beta-amyloid precursor protein family members by X11-like/Mint2 protein.

    PubMed

    Taru, Hidenori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2004-05-14

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the precursor of beta-amyloid (Abeta), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. APP complements amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2), and together they play essential physiological roles. Phosphorylation at the Thr(668) residue of APP (with respect to the numbering conversion for the APP 695 isoform) and the Thr(736) residue of APLP2 (with respect to the numbering conversion for the APLP2 763 isoform) in their cytoplasmic domains acts as a molecular switch for their protein-protein interaction and is implicated in neural function(s) and/or Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that both APP and APLP2 can be phosphorylated by JNK at the Thr(668) and Thr(736) residues, respectively, in response to cellular stress. X11-like (X11L, also referred to as X11beta and Mint2), which is a member of the mammalian LIN-10 protein family and a possible regulator of Abeta production, elevated APP and APLP2 phosphorylation probably by facilitating JNK-mediated phosphorylation, whereas other members of the family, X11 and X11L2, did not. These observations revealed an involvement of X11L in the phosphorylation of APP family proteins in cellular stress and suggest that X11L protein may be important in the physiology of APP family proteins as well as in the regulation of Abeta production.

  7. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  8. Benzodiazepines and benzotriazepines as protein interaction inhibitors targeting bromodomains of the BET family

    PubMed Central

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Fedorov, Oleg; Keller, Marco; Wrobel, Matthias; Morgenstern, Olaf; Bracher, Franz; Knapp, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are psychoactive drugs with anxiolytic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant and amnestic properties. Recently triazolo-benzodiazepines have been also described as potent and highly selective protein interaction inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins, a family of transcriptional co-regulators that play a key role in cancer cell survival and proliferation, but the requirements for high affinity interaction of this compound class with bromodomains has not been described. Here we provide insight into the structure–activity relationship (SAR) and selectivity of this versatile scaffold. In addition, using high resolution crystal structures we compared the binding mode of a series of benzodiazepine (BzD) and related triazolo-benzotriazepines (BzT) derivatives including clinically approved drugs such as alprazolam and midazolam. Our analysis revealed the importance of the 1-methyl triazolo ring system for BET binding and suggests modifications for the development of further high affinity bromodomain inhibitors. PMID:22137933

  9. Benzodiazepines and benzotriazepines as protein interaction inhibitors targeting bromodomains of the BET family.

    PubMed

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Fedorov, Oleg; Keller, Marco; Wrobel, Matthias; Morgenstern, Olaf; Bracher, Franz; Knapp, Stefan

    2012-03-15

    Benzodiazepines are psychoactive drugs with anxiolytic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant and amnestic properties. Recently triazolo-benzodiazepines have been also described as potent and highly selective protein interaction inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins, a family of transcriptional co-regulators that play a key role in cancer cell survival and proliferation, but the requirements for high affinity interaction of this compound class with bromodomains has not been described. Here we provide insight into the structure-activity relationship (SAR) and selectivity of this versatile scaffold. In addition, using high resolution crystal structures we compared the binding mode of a series of benzodiazepine (BzD) and related triazolo-benzotriazepines (BzT) derivatives including clinically approved drugs such as alprazolam and midazolam. Our analysis revealed the importance of the 1-methyl triazolo ring system for BET binding and suggests modifications for the development of further high affinity bromodomain inhibitors.

  10. Elucidating the Activation Mechanism of the Insulin-Family Proteins with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-family proteins bind to their own receptors, but insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) can also bind to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A), activating unique and alternative signaling pathways from those of insulin. Although extensive studies of insulin have revealed that its activation is associated with the opening of the B chain-C terminal (BC-CT), the activation mechanism of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) still remains unknown. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the insulin-family proteins comparing their activation process and mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations to reveal new insights into their specificity to the insulin receptor. We have found that all the proteins appear to exhibit similar stochastic dynamics in their conformational change to an active state. For the IGFs, our simulations show that activation involves two opening locations: the opening of the BC-CT section away from the core, similar to insulin; and the additional opening of the BC-CT section away from the C domain. Furthermore, we have found that these two openings occur simultaneously in IGF-I, but not in IGF-II, where they can occur independently. This suggests that the BC-CT section and the C domain behave as a unified domain in IGF-I, but as two independent domains in IGF-II during the activation process, implying that the IGFs undergo different activation mechanisms for receptor binding. The probabilities of the active and inactive states of the proteins suggest that IGF-II is hyperactive compared to IGF-I. The hinge residue and the hydrophobic interactions in the core are found to play a critical role in the stability and activity of IGFs. Overall, our simulations have elucidated the crucial differences and similarities in the activation mechanisms of the insulin-family proteins, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed differences between IGF-I and IGF-II in receptor binding. PMID

  11. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinxing; Zhai, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhang, Caiyun; Sang, Hong; Han, Guanzhu; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins) that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11). In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap) family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:26908577

  12. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1.

    PubMed

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1.

  13. The potential role of regulator of G-protein signaling 16 in cell motility mediated by δEF1 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Yuta; Endo, Kaori; Shirakihara, Takuya; Fukagawa, Akihiko; Miyazawa, Keiji; Saitoh, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with tumor progression. We reported previously that expression of the δEF1 family proteins (δEF1/ZEB1 and SIP1/ZEB2), key regulators of the EMT, is positively correlated with EMT phenotypes and aggressiveness of breast cancer. Here, we show that the expression levels of regulator of G-protein signaling 16 (RGS16) are negatively correlated with those of the δEF1 family proteins. On the basis of the results of gain- and loss-of-function analyses, we suggest that δEF1 family proteins promote cell motility of breast cancer cells directly or indirectly through repressing expression of RGS16.

  14. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  15. Six Subgroups and Extensive Recent Duplications Characterize the Evolution of the Eukaryotic Tubulin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog–paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. PMID:25169981

  16. Comparative and functional analysis of the widely occurring family of Nep1-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Oome, Stan; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Nep1-like proteins (NLP) are best known for their cytotoxic activity in dicot plants. NLP are taxonomically widespread among microbes with very different lifestyles. To learn more about this enigmatic protein family, we analyzed more than 500 available NLP protein sequences from fungi, oomycetes, and bacteria. Phylogenetic clustering showed that, besides the previously documented two types, an additional, more divergent, third NLP type could be distinguished. By closely examining the three NLP types, we identified a noncytotoxic subgroup of type 1 NLP (designated type 1a), which have substitutions in amino acids making up a cation-binding pocket that is required for cytotoxicity. Type 2 NLP were found to contain a putative calcium-binding motif, which was shown to be required for cytotoxicity. Members of both type 1 and type 2 NLP were found to possess additional cysteine residues that, based on their predicted proximity, make up potential disulfide bridges that could provide additional stability to these secreted proteins. Type 1 and type 2 NLP, although both cytotoxic to plant cells, differ in their ability to induce necrosis when artificially targeted to different cellular compartments in planta, suggesting they have different mechanisms of cytotoxicity.

  17. Interaction of Shiga toxin 2 with complement regulators of the factor H protein family.

    PubMed

    Poolpol, Kulwara; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Speth, Cornelia; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodriguez; Brockmeyer, Jens; Bielaszewska, Martina; Würzner, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) is believed to be a major virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) contributing to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The complement system has recently been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC-associated HUS. Stx2 was shown to activate complement via the alternative pathway, to bind factor H (FH) at short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6-8 and 18-20 and to delay and reduce FH cofactor activity on the cell surface. We now show that complement factor H-related protein 1 (FHR-1) and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), proteins of the FH protein family that show amino acid sequence and regulatory function similarities with FH, also bind to Stx2. The FHR-1 binding site for Stx2 was located at SCRs 3-5 and the binding capacity of FHR-1*A allotype was higher than that of FHR-1*B. FHR-1 and FHL-1 competed with FH for Stx2 binding, and in the case of FHR-1 this competition resulted in a reduction of FH cofactor activity. FHL-1 retained its cofactor activity in the fluid phase when bound to Stx2. In conclusion, multiple interactions of key complement inhibitors FH, FHR-1 and FHL-1 with Stx2 corroborate our hypothesis of a direct role of complement in EHEC-associated HUS.

  18. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  19. Six subgroups and extensive recent duplications characterize the evolution of the eukaryotic tubulin protein family.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog-paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other.

  20. Seed storage proteins of the globulin family are cleaved post-translationally in wheat embryos

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 7S globulins are plant seed storage proteins that have been associated with the development of a number of human diseases, including peanut allergy. Immune reactivity to the wheat seed storage protein globulin-3 (Glo-3) has been associated with the development of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes in diabetes-prone rats and mice, as well as in a subset of human patients. Findings The present study characterized native wheat Glo-3 in salt-soluble wheat seed protein extracts. Glo-3-like peptides were observed primarily in the wheat embryo. Glo-3-like proteins varied significantly in their molecular masses and isoelectric points, as determined by two dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-Glo-3A antibodies. Five major polypeptide spots were identified by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing as belonging to the Glo-3 family. Conclusions These results in combination with our previous findings have allowed for the development of a hypothetical model of the post-translational events contributing to the wheat 7S globulin profile in mature wheat kernels. PMID:22838494

  1. Sterol Transport In Yeast and the Oxysterol Binding Protein Homologue (OSH) Family

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Prinz, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol are a significant component of eukaryotic cellular membranes, and their unique physical properties influence a wide variety of membrane processes. It is known that the concentration of sterol within the membrane varies widely between organelles, and that the cell actively maintains this distribution through various transport processes. Vesicular pathways such as secretion or endocytosis may account for this traffic, but increasing evidence highlights the importance of nonvesicular routes as well. The structure of an oxysterol-binding protein homologue (OSH) in yeast (Osh4p/Kes1p) has recently been solved, identifying it as a sterol binding protein, and there is evidence consistent with the role of a cytoplasmic, nonvesicular sterol transporter. Yeast have seven such proteins, which appear to have distinct but overlapping functions with regard to maintaining intracellular sterol distribution and homeostasis. Control of sterol distribution can have far-reaching effects on membrane-related functions, and Osh proteins have been implicated in a variety of processes such as secretory vesicle budding from the Golgi and establishment of cell polarity. This review summarizes the current body of knowledge regarding this family and its potential functions, placing it in the context of known and hypothesized pathways of sterol transport in yeast. PMID:17434796

  2. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  3. OSBP-Related Protein Family in Lipid Transport Over Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) localize at membrane contact sites, which are high-capacity platforms for inter-organelle exchange of small molecules and information. ORPs can simultaneously associate with the two apposed membranes and transfer lipids across the interbilayer gap. Oxysterol-binding protein moves cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to trans-Golgi, driven by the retrograde transport of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). Analogously, yeast Osh6p mediates the transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in exchange for PI4P, and ORP5 and -8 are suggested to execute similar functions in mammalian cells. ORPs may share the capacity to bind PI4P within their ligand-binding domain, prompting the hypothesis that bidirectional transport of a phosphoinositide and another lipid may be a common theme among the protein family. This model, however, needs more experimental support and does not exclude a function of ORPs in lipid signaling. PMID:26715851

  4. The CRMP Family of Proteins and Their Role in Sema3A Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric F.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The CRMP proteins were originally identified as mediators of Sema3A signaling and neuronal differentiation. Much has been learned about the mechanism by which CRMPs regulate cellular responses to Sema3A. In this review, the evidence for CRMP as a component of the Sema3A signaling cascade and the modulation of CRMP by plexin and phosphorylation are considered. In addition, current knowledge of the function of CRMP in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of the cytoskeleton and endocytosis, is discussed in relationship to the mechanisms of axonal growth cone Sema3A response. The secreted protein Sema3A (collapsin-1) was the first identified vertebrate semaphorin. Sema3A acts primarily as a repulsive axon guidance cue, and can cause a dramatic collapse of the growth cone lamellipodium. This process results from the redistribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton1,2 and endocytosis of the growth cone cell membrane.2–4 Neuropilin-1 (NP1) and members of the class A plexins (PlexA) form a Sema3A receptor complex, with NP1 serving as a high-affinity ligand binding partner, and PlexA transducing the signal into the cell via its large intracellular domain. Although the effect of Sema3A on growth cones was first described nearly 15 years ago, the intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the cellular effects have only recently begun to be understood. Monomeric G-proteins, various kinases, the redox protein, MICAL, and protein turnover have all been implicated in PlexA transduction. In addition, the collapsin-response-mediator protein (CRMP) family of cytosolic phosphoproteins plays a crucial role in Sema3A/NP1/PlexA signal transduction. Current knowledge regarding CRMP functions are reviewed here. PMID:17607942

  5. A large family of divergent Drosophila odorant-binding proteins expressed in gustatory and olfactory sensilla.

    PubMed

    Galindo, K; Smith, D P

    2001-11-01

    We identified a large family of putative odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Some of these genes are present in large clusters in the genome. Most members are expressed in various taste organs, including gustatory sensilla in the labellum, the pharyngeal labral sense organ, dorsal and ventral cibarial organs, as well as taste bristles located on the wings and tarsi. Some of the gustatory OBPs are expressed exclusively in taste organs, but most are expressed in both olfactory and gustatory sensilla. Multiple binding proteins can be coexpressed in the same gustatory sensillum. Cells in the tarsi that express OBPs are required for normal chemosensation mediated through the leg, as ablation of these cells dramatically reduces the sensitivity of the proboscis extension reflex to sucrose. Finally, we show that OBP genes expressed in the pharyngeal taste sensilla are still expressed in the poxneuro genetic background while OBPs expressed in the labellum are not. These findings support a broad role for members of the OBP family in gustation and olfaction and suggest that poxneuro is required for cell fate determination of labellar but not pharyngeal taste organs. PMID:11729153

  6. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site. PMID:27599864

  7. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site.

  8. New member of the trefoil factor family of proteins is an alpha-macroglobulin protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, Ida B; Hammes, Stephen R; Rubenstein, David S; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Valnickova, Zuzana; Enghild, Jan J

    2002-07-29

    The amino acid sequence of the monomeric alpha-macroglobulin (alphaM) from the American bullfrog, Rana catesbiana, was determined. The mature protein consisted of 1469 amino acid residues and shared sequence identity with other members of the alphaM family of protein. The central portion of the frog monomeric alphaM contained Cys residues positioned analogously to the Cys residues in human alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M), known to be involved in disulfide bridges. Additionally, the frog monomeric alphaM contained six Cys residues in a approximately 60 residue COOH-terminal extension not present in previously characterized alphaMs. The spacing of the Cys residues and the overall sequence identity of this COOH-terminal extension were consistent with a trefoil motif. This is the first time a member of the trefoil factor family has been identified in the circulatory system. The "bait region" was located between Arg(675)-Lys(685) and contained mainly basic amino acid residues. The COOH-terminal receptor-binding domain was not exposed prior to proteolysis of this highly susceptible region. The proximity of the receptor-binding and trefoil domains implied that the trefoil domain is similarly concealed before bait region cleavage. PMID:12147353

  9. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Cristina K.; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L.; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J.; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27022937

  10. Marked phenotypic variation in a family with a new myelin protein zero mutation.

    PubMed

    Szabo, A; Züchner, S; Siska, E; Mechler, F; Molnar, M J

    2005-11-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, which has a role in myelin compaction. MPZ gene mutations cause mostly demyelinating neuropathies of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B type (CMT1B), but axonal CMT have been described as well. There is a broad spectrum of phenotypic manifestation of neuropathies caused by MPZ mutations. Some mutations of MPZ cause severe early-onset neuropathies such as Dejerine-Sottas disease, while others cause the classical CMT phenotype with normal early milestones but development of disability during the first two decades of life. We describe a family in which five members of three consecutive generations had a heterozygous mutation in nucleotide position 143 with a T-C transition in exon 2 of the MPZ gene. The resulting substitution of Leu48 with proline has not been previously described. The age of onset of symptoms varied from 8 months to 41 years. The marked variation of the age of disease onset and clinical phenotype in this one family, related to the same MPZ mutation, suggests that in addition to the type and intragenic location of the mutation, other putative modifying gene(s) are regulating MPZ gene expression, mRNA stability and posttranslational protein modification and may have an important effect on the ultimate clinical phenotype. PMID:16198109

  11. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristina K; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites.

  12. Alveolins, a new family of cortical proteins that define the protist infrakingdom Alveolata.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Tham, Wai-Hong; Cowman, Alan F; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Waller, Ross F

    2008-06-01

    Alveolates are a recently recognized group of unicellular eukaryotes that unites disparate protists including apicomplexan parasites (which cause malaria and toxoplasmosis), dinoflagellate algae (which cause red tides and are symbionts in many corals), and ciliates (which are microscopic predators and common rumen symbionts). Gene sequence trees provide robust support for the alveolate alliance, but beyond the common presence of membranous sacs (alveoli) subtending the plasma membrane, the group has no unifying morphological feature. We describe a family of proteins, alveolins, associated with these membranous sacs in apicomplexa, dinoflagellates, and ciliates. Alveolins contain numerous simple peptide repeats and are encoded by multigene families. We generated antibodies against a peptide motif common to all alveolins and identified a range of apparently abundant proteins in apicomplexa, dinoflagellates, and ciliates. Immunolocalization reveals that alveolins are associated exclusively with the cortical regions of apicomplexa, dinoflagellates, and ciliates where the alveolar sacs occur. Alveolins are the first molecular nexus between the unifying structures that defines this eukaryotic group. They provide an excellent opportunity to explore the exceptional compartment that was apparently the key to a remarkable diversification of unique protists that occupy a wide array of lifestyle niches.

  13. FAMSA: Fast and accurate multiple sequence alignment of huge protein families

    PubMed Central

    Deorowicz, Sebastian; Debudaj-Grabysz, Agnieszka; Gudyś, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of modern sequencing platforms has contributed to the unprecedented growth of protein families databases. The abundance of sets containing hundreds of thousands of sequences is a formidable challenge for multiple sequence alignment algorithms. The article introduces FAMSA, a new progressive algorithm designed for fast and accurate alignment of thousands of protein sequences. Its features include the utilization of the longest common subsequence measure for determining pairwise similarities, a novel method of evaluating gap costs, and a new iterative refinement scheme. What matters is that its implementation is highly optimized and parallelized to make the most of modern computer platforms. Thanks to the above, quality indicators, i.e. sum-of-pairs and total-column scores, show FAMSA to be superior to competing algorithms, such as Clustal Omega or MAFFT for datasets exceeding a few thousand sequences. Quality does not compromise on time or memory requirements, which are an order of magnitude lower than those in the existing solutions. For example, a family of 415519 sequences was analyzed in less than two hours and required no more than 8 GB of RAM. FAMSA is available for free at http://sun.aei.polsl.pl/REFRESH/famsa. PMID:27670777

  14. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database) of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the “ADAM_CR” domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates. PMID:27196928

  15. Plant stress proteins of the thaumatin-like family discovered in animals.

    PubMed

    Brandazza, Anna; Angeli, Sergio; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian; Pelosi, Paolo

    2004-08-13

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) are polypeptides of about 200 residues synthesized by plants in response to fungal infection. In addition to the exceptionally strong sweet taste exhibited by some members, they are also reported to be endowed with endo-beta-1,3-glucanase activity and alpha-amylase inhibiting properties. However, the detailed mechanism of their antifungal action is not completely understood. So far, TLPs have only been described in plants, with several members of the family expressed in the same species. Here, for the first time in animals, we report the identification of two genes encoding members of the thaumatin-like proteins family in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria and show their expression in different parts of the body. Southern blot and Western blot experiments revealed the presence of orthologous genes and their expression products in the related species Locusta migratoria. A search through the available genomes yielded similar sequences in the nematode Caenorhabditis but not in Drosophila and other insects. A three-dimensional model of S. gregaria TLP suggests a glucanase function. As in plants, TLPs could play a defense role in insects against pathogens. PMID:15304314

  16. O-GlcNAcylation, an Epigenetic Mark. Focus on the Histone Code, TET Family Proteins, and Polycomb Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dehennaut, Vanessa; Leprince, Dominique; Lefebvre, Tony

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing evidences that dietary components and metabolic disorders affect gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. These observations support the notion that epigenetic reprograming-linked nutrition is connected to the etiology of metabolic diseases and cancer. During the last 5 years, accumulating data revealed that the nutrient-sensing O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) may be pivotal in the modulation of chromatin remodeling and in the regulation of gene expression by being part of the “histone code,” and by identifying OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) as an interacting partner of the TET family proteins of DNA hydroxylases and as a member of the polycomb group proteins. Thus, it is suggested that O-GlcNAcylation is a post-translational modification that links nutrition to epigenetic. This review summarizes recent findings about the interplay between O-GlcNAcylation and the epigenome and enlightens the contribution of the glycosylation to epigenetic reprograming. PMID:25309514

  17. The C1q Family of Proteins: Insights into the Emerging Non-Traditional Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage-modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders – including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia, and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh et al. (2011) showing that pregnant C1q−/− mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q−/− mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al. (2009) which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1) and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand, enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNF-α-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the tumor necrosis factor family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral “cytokine-like” activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions. PMID:22536204

  18. Elaboration, Diversification and Regulation of the Sir1 Family of Silencing Proteins in Saccharomyces

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Jennifer E. G.; Babiarz, Joshua E.; Teytelman, Leonid; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Rine, Jasper

    2009-01-01

    Heterochromatin renders domains of chromosomes transcriptionally silent and, due to clonal variation in its formation, can generate heritably distinct populations of genetically identical cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae's Sir1 functions primarily in the establishment, but not the maintenance, of heterochromatic silencing at the HMR and HML loci. In several Saccharomyces species, we discovered multiple paralogs of Sir1, called Kos1–Kos4 (Kin of Sir1). The Kos and Sir1 proteins contributed partially overlapping functions to silencing of both cryptic mating loci in S. bayanus. Mutants of these paralogs reduced silencing at HML more than at HMR. Most genes of the SIR1 family were located near telomeres, and at least one paralog was regulated by telomere position effect. In S. cerevisiae, Sir1 is recruited to the silencers at HML and HMR via its ORC interacting region (OIR), which binds the bromo adjacent homology (BAH) domain of Orc1. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which diverged from Saccharomyces after the appearance of the silent mating cassettes, but before the whole-genome duplication, contained an ortholog of Kos3 that was apparently the archetypal member of the family, with only one OIR. In contrast, a duplication of this domain was present in all orthologs of Sir1, Kos1, Kos2, and Kos4. We propose that the functional specialization of Sir3, itself a paralog of Orc1, as a silencing protein was facilitated by the tandem duplication of the OIR domain in the Sir1 family, allowing distinct Sir1–Sir3 and Sir1–Orc1 interactions through OIR–BAH domain interactions. PMID:19171939

  19. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. Methods We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. Results We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Conclusions Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:24073962

  20. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review. PMID:27647069

  1. Luminescent quantum clusters of gold in transferrin family protein, lactoferrin exhibiting FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2010-12-01

    We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The stability of clusters in widely varying pH conditions and their continued luminescence make it feasible for them to be used for intracellular imaging and molecular delivery, particularly in view of Lf protection.We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The

  2. Expression of IAP family proteins and its clinical importance in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pluta, P; Jeziorski, A; Cebula-Obrzut, A Pluta B; Wierzbowska, A; Piekarski, J; Smolewski, P

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family proteins is involved in mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of selected IAP proteins such as XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin in breast cancer patients and evaluates their relationship with the prognostic and predictive factors and their impact to overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). The study was conducted with the use of tissue samples prospectively collected from 92 previously untreated female breast cancer patients. The control encompassed 10 fibroadenoma patients. The expression of XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin was assessed using flow multicolor cytometry. XIAP expression was present in 99 % of the breast cancer patients (91/92) with the median expression 13.65% (range 1-66.8%). Expression of XIAP in breast cancer was significantly higher compared to the control group (p=0.006). Median expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin in the study group was 25.95% (range 0.8-83.7%), 16.7% (range 1-53.2%) and 4.6% (range 0-43%) respectively. In the rank Spearman test, strong correlations (p<0.001) were seen among the expressions of XIAP, cIAP-2 and survivin, in all combination. Additionally, week correlation between XIAP and cIAP-1 was observed (p=0.02). The median expression of XIAP and survivin was significantly higher in more advanced tumors (stages pT2/pT3 vs. pT1). The median PFS and OS in breast cancer group were 46.15 and 47.1 months respectively. No significant correlations were observed among expressions of IAP family proteins and survival. However, low expression of XIAP in breast cancer showed trend to longer PFS (p=0.08). XIAP, cIAP-1 cIAP-2 and survivin participate in antiapoptotic mechanisms in breast cancer and XIAP and survivin seem to have the most significant prognostic importance. Further studies are needed to establish more complete prognostic and predictive values of IAP family proteins in breast cancer

  3. Signalling to actin assembly via the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family proteins and the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Thomas H; Sharp, Stewart J; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of a branched network of actin filaments provides the mechanical propulsion that drives a range of dynamic cellular processes, including cell motility. The Arp2/3 complex is a crucial component of such filament networks. Arp2/3 nucleates new actin filaments while bound to existing filaments, thus creating a branched network. In recent years, a number of proteins that activate the filament nucleation activity of Arp2/3 have been identified, most notably the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) family. WASP-family proteins activate the Arp2/3 complex, and consequently stimulate actin assembly, in response to extracellular signals. Structural studies have provided a significant refinement in our understanding of the molecular detail of how the Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments. There has also been much progress towards an understanding of the complicated signalling processes that regulate WASP-family proteins. In addition, the use of gene disruption in a number of organisms has led to new insights into the specific functions of individual WASP-family members. The present review will discuss the Arp2/3 complex and its regulators, in particular the WASP-family proteins. Emphasis will be placed on recent developments in the field that have furthered our understanding of actin dynamics and cell motility. PMID:15040784

  4. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  5. Characterization of an outer membrane protein of Pasteurella multocida belonging to the OmpA family.

    PubMed

    Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1996-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicle and N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble protein preparations of Pasteurella multocida 656 were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A major outer membrane protein (OMP) was found to be heat-modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a molecular mass of 37 kDa when it was solubilized at 100 degrees C. A monoclonal antibody, designated mAb MT4.1, was generated against heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida. This mAb reacted with the heat-modifiable OMP irrespective of the temperature at which it was solubilized, as demonstrated by immunoblot results. The heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida showed a significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with OmpA family. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that the mAb Mt4.1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. The mAb MT4.1 reacted with all the reference strains of 5 capsular and 16 somatic serotypes, as well as with 75 field strains of P. multocida in immunoblot assay. This mAb MT4.1 also reacted with strains of various other Pasteurella species such as P. stomatis, P. aerogenes P. gallinarum, P. betti, P. sp, B, P. SP-g and P. canis, but not with strains of 12 other Gram-negative bacteria. These results indicated that this protein carried a genus-specific epitope and mAb MT4.1 may be useful for identification of Pasteurella species. This is the first report in which a major heat-modifiable OMP has been identified and characterized using a mAb, and has been shown belonging to the OmpA family. PMID:9008341

  6. A family of intermediate filament-like proteins is sequentially assembled into the cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke R.; Ivey, F. Douglas; Cheng, Katherine; Szatanek, Tomasz; Lorestani, Alexander; Beckers, Con J.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Summary The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii divides by a unique process of internal budding that involves the assembly of two daughter cells within the mother. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma, which is composed of microtubules associated with an inner membrane complex (IMC), has an important role in this process. The IMC, which is directly under the plasma membrane, contains a set of flattened membranous sacs lined on the cytoplasmic side by a network of filamentous proteins. This network contains a family of intermediate filament-like proteins or IMC proteins. In order to elucidate the division process, we have characterized a 14-member sub-family of Toxoplasma IMC proteins that share a repeat motif found in proteins associated with the cortical alveoli in all alveolates. By creating fluorescent protein fusion reporters for the family members we determined the spatio-temporal patterns of all 14 IMC proteins through tachyzoite development. This revealed several distinct distribution patterns and some provide the basis for novel structural models such as the assembly of certain family members into the basal complex. Furthermore we identified IMC15 as an early marker of budding and, lastly, the dynamic patterns observed throughout cytokinesis provide a timeline for daughter parasite development and division. PMID:20698859

  7. Identification and Characterization of an Antigen I/II Family Protein Produced by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Green, Nicole M.; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; LeFebvre, Rance B.; Musser, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a gram-positive human bacterial pathogen that causes infections ranging in severity from pharyngitis to life-threatening invasive disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis. Serotype M28 strains are consistently isolated from invasive infections, particularly puerperal sepsis, a severe infection that occurs during or after childbirth. We recently sequenced the genome of a serotype M28 GAS strain and discovered a novel 37.4-kb foreign genetic element designated region of difference 2 (RD2). RD2 is similar in gene content and organization to genomic islands found in group B streptococci (GBS), the major cause of neonatal infections. RD2 encodes seven proteins with conventional gram-positive secretion signal sequences, six of which have not been characterized. Herein, we report that one of these six proteins (M28_Spy1325; Spy1325) is a member of the antigen I/II family of cell surface-anchored molecules produced by oral streptococci. PCR and DNA sequence analysis found that Spy1325 is very well conserved in GAS strains of distinct M protein serotypes. As assessed by real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR, the Spy1325 gene was expressed in vitro, and Spy1325 protein was present in culture supernatants and on the GAS cell surface. Western immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that Spy1325 was produced by GAS in infected mice and humans. Importantly, the immunization of mice with recombinant Spy1325 fragments conferred protection against GAS-mediated mortality. Similar to other antigen I/II proteins, recombinant Spy1325 bound purified human salivary agglutinin glycoprotein. Spy1325 may represent a shared virulence factor among GAS, GBS, and oral streptococci. PMID:16790795

  8. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  9. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  10. The role of the CCN family of proteins in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2014-06-01

    The CCN family of proteins consists of six high homologous matricellular proteins which act predominantly by binding to heparin sulphate proteoglycan and a variety of integrins. Interestingly, CCN proteins are regulated by ovarian steroid hormones and are able to adapt to changes in oxygen concentration, which is a necessary condition for successful implantation. CCN1 is involved in processes of angiogenesis within reproductive systems, thereby potentially contributing to diseases such as endometriosis and disturbed angiogenesis in the placenta and fetus. In the ovary, CCN2 is the key factor for follicular development, ovulation and corpora luteal luteolysis, and its deletion leads to fertility defects. CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 seem to be regulators for human trophoblast proliferation and migration, but with CCN2 acting as a counterweight. Alterations in the expression of these three proteins could contribute to the shallow invasion properties observed in preeclampsia. Little is known about the role of CCN4-6 in the reproductive organs. The ability of CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 to interact with numerous receptors enables them to adapt their biological function rapidly to the continuous remodelling of the reproductive organs and in the development of the placenta. The CCN proteins mediate their specific cell physiological function through the receptor type of their binding partner followed by a defined signalling cascade. Because of their partly overlapping expression patterns, they could act in a concert synergistically or in an opposite way within the reproductive organs. Imbalances in their expression levels are correlated to different human reproductive diseases, such as endometriosis and preeclampsia.

  11. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Gyurkó, M Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans. PMID:26469632

  12. Novel dimerization mode of the human Bcl-2 family protein Bak, a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Takemoto, Chie; Akasaka, Ryogo; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Kishishita, Seiichiro; Murayama, Kazutaka; Terada, Takaho; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Sugano, Sumio; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-05-29

    Interactions of Bcl-2 family proteins play a regulatory role in mitochondrial apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic protein Bak resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and the formation of Bak homo- or heterodimers is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The previously reported structure of the human Bak protein (residues Glu16-Gly186) revealed that a zinc ion was coordinated with two pairs of Asp160 and His164 residues from the symmetry-related molecules. This zinc-dependent homodimer was regarded as an anti-apoptotic dimer. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the human Bak residues Ser23-Asn185 at 2.5 {angstrom}, and found a distinct type of homodimerization through Cys166 disulfide bridging between the symmetry-related molecules. In the two modes of homodimerization, the molecular interfaces are completely different. In the membrane-targeted model of the S-S bridged dimer, the BH3 motifs are too close to the membrane to interact directly with the anti-apoptotic relatives, such as Bcl-x{sub L}. Therefore, the Bak dimer structure reported here may represent a pro-apoptotic mode under oxidized conditions.

  13. Family-wide Characterization of Histone Binding Abilities of Human CW Domain-containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Tempel, Wolfram; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Xiao; Loppnau, Peter; Qin, Su; Min, Jinrong

    2016-04-22

    Covalent modifications of histone N-terminal tails play a critical role in regulating chromatin structure and controlling gene expression. These modifications are controlled by histone-modifying enzymes and read out by histone-binding proteins. Numerous proteins have been identified as histone modification readers. Here we report the family-wide characterization of histone binding abilities of human CW domain-containing proteins. We demonstrate that the CW domains in ZCWPW2 and MORC3/4 selectively recognize histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4, similar to ZCWPW1 reported previously, while the MORC1/2 and LSD2 lack histone H3 Lys-4 binding ability. Our crystal structures of the CW domains of ZCWPW2 and MORC3 in complex with the histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 peptide reveal the molecular basis of this interaction. In each complex, two tryptophan residues in the CW domain form the "floor" and "right wall," respectively, of the methyllysine recognition cage. Our mutation results based on ZCWPW2 reveal that the right wall tryptophan residue is essential for binding, and the floor tryptophan residue enhances binding affinity. Our structural and mutational analysis highlights the conserved roles of the cage residues of CW domain across the histone methyllysine binders but also suggests why some CW domains lack histone binding ability. PMID:26933034

  14. A Multidomain Adhesion Protein Family Expressed in Plasmodium falciparum Is Essential for Transmission to the Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Pradel, Gabriele; Hayton, Karen; Aravind, L.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Abrahamsen, Mitchell S.; Bonawitz, Annemarie; Mejia, Cesar; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The recent sequencing of several apicomplexan genomes has provided the opportunity to characterize novel antigens essential for the parasite life cycle that might lead to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic markers. Here we have screened the Plasmodium falciparum genome sequence for genes encoding extracellular multidomain putative adhesive proteins. Three of these identified genes, named PfCCp1, PfCCp2, and PfCCp3, have multiple adhesive modules including a common Limulus coagulation factor C domain also found in two additional Plasmodium genes. Orthologues were identified in the Cryptosporidium parvum genome sequence, indicating an evolutionary conserved function. Transcript and protein expression analysis shows sexual stage–specific expression of PfCCp1, PfCCp2, and PfCCp3, and cellular localization studies revealed plasma membrane–associated expression in mature gametocytes. During gametogenesis, PfCCps are released and localize surrounding complexes of newly emerged microgametes and macrogametes. PfCCp expression markedly decreased after formation of zygotes. To begin to address PfCCp function, the PfCCp2 and PfCCp3 gene loci were disrupted by homologous recombination, resulting in parasites capable of forming oocyst sporozoites but blocked in the salivary gland transition. Our results describe members of a conserved apicomplexan protein family expressed in sexual stage Plasmodium parasites that may represent candidates for subunits of a transmission-blocking vaccine. PMID:15184503

  15. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David; Stone, Donna M.; Brush, Jennifer; Ryan, Anne; Armanini, Mark; Frantz, Gretchen; Rosenthal, Arnon; de Sauvage, Frederic J.

    1998-01-01

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule with sequence homology to PTCH, has been identified. To characterize both PTCH molecules with respect to the various Hedgehog proteins, we have isolated the human PTCH2 gene. Biochemical analysis of PTCH and PTCH2 shows that they both bind to all hedgehog family members with similar affinity and that they can form a complex with SMO. However, the expression patterns of PTCH and PTCH2 do not fully overlap. While PTCH is expressed throughout the mouse embryo, PTCH2 is found at high levels in the skin and in spermatocytes. Because Desert Hedgehog (Dhh) is expressed specifically in the testis and is required for germ cell development, it is likely that PTCH2 mediates its activity in vivo. Chromosomal localization of PTCH2 places it on chromosome 1p33–34, a region deleted in some germ cell tumors, raising the possibility that PTCH2 may be a tumor suppressor in Dhh target cells. PMID:9811851

  16. Onchocerca spp: a "family" of secreted acidic proteins expressed by infective larvae in blackflies.

    PubMed

    Bianco, A E; Wu, Y; Jenkins, R E

    1995-11-01

    Biosynthetic labeling of developing larvae of Onchocerca in blackflies has been used to characterize a group of stage-specific, secreted proteins produced by vector-stage parasites. These are highly acidic molecules (pI 4.4-5.1) present in at least three members of the genus (O. volvulus, O. lienalis, O. ochengi) that exhibit minor heterogeneity among species in apparent molecular mass (between 18 and 23 kDa). In O. volvulus, there are two polypeptides that run as a doublet of 18 and 20 kDa. In O. lienalis and O. ochengi, single polypeptides of 23 and 20 kDa were detected. The processes of synthesis and secretion appear to be temperature-sensitive and dissociated events. Experiments with O. volvulus in Simulium damnosum sl revealed that synthesis is initiated in second stage larvae and increases in infective-stage parasites: Secretion occurs when larvae leave the vector and enter the phase of development associated with the vertebrate host. Third-stage larvae of O. lienalis were shown to continue to express and accumulate the 23-kDa protein with age. The primary organ of secretion, as indicated by dissection, was the glandular esophagus. These data point to an important biological role for this group of molecules and suggest that they may belong to a family of related products. Because they have the distinctive characteristics of being secreted larval acidic proteins, we propose the acronym SLAP pending further insights into their functional properties.

  17. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  18. IFITM-Family Proteins: The Cell’s First Line of Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles C.; Zhong, Guocai; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells use a wide variety of mechanisms to slow or prevent replication of viruses. These mechanisms are usually mediated by antiviral proteins whose expression and activities can be constitutive but are frequently amplified by interferon induction. Among these interferon-stimulated proteins, members of the IFITM (interferon-induced transmembrane) family are unique because they prevent infection before a virus can traverse the lipid bilayer of the cell. At least three human IFITM proteins—IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3—have antiviral activities. These activities limit infection in cultured cells by many viruses, including dengue virus, Ebola virus, influenza A virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and West Nile virus. Murine Ifitm3 controls influenza A virus infection in vivo, and polymorphisms in human IFITM3 correlate with the severity of both seasonal and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. Here we review the discovery and characterization of the IFITM proteins, describe the spectrum of their antiviral activities, and discuss potential mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:25599080

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  20. Evolution of signal multiplexing by 14-3-3-binding 2R-ohnologue protein families in the vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Michele; Johnson, Catherine; Toth, Rachel; Ferrier, David E. K.; MacKintosh, Carol

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate cellular responses to stimuli by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated residues on target proteins. The present study shows that the human 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues, which are proteins in families of two to four members that were generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrates. We identify 2R-ohnologue families whose members share a ‘lynchpin’, defined as a 14-3-3-binding phosphosite that is conserved across members of a given family, and aligns with a Ser/Thr residue in pro-orthologues from the invertebrate chordates. For example, the human receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) 1–4 family has the commonest type of lynchpin motif in current datasets, with a phosphorylatable serine in the –2 position relative to the 14-3-3-binding phosphosite. In contrast, the second 14-3-3-binding sites of REEPs 1–4 differ and are phosphorylated by different kinases, and hence the REEPs display different affinities for 14-3-3 dimers. We suggest a conceptual model for intracellular regulation involving protein families whose evolution into signal multiplexing systems was facilitated by 14-3-3 dimer binding to lynchpins, which gave freedom for other regulatory sites to evolve. While increased signalling complexity was needed for vertebrate life, these systems also generate vulnerability to genetic disorders. PMID:22870394

  1. Emerging roles of the myocardin family of proteins in lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Swärd, Karl; Stenkula, Karin G; Rippe, Catarina; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Members of the myocardin family bind to the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) and act as coactivators controlling genes of relevance for myogenic differentiation and motile function. Binding of SRF to DNA is mediated by genetic elements called CArG boxes, found often but not exclusively in muscle and growth controlling genes. Studies aimed at defining the full spectrum of these CArG elements in the genome (i.e. the CArGome) have in recent years, unveiled unexpected roles of the myocardin family proteins in lipid and glucose homeostasis. This coactivator family includes the protein myocardin (MYOCD), the myocardin-related transcription factors A and B (MRTF-A/MKL1 and MRTF-B/MKL2) and MASTR (MAMSTR). Here we discuss growing evidence that SRF-driven transcription is controlled by extracellular glucose through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway and actin polymerization. We also describe data showing that adipogenesis is influenced by MLK activity through actions upstream of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ with consequences for whole body fat mass and insulin sensitivity. The recently demonstrated involvement of myocardin coactivators in the biogenesis of caveolae, Ω-shaped membrane invaginations of importance for lipid and glucose metabolism, is finally discussed. These novel roles of myocardin proteins may open the way for new unexplored strategies to combat metabolic diseases such as diabetes, which, at the current incidence, is expected to reach 333 million people worldwide by 2025. This review highlights newly discovered roles of myocardin-related transcription factors in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as novel insights into their well-established role as mediators of stretch-dependent effects in smooth muscle. As co-factors for serum response factor (SRF), MKLs regulates transcription of genes involved in the contractile function of smooth muscle cells. In addition to mechanical stimuli, this regulation has now been found to

  2. A family of structurally related RING finger proteins interacts specifically with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcM4.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Noel, G; Niedenthal, R; Tamura, T; Harbers, K

    1999-07-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcM4 was previously shown to be necessary for normal mouse development. As a first step in identifying target proteins or proteins involved in the specificity of UbcM4-mediated ubiquitylation, we have isolated seven cDNAs encoding proteins that specifically interact with UbcM4 but with none of the other Ubcs tested. This interaction was observed in yeast as well as in mammalian cells. With one exception, all UbcM4-interacting proteins (UIPs) belong to a family of proteins that contain a RING finger motif. As they are structurally related to RING finger proteins that have recently been shown to play an essential role in protein ubiquitylation and degradation, the possibility is discussed that UIPs are involved in the specific recognition of substrate proteins of UbcM4.

  3. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  4. Novel Interactions of the TRTK12 Peptide with S100 Protein Family Members: Specificity and Thermodynamic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N.; Tzul, Franco O.; Pandharipande, Pranav P.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of small, dimeric proteins that exert their biological functions in response to changing calcium concentrations. S100B is the best studied member and has been shown to interact with over 20 binding partners in a calcium-dependent manner. The TRTK12 peptide, derived from the consensus binding sequence for S100B, has previously been found to interact with S100A1 and has been proposed to be a general binding partner of the S100 family. To test this hypothesis and gain a better understanding of the specificity of binding for the S100 proteins sixteen members of the human S100 family were screened against this peptide and its alanine variants. Novel interactions were only found with two family members: S100P and S100A2, indicating that TRTK12 selectively interacts with a small subset of the S100 proteins. Substantial promiscuity was observed in the binding site of S100B to accommodate variations in the peptide sequence, while S100A1, S100A2, and S100P exhibited larger differences in the binding constants for the TRTK12 alanine variants. This suggests that single-point substitutions can be used to selectively modulate the affinity of TRTK12 peptides for individual S100 proteins. This study has important implications for the rational drug design of inhibitors for the S100 proteins, which are involved in a variety of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23899389

  5. PANTHER: a browsable database of gene products organized by biological function, using curated protein family and subfamily classification.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul D; Kejariwal, Anish; Campbell, Michael J; Mi, Huaiyu; Diemer, Karen; Guo, Nan; Ladunga, Istvan; Ulitsky-Lazareva, Betty; Muruganujan, Anushya; Rabkin, Steven; Vandergriff, Jody A; Doremieux, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    The PANTHER database was designed for high-throughput analysis of protein sequences. One of the key features is a simplified ontology of protein function, which allows browsing of the database by biological functions. Biologist curators have associated the ontology terms with groups of protein sequences rather than individual sequences. Statistical models (Hidden Markov Models, or HMMs) are built from each of these groups. The advantage of this approach is that new sequences can be automatically classified as they become available. To ensure accurate functional classification, HMMs are constructed not only for families, but also for functionally distinct subfamilies. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, including curator-assigned information, are available for each family. The current version of the PANTHER database includes training sequences from all organisms in the GenBank non-redundant protein database, and the HMMs have been used to classify gene products across the entire genomes of human, and Drosophila melanogaster. The ontology terms and protein families and subfamilies, as well as Drosophila gene c;assifications, can be browsed and searched for free. Due to outstanding contractual obligations, access to human gene classifications and to protein family trees and multiple sequence alignments will temporarily require a nominal registration fee. PANTHER is publicly available on the web at http://panther.celera.com.

  6. Chitosanases from Family 46 of Glycoside Hydrolases: From Proteins to Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Viens, Pascal; Lacombe-Harvey, Marie-Ève; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chitosanases, enzymes that catalyze the endo-hydrolysis of glycolytic links in chitosan, are the subject of numerous studies as biotechnological tools to generate low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) or chitosan oligosaccharides (CHOS) from native, high molecular weight chitosan. Glycoside hydrolases belonging to family GH46 are among the best-studied chitosanases, with four crystallography-derived structures available and more than forty enzymes studied at the biochemical level. They were also subjected to numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis. This review is focused on the taxonomic distribution of GH46 proteins, their multi-modular character, the structure-function relationships and their biological functions in the host organisms. PMID:26516868

  7. The tapetal AHL family protein TEK determines nexine formation in the pollen wall

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yue; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Jun; Gu, Jing-Nan; Blackmore, Stephen; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The pollen wall, an essential structure for pollen function, consists of two layers, an inner intine and an outer exine. The latter is further divided into sexine and nexine. Many genes involved in sexine development have been reported, in which the MYB transcription factor Male Sterile 188 (MS188) specifies sexine in Arabidopsis. However, nexine formation remains poorly understood. Here we report the knockout of TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK) leads to nexine absence in Arabidopsis. TEK encodes an AT-hook nuclear localized family protein highly expressed in tapetum during the tetrad stage. Absence of nexine in tek disrupts the deposition of intine without affecting sexine formation. We find that ABORTED MICROSPORES directly regulates the expression of TEK and MS188 in tapetum for the nexine and sexine formation, respectively. Our data show that a transcriptional cascade in the tapetum specifies the development of pollen wall. PMID:24804694

  8. Regulation of the Adaptive Immune Response by the IκB Family Protein Bcl-3

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Felicity D.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-3 is a member of the IκB family of proteins and an important regulator of Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB activity. The ability of Bcl-3 to bind and regulate specific NF-κB dimers has been studied in great depth, but its physiological roles in vivo are still not fully understood. It is, however, becoming clear that Bcl-3 is essential for the proper development, survival and activity of adaptive immune cells. Bcl-3 dysregulation can be observed in a number of autoimmune pathologies, and Bcl3-deficient animals are more susceptible to bacterial and parasitic infection. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles played by Bcl-3 in the development and regulation of the adaptive immune response, including lymphoid organogenesis, immune tolerance, lymphocyte function and dendritic cell biology. PMID:27023613

  9. CONTRIBUTION TO FAMILIAL BREAST CANCER OF INHERITED MUTATIONS IN THE BRCA2-INTERACTING PROTEIN PALB2

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Silvia; Norquist, Barbara M.; Walsh, Tom; Stray, Sunday; Mandell, Jessica B.; Lee, Ming K.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; King, Mary-Claire

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA2-interacting protein PALB2 are known to be associated with increased risks of breast cancer. In order to evaluate the contribution of PALB2 to familial breast cancer in the United States, we sequenced the coding sequences and flanking regulatory regions of the gene from constitutional genomic DNA of 1144 familial breast cancer patients with wildtype sequences at BRCA1 and BRCA2. Overall, 3.4% (33/972) of patients not selected by ancestry and 0% (0/172) of patients specifically of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry were heterozygous for a nonsense, frameshift, or frameshift-associated splice mutation in PALB2. Mutations were detected in both male and female breast cancer patients. All mutations were individually rare: the 33 heterozygotes harbored 13 different mutations, 5 previously reported and 8 novel. PALB2 heterozygotes were 4-fold more likely to have a male relative with breast cancer (P=0.0003) and 6-fold more likely to have a relative with pancreatic cancer (P=0.002), and 1.3-fold more likely to have a relative with ovarian cancer (P=0.18). Compared to their female relatives without mutations, increased risk of breast cancer for female PALB2 heterozygotes was 2.3-fold (95%CI [1.5–4.2]) by age 55 and 3.4-fold (95%CI [2.4–5.9]) by age 85. Loss of the wildtype PALB2 allele was observed in laser dissected tumor specimens from heterozygous patients. Given this mutation prevalence and risk, consideration might be given to clinical testing of PALB2 by complete genomic sequencing for familial breast cancer patients with wildtype sequences at BRCA1 and BRCA2. PMID:21285249

  10. An activation switch in the rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors: the thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Urizar, Eneko; Claeysen, Sylvie; Deupí, Xavier; Govaerts, Cedric; Costagliola, Sabine; Vassart, Gilbert; Pardo, Leonardo

    2005-04-29

    We aimed at understanding molecular events involved in the activation of a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, the thyrotropin receptor. We have focused on the transmembrane region and in particular on a network of polar interactions between highly conserved residues. Using molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis techniques we have identified residue Asn-7.49, of the NPxxY motif of TM 7, as a molecular switch in the mechanism of thyrotropin receptor (TSHr) activation. Asn-7.49 appears to adopt two different conformations in the inactive and active states. These two states are characterized by specific interactions between this Asn and polar residues in the transmembrane domain. The inactive gauche+ conformation is maintained by interactions with residues Thr-6.43 and Asp-6.44. Mutation of these residues into Ala increases the constitutive activity of the receptor by factors of approximately 14 and approximately 10 relative to wild type TSHr, respectively. Upon receptor activation Asn-7.49 adopts the trans conformation to interact with Asp-2.50 and a putatively charged residue that remains to be identified. In addition, the conserved Leu-2.46 of the (N/S)LxxxD motif also plays a significant role in restraining the receptor in the inactive state because the L2.46A mutation increases constitutive activity by a factor of approximately 13 relative to wild type TSHr. As residues Leu-2.46, Asp-2.50, and Asn-7.49 are strongly conserved, this molecular mechanism of TSHr activation can be extended to other members of the rhodopsin-like family of G protein-coupled receptors.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2179c protein establishes a new exoribonuclease family with broad phylogenetic distribution.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, Jan; Ollodart, Anja; Andrews, Emma S V; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Arcus, Vickery L; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    Ribonucleases (RNases) maintain the cellular RNA pool by RNA processing and degradation. In many bacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the enzymes mediating several central RNA processing functions are still unknown. Here, we identify the hypothetical Mtb protein Rv2179c as a highly divergent exoribonuclease. Although the primary sequence of Rv2179c has no detectable similarity to any known RNase, the Rv2179c crystal structure reveals an RNase fold. Active site residues are equivalent to those in the DEDD family of RNases, and Rv2179c has close structural homology to Escherichia coli RNase T. Consistent with the DEDD fold, Rv2179c has exoribonuclease activity, cleaving the 3' single-strand overhangs of duplex RNA. Functional orthologs of Rv2179c are prevalent in actinobacteria and found in bacteria as phylogenetically distant as proteobacteria. Thus, Rv2179c is the founding member of a new, large RNase family with hundreds of members across the bacterial kingdom. PMID:24311791

  12. An update of DIVERGE software for functional divergence analysis of protein family.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Zou, Yangyun; Su, Zhixi; Huang, Wei; Zhou, Zhan; Arendsee, Zebulun; Zeng, Yanwu

    2013-07-01

    DIVERGE is a software system for phylogeny-based analyses of protein family evolution and functional divergence. It provides a suite of statistical tools for selection and prioritization of the amino acid sites that are responsible for the functional divergence of a gene family. The synergistic efforts of DIVERGE and other methods have convincingly demonstrated that the pattern of rate change at a particular amino acid site may contain insightful information about the underlying functional divergence following gene duplication. These predicted sites may be used as candidates for further experiments. We are now releasing an updated version of DIVERGE with the following improvements: 1) a feasible approach to examining functional divergence in nearly complete sequences by including deletions and insertions (indels); 2) the calculation of the false discovery rate of functionally diverging sites; 3) estimation of the effective number of functional divergence-related sites that is reliable and insensitive to cutoffs; 4) a statistical test for asymmetric functional divergence; and 5) a new method to infer functional divergence specific to a given duplicate cluster. In addition, we have made efforts to improve software design and produce a well-written software manual for the general user.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Jéssica M; Ferreirós, Alba; Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Di Croce, Luciano; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Silva-Álvarez, Sabela Da; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Croce, Luciano Di; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression. PMID:25576924

  15. Apoptosis, Bcl-2 family proteins and caspases: the ABCs of seizure-damage and epileptogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Tobias; Henshall, David C

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common, chronic neurological disorder. It is characterized by recurring seizures which are the result of abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Molecular pathways underlying neuronal death are of importance because prolonged seizure episodes (status epilepticus) cause significant damage to the brain, particularly within vulnerable structures such as the hippocampus. Additionally, repeated seizures over time in patients with poorly controlled epilepsy may cause further cell loss. Biochemical hallmarks associated with apoptosis have been identified in hippocampal and neocortical material removed from patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy: altered expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family genes and increased expression of caspases and the presence of their cleaved forms. However, apoptotic cells are rarely detected in such patient material and there is evidence of anti-apoptotic signaling changes in the same tissue, including upregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. From animal studies there is evidence that both brief and prolonged seizures can cause neuronal apoptosis within the hippocampus. Such cell death can be associated with caspase and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein activation. Pharmacological or genetic modulations of these pathways can significantly influence DNA fragmentation and neuronal cell death after seizures. Thus, the signaling pathways associated with apoptosis are potentially important for the pathogenesis of epilepsy and may represent targets for neuroprotective and perhaps anti-epileptogenic therapies. PMID:21383882

  16. Characterization of a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase in Bifidobacterium longum: functional elucidation of a DUF1680 protein family member.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kiyotaka; Takashi, Yukari; Obuchi, Eriko; Kitahara, Kanefumi; Suganuma, Toshihiko

    2014-02-21

    Pfam DUF1680 (PF07944) is an uncharacterized protein family conserved in many species of bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and plants. Previously, we cloned and characterized the hypBA2 gene as a β-L-arabinobiosidase in Bifidobacterium longum JCM 1217. In this study, we cloned a DUF1680 family member, the hypBA1 gene, which constitutes a gene cluster with hypBA2. HypBA1 is a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase that liberates L-arabinose from the L-arabinofuranose (Araf)-β1,2-Araf disaccharide. HypBA1 also transglycosylates 1-alkanols with retention of the anomeric configuration. Mutagenesis and azide rescue experiments indicated that Glu-338 is a critical residue for catalytic activity. This study provides the first characterization of a DUF1680 family member, which defines a new family of glycoside hydrolases, the glycoside hydrolase family 127.

  17. HrpI of Erwinia amylovora functions in secretion of harpin and is a member of a new protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z M; Beer, S V

    1993-01-01

    HrpI, a 78-kDa protein, functions in the secretion of harpin, a proteinaceous elicitor of the hypersensitive response from Erwinia amylovora. The predicted amino acid sequence of HrpI is remarkably similar to that of LcrD of Yersinia species, the first member of a recently described protein family. Other proteins of the family are MixA from Shigella flexneri, InvA from Salmonella typhimurium, FlhA from Caulobacter crescentus, HrpI from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, HrpO from Pseudomonas solanacearum, and HrpC2 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Cells of E. amylovora containing mutated hrpI genes or cells of Escherichia coli containing the cloned hrp gene cluster with mutated hrpI produce but do not export harpin. When similar cells with functional hrpI genes were grown at 25 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C, harpin was exported to the culture supernatant. Direct evidence that HrpI is involved in the secretion of a virulence protein has been offered. Two other loci of the hrp gene cluster are involved in the regulation of harpin, and four other loci also are involved in the secretion of harpin. Since harpin and other proteins likely to be secreted by the LcrD family of proteins lack typical signal peptides, their secretion mechanism is distinct from the general protein export pathway. Images PMID:8253684

  18. A family of intermediate filament-like proteins is sequentially assembled into the cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Anderson-White, Brooke R; Ivey, F Douglas; Cheng, Katherine; Szatanek, Tomasz; Lorestani, Alexander; Beckers, Con J; Ferguson, David J P; Sahoo, Nivedita; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii divides by a unique process of internal budding that involves the assembly of two daughter cells within the mother. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma, which is composed of microtubules associated with an inner membrane complex (IMC), has an important role in this process. The IMC, which is directly under the plasma membrane, contains a set of flattened membranous sacs lined on the cytoplasmic side by a network of filamentous proteins. This network contains a family of intermediate filament-like proteins or IMC proteins. In order to elucidate the division process, we have characterized a 14-member subfamily of Toxoplasma IMC proteins that share a repeat motif found in proteins associated with the cortical alveoli in all alveolates. By creating fluorescent protein fusion reporters for the family members we determined the spatiotemporal patterns of all 14 IMC proteins through tachyzoite development. This revealed several distinct distribution patterns and some provide the basis for novel structural models such as the assembly of certain family members into the basal complex. Furthermore we identified IMC15 as an early marker of budding and, lastly, the dynamic patterns observed throughout cytokinesis provide a timeline for daughter parasite development and division.

  19. A member of the CPW-WPC protein family is expressed in and localized to the surface of developing ookinetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the development of malaria control programs, billions of people are still at risk for this infectious disease. Recently, the idea of the transmission-blocking vaccine, which works by interrupting the infection of mosquitoes by parasites, has gained attention as a promising strategy for malaria control and eradication. To date, a limited number of surface proteins have been identified in mosquito-stage parasites and investigated as potential targets for transmission-blocking vaccines. Therefore, for the development of effective transmission-blocking strategies in epidemic areas, it is necessary to identify novel zygote/ookinete surface proteins as candidate antigens. Methods Since the expression of many zygote/ookinete proteins is regulated post-transcriptionally, proteins that are regulated by well-known translational mediators were focused. Through in silico screening, CPW-WPC family proteins were selected as potential zygote/ookinete surface proteins. All experiments were performed in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii XNL. mRNA and protein expression profiles were examined by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, over the course of the life cycle of the malaria parasite. Protein function was also investigated by the generation of gene-disrupted transgenic parasites. Results The CPW-WPC protein family, named after the unique WxC repeat domains, is highly conserved among Plasmodium species. It is revealed that CPW-WPC mRNA transcripts are transcribed in gametocytes, while CPW-WPC proteins are expressed in zygote/ookinete-stage parasites. Localization analysis reveals that one of the CPW-WPC family members, designated as PyCPW-WPC-1, is a novel zygote/ookinete stage-specific surface protein. Targeted disruption of the pycpw-wpc-1 gene caused no obvious defects during ookinete and oocyst formation, suggesting that PyCPW-WPC-1 is not essential for mosquito-stage parasite development. Conclusions It is demonstrated that PyCPW-WPC-1

  20. A new family of highly variable proteins in the Chlamydophila pneumoniae genome

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Pradillon, Olivier; Bui, Hung; Sayada, Chalom; Denamur, Erick

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens characterized by a wide range of vertebrate host, tissue tropism and spectrum of diseases. To get insights into the biological mechanisms involved in these differences, we have put forward a computational and experimental procedure to identify the genome recombination hotspots, as frequent sequence variation allows rapid adaptation to environmental changes. We find a larger potential for recombination in Chlamydophila pneumoniae genomes as compared with Chlamydia trachomatis or Chlamydia muridarum. Such potential is mostly concentrated in a family of seven previously uncharacterized species-specific elements that we named ppp for C.pneumoniae polymorphic protein genes, which have the potential to vary by homologous recombination and slipped-mispair. Experimen tally, we show that these sequences are indeed highly polymorphic among a collection of nine C.pneumoniae strains of very diverse geographical and pathological origins, mainly by slippage of a poly(C) tract. We also show that most elements are transcribed during infection. In silico analyses suggest that Ppps correspond to outer membrane proteins. Given their species specificity, their putative location in the outer membrane and their extreme polymorphism, Ppps are most likely to be important in the pathogenesis of C.pneumoniae and could represent targets for future vaccine development. PMID:12384581

  1. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  2. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  3. The PSI family of nuclear proteins is required for growth in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Stührwohldt, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Dahlke, Renate I; Oecking, Claudia; Sauter, Margret

    2014-10-01

    PSI1 was identified as a gene that is co-expressed with the phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor genes PSKR1 and PSKR2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. It represents a plant-specific protein family of unknown function with six members in two clades. Clade 1 members PSI1, PSI2 and PSI3 were characterized in this study. All three are nuclear localized. A predicted N-terminal myristoylation site was functionally analyzed. psi1-1 seedlings have shorter roots and hypocotyls. This growth-retarded phenotype was restored by expression of either wildtype PSI1 or PSI1 G2A with a mutated myristate attachment site in the psi1-1 background suggesting that myristate attachment was not essential for PSI1 function. psi2-1 and psi3-1 seedlings have a wildtype phenotype but overexpression of PSI1 or PSI2 promoted seedling growth. PSI2 activity appears to be linked to PSK signaling as psi2-1 and psi2-1 psi3-1 roots are unresponsive to PSK. PSI3 functions in vegetative plant growth synergistic with PSI2. psi3-1 and particularly psi2-1 psi3-1 rosettes are small. Overexpression of PSI3 promoted plant growth indicating that PSI3 is limiting at the vegetative stage. Severe dwarfism of psi2-1 psi3-1 plants results from reduced cell growth and proliferation and premature leaf growth arrest. Plants further display reduced fertility and premature senescence revealing a crucial function of PSI proteins in vegetative growth and reproduction. Psi single and double knock-out plants have less and PSI3ox plants have more starch compared to wt and growth retardation is partially rescued by sucrose. Our studies reveal a crucial function of the nuclear-localized PSI proteins in growth possibly through metabolic control.

  4. Expanded microbial genome coverage and improved protein family annotation in the COG database

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects produce numerous sequences of deduced proteins, only a small fraction of which have been or will ever be studied experimentally. This leaves sequence analysis as the only feasible way to annotate these proteins and assign to them tentative functions. The Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/COG/), first created in 1997, has been a popular tool for functional annotation. Its success was largely based on (i) its reliance on complete microbial genomes, which allowed reliable assignment of orthologs and paralogs for most genes; (ii) orthology-based approach, which used the function(s) of the characterized member(s) of the protein family (COG) to assign function(s) to the entire set of carefully identified orthologs and describe the range of potential functions when there were more than one; and (iii) careful manual curation of the annotation of the COGs, aimed at detailed prediction of the biological function(s) for each COG while avoiding annotation errors and overprediction. Here we present an update of the COGs, the first since 2003, and a comprehensive revision of the COG annotations and expansion of the genome coverage to include representative complete genomes from all bacterial and archaeal lineages down to the genus level. This re-analysis of the COGs shows that the original COG assignments had an error rate below 0.5% and allows an assessment of the progress in functional genomics in the past 12 years. During this time, functions of many previously uncharacterized COGs have been elucidated and tentative functional assignments of many COGs have been validated, either by targeted experiments or through the use of high-throughput methods. A particularly important development is the assignment of functions to several widespread, conserved proteins many of which turned out to participate in translation, in particular rRNA maturation and tRNA modification. The new version of the

  5. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    PubMed

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates.

  6. Live-cell imaging with EosFP and other photoactivatable marker proteins of the GFP family.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Fluorescent proteins from the green fluorescent protein family have become indispensable imaging tools for cell biology. A wide variety of these proteins were discovered in nonbioluminescent anthozoa in recent years. Some of them feature exciting new properties, with the possibility to alter their intensity and/or fluorescence color by irradiation with light of specific wavelengths. Fluorescent highlighter proteins enable many interesting applications based on regional optical marking in live cells and tissues. This review provides an overview of photoactivatable marker proteins, with a focus on EosFP, a protein that can be switched from green to red fluorescence by approximately 400-nm light. A variety of applications are presented to illustrate the versatility of EosFP in live-cell imaging.

  7. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  8. Deficiency of pRb family proteins and p53 in invasive urothelial tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Mo, Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Changkun; Lepor, Herbert; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2009-12-15

    Defects in pRb tumor suppressor pathway occur in approximately 50% of the deadly muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas in humans and urothelial carcinoma is the most prevalent epithelial cancer in long-term survivors of hereditary retinoblastomas caused by loss-of-function RB1 mutations. Here, we show that conditional inactivation of both RB1 alleles in mouse urothelium failed to accelerate urothelial proliferation. Instead, it profoundly activated the p53 pathway, leading to extensive apoptosis, and selectively induced pRb family member p107. Thus, pRb loss triggered multiple fail-safe mechanisms whereby urothelial cells evade tumorigenesis. Additional loss of p53 in pRb-deficient urothelial cells removed these p53-dependent tumor barriers, resulting in late-onset hyperplasia, umbrella cell nuclear atypia, and rare-occurring low-grade, superficial papillary bladder tumors, without eliciting invasive carcinomas. Importantly, mice deficient in both pRb and p53, but not those deficient in either protein alone, were highly susceptible to subthreshold carcinogen exposure and developed invasive urothelial carcinomas that strongly resembled the human counterparts. The invasive lesions had a marked reduction of p107 but not p130 of the pRb family. Our data provide compelling evidence, indicating that urothelium, one of the slowest cycling epithelia, is remarkably resistant to transformation by pRb or p53 deficiency; that concurrent loss of these two tumor suppressors is necessary but insufficient to initiate urothelial tumorigenesis along the invasive pathway; that p107 may play a critical role in suppressing invasive urothelial tumor formation; and that replacing/restoring the function of pRb, p107, or p53 could be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to block urothelial tumor progression.

  9. A family of antimicrobial peptides is produced by processing of a 7S globulin protein in Macadamia integrifolia kernels.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J P; Green, J L; Goulter, K C; Manners, J M

    1999-09-01

    A new family of antimicrobial peptides has been discovered in Macadamia integrifolia. The first member of this new family to be purified from nut kernels was a peptide of 45 aa residues, termed MiAMP2c. This peptide inhibited various plant pathogenic fungi in vitro. cDNA clones corresponding to MiAMP2c encoded a 666 aa precursor protein homologous to vicilin 7S globulin proteins. The deduced precursor protein sequence contained a putative hydrophobic N-terminal signal sequence (28 aa), an extremely hydrophilic N-proximal region (212 aa), and a C-terminal region of 426 aa which is represented in all vicilins. The hydrophilic portion of the deduced protein contained the sequence for MiAMP2c as well as three additional segments having the same cysteine spacing pattern as MiAMP2c. Each member of the MiAMP2 family (i.e. MiAMP2a, b, c and d) consisted of approximately 50 amino acids and contained a C-X-X-X-C-(10-12)X-C-X-X-X-C motif. Subsequent isolations from seed exudates led to the purification of the predicted family members MiAMP2b and 2d, both of which also exhibited antimicrobial activity in vitro. These results suggest that some vicilins play a role in defence during seed germination.

  10. The current excitement about copy-number variation: how it relates to gene duplication and protein families

    PubMed Central

    Korbel, Jan O.; Kim, Philip M.; Chen, Xueying; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    Following recent technological advances there has been an increasing interest in genome structural variation, in particular copy-number variants (CNVs) – large-scale duplications and deletions – in the human genome. Although not immediately evident, CNV surveys make a conceptual connection between the fields of population genetics and protein families, in particular with regard to the stability and expandability of families. The mechanisms giving rise to CNVs can be considered as fundamental processes underlying gene duplication and loss; duplicated genes being the results of “successful” copies, fixed and maintained in the population. Conversely, many “unsuccessful” duplicates remain in the genome as pseudogenes. Here, we survey studies on CNVs, highlighting issues related to protein families. In particular, CNVs tend to affect specific gene functional categories, such as those associated with environmental response, and are depleted in genes related to basic cellular processes. Furthermore, CNVs occur more often at the periphery of the protein interaction network. Thereby, functional categories associated with successful duplicates and unsuccessful duplicates are clearly distinguishable. These trends are likely reflective of CNV formation biases and natural selection, both of which differentially influence distinct protein families. PMID:18511261

  11. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram.

  12. A family of antimicrobial peptides is produced by processing of a 7S globulin protein in Macadamia integrifolia kernels.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J P; Green, J L; Goulter, K C; Manners, J M

    1999-09-01

    A new family of antimicrobial peptides has been discovered in Macadamia integrifolia. The first member of this new family to be purified from nut kernels was a peptide of 45 aa residues, termed MiAMP2c. This peptide inhibited various plant pathogenic fungi in vitro. cDNA clones corresponding to MiAMP2c encoded a 666 aa precursor protein homologous to vicilin 7S globulin proteins. The deduced precursor protein sequence contained a putative hydrophobic N-terminal signal sequence (28 aa), an extremely hydrophilic N-proximal region (212 aa), and a C-terminal region of 426 aa which is represented in all vicilins. The hydrophilic portion of the deduced protein contained the sequence for MiAMP2c as well as three additional segments having the same cysteine spacing pattern as MiAMP2c. Each member of the MiAMP2 family (i.e. MiAMP2a, b, c and d) consisted of approximately 50 amino acids and contained a C-X-X-X-C-(10-12)X-C-X-X-X-C motif. Subsequent isolations from seed exudates led to the purification of the predicted family members MiAMP2b and 2d, both of which also exhibited antimicrobial activity in vitro. These results suggest that some vicilins play a role in defence during seed germination. PMID:10571855

  13. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  14. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family.

    PubMed

    Butt, Haroon; Graner, Sonja; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-03-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Involved in de novo DNA methylation 2 (IDN2) and the closely related factor of DNA methylation (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1-VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins.

  15. Multiple Evolutionary Origins of Ubiquitous Cu2+ and Zn2+ Binding in the S100 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lucas C.; Donor, Micah T.; Prell, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a large family of signaling proteins that play critical roles in biology and disease. Many S100 proteins bind Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Mn2+ as part of their biological functions; however, the evolutionary origins of binding remain obscure. One key question is whether divalent transition metal binding is ancestral, or instead arose independently on multiple lineages. To tackle this question, we combined phylogenetics with biophysical characterization of modern S100 proteins. We demonstrate an earlier origin for established S100 subfamilies than previously believed, and reveal that transition metal binding is widely distributed across the tree. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that Cu2+ and Zn2+ binding are common features of the family: the full breadth of human S100 paralogs—as well as two early-branching S100 proteins found in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica—bind these metals with μM affinity and stoichiometries ranging from 1:1 to 3:1 (metal:protein). While binding is consistent across the tree, structural responses to binding are quite variable. Further, mutational analysis and structural modeling revealed that transition metal binding occurs at different sites in different S100 proteins. This is consistent with multiple origins of transition metal binding over the evolution of this protein family. Our work reveals an evolutionary pattern in which the overall phenotype of binding is a constant feature of S100 proteins, even while the site and mechanism of binding is evolutionarily labile. PMID:27764152

  16. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis Sheds Light on the Diversity and Origin of the MLO Family of Integral Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Stefan; Pesch, Lina; Panstruga, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mildew resistance Locus O (MLO) proteins are polytopic integral membrane proteins that have long been considered as plant-specific and being primarily involved in plant–powdery mildew interactions. However, research in the past decade has revealed that MLO proteins diverged into a family with several clades whose members are associated with different physiological processes. We provide a largely increased dataset of MLO amino acid sequences, comprising nearly all major land plant lineages. Based on this comprehensive dataset, we defined seven phylogenetic clades and reconstructed the likely evolution of the MLO family in embryophytes. We further identified several MLO peptide motifs that are either conserved in all MLO proteins or confined to one or several clades, supporting the notion that clade-specific diversification of MLO functions is associated with particular sequence motifs. In baker’s yeast, some of these motifs are functionally linked to transmembrane (TM) transport of organic molecules and ions. In addition, we attempted to define the evolutionary origin of the MLO family and found that MLO-like proteins with highly diverse membrane topologies are present in green algae, but also in the distinctly related red algae (Rhodophyta), Amoebozoa, and Chromalveolata. Finally, we discovered several instances of putative fusion events between MLO proteins and different kinds of proteins. Such Rosetta stone-type hybrid proteins might be instructive for future analysis of potential MLO functions. Our findings suggest that MLO is an ancient protein that possibly evolved in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes, and consolidated in land plants with a conserved topology, comprising seven TM domains and an intrinsically unstructured C-terminus. PMID:26893454

  17. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis Sheds Light on the Diversity and Origin of the MLO Family of Integral Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Stefan; Pesch, Lina; Panstruga, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Mildew resistanceLocusO(MLO) proteins are polytopic integral membrane proteins that have long been considered as plant-specific and being primarily involved in plant-powdery mildew interactions. However, research in the past decade has revealed that MLO proteins diverged into a family with several clades whose members are associated with different physiological processes. We provide a largely increased dataset of MLO amino acid sequences, comprising nearly all major land plant lineages. Based on this comprehensive dataset, we defined seven phylogenetic clades and reconstructed the likely evolution of the MLO family in embryophytes. We further identified several MLO peptide motifs that are either conserved in all MLO proteins or confined to one or several clades, supporting the notion that clade-specific diversification of MLO functions is associated with particular sequence motifs. In baker's yeast, some of these motifs are functionally linked to transmembrane (TM) transport of organic molecules and ions. In addition, we attempted to define the evolutionary origin of the MLO family and found that MLO-like proteins with highly diverse membrane topologies are present in green algae, but also in the distinctly related red algae (Rhodophyta), Amoebozoa, and Chromalveolata. Finally, we discovered several instances of putative fusion events between MLO proteins and different kinds of proteins. Such Rosetta stone-type hybrid proteins might be instructive for future analysis of potential MLO functions. Our findings suggest that MLO is an ancient protein that possibly evolved in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes, and consolidated in land plants with a conserved topology, comprising seven TM domains and an intrinsically unstructured C-terminus. PMID:26893454

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  19. Overexpression of EVE1, a novel ubiquitin family protein, arrests inflorescence stem development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hoyeun; Jeong, Young-Min; Choi, Monica Y; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sang-Gu

    2011-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, inflorescence stem formation is a critical process in phase transition from the vegetative to the reproductive state. Although inflorescence stem development has been reported to depend on the expression of a variety of genes during floral induction and repression, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of inflorescence stem formation. By activation T-DNA tagging mutagenesis of Arabidopsis, a dominant gain-of-function mutation, eve1-D (eternally vegetative phase1-Dominant), which has lost the ability to form an inflorescence stem, was isolated. The eve1-D mutation exhibited a dome-shaped primary shoot apical meristem (SAM) in the early vegetative stage, similar to that seen in the wild-type SAM. However, the SAM in the eve1-D mutation failed to transition into an inflorescence meristem (IM) and eventually reached senescence without ever leaving the vegetative phase. The eve1-D mutation also displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including lobed and wavy rosette leaves, short petioles, and an increased number of rosette leaves. Genetic analysis indicated that the genomic location of the EVE1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana corresponded to a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) F4C21 from chromosome IV at ∼17cM which encoded a novel ubiquitin family protein (At4g03350), consisting of a single exon. The EVE1 protein is composed of 263 amino acids, contains a 52 amino acid ubiquitin domain, and has no glycine residue related to ubiquitin activity at the C-terminus. The eve1-D mutation provides a way to study the regulatory mechanisms that control phase transition from the vegetative to the reproductive state.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis efpA encodes an efflux protein of the QacA transporter family.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, J L; Pang, Y; Mdluli, K E; Moran, A J; Victor, T C; Stokes, R W; Mahenthiralingam, E; Kreiswirth, B N; Butt, J L; Baron, G S; Treit, J D; Kerr, V J; Van Helden, P D; Roberts, M C; Nano, F E

    1997-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv efpA gene encodes a putative efflux protein, EfpA, of 55,670 Da. The deduced EfpA protein was similar in secondary structure to Pur8, MmrA, TcmA, LfrA, EmrB, and other members of the QacA transporter family (QacA TF) which mediate antibiotic and chemical resistance in bacteria and yeast. The predicted EfpA sequence possessed all transporter motifs characteristic of the QacA TF, including those associated with proton-antiport function and the motif considered to be specific to exporters. The 1,590-bp efpA open reading frame was G+C rich (65%), whereas the 40-bp region immediately upstream had an A+T bias (35% G+C). Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that efpA was expressed in vitro and in situ. Putative promoter sequences were partially overlapped by the A+T-rich region and by a region capable of forming alternative secondary structures indicative of transcriptional regulation in analogous systems. PCR single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis demonstrated that these upstream flanking sequences and the 231-bp, 5' coding region are highly conserved among both drug-sensitive and multiply-drug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis. The efpA gene was present in the slow-growing human pathogens M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium bovis and in the opportunistic human pathogens Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellular. However, efpA was not present in 17 other opportunistically pathogenic or nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. PMID:9008277

  1. ETS family proteins activate transcription from HIV-1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Hodge, D R; Thompson, D M; Robinson, L; Panayiotakis, A; Watson, D K; Papas, T S

    1993-10-01

    ets is a multigene family and its members share a common ETS DNA-binding domain. ETS proteins activate transcription via binding to a purine-rich GGAA core sequence located in promoters/enhancers of various genes, including several that are transcriptionally active in T cells. The ETS1, ETS2, and ERBG/Hu-FLI-1 gene expression pattern also suggests a role for these genes in cells of hematopoietic lineage. The HIV-1 LTR core enhancer contains two 10-base pair direct repeat sequences (left and right) that are required for regulation of HIV-1 mRNA expression by host transcription factors, including NF kappa B. Two ETS-binding sites are present in the core enhancer of all the HIV-1 isolates reported so far. In our studies, we utilized HIV-1 HXB2 and HIV-1 Z2Z6 core enhancers because the Z2Z6 strain has a single point mutation flanking the right ETS-binding site. We demonstrate that the ETS1, ETS2, and ERGB/Hu-FLI-1 proteins can trans-activate transcription from both the HXB2 and Z2Z6 core enhancer when linked to a reporter (cat) gene. In addition, we show that the DNA binding and trans-activation with the Z2Z6 core enhancer is at least 40-fold higher than that observed with the HXB2 core enhancer. Further, we provide evidence that the marked increase in binding and trans-activation with Z2Z6 core enhancer sequences is due to the substitution of a flanking T residue in HXB2 TGGAA) by a C residue in Z2Z6 (CGGAA) isolate, thus generating an optimal ETS-binding core (CGGAA) sequence. PMID:8280476

  2. Familial acromegaly due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene mutation in a Turkish cohort.

    PubMed

    Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Sayitoglu, Muge; Firtina, Sinem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is associated with 15-20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas and 50-80% of cases with AIP mutation exhibit a somatotropinoma. Herein we report clinical characteristics of a large family where AIP R304X variants have been identified. AIP mutation analysis was performed on a large (n = 52) Turkish family across six generations. Sella MRIs of 30 family members were obtained. Basal pituitary hormone levels were evaluated in 13 family members harboring an AIP mutation. Thirteen of 52 family members (25%) were found to have a heterozygous nonsense germline R304X mutation in the AIP gene. Seven of the 13 mutation carriers (53.8%) had current or previous history of pituitary adenoma. Of these 7 mutation carriers, all but one had somatotropinoma/somatolactotropinoma (85.7% of the pituitary adenomas). Of the 6 acromegaly patients with AIP mutation (F/M: 3/3) the mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 32 ± 10.3 years while the mean age of symptom onset was 24.8 ± 9.9 years. Three of the six (50%) acromegaly cases with AIP mutation within the family presented with a macroadenoma and none presented with gigantism. Biochemical disease control was achieved in 66.6% (4/6) of the mutation carriers with acromegaly after a mean follow-up period of 18.6 ± 17.6 years. Common phenotypic characteristics of familial pituitary adenoma or somatotropinoma due to AIP mutation vary between families or even between individuals within a family. PMID:23743763

  3. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  4. Biochemical and biophysical approaches to study the structure and function of the chloride channel (ClC) family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The chloride channel (ClC) protein family comprises both chloride (Cl(-)) channels and chloride/proton (Cl(-)/H(+)) antiporters. In prokaryotes and eukaryotes, these proteins mediate the movement of Cl(-) ions across the membrane. In eukaryotes, ClC proteins play a role in the stabilization of membrane potential, epithelial ion transport, hippocampal neuroprotection, cardiac pacemaker activity and vesicular acidification. Moreover, mutations in the genes encoding ClC proteins can cause genetic disease in humans. In prokaryotes, the Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters, such as ClC-ec1 found in Escherichia coli promote proton expulsion in the extreme acid-resistance response common to enteric bacteria. To date, structural and functional studies of the prokaryotic protein have revealed unique structural features, including complicated transmembrane topology with 18 α-helices in each subunit and an anion-coordinating region in each subunit. Several different approaches such as X-ray crystallography, NMR, biochemical studies, and molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to the study of ClC proteins. Continued study of the unique structure and function of this diverse family of proteins has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for neuronal, renal, bone, and food-borne diseases. PMID:27554851

  5. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  6. Protein interactions with HER-family receptors can have different characteristics depending on the hosting cell line.

    PubMed

    Barta, Pavel; Malmberg, Jennie; Melicharova, Ludmila; Strandgård, John; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Laznicek, Milan; Andersson, Karl

    2012-05-01

    Cell lines are common model systems in the development of therapeutic proteins and in the research on cellular functions and dysfunctions. In this field, the protein interaction assay is a frequently used tool for assessing the adequacy of a protein for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the interaction characteristics depend on the choice of cell line for HER-family receptors. The interaction characteristics of two therapeutic antibodies (trastuzumab and cetuximab) and one Affibody molecule (ZHER2:342), interacting with the intended receptor were characterized with high precision using an automated real-time interaction method, in different cell lines (HaCaT, A431, HEP-G2, SKOV3, PC3, DU-145). Clear differences in binding affinity and kinetics, up to one order of magnitude, were found for the interaction of the same protein binding to the same receptor on different cells for all three proteins. For HER-family receptors, it is therefore important to refer to the measured affinity for a protein-receptor interaction together with the hosting cell line. The ability to accurately measure affinity and kinetics of a protein-receptor interaction on cell lines of different origins may increase the understanding of underlying receptor biology, and impact the selection of candidates in the development of therapeutic or diagnostic agents. PMID:22200885

  7. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution. PMID:17630830

  8. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein gene family in peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanping; Han, Jan; Liu, Dan; Wen, Xicheng; Li, Yu; Tao, Ran; Peng, Yongbin; Fang, Jinggui; Wang, Chen

    2014-02-25

    The FKBP protein family has prolyl isomerase activity and is related in function to cyclophilins. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete peach genome sequences allowed the identification of 21 FKBP genes by HMMER and BLAST analyses. Scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the peach genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of peach FKBPs were analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between peach FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of peach FKBP gene results revealed that most peach FKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few peach FKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. This data could contribute to better understanding of the complex regulation of the peach FKBP gene family, and also provide valuable information for further research in peach functional genomics.

  9. Loss of Prkar1a leads to Bcl-2 family protein induction and cachexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Gangoda, L; Doerflinger, M; Srivastava, R; Narayan, N; Edgington, L E; Orian, J; Hawkins, C; O'Reilly, L A; Gu, H; Bogyo, M; Ekert, P; Strasser, A; Puthalakath, H

    2014-11-01

    Loss of function mutations in the Prkar1a gene are the cause of most cases of Carney complex disorder. Defects in Prkar1a are thought to cause hyper-activation of PKA signalling, which drives neoplastic transformation, and Prkar1a is therefore considered to be a tumour suppressor. Here we show that loss of Prkar1a in genetically modified mice caused transcriptional activation of several proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and thereby caused cell death. Interestingly, combined loss of Bim and Prkar1a increased colony formation of fibroblasts in culture and promoted their growth as tumours in immune-deficient mice. Apart from inducing apoptosis, systemic deletion of Prkar1a caused cachexia with muscle loss, macrophage activation and increased lipolysis as well as serum triglyceride levels. Loss of single allele of Prkar1a did not enhance tumour development in a skin cancer model, but surprisingly, when combined with the loss of Bim, caused a significant delay in tumorigenesis and this was associated with upregulation of other BH3-only proteins, PUMA and NOXA. These results show that loss of Prkar1a can only promote tumorigenesis when Prkar1a-mediated apoptosis is somehow countered. PMID:25012505

  10. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Rieger, Simone; Moquet, Jayne; Spanswick, Victoria J.; Hartley, John A.; Rothkamm, Kai; Huang, Paul H.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1) is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ). Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution. PMID:25818292

  11. A Novel Family of Cys-Rich Membrane Proteins Mediates Cadmium Resistance in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Yong; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, Do-Young; Vogt, Esther; Shim, Donghwan; Choi, Kwan Sam; Hwang, Inhwan; Lee, Youngsook

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread pollutant that is toxic to plant growth. However, only a few genes that contribute to Cd resistance in plants have been identified. To identify additional Cd(II) resistance genes, we screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expression system employing the Cd(II)-sensitive yeast mutant ycf1. This screening process yielded a small Cys-rich membrane protein (Arabidopsis plant cadmium resistance, AtPcrs). Database searches revealed that there are nine close homologs in Arabidopsis. Homologs were also found in other plants. Four of the five homologs that were tested also increased resistance to Cd(II) when expressed in ycf1. AtPcr1 localizes at the plasma membrane in both yeast and Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPcr1 exhibited increased Cd(II) resistance, whereas antisense plants that showed reduced AtPcr1 expression were more sensitive to Cd(II). AtPcr1 overexpression reduced Cd uptake by yeast cells and also reduced the Cd contents of both yeast and Arabidopsis protoplasts treated with Cd. Thus, it appears that the Pcr family members may play an important role in the Cd resistance of plants. PMID:15181212

  12. Functional Evolution in the Plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Hileman, Lena C.

    2013-01-01

    The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development. PMID:23577017

  13. Loss of Prkar1a leads to Bcl-2 family protein induction and cachexia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gangoda, L; Doerflinger, M; Srivastava, R; Narayan, N; Edgington, L E; Orian, J; Hawkins, C; O'Reilly, L A; Gu, H; Bogyo, M; Ekert, P; Strasser, A; Puthalakath, H

    2014-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the Prkar1a gene are the cause of most cases of Carney complex disorder. Defects in Prkar1a are thought to cause hyper-activation of PKA signalling, which drives neoplastic transformation, and Prkar1a is therefore considered to be a tumour suppressor. Here we show that loss of Prkar1a in genetically modified mice caused transcriptional activation of several proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and thereby caused cell death. Interestingly, combined loss of Bim and Prkar1a increased colony formation of fibroblasts in culture and promoted their growth as tumours in immune-deficient mice. Apart from inducing apoptosis, systemic deletion of Prkar1a caused cachexia with muscle loss, macrophage activation and increased lipolysis as well as serum triglyceride levels. Loss of single allele of Prkar1a did not enhance tumour development in a skin cancer model, but surprisingly, when combined with the loss of Bim, caused a significant delay in tumorigenesis and this was associated with upregulation of other BH3-only proteins, PUMA and NOXA. These results show that loss of Prkar1a can only promote tumorigenesis when Prkar1a-mediated apoptosis is somehow countered. PMID:25012505

  14. Trefoil factor family (TFF) proteins as potential serum biomarkers in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vocka, M; Langer, D; Petrtyl, J; Vockova, P; Hanus, T; Kalousova, M; Zima, T; Petruzelka, L

    2015-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) is composed of three secretory proteins (TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3) that play an important role in mucosal protection of gastrointestinal tract. Their overexpression in colorectal tumors seems to be associated with more aggressive disease. We collected serum samples from 79 healthy controls and 97 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer at the time of diagnosis or at progression. Serum levels of TTF1-3, CEA and CA19-9 were measured by ELISA. Serum TFF1 and TFF3 levels were significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer compared to healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Moreover, serum levels of TFF3 correlated with extent of liver involvement in patient without pulmonary metastases and patients with higher TFF3 levels had significantly worse outcome (p < 0.0001). Compared to CEA and CA19-9, TFF3 had higher sensitivity and the same specificity. Our results indicate that TFF3 is an effective biomarker in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with higher sensitivity than CEA a CA19-9. TFF3 levels strongly correlate with extension of liver disease and seem to have prognostic value.

  15. In vitro activity differences between proteins of the ADF/cofilin family define two distinct subgroups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Bernstein, Barbara W; Sneider, Judith M; Boyle, Judith A; Minamide, Laurie S; Bamburg, James R

    2004-06-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are an essential group of proteins that are important regulators of actin filament turnover in vivo. Although protists and yeasts express only a single member of this family, metazoans express two or more members in many cell types. In cells expressing both ADF and cofilin, differences have been reported in the regulation of their expression, their pH sensitivity, and their intracellular distribution. Each member has qualitatively similar interactions with actin, but quantitative differences have been noted. Here we compared quantitative differences between chick ADF and chick cofilin using several assays that measure G-actin binding, actin filament length distribution, and assembly/disassembly dynamics. Quantitative differences were measured in the critical concentrations of the complexes required for assembly, in the effects of nucleotide and divalent metal on actin monomer binding, in pH-dependent severing, in enhancement of filament minus end off-rates, and in steady-state filament length distributions generated in similar mixtures. Some of these assays were used to compare the activities of several ADF/cofilins from across phylogeny, most of which fall into one of two groups based upon their behavior. The ADF-like group has higher affinities for Mg(2+)-ATP-G-actin than the cofilin-like group and a greater pH-dependent depolymerizing activity.

  16. Hereditary protein C deficiency caused by compound heterozygous mutants in two independent Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Ting; Yue, Fei; Wang, Min; Lu, Ye-Ling; Dai, Jing; Ding, Qiu-Lan; Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Hui-Fen; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-12-01

    We report two compound heterozygous mutants that caused severe type I protein C (PC) deficiency in two independent Chinese families.PC antigen was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and PC activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Genetic mutations were screened with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by direct sequencing. PC mutants were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells for the evaluation of PC secretory activity and function. The subcellular location was visualised by immunofluorescence assay. The structural analysis of mutation was performed as well.Compound heterozygous mutations of Arg178Trp and Asp255His with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 1, a 28-year-old male with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. The other mutations of Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 2, a 19-year-old male with DVT. The PC activities with Arg178Trp, Asp255His, Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile mutations decreased significantly. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that only trace amount of PC with novel Thr295Ile mutation was transported to the Golgi apparatus. Subsequent structural analysis indicated severe impairments of intracellular folding and secretion.The two rare compound heterozygous mutations could cause type I PC deficiency via impairment of secretory activity of PC.

  17. Familial Alzheimer’s Disease Mutations Differentially Alter Amyloid β-Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although most cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide’s assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD. PMID:23173071

  18. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  19. Bid, a Widely Expressed Proapoptotic Protein of the Bcl-2 Family, Displays Lipid Transfer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Esposti, Mauro Degli; Erler, Janine T.; Hickman, John A.; Dive, Caroline

    2001-01-01

    Bid is an abundant proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is crucial for the induction of death receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary tissues such as liver. Bid action has been proposed to involve the relocation of its truncated form, tBid, to mitochondria to facilitate the release of apoptogenic cytochrome c. The mechanism of Bid relocation to mitochondria was unclear. We report here novel biochemical evidence indicating that Bid has lipid transfer activity between mitochondria and other intracellular membranes, thereby explaining its dynamic relocation to mitochondria. First, physiological concentrations of phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylgycerol induced an accumulation of full-length Bid in mitochondria when incubated with light membranes enriched in endoplasmic reticulum. Secondly, native and recombinant Bid, as well as tBid, displayed lipid transfer activity under the same conditions and at the same nanomolar concentrations leading to mitochondrial relocation and release of cytochrome c. Thus, Bid is likely to be involved in the transport and recycling of mitochondrial phospholipids. We discuss how this new role of Bid may relate to its proapoptotic action. PMID:11585909

  20. Lincomycin Biosynthesis Involves a Tyrosine Hydroxylating Heme Protein of an Unusual Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Jitka; Olsovska, Jana; Novak, Petr; Mojzes, Peter; Chaloupkova, Radka; Kamenik, Zdenek; Spizek, Jaroslav; Kutejova, Eva; Mareckova, Marketa; Tichy, Pavel; Damborsky, Jiri; Janata, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The gene lmbB2 of the lincomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces lincolnensis ATCC 25466 was shown to code for an unusual tyrosine hydroxylating enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of this clinically important antibiotic. LmbB2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified near to homogeneity and shown to convert tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In contrast to the well-known tyrosine hydroxylases (EC 1.14.16.2) and tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), LmbB2 was identified as a heme protein. Mass spectrometry and Soret band-excited Raman spectroscopy of LmbB2 showed that LmbB2 contains heme b as prosthetic group. The CO-reduced differential absorption spectra of LmbB2 showed that the coordination of Fe was different from that of cytochrome P450 enzymes. LmbB2 exhibits sequence similarity to Orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which has recently been classified as a heme peroxidase. Tyrosine hydroxylating activity of LmbB2 yielding DOPA in the presence of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) was also observed. Reaction mechanism of this unique heme peroxidases family is discussed. Also, tyrosine hydroxylation was confirmed as the first step of the amino acid branch of the lincomycin biosynthesis. PMID:24324587

  1. YcgC represents a new protein deacetylase family in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Jiang, He-Wei; Ge, Feng; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yang; Qi, Bang-Ruo; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Cole, Philip A; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is one of the most important protein posttranslational modifications that plays essential roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, only a few lysine deacetylases (KDACs) have been identified in prokaryotes, perhaps in part due to their limited sequence homology. Herein, we developed a ‘clip-chip’ strategy to enable unbiased, activity-based discovery of novel KDACs in the Escherichia coli proteome. In-depth biochemical characterization confirmed that YcgC is a serine hydrolase involving Ser200 as the catalytic nucleophile for lysine deacetylation and does not use NAD+ or Zn2+ like other established KDACs. Further, in vivo characterization demonstrated that YcgC regulates transcription by catalyzing deacetylation of Lys52 and Lys62 of a transcriptional repressor RutR. Importantly, YcgC targets a distinct set of substrates from the only known E. coli KDAC CobB. Analysis of YcgC’s bacterial homologs confirmed that they also exhibit KDAC activity. YcgC thus represents a novel family of prokaryotic KDACs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05322.001 PMID:26716769

  2. Expression pattern of the apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 family in p53+ human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (ASPP) family comprises three members, namely, ASPP1, ASPP2, and iASPP. They regulate the promotive effect of p53 on apoptosis. Breast cancer (BC) remains as one of the leading causes of cancer or cancer-related mortality among women. However, the relationship between the ASPP family members and p53, as well as the dissemination and expression pattern of ASPP family members in p53+ BC, has not been elucidated. Our objectives are to detect the expression of ASPP family members in p53+ BC cell lines and determine its significance in tumor cell apoptosis. Methods The mRNA expression of ASPP family members in five p53+ BC cell lines was detected through RT-PCR and assayed using Quality-one software. The p53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. Afterward, the apoptosis indices of the five BC cell lines were detected by flow cytometry. Results The iASPP mRNA was expressed in Bcap-37, MCF-7, and HBL-100. Compared with the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, significant differences were found in the ASPP1 mRNA in Bcap-37, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HBL-100 (p < 0.05), except that in ZR-75-30 (p > 0.05). The ASPP2 mRNA was expressed in MDA-MB-231, Bcap-37, and MCF-7, but not in HBL-100 and ZR-75-30. The p53 protein was expressed in five breast cancer cell lines. ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 apoptosis indices were higher than those of other breast cancer cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p < 0.01). Conclusions The mRNA expression of ASPP family members varied in the five p53+ BC cell lines. The results also verified that the family members have an important function in apoptosis, which was promoted by p53 protein. ZR-75-30 BC showed high apoptosis index, without expression of any ASPP family members, indicating that the pathway of apoptosis in this cell line may be related to other cell transduction pathway. MDA-MB-231, Bcap37, and MCF-7 cell lines all expressed ASPP1/2. However, the

  3. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein family and its transmembrane regulator from capsicum (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Romero-Castillo, Rafael A; Roy Choudhury, Swarup; León-Félix, Josefina; Pandey, Sona

    2015-05-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have created numerous mechanisms to sense and respond to their environment. One such highly conserved mechanism involves regulation by heterotrimeric G-protein complex comprised of alpha (Gα), beta (Gβ) and gamma (Gγ) subunits. In plants, these proteins play important roles in signal transduction pathways related to growth and development including response to biotic and abiotic stresses and consequently affect yield. In this work, we have identified and characterized the complete heterotrimeric G-protein repertoire in the Capsicum annuum (Capsicum) genome which consists of one Gα, one Gβ and three Gγ genes. We have also identified one RGS gene in the Capsicum genome that acts as a regulator of the G-protein signaling. Biochemical activities of the proteins were confirmed by assessing the GTP-binding and GTPase activity of the recombinant Gα protein and its regulation by the GTPase acceleration activity of the RGS protein. Interaction between different subunits was established using yeast- and plant-based analyses. Gene and protein expression profiles of specific G-protein components revealed interesting spatial and temporal regulation patterns, especially during root development and during fruit development and maturation. This research thus details the characterization of the first heterotrimeric G-protein family from a domesticated, commercially important vegetable crop.

  4. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    PubMed

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  5. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  6. AinS and a new family of autoinducer synthesis proteins.

    PubMed

    Gilson, L; Kuo, A; Dunlap, P V

    1995-12-01

    In Vibrio fischeri, the autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AI-1) governs the cell density-dependent induction of the luminescence operon via the LuxR transcriptional activator. The synthesis of AI-1 from bacterial metabolic intermediates is dependent on luxI. Recently, we found a second V. fischeri autoinducer molecule, N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AI-2), that in E. coli also activates the luminescence operon via LuxR. A locus independent of luxI was identified as being required for AI-2 synthesis. This 2.7-kb ain (autoinducer) locus was characterized by transposon insertion mutagenesis, deletion and complementation analysis, and DNA sequencing. A single 1,185-bp gene, ainS, was found to be the sole exogenous gene necessary for the synthesis of AI-2 in Escherichia coli. In addition, a V. fischeri ainS mutant produced AI-1 but not AI-2, confirming that in its native species ainS is specific for the synthesis of AI-2. ainS is predicted to encode a 45,580-Da protein which exhibits no similarity to LuxI or to any of the LuxI homologs responsible for the synthesis of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones in a variety of other bacteria. The existence of two different and unrelated autoinducer synthesis genes suggests the occurrence of convergent evolution in the synthesis of homoserine lactone signaling molecules. The C-terminal half of AinS shows homology to a putative protein in Vibrio harveyi, LuxM, which is required for the synthesis of a V. harveyi bioluminescence autoinducer. Together, AinS and LuxM define a new family of autoinducer synthesis proteins. Furthermore, the predicted product of another gene, ainR, encoded immediately downstream of ainS, shows homology to LuxN, which is similarly encoded downstream of luxM in V. harveyi and proposed to have sensor/regulator functions in the bioluminescence response to the V. harveyi auto inducer. This similarity presents the possibility that AI-2, besides interacting with LuxR, also interacts with AinR under

  7. Identification of a family of fatty acid-speciated Sonic Hedgehog proteins, whose members display differential biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Houel, Stephane; Rodgriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Singh, Samer; Schilling, Neal; J.Capobianco, Anthony; Ahn, Natalie G.; Robbins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (HH) proteins are proteolytically processed into a biologically active form, which is covalently modified by cholesterol and palmitate. However, most studies of HH biogenesis have characterized protein from cells in which HH is over-expressed. We purified Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) from cells expressing physiologically relevant levels, and showed that it was more potent than SHH isolated from over-expressing cells. Furthermore, the SHH in our preparations were modified with a diverse spectrum of fatty acids on their amino-termini, and this spectrum of fatty acids varied dramatically depending on the growth conditions of the cells. The fatty acid composition of SHH affected its trafficking to lipid rafts, as well as its potency. Our results suggest that HH proteins exist as a family of diverse lipid-speciated proteins, which might be altered in different physiological and pathological contexts to regulate distinct properties of HH proteins. PMID:25732819

  8. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: The Two Faces of the FUS/EWS/TAF15 Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    FUS, EWS, and TAF15 form the FET family of RNA-binding proteins whose genes are found rearranged with various transcription factor genes predominantly in sarcomas and in rare hematopoietic and epithelial cancers. The resulting fusion gene products have attracted considerable interest as diagnostic and promising therapeutic targets. So far, oncogenic FET fusion proteins have been regarded as strong transcription factors that aberrantly activate or repress target genes of their DNA-binding fusion partners. However, the role of the transactivating domain in the context of the normal FET proteins is poorly defined, and, therefore, our knowledge on how FET aberrations impact on tumor biology is incomplete. Since we believe that a full understanding of aberrant FET protein function can only arise from looking at both sides of the coin, the good and the evil, this paper summarizes evidence for the central function of FET proteins in bridging RNA transcription, processing, transport, and DNA repair. PMID:21197473

  9. Molecular Characterization of an Outer Membrane Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Belonging to the OmpA Family

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter A.; Nair, Sean P.; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Wilson, Michael; Henderson, Brian

    1998-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (OMP) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an OmpA homolog that demonstrates electrophoretic heat modifiability. The gene encoding this protein was isolated from a genomic library of A. actinomycetemcomitans NCTC 9710 by immunoscreening with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis. Expression of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli and subsequent Western blot analysis revealed a protein with an approximate molecular mass of 34 kDa. The amino acid sequence predicted from the cloned gene demonstrated that the mature protein had a molecular mass of 34,911 Da and significant identity to members of the OmpA family of proteins. We have named the major OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans Omp34, and its corresponding gene has been named omp34. PMID:9423883

  10. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 - a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jasmin K; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T; Henderson, Peter J F; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the "unknown major facilitator family-2" (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria.

  11. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  12. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 – a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the “unknown major facilitator family-2” (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26528249

  13. Interactions of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor with multiple Gi-family G-proteins: studies with pertussis toxin-resistant G-protein mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, A; Watson-Koken, M A; Rees, S; Lee, M; Milligan, G

    1997-01-01

    The alpha2A-adrenoceptor is the prototypic example of the family of G-protein-coupled receptors which function by activation of 'Gi-like' pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. A number of members of this subfamily of G-proteins are often co-expressed in a single cell type. To examine the interaction of this receptor with individual Gi-family G-proteins the porcine alpha2A-adrenoceptor was transiently transfected into COS-7 cells either alone or with each of wild-type Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha or mutations of each of these G-proteins in which the cysteine residue which is the target for pertussis toxin-catalysed ADP-ribosylation was exchanged for a glycine residue. The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 stimulated both high-affinity GTPase activity and the binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-35thio]-triphosphate (GTP[35S]), when expressed without any additional G-protein. These effects were greatly reduced by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of each of the wild-type Gi-like G-protein alpha-subunits resulted in enhanced agonist activation of the cellular G-protein population which was fully prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of the receptor along with the cysteine-to-glycine mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha resulted in agonist stimulation of these G-proteins, which was as great as that of the wild type proteins, but now the agonist stimulation produced over that due to the activation of endogenously expressed Gi-like G-proteins was resistant to pertussis toxin treatment. The Cys --> Gly mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha were each also able to limit agonist-mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. The degree of agonist-mediated activation of the pertussis toxin-resistant mutant of Gi1alpha was correlated highly both with the level of expression of this G-protein and with the level of expression of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor. Half-maximal stimulation of high-affinity GTPase

  14. Crystal Structure of Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Reveals Targeting of TRIM Family Member PML via Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D.; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A.; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)