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Sample records for 6-hour sepsis resuscitation

  1. The resuscitation package in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Demertzis, Lee M; Kollef, Marin H

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis and its attendant complications are commonly encountered in the intensive care unit. Early recognition of sepsis is critical because it allows for rapid deployment of a multifaceted resuscitation package. The cornerstones of sepsis management are antibiotic therapy, source control, and hemodynamic resuscitation. In select patients, ancillary therapies are indicated, such as activated protein C, corticosteroids, and glycemic control. Given the complexity of sepsis management, optimal care can be delivered as a bundle-a protocol encompassing the above interventions. The evidence behind the various components of sepsis management are reviewed here.

  2. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  4. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named "metabolic resuscitation", would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to "mitochondrial resuscitation" are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  5. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named "metabolic resuscitation", would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to "mitochondrial resuscitation" are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics.

  6. Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls: Excessive Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fluid resuscitation is the mainstay therapy in modern sepsis management. Its efficacy was demonstrated in the landmark study by Emmanuel Rivers in 2001. However, more recent evidence largely shows that a positive fluid balance increases mortality in critically ill patients with sepsis. This article examines the theoretical benefits of fluid resuscitation and physiological responses to it that may negatively affect patients' outcome.

  7. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named “metabolic resuscitation”, would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to “mitochondrial resuscitation” are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  8. Prognostic Value of Lactate and Central Venous Oxygen Saturation after Early Resuscitation in Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ik Joon; Suh, Gee Young; Jeon, Kyeongman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of static and dynamic variables of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and lactate in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who underwent early quantitative resuscitation. We also investigated whether ScvO2 measured after initial resuscitation could provide additive prognostic value to that of lactate. We analyzed the sepsis registry for patients presenting to the emergency department and included patients with simultaneous measurements of lactate and ScvO2 at the time of presentation (H0) and 6 hours (H6) after resuscitation. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality and multivariable logistic analysis was used to adjust for confounders. A total of 363 patients were included, and the overall 28-day mortality was 18%. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for predicting 28-day mortality was as follows: lactate (H6), 0.81; lactate (H0), 0.73; relative lactate change, 0.67; ScvO2 (H6), 0.65; relative ScvO2 change 0.59; ScvO2 (H0), 0.58. Patients with lactate normalization showed significantly lower 28-day mortality compared to patients without lactate normalization (3% vs. 28%, P<0.01). However, in those who achieved ScvO2 (H6) ≥70%, there was a significant difference in 28-mortality only in patients without lactate normalization (21% vs. 39%, P<0.01) but no difference in those with lactate normalization (4% vs. 3%, P = 0.71). In multivariable analysis, lactate normalization was significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for 28-day mortality, 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.54; P <0.01), but ScvO2 (H6) ≥70% showed only a marginal association (the adjusted OR for 28-day mortality, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.26–1.01; P = 0.05). ScvO2 (H6) ≥70% was associated with 28-day mortality only in cases without lactate normalization in subgroup analysis (adjusted OR 0.37, 95% CI, 0.18–0.79; P = 0.01). Six-hour lactate was the strongest

  9. Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls: Excessive Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fluid resuscitation is the mainstay therapy in modern sepsis management. Its efficacy was demonstrated in the landmark study by Emmanuel Rivers in 2001. However, more recent evidence largely shows that a positive fluid balance increases mortality in critically ill patients with sepsis. This article examines the theoretical benefits of fluid resuscitation and physiological responses to it that may negatively affect patients' outcome. PMID:26633156

  10. Initial resuscitation from severe sepsis: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Vandervelden, Stefanie; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades many recommendations for the management of patients with sepsis and septic shock have been published, mainly as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines. In order to use these recommendations at the bedside one must fully understand their limitations, especially with regard to preload assessment, fluid responsiveness and cardiac output. In this review we will discuss the evidence behind the bundles presented by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and will try to explain why some recommendations may need to be updated. Barometric preload indicators, such as central venous pressure (CVP) or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, can be persistently low or erroneously increased, as is the case in situations of increased intrathoracic pressure, as seen with the application of high positive end-expiratory pressure, or in situations with increased intra-abdominal pressure. Chasing a CVP of 8 to 12 mm Hg may lead to under-resuscitation in these situations. On the other hand, a low CVP does not always correspond to fluid responsiveness and may lead to over-resuscitation and all the deleterious effects on end-organ function associated with fluid overload. We will suggest the introduction of new variables and more dynamic measurements. During the initial resuscitation phase, it is equally important to assess fluid responsiveness, either with a passive leg raising manoeuvre or an end-expiratory occlusion test. The use of functional hemodynamics with stroke volume variation or pulse pressure variation may further help to identify patients who will respond to fluid administration or not. Furthermore, ongoing fluid resuscitation beyond the first 24 hours guided by CVP may lead to futile fluid loading. In patients that do not transgress spontaneously from the Ebb to Flow phase of shock, one should consider (active) de-resuscitation guided by extravascular lung water index measurements.

  11. Initial resuscitation from severe sepsis: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Vandervelden, Stefanie; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades many recommendations for the management of patients with sepsis and septic shock have been published, mainly as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines. In order to use these recommendations at the bedside one must fully understand their limitations, especially with regard to preload assessment, fluid responsiveness and cardiac output. In this review we will discuss the evidence behind the bundles presented by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and will try to explain why some recommendations may need to be updated. Barometric preload indicators, such as central venous pressure (CVP) or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, can be persistently low or erroneously increased, as is the case in situations of increased intrathoracic pressure, as seen with the application of high positive end-expiratory pressure, or in situations with increased intra-abdominal pressure. Chasing a CVP of 8 to 12 mm Hg may lead to under-resuscitation in these situations. On the other hand, a low CVP does not always correspond to fluid responsiveness and may lead to over-resuscitation and all the deleterious effects on end-organ function associated with fluid overload. We will suggest the introduction of new variables and more dynamic measurements. During the initial resuscitation phase, it is equally important to assess fluid responsiveness, either with a passive leg raising manoeuvre or an end-expiratory occlusion test. The use of functional hemodynamics with stroke volume variation or pulse pressure variation may further help to identify patients who will respond to fluid administration or not. Furthermore, ongoing fluid resuscitation beyond the first 24 hours guided by CVP may lead to futile fluid loading. In patients that do not transgress spontaneously from the Ebb to Flow phase of shock, one should consider (active) de-resuscitation guided by extravascular lung water index measurements. PMID:26578400

  12. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  13. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis: Post Hoc Analyses of Data from a Multicentre Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn; Perner, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. Methods We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer’s acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume and secondary outcome total fluid input administered from 24 hours before randomisation until the end of day 3 post-randomisation. We performed multivariate analyses with hospital and patient baseline characteristics as covariates to assess associations with fluid volumes given. Results We included 654 patients who were in the ICU for 3 days and had fluid volumes available. Individual trial sites administered significantly different volumes of fluid resuscitation and total fluid input after adjusting for baseline variables (P<0.001). Increased lactate, higher cardiovascular and renal SOFA subscores, lower respiratory SOFA subscore and surgery were all independently associated with increased fluid resuscitation volumes. Conclusions Hospital characteristics adjusted for patient baseline values were associated with differences in fluid resuscitation volumes given in the first 3 days of severe sepsis. The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis. PMID:27196104

  14. Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers in patients with sepsis during resuscitation in the emergency department: a prospective observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quinten, Vincent M; van Meurs, Matijs; ter Maaten, Jan C; Ligtenberg, Jack J M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sepsis lacks a reliable and readily available measure of disease activity. Thereby, it remains unclear how to monitor response to treatment. Research on numerous (new) biomarkers associated with sepsis provided disappointing results and little is known about changes in vital signs during sepsis resuscitation. We hypothesised that trends in vital signs together with routine biomarker levels during resuscitation might provide information about the response to treatment at a very early stage of sepsis in the emergency department (ED). We therefore explore trends in vital signs and routine biomarker levels during sepsis resuscitation in the ED. Design Prospective observational pilot study. Setting ED of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Participants 99 Adult non-trauma patients with suspected infection and 2 or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria admitted to the ED. Primary and secondary outcome measures Vital signs and biomarker levels at admittance (T0) and after 3 h in the ED (T1). Results In total, data of 99 patients were analysed. Of these patients, 63 presented with sepsis, 30 with severe sepsis and 6 with septic shock. All vital signs decreased, except for peripheral oxygen saturation which increased. Almost all routine biomarker levels decreased during resuscitation, except for C reactive protein, bands, potassium, troponin T and direct bilirubin which remained stable. Sodium, chloride and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide increased slightly. Conclusions Vital signs and biomarker levels showed descending trends during resuscitation, except for parameters directly affected by treatment modalities. Despite these trends, most patients improved clinically. Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers might be helpful in predicting clinical course and response to treatment in patients with sepsis during early resuscitation. PMID:27225646

  15. Comparative analysis of survival between elderly and non-elderly severe sepsis and septic shock resuscitated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Henrique; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Silva, Eliézer; Pardini, Andreia; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes between elderly (≥65 years old) and non-elderly (<65 years old) resuscitated severe sepsis and septic shock patients and determine predictors of death among elderly patients. Methods Retrospective cohort study including 848 severe sepsis and septic shock patients admitted to the intensive care unit between January 2006 and March 2012. Results Elderly patients accounted for 62.6% (531/848) and non-elderly patients for 37.4% (317/848). Elderly patients had a higher APACHE II score [22 (18-28) versus 19 (15-24); p<0.001], compared to non-elderly patients, although the number of organ dysfunctions did not differ between the groups. No significant differences were found in 28-day and in-hospital mortality rates between elderly and non-elderly patients. The length of hospital stay was higher in elderly compared to non-elderly patients admitted with severe sepsis and septic shock [18 (10-41) versus 14 (8-29) days, respectively; p=0.0001]. Predictors of death among elderly patients included age, site of diagnosis, APACHE II score, need for mechanical ventilation and vasopressors. Conclusion In this study population early resuscitation of elderly patients was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies addressing the long-term impact on functional status and quality of life are necessary. PMID:26313436

  16. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Where have we been and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Dellinger, R Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign develops and promotes evidence-based guidelines and performance-improvement practices aimed at reducing deaths from sepsis worldwide. The most recent guidelines, published in 2013, provide detailed management strategies for acute care, fluid resuscitation, and vasopressor use. In addition, the campaign has developed simple, short protocols for what to do within 3 and 6 hours of recognition of sepsis. These protocols are associated with reduced mortality rates.

  17. Harmonizing international trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock: methodology of ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe and compare the design of three independent but collaborating multicenter trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods We reviewed the three current trials, one each in the USA (ProCESS: protocolized care for early septic shock), Australasia (ARISE: Australasian resuscitation in sepsis evaluation), and the UK (ProMISe: protocolised management in sepsis). We used the 2010 CONSORT (consolidated standards of reporting trials) statement and the 2008 CONSORT extension for trials assessing non-pharmacologic treatments to describe and compare the underlying rationale, commonalities, and differences. Results All three trials conform to CONSORT guidelines, address the same fundamental questions, and share key design elements. Each trial is a patient-level, equal-randomized, parallel-group superiority trial that seeks to enroll emergency department patients with inclusion criteria that are consistent with the original early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) trial (suspected or confirmed infection, two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, and refractory hypotension or elevated lactate), is powered to detect a 6–8 % absolute mortality reduction (hospital or 90-day), and uses trained teams to deliver EGDT. Design differences appear to primarily be driven by between-country variation in health care context. The main difference between the trials is the inclusion of a third, alternative resuscitation strategy arm in ProCESS. Conclusions Harmonization of study design and methods between severe sepsis trials is feasible and may facilitate pooling of data on completion of the trials. PMID:23958738

  18. High Mortality in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients with Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Ko, Wen-Je; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is a potentially deadly illness and always requires intensive care. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders remain a debated issue in critical care and limited data exist about its impact on care of septic patients, particularly in East Asia. We sought to assess outcome of severe sepsis patients with regard to DNR status in Taiwan. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units (ICUs) between 2008 and 2010. All severe sepsis patients were included for analysis. Primary outcome was association between DNR orders and ICU mortality. Volume of interventions was used as proxy indicator to indicate aggressiveness of care. Results Sixty-seven (9.4%) of 712 patients had DNR orders on ICU admission, and these patients were older and had higher disease severity compared with patients without DNR orders. Notably, DNR patients experienced high ICU mortality (90%). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of DNR orders was independently associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio: 6.13; 95% confidence interval: 2.66–14.10). In propensity score-matched cohort, ICU mortality rate (91%) in the DNR group was statistically higher than that (62%) in the non-DNR group (p <0.001). Regarding ICU interventions, arterial and central venous catheterization were more commonly used in DNR patients than in non-DNR patients. Conclusions From the Asian perspective, septic patients placed on DNR orders on ICU admission had exceptionally high mortality. In contrast to Western reports, DNR patients received more ICU interventions, reflecting more aggressive approach to dealing with this patient population. The findings in some ways reflect differences between East and West cultures and suggest that DNR status is an important confounder in ICU studies involving severely septic patients. PMID:27416064

  19. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the episode 3 , 4 . What is the economic cost of sepsis? Treatment for sepsis often involves a ... care unit and complex therapies, which incur high costs. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality lists ...

  20. Effects of Fluid Resuscitation With 0.9% Saline Versus a Balanced Electrolyte Solution on Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model of Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feihu; Peng, Zhi-Yong; Bishop, Jeffery V.; Cove, Matthew E.; Singbartl, Kai; Kellum, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of 0.9% saline versus a balanced electrolyte solution on acute kidney injury in a rat model of sepsis. Design Controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University laboratory. Subjects Sixty adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions We induced sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture and randomized animals to receive fluid resuscitation with either 0.9% saline or Plasma-Lyte solution for 4 hours after 18 hours of cecal ligation and puncture (10 mL/kg in the first hour and 5 mL/kg in the next 3 hr). Blood and urine specimens were obtained from baseline, 18 hours after cecal ligation and puncture, immediately after 4 hours fluid resuscitation, and 24 hours later. We measured blood gas, plasma electrolytes, creatinine, interleukin-6, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentrations. We also analyzed urine for cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. We used Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage criteria for creatinine to assess severity of acute kidney injury. We observed all animals for survival up to 1 day after resuscitation. Surviving animals were killed for kidney histology. Finally, we carried out an identical study in 12 healthy animals. Measurements and Main Results Compared with Plasma-Lyte, 0.9% saline resuscitation resulted in significantly greater blood chloride concentrations (p < 0.05) and significantly decreased pH and base excess. Acute kidney injury severity measured by RIFLE criteria was increased with 0.9% saline compared with Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (p < 0.05), and these results were consistent with kidney histology and biomarkers of acute kidney injury. Twenty-four-hour survival favored Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (76.6% vs 53.3%; p = 0.03). Finally, in healthy animals, we found no differences between fluids and no evidence of acute kidney injury. Conclusion Volume resuscitation with Plasma-Lyte resulted in less acidosis and less kidney injury and improved short

  1. Sepsis in critical care.

    PubMed

    King, Joan E

    2007-03-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome produced by the accelerated activity of the inflammatory immune response, the clotting cascade, and endothelial damage. It is a systematic process that can progress easily into septic shock and MODS. The chemical mediators or cytokines produce a complex self-perpetuating process that impacts all body systems. It is critical for the nurse first to identify patients at risk for developing sepsis and to assess patients who have SIRS and sepsis continually for signs and symptoms of organ involvement and organ dysfunction. Once sepsis has been diagnosed, evidence-based practice indicates initiation of fluid resuscitation. Vasopressor therapy, positive inotropic support, and appropriate antibiotic therapy should be started within the first hour. Within a 6-hour timeframe the goal is stabilization of the CVP, MAP, and UOP to prevent further organ damage. The challenge for nurses caring for septic patients is to support the treatment goals, to prevent added complications including stress ulcers, DVTs, aspiration pneumonia, and the progression to MODS, and to address the patient's and the family's psychosocial needs. As complex as the pathophysiology of sepsis is, the nursing care is equally complex but also rewarding. Patients who previously might have died now recover as vigilant nursing care combines forces with new drug therapies and evidence-based practice guidelines.

  2. Impact of Compliance with a Sepsis Resuscitation Bundle in a Portuguese Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Carvas, Joao Miguel; Canelas, Cátia; Montanha, Gustavo; Silva, Carlos; Esteves, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Introdução: A sépsis severa e o choque sético são entidades clínicas frequentes com elevada morbi-mortalidade que superam os da doença cardíaca coronária ou do acidente vascular cerebral. A realidade da sépsis tratada no hospital fora das unidades de cuidados intensivos é amplamente desconhecida. Pretende-se neste trabalho estimar o cumprimento da bundle das 6-horas da Surviving Sepsis Campaign num serviço de urgência português e os resultados clínicos dos doentes. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospetivo, observacional de coorte com 178 pacientes com sépsis severa/choque sético internados na unidade de cuidados intensivos e intermédios entre 1 de Janeiro de 2012 e 31 de Dezembro de 2012. Resultados: Durante o período estudado foi diagnosticado choque sético em 100 pacientes (56,2%) e sépsis severa em 78 pacientes (43,8%). O cumprimento com a bundle foi: (1) 62,9% para a medição de lactatos; (2) 62,9% para a colheita hemoculturas antes da antibioterapia; (3) 41,6% para a administração de antibióticos nas primeiras 3 horas; (4) 76,4% para a administração de fluidos; (5) 25% para a administração de vasopressores; (6) 37% for medição da pressão venosa central; (7) 39% para a medição da saturação venosa central de oxigénio. O cumprimento de todas as medidas foi observado em 22% dos pacientes. A medida 'colheita hemoculturas antes da antibioterapia' esteve significativamente associada a um menor risco de mortalidade na unidade de cuidados intensivos e aos 28 dias. Também se verificou uma tendência para uma correlação inversa entre cumprimento crescente da bundle e a mortalidade na unidade de cuidados intensivos e aos 28 dias. Discussão: A baixa adesão à bundle das 6-horas da Surviving Sepsis Campaign é um resultado que replica o de estudos internacionais semelhantes. A explicação para este fenómeno é complexa mas pode incluir a falta de monitorização da qualidade dos cuidados no serviço de urgência. Conclusões: O

  3. Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Essential facts Sepsis, a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection, is believed to cause about 44,000 deaths a year. If not recognised early and treated promptly, sepsis can lead to shock, multiple organ failure and death. Major reports (UK parliamentary and health service ombudsman enquiry in 2013 and the UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death in 2015) have highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined. PMID:27581906

  4. Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Essential facts [Figure: see text] Sepsis, a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection, is believed to cause about 44,000 deaths a year. If not recognised early and treated promptly, sepsis can lead to shock, multiple organ failure and death. Major reports (UK parliamentary and health service ombudsman enquiry in 2013 and the UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death in 2015) have highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined. PMID:27615338

  5. The impact of serial lactate monitoring on emergency department resuscitation interventions and clinical outcomes in severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Matthew; Holthaus, Christopher V; Fuller, Brian M

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring in the setting of critical illness must be linked to beneficial therapy to affect clinical outcome. Elevated serum lactate is associated with an increase in mortality in emergency department (ED) patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The reduction of lactate levels toward normal during acute resuscitation is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The majority of data demonstrating the interventions used to achieve a reduction in lactate levels and the associated clinical outcomes have been obtained during protocolized randomized trials. We therefore conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of 243 adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock to assess the interventions associated with nonprotocolized serial lactate monitoring and to assess clinical outcomes. A multivariable model was used to assess outcome differences between the serial lactate (SL) and no serial lactate (NL) cohorts. The SL group received more crystalloid resuscitation (3.6 L vs. 2.5 L; P < 0.01), central venous oxygen saturation monitoring (30% vs. 12%; P < 0.01), and central venous pressure monitoring (23.5% vs. 11.8%; P = 0.02). By day 28, a total of 31 patients in the SL group (23.5%) and 44 in the NL group (39.6%) had died. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the lack of serial lactate monitoring was independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 - 3.89; P = 0.02). The SL group also showed greater improvement in 24-h Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (1.16 vs. 0.19; P = 0.03), decreased intensive care unit length of stay in days (4.6 vs. 6.0; P = 0.04), and more ventilator-free (19.9 vs. 16; P = 0.05) and vasopressor-free (21.6 vs. 17.9; P = 0.02) days. In the setting of routine clinical care, serial lactate monitoring is associated with an increase in crystalloid administration, resuscitation interventions, and improved clinical outcomes in ED patients with

  6. The adverse effect of emergency department crowding on compliance with the resuscitation bundle in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of emergency department (ED) crowding on the implementation of tasks in the early resuscitation bundle during acute care of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Methods We analyzed the sepsis registry from August 2008 to March 2012 for patients presenting to an ED of a tertiary urban hospital and meeting the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. The ED occupancy rate, which was defined as the total number of patients in the ED divided by the total number of ED beds, was used for measuring the degree of ED crowding. It was categorized into three groups (low; intermediate; high crowding). The primary endpoint was the overall compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle. Results A total of 770 patients were enrolled. Of the eligible patients, 276 patients were assigned to the low crowding group, 250 patients to the intermediate crowding group, and 244 patients to the high crowding group (ED occupancy rate: ≤ 115; 116–149; ≥ 150%). There was significant difference in compliance rates among the three groups (31.9% in the low crowding group, 24.4% in the intermediate crowding group, and 16.4% in the high crowding group, P < 0.001). In a multivariate model, the high crowding group had a significant association with lower compliance (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26 to 0.76; P = 0.003). When the ED occupancy rate was included as a continuous variable in the model, it had also a negative correlation with the overall compliance (OR of 10% increase of the ED occupancy rate, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84 to 0.96, P = 0.002). Conclusions ED crowding was significantly associated with lower compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle and decreased likelihood of the timely implementation of the bundle elements. PMID:24093643

  7. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in People with weakened immune systems Infants and children The elderly People with chronic ...

  8. Early management of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Pereira, Adriano José; Gleeson, James; Backer, Daniel De

    2014-01-01

    Increased awareness of the signs and symptoms of sepsis and an emphasis on the importance of early treatment have helped to improve survival rates from this serious and frequent condition in recent years. With no specific, effective anti-sepsis therapies available, management focuses on early source control with adequate and appropriate antibiotics and removal of any source of infection, rapid resuscitation, hemodynamic stabilization and organ support. Use of dedicated teams to care for patients with sepsis can help optimize early management.

  9. 19 CFR 101.6 - Hours of business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 11582, Jan. 1, 1971; 34 FR 2957; 3 CFR Ch. 11) (b) Local conditions requiring different hgurs. If... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hours of business. 101.6 Section 101.6 Customs... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.6 Hours of business. Except as specified in paragraphs (a) through (g) of...

  10. An Electronic Tool for the Evaluation and Treatment of Sepsis in the ICU: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Matthew W.; Weavind, Liza; Hooper, Michael H.; Rice, Todd W.; Gowda, Supriya Srinivasa; Nadas, Andras; Song, Yanna; Martin, Jason B.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Wheeler, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether addition of an electronic sepsis evaluation and management tool to electronic sepsis alerting improves compliance with treatment guidelines and clinical outcomes in septic intensive care unit patients. Design A pragmatic randomized trial. Setting Medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic, tertiary care medical center Patients Four hundred and seven patients admitted during a 4-month period to the medical or surgical intensive care unit with a diagnosis of sepsis established at the time of admission or in response to an electronic sepsis alert. Interventions Patients were randomized to usual care or the availability of an electronic tool capable of importing, synthesizing, and displaying sepsis-related data from the medical record, using logic rules to offer individualized evaluations of sepsis severity and response to therapy, informing users about evidence-based guidelines, and facilitating rapid order entry. Measurements and Main Results There was no difference between the electronic tool (218 patients) and usual care (189 patients) with regard to the primary outcome of time to completion of all indicated Surviving Sepsis Campaign 6 hour Sepsis Resuscitation Bundle elements (Hazard Ratio 1.98, 95% Confidence Interval 0.75 – 5.20, p=0.159) or time to completion of each element individually. ICU mortality, ICU-free days, and ventilator-free days did not differ between intervention and control. Providers used the tool to enter orders in only 28% of available cases. Conclusions A comprehensive electronic sepsis evaluation and management tool is feasible and safe but did not influence guideline compliance or clinical outcomes, perhaps due to low utilization. PMID:25867906

  11. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Avila, Audrey A; Kinberg, Eliezer C; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-03-10

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer's Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role.

  12. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Audrey A; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer’s Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role. PMID:27081589

  13. BOREAS ECMWF 6-Hour Analysis and Forecast Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcommer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Betts, Alan; Strub, Richard

    2000-01-01

    In cooperation with BOREAS atmospheric research efforts, the ECMWF agreed to provide BOREAS with a customized subset of its 6-hourly forecast data. This data set contains parameters from three ECMWF data products in GRIB format: Surface and Diagnostic Fields, Supplemental Fields, and Extension Data. Sample software and information are provided to assist in reading the data files. Temporally, the atmospheric parameters are available for the four main synoptic hours of 00, 06, 12, and 18 UTC from 1994 to 1996. Spatially, the data are stored in a 0.5- by 0.5-degree latitude/longitude grid. To cover the entire BOREAS study area, the grid extends from 48 to 62 degrees latitude and -92 to -114 degrees longitude. The data are stored in binary data representation known as FM 92 GRIB. Due to the complexity of the content and format of this data set, users are advised to read Sections 6, 7, 8, and 14 before using data. Based on agreements between BOREAS and ECMWF, users may legally obtain and use these data only by having a set of the BOREAS CD-ROMs that contain the data. Possession or use of these data under any other circumstance is prohibited. See Sections 11.3 and 20.4 for details.

  14. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Christa A; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) was created in 2002 and consists of severe sepsis management guidelines and a sepsis performance improvement program. The second revision of the guidelines, published in 2013, are sponsored by 30 international scientific organizations and contain changes in recommendations for fluids and vasopressor administration. The new 3- and 6-hour sepsis 'bundles' (sets of care elements) include a software program that can be downloaded free from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign website (www.survivingsepsis.org). The traditional intensive care unit and emergency department champion-driven sepsis performance improvement program continues internationally with the kick off of a new grant-funded hospital floor sepsis performance improvement initiative.

  15. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  16. Sepsis-associated hyperlactatemia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alvarez, Mercedes; Marik, Paul; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2014-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that sepsis and septic shock are associated with hyperlactatemia (sepsis-associated hyperlactatemia (SAHL)). SAHL is a strong independent predictor of mortality and its presence and progression are widely appreciated by clinicians to define a very high-risk population. Until recently, the dominant paradigm has been that SAHL is a marker of tissue hypoxia. Accordingly, SAHL has been interpreted to indicate the presence of an 'oxygen debt' or 'hypoperfusion', which leads to increased lactate generation via anaerobic glycolysis. In light of such interpretation of the meaning of SAHL, maneuvers to increase oxygen delivery have been proposed as its treatment. Moreover, lactate levels have been proposed as a method to evaluate the adequacy of resuscitation and the nature of the response to the initial treatment for sepsis. However, a large body of evidence has accumulated that strongly challenges such notions. Much evidence now supports the view that SAHL is not due only to tissue hypoxia or anaerobic glycolysis. Experimental and human studies all consistently support the view that SAHL is more logically explained by increased aerobic glycolysis secondary to activation of the stress response (adrenergic stimulation). More importantly, new evidence suggests that SAHL may actually serve to facilitate bioenergetic efficiency through an increase in lactate oxidation. In this sense, the characteristics of lactate production best fit the notion of an adaptive survival response that grows in intensity as disease severity increases. Clinicians need to be aware of these developments in our understanding of SAHL in order to approach patient management according to biological principles and to interpret lactate concentrations during sepsis resuscitation according to current best knowledge. PMID:25394679

  17. Nutrition and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Chin, w Dat N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional support in critically ill patients with sepsis has received much attention in recent years. However, many of the studies have produced conflicting results. As for all critically ill patients, nutritional support, preferably via the enteral route, should be commenced once initial resuscitation and adequate perfusion pressure is achieved. Where enteral feeding is impossible or not tolerated, parenteral nutrition (either as total or complimentary therapy) may safely be administered. Most positive studies relating to nutritional support and sepsis have been in the setting of sepsis prevention. Thus, the administration of standard nutrition formulas to critically ill patients within 24 h of injury or intensive care unit admission may decrease the incidence of pneumonia. Both arginine-supplemented enteral diets, given in the perioperative period, and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition have been shown to decrease infections in surgical patients. Parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions as well as probiotics given in the perioperative period may also reduce infections in patients undergoing major abdominal operations, such as liver transplantation. There is little support at the present time for the positive effect of specific pharmaconutrients, in particular fish oil, probiotics, or antioxidants, in the setting of established sepsis. More studies are clearly required on larger numbers of more homogeneous groups of patients. PMID:23075593

  18. Nutrition and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Chin, w Dat N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional support in critically ill patients with sepsis has received much attention in recent years. However, many of the studies have produced conflicting results. As for all critically ill patients, nutritional support, preferably via the enteral route, should be commenced once initial resuscitation and adequate perfusion pressure is achieved. Where enteral feeding is impossible or not tolerated, parenteral nutrition (either as total or complimentary therapy) may safely be administered. Most positive studies relating to nutritional support and sepsis have been in the setting of sepsis prevention. Thus, the administration of standard nutrition formulas to critically ill patients within 24 h of injury or intensive care unit admission may decrease the incidence of pneumonia. Both arginine-supplemented enteral diets, given in the perioperative period, and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition have been shown to decrease infections in surgical patients. Parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions as well as probiotics given in the perioperative period may also reduce infections in patients undergoing major abdominal operations, such as liver transplantation. There is little support at the present time for the positive effect of specific pharmaconutrients, in particular fish oil, probiotics, or antioxidants, in the setting of established sepsis. More studies are clearly required on larger numbers of more homogeneous groups of patients.

  19. Management of neonatal sepsis in term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Du Pont-Thibodeau, Geneviève; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a common and deadly disease. It is broadly defined as a systemic inflammatory response, occurring in the first four weeks of life, as a result of a suspected or proven infection. Yet, more reliable and consistently applied diagnostic criteria would help improve our knowledge of the disease epidemiology. Several therapeutic attempts to control systemic inflammation in sepsis were unsuccessful. Immediate empirical administration of broad-spectrum anti-microbials, aggressive fluid resuscitation, and vaso-active or inotropic support (or both) are the mainstays of the therapeutic management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:25165566

  20. Sepsis-associated renal salt wasting: how much is too much?

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who presented with an extremely high level of glomerular filtration rate and renal salt wasting during acute severe sepsis. Clinical implications for resuscitation and antibiotics dosage regimens are discussed. PMID:24408942

  1. 49 CFR 398.6 - Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.6 Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time. No person shall drive nor shall any motor carrier permit or require a driver employed or used by it to...

  2. 49 CFR 398.6 - Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.6 Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time. No person shall drive nor shall any motor carrier permit or require a driver employed or used by it to...

  3. 49 CFR 398.6 - Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.6 Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time. No person shall drive nor shall any motor carrier permit or require a driver employed or used by it to...

  4. 49 CFR 398.6 - Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.6 Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time. No person shall drive nor shall any motor carrier permit or require a driver employed or used by it to...

  5. 49 CFR 398.6 - Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.6 Hours of service of drivers; maximum driving time. No person shall drive nor shall any motor carrier permit or require a driver employed or used by it to...

  6. Thermic effect of a meal over 3 and 6 hours in lean and obese men.

    PubMed

    Segal, K R; Edaño, A; Tomas, M B

    1990-09-01

    Controversy regarding defective postprandial thermogenesis in obesity may partly be due to methodological factors such as duration of measurement. To clarify further the role of blunted thermogenesis in obesity, the thermic effect of food was compared in seven lean (mean +/- SEM, 15.7% +/- 1.5% body fat, by densitometry) and seven obese men (37.3% +/- 3% fat) over 3 and 6 hours. The groups were matched for age (35 +/- 2 and 33 +/- 2 years for the lean and obese groups; range, 25 to 39 years), fat-free mass (FFM), and aerobic fitness. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured by indirect calorimetry for 6 hours on two mornings, in randomized order: (1) after a 720-kcal liquid mixed meal, which was 24% protein, 21% fat, and 55% carbohydrate; and (2) in the postabsorptive state. The thermic effect of food, calculated as postprandial minus postabsorptive RMR, was significantly greater for the lean than obese men for the first 3 hours of measurement (67 +/- 6 v 49 +/- 3 kcal/3 hours; P less than .01). During the second 3 hours, the thermic effect of food was marginally, but not significantly, greater for the lean than obese men (34 +/- 8 v 20 +/- 4 kcal/3 hours; P = .10, NS). Over the entire 6 hours, the thermic effect of food was significantly greater for the lean than obese men (100 +/- 12 v 69 +/- 5 kcal/6 hours; P less than .05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Evaluation of 3- and 6-Hour Courses: Stage 2. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Jenny; Kirk, Gordon

    Stage 2 of an evaluation assessed the impact of changes to the United Kingdom's national funding rules to include 3- and 6-hour information and communications technology (ICT) courses. Fieldwork consisted of a questionnaire to colleges, postal survey of learners, visits to colleges, and analysis of the national student database for 2000-2001.…

  8. Pediatric Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Children have unique physiologic, physical, psychological, and social needs compared with adults. Although adhering to the basic tenets of burn resuscitation, resuscitation of the burned child should be modified based on the child's age, physiology, and response to injury. This article outlines the unique characteristics of burned children and describes the fundamental principles of pediatric burn resuscitation in terms of airway, circulatory, neurologic, and cutaneous injury management. PMID:27600126

  9. Sepsis in Pregnancy: Identification and Management.

    PubMed

    Albright, Catherine M; Mehta, Niharika D; Rouse, Dwight J; Hughes, Brenna L

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis accounts for up to 28% of all maternal deaths. Prompt, appropriate treatment improves maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. To date, there are no validated tools for identification of sepsis in pregnant women, and tools used in the general population tend to overestimate mortality. Once identified, management of pregnancy-associated sepsis is goal-directed, but because of the lack of studies of sepsis management in pregnancy, it must be assumed that modifications need to be made on the basis of the physiologic changes of pregnancy. Key to management is early fluid resuscitation and early initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy directed toward the likely source of infection or, if the source is unknown, empiric broad-spectrum therapy. Efforts directed at identifying the source of infection and appropriate source control measures are critical. Development of an illness severity scoring system and treatment algorithms validated in pregnant women needs to be a research priority.

  10. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation.

  11. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  12. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  13. The effect of liver disease on lactate normalization in severe sepsis and septic shock: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the effect of liver disease (LD) on lactate clearance during early sepsis resuscitation. Methods This is a multicenter randomized clinical trial. An initial lactate >2 mmol/L and subsequent serum lactate measurement within 6 hours were required for inclusion. LD was categorized by two methods: 1) past medical history (PMH) categorized as no LD, mild LD (no Child’s score criteria, but PMH of hepatitis B/C), cirrhosis; and 2) measurable liver dysfunction determined by the liver component of the sequential organ failure assessment (L-SOFA) score as no dysfunction (L-SOFA score 0), mild dysfunction (score 1), moderate-severe dysfunction (score 2 to 4). Primary outcome was the rate of lactate normalization. Results One hundred eighty-seven patients were included. When categorized by PMH, 169 patients had no LD, 6 mild LD, and 12 cirrhosis. 63/169 (37%) of patients with no LD achieved lactate normalization, compared to 4/6 (67%) with mild LD, and 1/12 (8%) with cirrhosis (P<0.03). Categorized by L-SOFA score, 59/124 (47%) patients with L-SOFA 0 achieved lactate normalization, compared to 6/31 (19%) with L-SOFA 1, and 3/32 (9%) with L-SOFA 2–4 (P<0.01). Relative lactate clearance [(initial lactate–subsequent lactate)/initial lactate] was lower in patients with more advanced LD by PMH (37.7 vs. 40.4 vs. 21.8, P=0.07), and lower with increasing L-SOFA score (42.0 vs. 30.1 vs. 23.4, P=0.01). Conclusion Liver dysfunction was significantly associated with impaired lactate clearance and normalization during the early resuscitation of sepsis. PMID:27752598

  14. Open fractures and the incidence of infection in the surgical debridement 6 hours after trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Miguel de Castro; Peres, Luciano Rodrigo; de Queiroz, Aristóteles Correia; Lima, José Queiroz; Turíbio, Flávio Moral; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a time delay greater than 6h from injury to surgical debridement influences the infection rate in open fractures. Methods: During a period of 18 months, from October 2010 to March 2012, 151 open fractures were available for study in 142 patients in our hospital. The data were collected prospectively and the patients were followed up for 6 weeks. The patients were divided into two groups regarding the time delay from injury to surgical debridement (more or less than 6 hours). Results: Surgical debridement was carried out in less than 6h from injury in 90 (59.6%) fractures and after 6 hours from injury in 61 (40.4%) fractures. Infection rates were 12.22% and 13.24%, respectively. The global infection rate was 13.24%. Conclusion: A significantly increased infection rate was not observed in patients whose surgical debridement occurred more than 6h after injury. However, in the fractures of high-energy trauma, a statistically significant increase of the rate of infection was observed in those operated 6 hours after trauma. Level of Evidence II, Study Type Comparative and Prospective. PMID:26327794

  15. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  16. Witnessed resuscitation by relatives.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R

    2000-02-01

    Witnessed resuscitation is the process of active 'medical' resuscitation in the presence of family members. Witnessed resuscitation though not as yet wide spread in practice is becoming established. Early reports of programs designed to promote such a process first appeared in the early 1980s. More recent work appears to show both public support and a desire for inclusion in the resuscitation process. Some research has been produced that indicates both satisfaction and psychological benefit for those relatives enabled to witness. Limited work only, exists pertaining to the effects on health care providers and these reports currently do not show any significant deleterious effects. Approval of witnessed resuscitation programs is not universal amongst all groups of health care workers. Concerns about the ethics of witnessed resuscitation and its medico-legal implications have been raised. The quality of the initial witnessed resuscitation reports is however variable and there is a great need for further work to validate the initial findings particularly in the areas of psychological stressors in staff and risk management implications.

  17. The GEOS Retrospective Data Assimilation System: The 6-hour lag case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Yan-Qiu; Todling, Ricardo; Guo, Jing; Cohn, Stephen E.; Navon, I. Michael; Yang, Yan; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The fixed-lag Kalman smoother (FLKS) has been proposed as a framework to construct data assimilation procedures capable of producing high-quality climate research datasets. Fixed-lag Kalman smoother-based systems, referred to as retrospective data assimilation systems, are an extension to three-dimensional filtering procedures with the added capability of incorporating observations not only in the past and present time of the estimate, but also at future times. A variety of simplifications are necessary to render retrospective assimilation procedures practical. In this article, we present an FLKS-based retrospective data assimilation system implementation for the Goddard Earth Observing System (GOES) Data Assimilation System (DAS). The practicality of this implementation comes from the practicality of its underlying (filter) analysis system, i.e., the physical-space statistical analysis system (PSAS). The behavior of two schemes is studied here. The first retrospective analysis (RA) scheme is designed simply to update the regular PSAS analyses with observations available at times ahead of the regular analysis times. Although our GEOS DAS implementation is general, results are only presented for when observations 6-hours ahead of the analysis time are used to update the PSAS analyses and thereby to calculate the so-called lag-1 retrospective analyses. Consistency tests for this RA scheme show that the lag-1 retrospective analyses indeed have better 6-hour predictive skills than the predictions from the regular analyses. This motivates the introduction of the second retrospective analysis scheme which, at each analysis time, uses the 6-hour retrospective analysis to replace the first-guess normally used in the PSAS analysis, and therefore allows the calculation of a revised (filter) PSAS analysis. Since in this scheme the lag-1 retrospective analyses influence the filter results, this procedure is referred to as the retrospective-based iterative analysis (RIA) scheme

  18. Management of acute burns and burn shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Faldmo, L; Kravitz, M

    1993-05-01

    Initial management of minor and moderate, uncomplicated burn injury focuses on wound management and patient comfort. Initial management of patients with major burn injury requires airway support, fluid resuscitation for burn shock, treatment for associated trauma and preexisting medical conditions, management of adynamic ileus, and initial wound treatment. Fluid resuscitation, based on assessment of the extent and depth of burn injury, requires administration of intravenous fluids using resuscitation formula guidelines for the initial 24 hours after injury. Inhalation injury complicates flame burns and increases morbidity and mortality. Electrical injury places patients at risk for cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis, and myoglobinuria. Circumferential full-thickness burns to extremities compromise circulation and require escharotomy or fasciotomy. Circumferential torso burns compromise air exchange and cardiac return. Loss of skin function places patients at risk for hypothermia, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and systemic sepsis. The first 24 hours after burn injury require aggressive medical management to assure survival and minimize complications. PMID:8489882

  19. Neutropenic sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tracie

    2016-09-28

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article discussed the causes, signs and symptoms of neutropenic sepsis in adult patients after cancer treatment. It also explored the prevention and management of this condition. PMID:27682569

  20. Identification of adults with sepsis in the prehospital environment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early identification of sepsis could enable prompt delivery of key interventions such as fluid resuscitation and antibiotic administration which, in turn, may lead to improved patient outcomes. Limited data indicate that recognition of sepsis by paramedics is often poor. We systematically reviewed the literature on prehospital sepsis screening tools to determine whether they improved sepsis recognition. Design Systematic review. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed were systematically searched up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. Setting Prehospital/emergency medical services (EMS). Study selection All studies addressing identification of sepsis (including severe sepsis and septic shock) among adult patients managed by EMS. Outcome measures Recognition of sepsis by EMS clinicians. Results Owing to considerable variation in the methodological approach adopted and outcome measures reported, a narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Three studies addressed development of prehospital sepsis screening tools. Six studies addressed paramedic diagnosis of sepsis with or without use of a prehospital sepsis screening tool. Conclusions Recognition of sepsis by ambulance clinicians is poor. The use of screening tools, based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign diagnostic criteria, improves prehospital sepsis recognition. Screening tools derived from EMS data have been developed, but they have not yet been validated in clinical practice. There is a need to undertake validation studies to determine whether prehospital sepsis screening tools confer any clinical benefit. PMID:27496231

  1. Quality Control and Homogenization of China's 6-hourly Surface Pressure Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Tang, Guoli; Wang, Xiaolan L.; Wan, Hui; Cao, Lijuan

    2014-05-01

    Aiming to produce a homogeneous high-quality 6-hourly surface pressure database, this study applied a comprehensive quality control (QC) system and a data homogenization procedure to correct both random and systematic errors in 6-hourly surface pressure data from 194 sites in China for the period 1951-2012. Relocation and/or joining of stations were found to be the main causes for discontinuities (systematic errors) in the surface pressure database (including both station pressure and sea level pressure). Both physical and statistical approaches were used to detect and correct errors, along with available metadata. The hydrostatic model was used to identify and correct for errors caused by the use of incorrect station elevation values in the reduction of barometer readings to station or sea level pressure values, or by changes in station elevation due to relocation and/or joining of two or more station records. A statistical approach based on the penalized maximum F test was also used when a physical-based correction is not possible due to lack of related data or metadata (e.g. an elevation change was documented, but the old station elevation was not). However, all discontinuities that were adjusted in this study have metadata support (i.e., documented change points). As a result, pressure data for 74 of the 194 sites were adjusted for station elevation changes using the hydrostatic model, and pressure data for additional 31 sites were homogenized using a quantile-matching adjustment method. The effect of the artificial discontinuities on pressure trends was also assessed by comparing the trends of the raw and homogenized pressure data.

  2. Sepsis: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliézer; Passos, Rogério Da Hora; Ferri, Maurício Beller; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome related to severe infections. It is defined as the systemic host response to microorganisms in previously sterile tissues and is characterized by end-organ dysfunction away from the primary site of infection. The normal host response to infection is complex and aims to identify and control pathogen invasion, as well as to start immediate tissue repair. Both the cellular and humoral immune systems are activated, giving rise to both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory responses. The chain of events that leads to sepsis is derived from the exacerbation of these mechanisms, promoting massive liberation of mediators and the progression of multiple organ dysfunction. Despite increasing knowledge about the pathophysiological pathways and processes involved in sepsis, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. A large number of immunomodulatory agents have been studied in experimental and clinical settings in an attempt to find an efficacious anti-inflammatory drug that reduces mortality. Even though preclinical results had been promising, the vast majority of these trials actually showed little success in reducing the overwhelmingly high mortality rate of septic shock patients as compared with that of other critically ill intensive care unit patients. Clinical management usually begins with prompt recognition, determination of the probable infection site, early administration of antibiotics, and resuscitation protocols based on “early-goal” directed therapy. In this review, we address the research efforts that have been targeting risk factor identification, including genetics, pathophysiological mechanisms and strategies to recognize and treat these patients as early as possible. PMID:18297215

  3. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  4. Brain resuscitation. Ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Omery, A; Caswell, D

    1989-03-01

    Brain resuscitation is the newest in a long line of treatment protocols that is designed to aid us in sustaining not just life, but quality life in the critical care setting. Like other, previously established protocols, it is not value free. Its implementation brings ethical considerations that must be addressed. If the issues are not addressed, there is the real danger that the resulting moral dilemmas will overwhelm the nurse. In brain resuscitation, there are at least three ethical issues that must be recognized. These are the role of resuscitation in the life process, allocation of scarce resources, and participation in research. To address these issues, nurses will have to be aware of the ethical principle and/or perspectives involved. For some of these issues, the solutions will have to come from nursing's national organizations, such as the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. Other solutions presented will require the nurse to come to an individual decision regarding the ethics of brain resuscitation. The journey to the conclusion of this discussion will end with disappointment for those who sought an algorhythm or decision tree with which to make definitive decisions in regard to ethical decisions about brain resuscitation. To have assumed that such an absolute discussion in regard to the ethical perspectives related to brain resuscitation is possible or even desirable would have been to deny the moral/ethical responsibilities of the nurse who practices in a critical care setting. While these ethical responsibilities can be overwhelmingly burdensome, they can also be opportunities. They can be positive opportunities for our health care colleagues, our patients, and ourselves. PMID:2803694

  5. Sepsis following cancer surgery: the need for early recognition and standardised clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hiong, A; Thursky, K A; Teh, B W; Haeusler, G M; Slavin, M A; Worth, L J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the implementation of multimodal bundles of care in hospitalised patients, post-operative sepsis in patients with cancer still accounts for a significant burden of illness and substantial healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for cancer are at particular risk of sepsis due to underlying malignancy, being immunocompromised associated with cancer management and the complexity of surgical procedures performed. In this review, we evaluate the burden of illness and risks for sepsis following surgery for cancer. Current evidence supporting standardised strategies for sepsis management (including early recognition and resuscitation) is examined together with challenges in implementing quality improvement programs.

  6. Family-witnessed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Melanie

    2010-09-01

    Family-witnessed resuscitation is a controversial subject for healthcare professionals and support for the practice is not universal (Albarran and Stafford 1999, Kissoon 2006). Research suggests, however, that the advantages of this form of resuscitation for relatives far outweigh the disadvantages, and that hospital staff can support the practice without hindering the clinical care of patients. This article explores the ethical issues raised, as well as the views of patients, families and staff on the subject, and suggests that there should be guidelines on the practice in all emergency departments where it is likely to take place.

  7. In-hospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Christine

    2016-09-21

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article outlined the response sequence required for cardiac arrest in an in-hospital environment and discussed effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. PMID:27654563

  8. Can We Estimate Surface Carbon Fluxes With a 6-hour Data Assimilation System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Kang, J.; Liu, J.; Fung, I.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of surface carbon fluxes from atmospheric measurements of CO2 is an ill-posed problem (Enting, 2002). In the real atmosphere emissions are transported and mixed, losing information; measuring atmospheric concentrations introduces further errors; and the calculation of transports with imperfect models amplifies the errors in estimating surface sources and sinks. Because of this ill-posedness, prior information on carbon surface fluxes is essential for inverse estimations (e.g., Gurney et al., 2004, Baker et al., 2006, Roedenbeck et al., 2003). Peters et al. (2007) have used instead an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation approach where the winds are given (e.g., from ECMWF). They use a Kalman smoother with a 5-week smoother, producing the operational "Carbon Tracker" estimation of surface fluxes at NOAA. We address the ill-posedness by assimilating simultaneously every 6 hours both carbon concentrations and meteorological variables, since within this time scale changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations should be dominated by surface fluxes rather than transport and mixing. A simulation system using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) to assimilate CO2 from a realistic observing system including GOSAT, AIRS and surface observations, and is able to estimate in detail the seasonal evolution of "true" surface fluxes (including fossil fuel emissions) even in the absence of prior information. These promising results (albeit simulated) suggest that with more advanced models and accurate column observations such as those expected from OCO-2 it may be possible to estimate surface carbon fluxes if the LETKF is optimized (Kang et al., 2011).

  9. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients.

  10. Witnessed resuscitation: beneficial or detrimental?

    PubMed

    Terzi, Angela B; Aggelidou, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the existing literature and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of witnessed resuscitation for health professionals, relatives, and patients themselves. Keywords "witnessed resuscitation," "patient perspective," "health professionals," and "resuscitation room" were entered into MEDLINE, Medscape, and Science Direct databases. The issue of witnessed resuscitation, along with the benefits and disadvantages of its implementation, is discussed widely with increasing controversy among health professionals. Many authors accept the existence of benefits of witnessed resuscitation, but they each have reservations on certain aspects of the practice. Although witnessed resuscitation has demonstrable benefits, the dearth of research literature on the subject makes it difficult to come to a concrete conclusion about its value in practice. More studies are needed focusing on the impact of witnessed resuscitation on staff, family members, and patients. Larger sample sizes are needed in future studies, and studies are needed in which geographical, cultural, religious, and sociological factors are taken into consideration.

  11. Witnessed resuscitation: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    2006-03-01

    The science and practice of resuscitation is recognised and endorsed on an international level, yet for more than a decade it has appeared in the literature alongside words such as witnessing or witnessed to signify the practice of family presence during a resuscitation attempt. This paper explores the meaning of witnessed resuscitation using the process for concept analysis proposed by Rodgers. The term resuscitation is explored, followed by identification of relevant uses of the concept of witnessed resuscitation. The reader is introduced to conceptual variations that challenge the way in which the concept has become associated with family or relatives presence in the resuscitation room of an accident and emergency department. Conceptual clarity is further enhanced through the identification of references, antecedents and consequences of witnessed resuscitation and by providing a model case of the concept that includes its defining attributes.

  12. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  13. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Matthew M; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  14. Witnessed resuscitation: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    2006-03-01

    The science and practice of resuscitation is recognised and endorsed on an international level, yet for more than a decade it has appeared in the literature alongside words such as witnessing or witnessed to signify the practice of family presence during a resuscitation attempt. This paper explores the meaning of witnessed resuscitation using the process for concept analysis proposed by Rodgers. The term resuscitation is explored, followed by identification of relevant uses of the concept of witnessed resuscitation. The reader is introduced to conceptual variations that challenge the way in which the concept has become associated with family or relatives presence in the resuscitation room of an accident and emergency department. Conceptual clarity is further enhanced through the identification of references, antecedents and consequences of witnessed resuscitation and by providing a model case of the concept that includes its defining attributes. PMID:16043184

  15. Sepsis biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prucha, Miroslav; Bellingan, Geoff; Zazula, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of death in non-coronary intensive care units (ICUs). In the past 10 years, progress has been made in the early identification of septic patients and in their treatment and these improvements in support and therapy mean that the mortality is gradually decreasing but it still remains unacceptably high. Leaving clinical diagnosis aside, the laboratory diagnostics represent a complex range of investigations that can place significant demands on the system given the speed of response required. There are hundreds of biomarkers which could be potentially used for diagnosis and prognosis in septic patients. The main attributes of successful markers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bed-side monitoring, and financial accessibility. Only a fraction is used in routine clinical practice because many lack sufficient sensitivity or specificity. The following review gives a short overview of the current epidemiology of sepsis, its pathogenesis and state-of-the-art knowledge on the use of specific biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters in its diagnostics. Prospective approaches towards discovery of new diagnostic biomarkers have been shortly mentioned.

  16. New perspectives on immunomodulatory therapy for bacteraemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-12-01

    Systemic immune dysregulation is generally acknowledged to be the fundamental molecular mechanism that underlies the pathophysiology of severe sepsis and septic shock. In the presence of a systemic infection, microbial pathogens and their soluble mediators induce generalised immune activation and coagulation activation, leading to severe sepsis and septic shock. For decades, immune-based therapies have been devised with the specific intent of inhibiting the pro-inflammatory events that are thought to precipitate the septic process. Despite a clear therapeutic rationale based upon the available experimental evidence, anti-inflammatory therapies targeting the innate or acquired immune response have largely been unsuccessful in clinical trials of sepsis. Compelling evidence now exists that a prolonged state of sepsis-induced immune suppression follows the initial period of stabilisation and resuscitation in many critically ill patients. Sepsis-related immune suppression is evidenced by histological findings of markedly enhanced lymphocytic and monocytic apoptosis, poor response to neoantigens and recall antigens, and increased incidence of infections by opportunistic pathogens. Candidiasis, cytomegalovirus activation and secondary infections by relatively avirulent bacterial pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter spp. are commonplace in septic patients during prolonged Intensive Care Unit stays. Immunological tools to detect sepsis-induced immunosuppression are now available, and novel immunoadjuvants are in development to re-establish immune competence in sepsis patients. The intelligent use of immunomodulatory agents in sepsis will necessitate a personalised medicine approach to treat each patient at the appropriate time and with the optimal therapy.

  17. Development and Validation of an Automated Sepsis Risk Assessment System.

    PubMed

    Back, Ji-Sun; Jin, Yinji; Jin, Taixian; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive resuscitation can decrease sepsis mortality, but its success depends on early detection of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify an Automated Sepsis Risk Assessment System (Auto-SepRAS), which would automatically assess the sepsis risk of inpatients by applying data mining techniques to electronic health records (EHR) data and provide daily updates. The seven predictors included in the Auto-SepRAS after initial analysis were admission via the emergency department, which had the highest odds ratio; diastolic blood pressure; length of stay; respiratory rate; heart rate; and age. Auto-SepRAS classifies inpatients into three risk levels (high, moderate, and low) based on the predictive values from the sepsis risk-scoring algorithm. The sepsis risk for each patient is presented on the nursing screen of the EHR. The AutoSepRAS was implemented retrospectively in several stages using EHR data and its cut-off scores adjusted. Overall discrimination power was moderate (AUC>.80). The Auto-SepRAS should be verified or updated continuously or intermittently to maintain high predictive performance, but it does not require invasive tests or data input by nurses that would require additional time. Nurses are able to provide patients with nursing care appropriate to their risk levels by using the sepsis risk information provided by the Auto-SepRAS. In particular, with early detection of changes related to sepsis, nurses should be able to help in providing rapid initial resuscitation of high-risk patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  19. Sepsis management: An evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Shahzad, Hira; Jamil, Bushra; Hussain, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines have outlined an early goal directed therapy (EGDT) which demonstrates a standardized approach to ensure prompt and effective management of sepsis. Having said that, there are barriers associated with the application of evidence-based practice, which often lead to an overall poorer adherence to guidelines. Considering the global burden of disease, data from low- to middle-income countries is scarce. Asia is the largest continent but most Asian countries do not have a well-developed healthcare system and compliance rates to resuscitation and management bundles are as low as 7.6% and 3.5%, respectively. Intensive care units are not adequately equipped and financial concerns limit implementation of expensive treatment strategies. Healthcare policy-makers should be notified in order to alleviate financial restrictions and ensure delivery of standard care to septic patients.

  20. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. PMID:27600131

  1. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  2. Pulmonary Responses in Healthy Young Adults Exposed to Low Concentration of Ozone for 6.6 Hours with Mild Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rational: Recent studies have shown small but significant decreases in lung function following a prolonged exposure (6.6 hour) of healthy young adults to levels of ozone (0.08 ppm) near the current 8 hour standard. It is unclear, however, if such effects may be extended to concen...

  3. Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection. PMID:27468649

  4. A blueprint for a sepsis protocol.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan I; Howell, Michael; Talmor, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    Despite numerous advances in medicine, sepsis remains an unconquered challenge. Although outcomes have improved slightly over decades, the unacceptably high mortality rate of 30%-50% for severe sepsis and septic shock continues. However, after years of unsuccessful clinical trials, several investigations over the last few years have reported survival benefit in the treatment of sepsis. Physicians now have several proven therapies to treat sepsis, but have yet to implement them on a widespread, systematic basis. This led 11 international professional societies spanning multiple specialties and continents to come together to create the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. The product of their work is an international effort organized to improve care of patients with sepsis and includes consensus, evidence-based guidelines for care that improves survival in septic patients, and an action plan for change. Given the clear role of early identification and treatment in stopping the sepsis cascade, therapy must start early in the emergency department (ED) and continue throughout the hospital course. The first of the recommendations by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign is the aggressive resuscitation strategy of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). EGDT is reported to reduce absolute mortality by a staggering 16%. The use of recombinant activated protein C was demonstrated to confer a 6% absolute survival benefit. Steroid supplementation in adrenal insufficiency produced a 10% benefit. Additionally, early and appropriate use of antibiotics remains a cornerstone of therapy. Although no randomized trial will be performed, the effects are undisputed. Finally, although predominantly intensive care unit therapies, tight glucose control and low-tidal-volume ventilation strategies have also led to improved survival. Armed with these new therapies, the medical community must rise to this call to action. Clinicians must change the approach to this disease, as well as the way the septic patient is

  5. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the 'Sepsis Six' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  6. Sepsis Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... has kidney problems, sepsis can lead to kidney failure that requires lifelong dialysis. Top of Page How ... to prevent healthcare-associated infections. Recently, CDC has projects specifically focused on sepsis prevention so that we ...

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Clark, Tammi

    2005-01-01

    It is critical for health care providers to have the skills and composure required to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when necessary. Unfortunately, it is easy to postpone updating one's CPR certification when confronted with the demands of leading a practice. New guidelines for CPR have been in effect since 2000. This clinical update provides a brief overview of the new guidelines, some suggestions for incorporating CPR training into the clinician's practice, and clarification for some common legal misconceptions that doctors may have pertaining to administering CPR. PMID:19674653

  8. The ethics of newborn resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed in neonatology and obstetrics that there are situations in which it is inappropriate to attempt newborn resuscitation, and other times when newborn resuscitation is obligatory despite parental refusal. In each case, an ethical justification for the decision needs to be identified. This essay is intended to provide guidance in deciding when resuscitation should be attempted, and in identifying ethical considerations that should be taken into account. It specifically addresses the issue of extreme prematurity, including an analysis of current recommendations, the data, relevant rights of patient and parents, and a discussion of the relative merits of withholding resuscitation vs providing resuscitation and possibly withdrawing intensive care later. In addition to extreme prematurity, the considerations presented are also relevant to a wider spectrum of newborn problems, including Trisomy 13, Trisomy 18, and severe congenital anomalies.

  9. How to Recognize a Failed Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Elisha G; Pham, Tam N; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-10-01

    Failed burn resuscitation can occur at various points. Early failed resuscitation will be largely caused by prehospital factors. During resuscitation, failure will present as a patient's nonresponse to adjunctive therapy. Late failure will occur in the setting of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Burn care providers must be vigilant during the resuscitation to identify a threatened resuscitation so that adjunctive therapies or rescue maneuvers can be used to convert to a successful resuscitation. However, when a patient's resuscitative course becomes unsalvageable, transition to comfort care should be taken to avoid prolongation of suffering. PMID:27600128

  10. Future Therapies in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, Erica I; Subramanian, Madhu; Arnoldo, Brett D; Phelan, Herb A; Wolf, Steven E

    2016-10-01

    Since the 1940s, the resuscitation of burn patients has evolved with dramatic improvements in mortality. The most significant achievement remains the creation and adoption of formulae to calculate estimated fluid requirements to guide resuscitation. Modalities to attenuate the hypermetabolic phase of injury include pharmacologic agents, early enteral nutrition, and the aggressive approach of early excision of large injuries. Recent investigations into the genomic response to severe burns and the application of computer-based decision support tools will likely guide future resuscitation, with the goal of further reducing mortality and morbidity, and improving functional and quality of life outcomes. PMID:27600132

  11. Improving time to antibiotics and implementing the "Sepsis 6".

    PubMed

    McGregor, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that completion of the "Sepsis 6" within 1 hour reduces mortality (1). This project aims to assess compliance with this standard and evaluate the effectiveness of a sepsis improvement plan in a district general hospital in the UK. A baseline audit was performed, examining case notes of "septic patients" retrospectively (those on intravenous antibiotics). Compliance with each element of the sepsis six plus time to first antibiotic (TTFA) was assessed. A sepsis improvement plan was introduced consisting of staff education, reinforcing vigilance, regular multidisciplinary meetings and incorporating a standardised approach through the use of a sepsis proforma. Following the introduction of this, and after some refinement, the average time to antibiotic fell from 6 hours to 1.4 hours. In conclusion, an educational drive along with a systematic change in processes has seen reduced TTFA along with enhanced compliance with most elements of the sepsis 6. Through continued assessment and further improving upon systematic processes with continued education we would anticipate consistent improvement in the management of septic patients.

  12. [Sepsis in Emergency Medicine].

    PubMed

    Christ, Michael; Geier, Felicitas; Bertsch, Thomas; Singler, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is defined as "life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host-response to infection". Presence of organ dysfunction is associated with a mortality of 10% and higher in hospitalized sepsis patients.Introduction of standards in diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in intensive care units has not considerably reduced sepsis mortality. About 80% of patients with sepsis are transferred to intensive care units from usual care wards and emergency departments. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether opportunities for further improvement of sepsis management exist outside of intensive care units. Performing a "quick sequential organ assessment" (qSOFA; two of following criteria have to be present: respiratory rate >22/min; sytolic blood pressure <100mmHg; altered mental status) supports to identify patients with suspicion of an infection and an increased risk of death within the hospital. Subsequent treatment according to current guidelines on sepsis management will reduce in-hospital mortality of sepsis patients. Indeed, we were able to show a substantial decrease of in-hospital mortality of about 20% in patients presenting with community acquired pneumonia to the emergency department.In summary, decision of further management of sepsis patients has to be done outside intensive care units at the time of initial presentation to professional care givers. Sepsis management in acute care settings should include a structured and standardized protocol to further improve survival in affected patients with even mild organ dysfunction.

  13. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ...

  14. Impact of Time on Fluid Resuscitation with Hypertonic Saline (NaCl 7.5%) in Rats with LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Ricardo Costa; Biselli, Paolo Jose Cesare; Lima, Thais Martins de; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication associated with septic shock that directly influences the prognosis of sepsis patients. Currently, one of the main supportive treatment modalities for septic shock is fluid resuscitation. The use of hypertonic saline (HS: 7.5% NaCl) for fluid resuscitation has been described as a promising therapy in experimental models of sepsis-induced ALI, but it has failed to produce similar results in clinical practice. Thus, we compared experimental timing versus clinical timing effectiveness (i.e., early vs. late fluid resuscitation) after the inflammatory scenario was established in a rat model of bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. We found that late fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline (NaCl 7.5%) did not reduce the mortality rates of animals compared with the mortality late associated with early treatment. Late fluid resuscitation with both hypertonic and normal saline increased pulmonary inflammation, decreased pulmonary function, and induced pulmonary injury by elevating metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 activity and collagen deposition in the animals, unlike early treatment. The animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI that received late resuscitation with any kind of fluids demonstrated aggravated pulmonary injury and respiratory function. Moreover, we showed that the therapeutic window for a beneficial effect of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline is very narrow.

  15. Exogenous arginine in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2007-09-01

    Sepsis is a severe condition in critically ill patients and is considered an arginine deficiency state. The rationale for arginine deficiency in sepsis is mainly based on the reduced arginine levels in sepsis that are associated with the specific changes in arginine metabolism related to endothelial dysfunction, severe catabolism, and worse outcome. Exogenous arginine supplementation in sepsis shows controversial results with only limited data in humans and variable results in animal models of sepsis. Since in these studies the severity of sepsis varies but also the route, timing, and dose of arginine, it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion for sepsis in general without considering the influence of these factors. Enhanced nitric oxide production in sepsis is related to suggested detrimental effects on hemodynamic instability and enhanced oxidative stress. Potential mechanisms for beneficial effects of exogenous arginine in sepsis include enhanced (protein) metabolism, improved microcirculation and organ function, effects on immune function and antibacterial effects, improved gut function, and an antioxidant role of arginine. We recently performed a study indicating that arginine can be given to septic patients without major effects on hemodynamics, suggesting that more studies can be conducted on the effects of arginine supplementation in septic patients.

  16. Overcoming resistance to family-witnessed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Jordahl, Erica; Hyde, Yolanda M; Kautz, Donald D

    2015-01-01

    Giving family members the option of being present during resuscitation has been shown to be beneficial for both family and staff. However, only a small percentage of intensive care units have policies promoting family-witnessed resuscitation. This article reviews current research showing the benefits of family-witnessed resuscitation, outlines how to successfully integrate a family facilitator during resuscitation, and includes research that has been effective in changing the prevailing attitudes of staff. The authors also argue for the resuscitation team to practice ethical and cultural humility when involving family members so that all resuscitation efforts are a success, whether the patient lives or dies.

  17. Witnessed resuscitation: good practice or not?

    PubMed

    Rattrie, E

    Should relatives be given the choice to witness the resuscitation of a family member? From the available literature, three main topic areas emerge: research studies that allow witnessed resuscitation, the effects on relatives of witnessed resuscitation, and A&E staff attitudes towards witnessed resuscitation. There is abundant literature on the positive effects for relatives of witnessing the attempted resuscitation of a loved-one, the main benefit being that the grieving process was made easier. However, staff attitudes are mixed, making witnessed resuscitation a controversial topic.

  18. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  19. Sepsis-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Leigh Ann; Supinski, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and despite advances in management, mortality remains high. In survivors, sepsis increases the risk for the development of persistent acquired weakness syndromes affecting both the respiratory muscles and the limb muscles. This acquired weakness results in prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, difficulty weaning, functional impairment, exercise limitation, and poor health-related quality of life. Abundant evidence indicates that sepsis induces a myopathy characterized by reductions in muscle force-generating capacity, atrophy (loss of muscle mass), and altered bioenergetics. Sepsis elicits derangements at multiple subcellular sites involved in excitation contraction coupling, such as decreasing membrane excitability, injuring sarcolemmal membranes, altering calcium homeostasis due to effects on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and disrupting contractile protein interactions. Muscle wasting occurs later and results from increased proteolytic degradation as well as decreased protein synthesis. In addition, sepsis produces marked abnormalities in muscle mitochondrial functional capacity and when severe, these alterations correlate with increased death. The mechanisms leading to sepsis-induced changes in skeletal muscle are linked to excessive localized elaboration of proinflammatory cytokines, marked increases in free-radical generation, and activation of proteolytic pathways that are upstream of the proteasome including caspase and calpain. Emerging data suggest that targeted inhibition of these pathways may alter the evolution and progression of sepsis-induced myopathy and potentially reduce the occurrence of sepsis-mediated acquired weakness syndromes. PMID:20046121

  20. Neurology of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sweis, Rochelle; Ortiz, Jorge; Biller, José

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome occurring secondary to infection and labeled severe when end organ dysfunction or tissue hypoperfusion transpires. Sepsis-associated mortality remains high among critically ill patients, with chronic disease and immunosuppression being the most common risk factors. Studies demonstrate that early recognition and treatment are vital to decreasing mortality. Some of the least understood effects of sepsis are the associated neurologic complications. The peripheral nervous system (PNS) has gained most consideration and thought, largely due to dependence on mechanical ventilation. Central nervous system (CNS) complications related to sepsis have only more recently gained attention but continue to go unnoticed. Aside from the clinical examination, electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive tool for prognostication or uncovering non-convulsive seizures in encephalopathic patients. Further studies are needed to further define the urgency of a prevention and treatment plan for the deleterious effects of sepsis on the PNS and CNS. PMID:26820754

  1. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  2. Touch during preterm infant resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, L W; Hutchinson, S

    1996-10-01

    Preterm infants frequently require resuscitation in the delivery room. Under the intense circumstances of providing lifesaving interventions, caregivers may be unaware of the amount and kind of touch an infant receives. The purpose of this qualitative, ethologic study was to describe the kinds of touch that occur during resuscitation of premature infants immediately after delivery as viewed on videotape. The convenience sample consisted of ten videotapes of premature infant resuscitation performed at a tertiary care center. Using Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence, a description of kinds of touch--including mechanical and human touch--was developed. Descriptive research conceptualizing touch promotes awareness of current practice and may lead to alterations in clinical practice that best support the adaptive response in the depressed infant. PMID:9035643

  3. Resuscitation of the newly born.

    PubMed

    Johannson, A B; Biarent, D

    2002-01-01

    International guidelines developed recommendations in the resuscitation of the new-born: at least one person trained in resuscitation of the newly born should attend every delivery. A minority of the new-borns require active resuscitation to achieve regular respiration, heart rhythm above 100/min, pink colour and adequate tone. Establishment of adequate ventilation should be of primary concern. Most new-borns who require positive-pressure ventilation can be adequately ventilated with a bag and mask. All healthcare providers, who may be asked to deal with an emergency delivery, should master such technique. In case of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, thorough oropharyngeal suctioning should be perform before the delivery of the chest. Tracheal aspiration of mecomium should be perform only in depressed child. Very few infants require chest compressions and much less administration of drugs. Umbilical access remains the most widely recommended access in new-born. Adequate transfer to Neonatal Unit improves outcome. PMID:12503356

  4. Vitamin C in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Julie A; Rowan, Matthew P; Driscoll, Ian R; Chung, Kevin K; Friedman, Bruce C

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory state after burn injury is characterized by an increase in capillary permeability that results in protein and fluid leakage into the interstitial space, increasing resuscitative requirements. Although the mechanisms underlying increased capillary permeability are complex, damage from reactive oxygen species plays a major role and has been successfully attenuated with antioxidant therapy in several disease processes. However, the utility of antioxidants in burn treatment remains unclear. Vitamin C is a promising antioxidant candidate that has been examined in burn resuscitation studies and shows efficacy in reducing the fluid requirements in the acute phase after burn injury. PMID:27600125

  5. [Resuscitation 2015-the new guidelines].

    PubMed

    Wetsch, W A; Böttiger, B W

    2016-06-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is amongst the major causes of death in industrialized countries. The patient's prognosis however is still very serious. Because diagnosis and therapy in medicine constantly undergo further development, guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation are updated und published frequently, to ensure that every patient receives the best state of the art medical therapy and consequently has the best chances to survive. On October 15, 2015, the new guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were published. This article gives a short summary of the most important changes. PMID:27160260

  6. Equipment review: The success of early goal-directed therapy for septic shock prompts evaluation of current approaches for monitoring the adequacy of resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Scott R; Fink, Mitchell P; Wallace, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    A recent trial utilizing central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2) as a resuscitation marker in patients with sepsis has resulted in its inclusion in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. We review the evidence behind SCVO2 and its relationship to previous trials of goal-directed therapy. We compare SCVO2 to other tools for assessing the adequacy of resuscitation including physical examination, biochemical markers, pulmonary artery catheterization, esophageal Doppler, pulse contour analysis, echocardiography, pulse pressure variation, and tissue capnometry. It is unlikely that any single technology can improve outcome if isolated from an organized pattern of early recognition, algorithmic resuscitation, and frequent reassessment. This article includes a response to the journal's Health Technology Assessment questionnaire by the manufacturer of the SCVO2 catheter. PMID:16137384

  7. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the ‘Sepsis Six’ recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  8. Initial Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Adult Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Severe sepsis is a medical emergency affecting up to 18 million individuals world wide, with an annual incidence of 750,000 in North America alone. Mortality ranges between 28-50% of those individuals stricken by severe sepsis. Sepsis is a time critical illness, requiring early identification and prompt intervention in order to improve outcomes. This observation has led to increased awareness and education in the field of Emergency Medicine; it has also led to the implementation of critical interventions early in the course of patient management, specifically Early-Goal Directed Therapy, and rapid administration of appropriate antimicrobials. This review begins with a brief summary of the pathophysiology of sepsis, and then addresses the fundamental clinical aspects of ED identification and resuscitation of the septic patient. PMID:22737991

  9. The older adult experiencing sepsis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Nadine C; Ross, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a potentially fatal response to infection affecting patients across the life span. Sepsis can progress from systemic inflammatory response to severe sepsis and septic shock if not recognized promptly and managed effectively. Risk factors for sepsis include age, gender, the presence of invasive devices (eg, urinary catheters), and chronic medical conditions (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Sepsis awareness is essential and includes identification of population-focused risk factors, recognition of clinical signs and symptoms, and timely implementation of interventions. The purpose of this article was to examine sepsis in older adults, including prevalence, atypical presentation of the condition, and considerations for sepsis management in the elderly population.

  10. Burn Resuscitation in the Austere Environment.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael; Jeng, James; Moghazy, Amr

    2016-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) cannulation and sterile IV salt solutions may not be options in resource-limited settings (RLSs). This article presents recipes for fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of burns occurring in RLSs. Burns of 20% total body surface area (TBSA) can be resuscitated, and burns up to 40% TBSA can most likely be resuscitated, using oral resuscitation solutions (ORSs) with salt supplementation. Without IV therapy, fluid resuscitation for larger burns may only be possible with ORSs. Published global experience is limited, and the magnitude of burn injuries that successfully respond to World Health Organization ORSs is not well-described. PMID:27600127

  11. Lactate kinetics in sepsis and septic shock: a review of the literature and rationale for further research.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Jason; Chisum, Michael; Garcia, Bryan; Lascano, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been vast improvements in sepsis-related outcomes, largely resulting from the widespread adoption of aggressive fluid resuscitation and infection control. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis, novel diagnostics and resuscitative interventions are being discovered. In recent years, few diagnostic tests like lactate have engendered more attention and research in the sepsis arena. Studies highlighting lactate's prognostic potential for mortality and other outcomes are ubiquitous and largely focus on the early stage of sepsis management, defined as the initial 6 h and widely referred to as the "golden hours." Additional investigations, although more representative of surgical and trauma patients, suggest that lactate measurements beyond 24 h from the initiation of resuscitation continue to have predictive and prognostic utility. This review summarizes the current research and evidence regarding lactate's utility as a prognosticator of clinical outcomes in both early and late sepsis management, defines the mechanism of lactate production and clearance, and identifies areas warranting further research.

  12. Vertical jump, anaerobic power, and shooting accuracy are not altered 6 hours after strength training in collegiate women basketball players.

    PubMed

    Woolstenhulme, Mandy T; Bailey, Brooke Kerbs; Allsen, Philip E

    2004-08-01

    We measured vertical jump, anaerobic power, and shooting accuracy in 18 Division I women basketball players (age 18-22 years) 6 hours following a morning strength training routine called a lift day (LD) and on a control day in which no strength training was performed. Subjects had been strength trained for 4 weeks prior to testing. The strength training session on lift day was a full-body workout and included 7 exercises performed in 3-6 sets at loads ranging from a 5 to 12 repetition maximum (RM). There were no significant differences in jump height with 2 legs (49.5 +/- 4.8 cm and 49.0 +/- 4.8 cm, LD and control, respectively), relative mean power output over 30 seconds on a Wingate bicycle test (6.4 +/- 0.8 W.kg(-1) and 6.6 +/- 0.7 W.kg(-1), LD and control, respectively), or shooting accuracy over 60 seconds (21.5 +/- 3.8 points/min and 21.3 +/- 4.1 points/min, LD and control, respectively). These data suggest that in collegiate women basketball players, a previous bout of strength training has no negative effect on vertical jump height, anaerobic power, or shooting accuracy.

  13. Animal models of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains a common, serious, and heterogeneous clinical entity that is difficult to define adequately. Despite its importance as a public health problem, efforts to develop and gain regulatory approval for a specific therapeutic agent for the adjuvant treatment of sepsis have been remarkably unsuccessful. One step in the critical pathway for the development of a new agent for adjuvant treatment of sepsis is evaluation in an appropriate animal model of the human condition. Unfortunately, the animal models that have been used for this purpose have often yielded misleading findings. It is likely that there are multiple reasons for the discrepancies between the results obtained in tests of pharmacological agents in animal models of sepsis and the outcomes of human clinical trials. One of important reason may be that the changes in gene expression, which are triggered by trauma or infection, are different in mice, a commonly used species for preclinical testing, and humans. Additionally, many species, including mice and baboons, are remarkably resistant to the toxic effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, whereas humans are exquisitely sensitive. New approaches toward the use of animals for sepsis research are being investigated. But, at present, results from preclinical studies of new therapeutic agents for sepsis must be viewed with a degree of skepticism. PMID:24022070

  14. Sepsis and pregnancy: do we know how to treat this situation?

    PubMed Central

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Cordioli, Eduardo; Negrini, Romulo; Silva, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an acute inflammatory response syndrome secondary to an infectious focus. It has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality, causing substantial financial costs, especially due to complications such as septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The pathogen toxins associated with individual susceptibility culminate with cytokine release, which promotes a systemic inflammatory response that can progress to multiple organ dysfunction and eventual patient death. Specifically, sepsis incidence, morbidity and mortality are lower in pregnant women, as this group is typically younger with fewer comorbidities having a polymicrobial etiology resulting in sepsis. Pregnant women exhibit physiological characteristics that may confer specific clinical presentation and laboratory patterns during the sepsis course. Thus, a better understanding of these changes is critical for better identification and management of these patients. The presence of a fetus also requires unique approaches in a pregnant woman with sepsis. Sepsis treatment is based on certain guidelines that were established after major clinical trials, which, unfortunately, all classified pregnancy as a exclusion criteria. Thus, the treatment of sepsis in the general population has been extrapolated to the pregnant population, with the following main goals: maintenance of tissue perfusion with fluid replacement and vasoactive drugs (initial resuscitation), adequate oxygenation, control of the infection source and an early start of antibiotic therapy, corticosteroid infusion and blood transfusion when properly indicated, prophylaxis, and specifically monitoring and maintenance of fetal heath. PMID:24553516

  15. Sepsis and pregnancy: do we know how to treat this situation?

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Cordioli, Eduardo; Negrini, Romulo; Silva, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an acute inflammatory response syndrome secondary to an infectious focus. It has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality, causing substantial financial costs, especially due to complications such as septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The pathogen toxins associated with individual susceptibility culminate with cytokine release, which promotes a systemic inflammatory response that can progress to multiple organ dysfunction and eventual patient death. Specifically, sepsis incidence, morbidity and mortality are lower in pregnant women, as this group is typically younger with fewer comorbidities having a polymicrobial etiology resulting in sepsis. Pregnant women exhibit physiological characteristics that may confer specific clinical presentation and laboratory patterns during the sepsis course. Thus, a better understanding of these changes is critical for better identification and management of these patients. The presence of a fetus also requires unique approaches in a pregnant woman with sepsis. Sepsis treatment is based on certain guidelines that were established after major clinical trials, which, unfortunately, all classified pregnancy as a exclusion criteria. Thus, the treatment of sepsis in the general population has been extrapolated to the pregnant population, with the following main goals: maintenance of tissue perfusion with fluid replacement and vasoactive drugs (initial resuscitation), adequate oxygenation, control of the infection source and an early start of antibiotic therapy, corticosteroid infusion and blood transfusion when properly indicated, prophylaxis, and specifically monitoring and maintenance of fetal heath.

  16. Feasibility of Modified Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines in a Resource-Restricted Setting Based on a Cohort Study of Severe S. Aureus Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Srisomang, Pramot; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Lorvinitnun, Pichet; Wongyingsinn, Mingkwan; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Hongsuwan, Maliwan; West, T. Eoin; Day, Nicholas P.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines describe best practice for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock in developed countries, but most deaths from sepsis occur where healthcare is not sufficiently resourced to implement them. Our objective was to define the feasibility and basis for modified guidelines in a resource-restricted setting. Methods and Findings We undertook a detailed assessment of sepsis management in a prospective cohort of patients with severe sepsis caused by a single pathogen in a 1,100-bed hospital in lower-middle income Thailand. We compared their management with the SSC guidelines to identify care bundles based on existing capabilities or additional activities that could be undertaken at zero or low cost. We identified 72 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock associated with S. aureus bacteraemia, 38 (53%) of who died within 28 days. One third of patients were treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Numerous interventions described by the SSC guidelines fell within existing capabilities, but their implementation was highly variable. Care available to patients on general wards covered the fundamental principles of sepsis management, including non-invasive patient monitoring, antimicrobial administration and intravenous fluid resuscitation. We described two additive care bundles, one for general wards and the second for ICUs, that if consistently performed would be predicted to improve outcome from severe sepsis. Conclusion It is feasible to implement modified sepsis guidelines that are scaled to resource availability, and that could save lives prior to the publication of international guidelines for developing countries. PMID:22363410

  17. The Physiology of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Keith G; Nemergut, Edward C; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Sweeney, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Outcomes after cardiac arrest remain poor more than a half a century after closed chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was first described. This review article is focused on recent insights into the physiology of blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR. Over the past 20 years, a greater understanding of heart-brain-lung interactions has resulted in novel resuscitation methods and technologies that significantly improve outcomes from cardiac arrest. This article highlights the importance of attention to CPR quality, recent approaches to regulate intrathoracic pressure to improve cerebral and systemic perfusion, and ongoing research related to the ways to mitigate reperfusion injury during CPR. Taken together, these new approaches in adult and pediatric patients provide an innovative, physiologically based road map to increase survival and quality of life after cardiac arrest.

  18. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  19. Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole. PMID:23905041

  20. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  1. Monitoring End Points of Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Daniel M; Matthews, Marc R

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses commonly used methods of monitoring and determining the end points of resuscitation. Each end point of resuscitation is examined as it relates to use in critically ill burn patients. Published medical literature, clinical trials, consensus trials, and expert opinion regarding end points of resuscitation were gathered and reviewed. Specific goals were a detailed examination of each method in the critical care population and how this methodology can be used in the burn patient. Although burn resuscitation is monitored and administered using the methodology as seen in medical/surgical intensive care settings, special consideration for excessive edema formation, metabolic derangements, and frequent operative interventions must be considered. PMID:27600124

  2. Essentials of sepsis management.

    PubMed

    Green, John M

    2015-04-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the knowledge of infection and human response to it, sepsis continues to be one of the most common challenges surgeons and critical care providers face. Surgeons confront the problem of infection every day, in treating established infections or reacting to a consequence of surgical intervention. Infections after surgery continue to be a problem despite massive efforts to prevent them. Patients rely on the surgeon's ability to recognize infection and treat it. Also, preventing nosocomial infection and antibiotic resistance is a primary responsibility. This article describes diagnostic and therapeutic measures for sepsis in the perioperative surgical patient.

  3. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  4. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  5. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  6. Revisiting caspases in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  7. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  8. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  9. [Sepsis management -- antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Welte, T

    2004-11-26

    Sepsis is one of the most frequent infectious problems at Intensive Care Units, and sepsis is associated with significant mortality. The latter could not be markedly reduced in the last years, despite a number of advances in the field of volume substitution, catecholamines, and endocrinologic therapy. The reason might be that important steps towards overcoming of sepsis are the surgical resection of infectious foci and an adequate antibiotic treatment. A critical role plays the growing resistance of pathogens against the common antibiotics. Since no major progress in the development of new antibiotics can be expected for the next years, sepsis treatment must be focused on prevention of infection, and on an optimised application of current antibiotic substances. The key factors are a broad and high dose initial treatment, a de-escalation strategy according to the clinical course, and -with exceptions- a limitation of treatment to 7 to 10 days. Rotation of antibiotics should be performed, if problems with resistances exist or no specialist for infectious diseases is available on the Intensive Care Unit.

  10. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27165831

  11. 'An unusual response of dental sepsis to antibiotics: parallels with the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction'.

    PubMed

    Moss, Helen; Collier, Jonathan Marc; Collier, Sophie

    2012-06-14

    Spreading odontogenic infections are a common source of hospital admissions to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) units. This report describes an unusual reaction to routine treatment for a spreading odontogenic infection in a healthy male with no known allergies, requiring the patient to be managed supportively in the resuscitation room. The patient deteriorated rapidly after the administration of paracetamol, intravenous fluids, steroids and antibiotics, demonstrating delusional behaviour, fever, rigors, tachycardia and hypoxia. Fever associated with sepsis can lead to confusional states, but similar symptoms have been described in the literature as a reaction to antibiotic therapy known as Jarisch-Herxheimer (J-H) reaction. This is potentially the first time a J-H like reaction has been described in the context of dental sepsis. The authors feel that the OMFS team should be aware of possible sequelae of medical therapy in patients with acute dental sepsis and be confident in their management of these complications.

  12. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  13. Nurses' accounts of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Page, S; Meerabeau, L

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between theory and practice has received considerable attention within the nursing literature. This paper uses qualitative data from debriefing interviews with nurses following episodes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to illustrate the complexities of translating sanitized theory into the messiness of practice. The interplay of affect and cognition on both learning from experience and on professional practice are explored. The feelings engendered by the CPR event and the labour required for their management form the second and major part of the paper. These are explored by examining the realities of a CPR event with its accompanying threat of death; success and failure, dignity versus indignity and the place of appropriate emotions throughout.

  14. The effects of nitroglycerin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Stefaniotou, Antonia; Varvarousi, Giolanda; Varvarousis, Dimitrios P; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-07-01

    The outcome for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrest remains dismal. Vasopressors are used to increase coronary perfusion pressure and thus facilitate return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, they are associated with a number of potential adverse effects and may decrease endocardial and cerebral organ blood flow. Nitroglycerin has a favourable haemodynamic profile which promotes forward blood flow. Several studies suggest that combined use of nitroglycerin with vasopressors during resuscitation, is associated with increased rates of resuscitation and improved post-resuscitation outcome. This article reviews the effects of nitroglycerin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and postresuscitation period, as well as the beneficial outcomes of a combination regimen consisting of a vasopressor and a vasodilator, such as nitroglycerin.

  15. Predictive Value of Total Serum Bilirubin within 6 Hour of Birth for the Development of Hyperbilirubinemia After 72 hours of Birth

    PubMed Central

    Vanaki, Raghavendra; Badakali, Ashok V.; Pol, Ramesh R; Yelamali, Bhuvaneshwari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal jaundice is benign and no intervention might be required, but jaundice can be associated with an underlying disease condition, which therefore warrants accurate and unbiased estimation of bilirubin. Total Serum Bilirubin (TSB) measurements (at discharge between 18 hours and 72 hours) can be used to predict the chances of developing severe hyperbilirubinemia. Materials and Methods The present hospital-based prospective study was undertaken to determine the predictive value of serum bilirubin before 6 hours of life for subsequent hyperbilirubinemia in healthy term neonates. One hundred and fifty healthy term newborns delivered during January 2013–December 2013 at Hanagal Shri Kumareshwara Hospital and Research Centre, S. Nijalingappa Medical College, Bagalkot Karnataka, India, were included in the study. Serum bilirubin levels were estimated twice, first, within 6 hours of life and second, after 72 hours of life. Bilirubin values were plotted on previously published nomograms. Sensitivity, specificity of the test was established. Results A measure of TSB levels (within 6 hours of life) across the study population, showed that maximum number of infants (70/150) had TSB level between 4.1 and 5.5 mg/dL and 16 infants had TSB level >5.6 mg/dL. The TSB levels (after 72 hours of life) showed that maximum newborns (83/150) had TSB levels between 12.8 and 15.3 mg/dL and 9 infants had TSB levels between 7.7 and 10.2mg/dL. Eighteen infants developed hyperbilirubinemia. Newborns with TSB value of >4.95mg/dL within 6hours of life had developed significant hyperbilirubinemia after 72 hours of life with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 89% (p=0.0001), which was highly statistically significant. Conclusion A TSB level of >5 mg/dL within 6 hours of birth would serve as a predictor for risk of subsequent hyperbilirubinemia in the near future. PMID:27790538

  16. [New recommendations on the use of human albumin solutions in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. A critical evaluation of the literature].

    PubMed

    Latour-Pérez, J

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines opens the door to the use of albumin for fluid resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This recommendation is based on a recent meta-analysis that included studies with evidence of insufficient plasma expansion in the control group and studies performed in children with malaria with clear statistical heterogeneity (P for interaction=.02). After excluding pediatric studies, the confidence interval of the effect estimate was consistent with a mortality excess in the group treated with albumin (OR=.87 [95%CI: .71 to 1.07]). Two new randomized studies reported after publication of the meta-analysis found no benefit in patients treated with albumin. Given the uncertainty about the true effect of albumin (due to the existence of indirectness and imprecision) and its cost considerations, it is suggested not to use albumin in the initial resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (GRADE2C). PMID:23664006

  17. [Hospital organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arnau, J; Lacoma, F; García del Valle, S; Núñez, A; González, A; Burgos, E

    1999-05-01

    That hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be supported by an organized plan rather than on the skills of individual health care personnel is a universally agreed-upon principle. Such a plan should guarantee that needed materials are available and in working order in all departments and that the team assigned to carry out CPR arrives promptly. Personnel other than the specialized team should also receive CPR training appropriate to their posts. The main features of a CPR plan are related to the five steps in the chain of survival: a) identification of a patient to be resuscitated, a matter that has important ethical ramifications; b) early recognition of cardiac arrest; c) early defibrillation; d) basic CPR, and e) advanced CPR. The CPR plan should incorporate the automatic recording of system, population, event and outcome variables. Task forces responsible for establishing and maintaining the plan and its quality control will periodically review the data with the aim of detecting errors, correcting them or introducing improvements. Various international societies and CPR committees have recently suggested a uniform way (the Utstein style) of recording and presenting data to allow comparisons either from hospital to hospital or over time within a single center.

  18. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  19. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients. PMID:21658557

  20. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients.

  1. Magnetically targeted drug delivery during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the post-resuscitation period.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros; Chatzigeorgiou, Michael; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Chalkias, Athanasios

    2012-07-01

    Treatment with pharmacological agents is frequently required during cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts and almost always during the post-resuscitation period. However, the lack of scientific evidence, the potent side effects and the association of resuscitation drugs with poor outcome act as a disincentive for their use. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in medicine has great potential. Magnetically targeted drug delivery may be an ideal method of pharmaceutical treatment during the resuscitation efforts and post-resuscitation period. In addition, there is evidence that magnetic nanotechnology may be used in the detection of post-cardiac arrest brain injury. In the light of poor survival of cardiac arrest victims, research in cardiopulmonary resuscitation should focus on this promising technology as soon as possible.

  2. Evaluation of procalcitonin for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission

    PubMed Central

    López Sastre, José B; Solís, David Pérez; Serradilla, Vicente Roqués; Colomer, Belén Fernández; Cotallo, Gil D Coto

    2007-01-01

    Background The results of recent studies suggest the usefulness of PCT for early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, with varying results. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to determine the behavior of serum PCT concentrations in both uninfected and infected neonates, and to assess the value of this marker for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission. Methods PCT was measured in 827 blood samples collected prospectively from 317 neonates admitted to 13 acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain over one year. Serum PCT concentrations were determined by a specific immunoluminometric assay. The diagnostic efficacy of PCT at birth and within 12–24 h and 36–48 h of life was evaluated calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio of positive and negative results. Results 169 asymptomatic newborns and 148 symptomatic newborns (confirmed vertical sepsis: 31, vertical clinical sepsis: 38, non-infectious diseases: 79) were studied. In asymptomatic neonates, PCT values at 12–24 h were significantly higher than at birth and at 36–48 h of life. Resuscitation at birth and chorioamnionitis were independently associated to PCT values. Neonates with confirmed vertical sepsis showed significantly higher PCT values than those with clinical sepsis. PCT thresholds for the diagnosis of sepsis were 0.55 ng/mL at birth (sensitivity 75.4%, specificity 72.3%); 4.7 ng/mL within 12–24 h of life (sensitivity 73.8%, specificity 80.8%); and 1.7 ng/mL within 36–48 h of life (sensitivity 77.6%, specificity 79.2%). Conclusion Serum PCT was moderately useful for the detection of sepsis of vertical transmission, and its reliability as a maker of bacterial infection requires specific cutoff values for each evaluation point over the first 48 h of life. PMID:17324267

  3. Evaluation of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spittal, M J

    1993-08-01

    This study evaluates whether the pulse oximeter is useful during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The instrument was of undoubted benefit in the management of primary respiratory arrest, but of equivocable value in cardiac arrest. Data were displayed during external chest compressions, but were generally unreliable. The ear probe was not able to produce a consistently good signal during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nevertheless, the provision of an oximeter amongst the first-line resuscitation equipment available at a cardiopulmonary arrest significantly altered the management of seven out of 20 patients, five of whom survived.

  4. Injuries associated with resuscitation - An overview.

    PubMed

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Langlois, Neil E I

    2015-07-01

    External cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a potentially lifesaving intervention aimed at preserving the cerebral function of a person in cardiac arrest. However, certain injuries can be caused by the various techniques employed. Although these are seldom consequential, they may complicate the forensic evaluation of cases. Fractures of the ribs and sternum are the most common internal injuries and are frequently acknowledged as a consequence of resuscitation. Nonethlesss, the recognition that less common fractures such as of the larynx or injuries involving the stomach, spleen, heart and liver can occur due to resuscitation will assist the forensic examiner assess the significance of these findings when they present in cases of sudden death.

  5. Gelatin colloids in the resuscitation of trauma.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, C

    2006-12-01

    To date, the specific role of gelatins in trauma resuscitation remains under-investigated. Their adverse affects are well described and relate principally to the provocation of allergic responses whilst their influence upon haemostasis is relatively benign in comparison to the other colloids. However, their benefits are only sparsely documented and the evidence to choose one gelatin over another virtually non-existent. As knowledge of the microcirculatory dysfunction inherent in the shocked state increases, the role of the gelatins in trauma resuscitation is being increasing sidelined by other colloids--notably the starches. Their role beyond a basic resuscitation tool is now uncertain.

  6. STUDIES IN RESUSCITATION: I. THE GENERAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING RESUSCITATION, AND THE RESUSCITATION OF THE BLOOD AND OF THE HEART

    PubMed Central

    Pike, F. H.; Guthrie, C. C.; Stewart, G. N.

    1908-01-01

    Our results may be briefly summarized: 1. Blood, when defibrinated, soon loses its power to maintain the activity of the higher nervous centers, and its nutritive properties for all tissues quickly diminish. 2. Artificial fluids, as a substitute for blood, are not satisfactory. 3. The proper oxygenation of the blood is an indispensable adjunct in the resuscitation of an animal. 4. The heart usually continues to beat for some minutes after it ceases to affect a mercury manometer, and resuscitation of it within this period by extra-thoracic massage and artificial respiration is sometimes successful. 5. Resuscitation of the heart by direct massage is the most certain method at our command. 6. A proper blood-pressure is an indispensable condition for the continued normal activity of the heart. 7. Anæsthetics, hemorrhage and induced currents applied to the heart render resuscitation more difficult than asphyxia alone. PMID:19867138

  7. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response Many people have never heard of sepsis, or ... tract infection) and then a powerful and harmful response by your body’s own immune system . “With sepsis, ...

  8. [Resuscitation after intoxication with amitriptylin].

    PubMed

    Fippel, A; Berkel, H; Finkemeyer, S; Knape, R; Hoitz, J

    2005-09-01

    Intoxications with tricyclic antidepressants are often life threatening situations. In consequence of interference with many organ systems specific treatment consists in transportation to hospital under cardiopulmonary monitoring by physicians. The multiple possibilities of complications require the following treatments: continuous monitoring of the cardiovascular system, gastrolavage, application of carbon through a nasogastric tube, intubation and controlled ventilation in case of coma and continuous stand by for defibrillation. Additionally patients with stable parameters should be monitored in intensive care units because often there are no precursors of cardiac or pulmonary complications. We report the case of a 49-year old women with ingestion of 2500 mg of amitriptyline who suffered from multiple cardiac arrhythmias with following cardiac arrests and who required multiple defibrillations and resuscitation.

  9. The Effect of Early Goal-Directed Therapy on Outcome in Adult Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Hong; Liu, Song-Qiao; Pan, Chun; Xu, Xiu-Ping; Han, Ji-Bin; Xie, Jian-Feng; Huang, Ying-Zi; Guo, Feng-Mei; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) improves outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of existing clinical trials to examine whether EGDT improved outcome in the resuscitation of adult sepsis patients compared with control care. METHODS: We searched for eligible studies using MEDLINE, Elsevier, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases. Studies were eligible if they compared the effects of EGDT versus control care on mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Data including mortality, sample size of the patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, and resuscitation end points were extracted. Data were analyzed using methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 4.2 software. Random errors were evaluated by trial sequential analysis (TSA). RESULTS: Nine studies compared EGDT with control care, and 5202 severe sepsis and septic shock patients were included. A nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality was observed in the EGDT group compared with control care (relative risk, 0.89; 99% confidence interval, 0.74–1.07; P = 0.10). However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients (relative risk, 0.72; 99% confidence interval, 0.57–0.90; P = 0.0002). TSA indicated lack of firm evidence for a beneficial effect. CONCLUSIONS: In this meta-analysis, a nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality in patients resuscitated with EGDT was noted. However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients. TSA indicated a lack of firm evidence for the results. More powered, randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the effects. PMID:27049857

  10. Fluid Creep and Over-resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2016-10-01

    Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented. PMID:27600130

  11. Anticoagulant therapy for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation: the view from Japan.

    PubMed

    Iba, T; Gando, S; Thachil, J

    2014-07-01

    The current management of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is based on aggressive treatment of the underlying condition and resuscitation with appropriate blood products. Anticoagulant therapy has appeared and disappeared in the different guidelines and important documents detailing the treatment of DIC. For example, Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines, the 'global standard' for the management of severe sepsis, had recombinant activated protein C highly recommended in the original version, but this was withdrawn in the latest version due to the lack of evidence. In contrast, recent international guidance released from the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has introduced the potential efficacy of other agents. In sepsis-related DIC, the basis for anticoagulant therapy comes from the mounting evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects which these agents possess and can prove beneficial in septic situations. Several studies have clearly shown the important cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation in patients with sepsis. More recently, neutrophil extracellular traps and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), especially histones, have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the coagulopathy of sepsis. Once again, the natural anticoagulants have an important function in neutralizing the effects of DAMPs and histones. In this review, in addition to examining the important role of anticoagulants in the septic milieu, the clinical studies examining antithrombin, recombinant thrombomodulin and plasma-derived activated protein C are detailed. However, large-scale randomized controlled trials are yet to be performed, with important consideration of the timing, dosage and duration of treatment.

  12. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  13. 'Not for resuscitation': the student nurses' viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Candy, C E

    1991-02-01

    A variable proportion of hospital in-patients were deemed 'not for resuscitation'. Using a qualitative methodology, this phenomenon was investigated, placing particular emphasis upon the effect on nursing care. A total of 71 student nurses from two district general hospitals were interviewed and from transcriptions of tape recordings of the interviews, utilizing a grounded theory approach, the following conceptual categories were identified: the patients; decision making; changes in nursing care? are patients and/or their relatives consulted? the unsuccessful resuscitation; the right to die; and dying and death. Up to 40% of patients on medial wards, and up to 100% of patients on geriatric and psychiatric wards, were deemed 'not for resuscitation'. The most junior members of the medical team had the power to make this decision without consultation with the nursing staff, patients or relatives. Nurses spent more time attending to patients 'not for resuscitation', but physiotherapists and medical staff withdrew. Informants felt that subjecting patients to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was incompatible with a dignified death. Senior members of the nursing staff were felt to be unfeeling in dealing with the distress of their juniors when laying out deceased patients. More discussion and joint decision making between health care professionals would alleviate some of the student nurses' distress concerning patients who are 'not for resuscitation'.

  14. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  15. Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: current evidence for emergency department management.

    PubMed

    Booker, Ethan

    2011-05-01

    In the middle of a busy shift, a patient arrives by ambulance from a local long-term care facility with a report of altered mental status. You enter the room to find a chronically ill-appearing 85-year-old man with fever, tachycardia, and hypotension, and it is instantly apparent that this patient is septic. What is not clear is what the source is, what modifications in treatment might be necessary based on preexisting microbial resistance, and which of the array of invasive resuscitation techniques are appropriate when meaningful recovery is questionable and efforts may not be desired by the patient and family. You order IV fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics; send lab tests, including lactate and cultures of blood, urine, and sputum; and begin to review his extensive history to discuss goals of care with his family and primary doctor. While reviewing these issues, a 54-year-old woman with a history of asthma is brought straight back from triage with respiratory distress. You listen to her lungs, expecting wheezes, but hear decreased lung sounds at the right base, preserved air movement elsewhere, and her skin radiates heat. Now, on the monitor, she has a heart rate of 135 beats per minute, blood pressure of 90/60 mm Hg, O2 saturation of 86%, and a temperature of 39.4 degrees C (103 degrees F). You again identify sepsis and instruct your team that you will be using your department's severe sepsis protocol. Equipment for monitoring and procedures is assembled, your staff provides preprinted order and monitoring flow sheets, and the ICU is alerted. Within an hour, the patient is intubated, has a central line placed, and has received IV fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics and norepinephrine, and you are pleased to see a MAP of 67 mm Hg, a lactate decreasing from an initial value of 7.0, CVP of 10, and ScvO2 of 78%.

  16. Drowning. Rescue, resuscitation, and reanimation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P; Szpilman, D

    2001-06-01

    Several myths about drowning have developed over the years. This article has attempted to dispel some of these myths, as follows: 1. Drowning victims are unable to call or wave for help. 2. "Dry drownings" probably do not exist; if there is no water in the lungs at autopsy, the victim probably was not alive when he or she entered the water. 3. Do not use furosemide to treat the pulmonary edema of drowning; victims may need volume. 4. Seawater drowning does not cause hypovolemia, and freshwater drowning does not cause hypervolemia, hemolysis, or hyperkalemia. 5. Drowning victims swallow much more water than they inhale, resulting in a high risk for vomiting spontaneously or on resuscitation. No discussion of drowning would be complete without mentioning the importance of prevention. Proper pool fencing and water safety training at a young age are instrumental in reducing the risk for drowning. Not leaving an infant or young child unattended in or near water can prevent many of these deaths, especially bathtub drownings. Also crucial is the use of personal flotation devices whenever boating. Proper training in water safety is crucial for participation in water recreation and sporting activities, including SCUBA diving. The incidence of pediatric drowning deaths in the United States has decreased steadily over the past decade, perhaps as a result of increased awareness and attention to drowning-prevention measures (Box 1).

  17. Dying, sudden cardiac death and resuscitation technology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy M

    2008-04-01

    Many nurses will be familiar with the demanding role of caring for a patient who requires cardiopulmonary resuscitation following a sudden, life-threatening illness or event. This paper examines the phenomenon of sudden cardiac death and in particular, focuses on the medical-technical discourse of dying and death in the context of resuscitation for the victims of sudden cardiac arrest. The process of dying is distinguished from the end point of death by drawing upon biomedical determinants and definitions of death. Comparison is made between the use of resuscitation techniques in an attempt to reverse 'clinical death' and the notion of a 'natural death' that is proffered as a means to a 'good' or 'ideal' death. The humanistic versus technological imperative is further deliberated by examining the role of the emergency team in end of life care and includes consideration of the effects that medical dominance may have on the dying process. The practice of family witnessed resuscitation is recognised as one way in which a holistic approach to emergency resuscitative care may be achieved.

  18. Drugs during delivery room resuscitation--what, when and why?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Vishal S; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2013-12-01

    Although seldom needed, the short list of medications used for delivery room resuscitation of the newborn includes epinephrine and volume expanders. Naloxone, sodium bicarbonate and the use of other vasopressors are no longer considered helpful during acute resuscitation and are more often administered in the post-resuscitative period under special circumstances. This review examines the existing literature for the two commonly used medications in neonatal resuscitation and identifies the many knowledge gaps requiring further research.

  19. The role of Levosimendan in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Stefaniotou, Antonia; Varvaroussis, Dimitrios; Aroni, Filippia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although initial resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA) has increased over the past years, long term survival rates remain dismal. Epinephrine is the vasopressor of choice in the treatment of CA. However, its efficacy has been questioned, as it has no apparent benefits for long-term survival or favorable neurologic outcome. Levosimendan is an inodilator with cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects. Several studies suggest that it is associated with increased rates of return of spontaneous circulation as well as improved post-resuscitation myocardial function and neurological outcome. The purpose of this article is to review the properties of Levosimendan during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also to summarize existing evidence regarding the use of Levosimendan in the treatment of CA.

  20. Practical aspects of advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, J

    1988-08-01

    Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the paediatric age group necessitates the acquisition of technical skills for rapid tracheal intubation, external cardiac compression and access to the circulation. Skills and equipment must be adapted to each age group. For optimal mechanical ventilation and the avoidance of complications, correct selection of endotracheal tube diameter and length is necessary. New techniques in resuscitation incorporate an understanding of the mechanism of blood flow during cardiac compression, the use of the intratracheal route for drug administration, and a revision of the use of catecholamines, sodium bicarbonate and calcium solutions in the treatment of asystole-bradycardia, electromechanical dissociation, ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia. Early intubation, adequate ventilation with oxygen, well performed external cardiac compression, prompt defibrillation and administration of adrenaline remain the cornerstones of advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:3064747

  1. Application of the Berlin definition in PROMMTT patients: the impact of resuscitation on the incidence of hypoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bryce RH; Cotton, Bryan A; Pritts, Timothy A; Branson, Richard; Holcomb, John B; Muskat, Peter C; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; del Junco, Deborah J; Bulger, Eileen M; Cohen, Mitchell J; Schreiber, Martin A; Myers, John G; Brasel, Karen J; Phelan, Herbert A; Alarcon, Louis H; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Callcut, Rachael A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury following trauma resuscitation remains a concern despite recent advances. Utilizing PROMMTT study population, the risk of hypoxemia and potential modifiable risk factors are studied. Methods Patients with survival ≥ 24 hours with at least 1 ICU day were included in the analysis. Hypoxemia was categorized utilizing the Berlin definition for ARDS: none (PaO2 to FiO2 ratio (P/F) > 300 mmHg), mild (P/F = 201–300), moderate (P/F = 101–200) or severe (P/F ≤ 100). The cohort was dichotomized into those with none or mild hypoxemia and those with moderate or severe injury. Early resuscitation was defined as that occurring 0–6 hours from arrival, late resuscitation was defined as that occurring 7–24 hours. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed controlling for age, gender, mechanisms of injury, arrival physiology, individual AIS scores, blood transfusions and crystalloid administration. Results 58.7% (731/1245) met inclusion criteria. Hypoxemia occurred in 69% (mild 24%, moderate 28%, severe 17%). Mortality was highest (24%) in the severe group. During early resuscitation (0–6 h), logistic regression revealed age (OR 1.02, CI 1.00–1.04), chest AIS (OR 1.31, CI 1.10–1.57) and intravenous crystalloid fluids given in 500 mL increments (OR 1.12 CI 1.01–1.25) as predictive of moderate or severe hypoxemia. During late resuscitation, age (OR 1.02, CI 1.00–1.04), chest AIS (OR 1.33, CI 1.11–1.59) and crystalloids given during this period (OR 1.05 CI 1.01–1.10) were also predictive of moderate to severe hypoxemia. RBC, plasma and platelet transfusions (whether received during early or late resuscitation) failed to demonstrate an increased risk of developing moderate/severe hypoxemia. Conclusion Severe chest injury, increasing age and crystalloid-based resuscitation, but not blood transfusions, were associated with increased risk of developing moderate to severe hypoxemia following injury. Level of Evidence I

  2. Damage control resuscitation: history, theory and technique

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.

    2014-01-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) represents the natural evolution of the initial concept of damage control surgery. It currently includes early blood product transfusion, immediate arrest and/or temporization of ongoing hemorrhage (i.e., temporary intravascular shunts and/or balloon tamponade) as well as restoration of blood volume and physiologic/hematologic stability. As a result, DCR addresses the early coagulopathy of trauma, avoids massive crystalloid resuscitation and leaves the peritoneal cavity open when a patient approaches physiologic exhaustion without improvement. This concept also applies to severe injuries within anatomical transition zones as well as extremities. This review will discuss each of these concepts in detail. PMID:24461267

  3. External cardiovascular resuscitation of the anesthetized pony.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, H C; Fessler, J F; Latshaw, H S; Moore, A B; Bottoms, G D

    1981-10-01

    External cardiac massage and concomitant respiratory support were used successfully 6 of 8 anesthetized ponies sustaining unexpected cardiac arrest while being used in a study of shock. Approximately 20 thoracic compressions/min maintained systolic and diastolic aortic blood pressures in excess of 50% of the corresponding base-line values in 5 ponies. The high success rate was attributed to early recognition of the problem, the small size of the patient, and the relatively short duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (average, 2.9 minutes). It was concluded that external cardiac message can be effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in selected equine patients that have sustained cardiac arrest.

  4. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  5. The role of immune and metabolic biomarkers for improved management of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Philipp; Mueller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    Sepsis, the body`s overwhelming response to systemic infections, is responsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and financial burden. Pathogens and their antigens stimulate pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and immune markers which characterize the host defense and orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the acute site of infection. Different immune and metabolic biomarkers have been studied in relation to sepsis for their diagnostic and/or prognostic aid. Recent studies have provided abundant evidence that specific immune and metabolic biomarkers improve a physician`s ability to guide early sepsis recognition, severity assessment and therapeutic decisions in individual patients. This may allow for a transition from bundled sepsis care (protocols combining several medical practices) to more individualized management. First, lactate has now been widely used for risk stratification and guidance of fluid resuscitation. Second, procalcitonin correlates with risks of bacterial infections and helps guide therapeutic decisions about initiation and withdrawal of anti-microbial therapy. Third, prognostic markers such as pro-adrenomedullin improve early mortality prediction and thereby site-of-care decisions in respiratory infections. For these markers interventional trials have documented their value when integrated in clinical protocols.

  6. Surviving sepsis in the critical care environment.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The management of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care environment is a complex task requiring the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign provides systematic guidelines for the recognition, early intervention, and supportive management of sepsis. Critical care nurses are instrumental in ensuring that these guidelines and other sources of evidence-based practice are used for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. This article discusses the pathophysiologic processes in severe sepsis and septic shock and discusses the appropriate interventions as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Recommended early treatments are reviewed along with interventions related to hemodynamics, perfusion, and supportive care in the critical care environment.

  7. Small volume hypertonic resuscitation of circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Rocha-e-Silva, Mauricio; Poli de Figueiredo, Luiz F

    2005-04-01

    Small volume hypertonic resuscitation is a relatively new conceptual approach to shock therapy. It was originally based on the idea that a relatively large blood volume expansion could be obtained by administering a relatively small volume of fluid, taking advantage of osmosis. It was soon realized that the physiological vasodilator property of hypertonicity was a useful byproduct of small volume resuscitation in that it induced reperfusion of previously ischemic territories, even though such an effect encroached upon the malefic effects of the ischemia-reperfusion process. Subsequent research disclosed a number of previously unsuspected properties of hypertonic resuscitation, amongst them the correction of endothelial and red cell edema with significant consequences in terms of capillary blood flow. A whole set of actions of hypertonicity upon the immune system are being gradually uncovered, but the full implication of these observations with regard to the clinical scenario are still under study. Small volume resuscitation for shock is in current clinical use in some parts of the world, in spite of objections raised concerning its safety under conditions of uncontrolled bleeding. These objections stem mainly from experimental studies, but there are few signs that they may be of real clinical significance. This review attempts to cover the earlier and the more recent developments in this field. PMID:15880253

  8. Disappearing Acts: Resuscitative Reflections on the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    To resuscitate means to revive or make go on. This paper is an exploration of my first six months at a Canadian university as a doctoral student. Through a chronological narrative, I explore my experiences through the governing relations of the academy as a way to provoke dialogue about the role of feminist researcher in the institution. By…

  9. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  10. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  12. Incidence, organ dysfunction and mortality in severe sepsis: a Spanish multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Jesús; Muriel-Bombín, Arturo; Sagredo, Víctor; Taboada, Francisco; Gandía, Francisco; Tamayo, Luís; Collado, Javier; García-Labattut, Ángel; Carriedo, Demetrio; Valledor, Manuel; De Frutos, Martín; López, María-Jesús; Caballero, Ana; Guerra, José; Álvarez, Braulio; Mayo, Agustín; Villar, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    found a high incidence of severe sepsis attended in the ICU and high ICU and hospital mortality rates. The high prevalence of multiple organ failure at diagnosis and the high mortality in the first 48 h suggests delays in diagnosis, in initial resuscitation, and/or in initiating appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:19091069

  13. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  14. Current epidemiology of sepsis in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xuelian; Du, Bin; Lu, Meizhu; Wu, Minming

    2016-01-01

    The disease burden of sepsis is a global issue. Most of the large-scale epidemiological investigations on sepsis have been carried out in developed countries. The population of 1.3 billion in mainland China accounts for approximately 1/5th of the whole world population. Thus, the knowledge of the incidence and mortality of sepsis in mainland China is vital before employing measures for its improvement. However, most of the epidemiological data of sepsis in mainland China was obtained from ICU settings, and thus lacks the population-based incidence and mortality of sepsis. In the present review, we summarized the limited literature encompassing the incidence, mortality, long-term outcome, and pathogens of sepsis in mainland China. Therefore, it might provide some valuable information regarding the sepsis disease burden and current issues in the management of sepsis in mainland China. PMID:27713882

  15. Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160574.html Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC Know the signs of extreme response to ... treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs ...

  16. Severe sepsis management are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Tom; Vollman, Kathleen

    2003-10-01

    For the first time in medical history, a drug has been shown to reduce the mortality associated with sepsis, the leading cause of death in many ICUs. Optimal use by appropriate selection of patients and early recognition of sepsis could save thousands of lives. Nurses play a major role in recognizing severe sepsis. By using the concepts introduced here, nurses can play a direct role in saving the lives of patients with sepsis.

  17. Sepsis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Lucas, K G; Kiehn, T E; Sobeck, K A; Armstrong, D; Brown, A E

    1994-07-01

    Previous reports of F. oryzihabitans sepsis involving central venous access devices reveal a relatively high rate of complications, including device removal, despite a course of broad-spectrum anti-microbials with compatible in vitro susceptibility results. In the present report of 22 cases of F. oryzihabitans sepsis treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from February 1986 through September 1993, the majority of CVAD-related infections with F. oryzihabitans were successfully treated with a 14-day course of antimicrobials with antipseudomonal activity, and removal of the device was usually not required. Factors that may complicate successful treatment of CVAD-related sepsis caused by F. oryzihabitans include polymicrobial infections and premature discontinuation of antibiotic therapy.

  18. Sepsis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Lucas, K G; Kiehn, T E; Sobeck, K A; Armstrong, D; Brown, A E

    1994-07-01

    Previous reports of F. oryzihabitans sepsis involving central venous access devices reveal a relatively high rate of complications, including device removal, despite a course of broad-spectrum anti-microbials with compatible in vitro susceptibility results. In the present report of 22 cases of F. oryzihabitans sepsis treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from February 1986 through September 1993, the majority of CVAD-related infections with F. oryzihabitans were successfully treated with a 14-day course of antimicrobials with antipseudomonal activity, and removal of the device was usually not required. Factors that may complicate successful treatment of CVAD-related sepsis caused by F. oryzihabitans include polymicrobial infections and premature discontinuation of antibiotic therapy. PMID:8041243

  19. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  20. Epidemiologic trends of sepsis in western countries

    PubMed Central

    Suarez De La Rica, Alejandro; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Since the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and the Society of Critical care Medicine (SCCM) published the first consensus definition of syndromes related to sepsis in 1992, the knowledge of epidemiology of sepsis has clearly improved, although no prospective studies have been performed to analyse the incidence of sepsis in general population. There are differences in epidemiologic trends in sepsis between western countries and low-income and middle-income countries. In the United States (US), most of epidemiologic studies have been based on large, administrative databases, reporting an increase in the incidence of severe sepsis over years. In general, studies describing epidemiology of sepsis outside the US use clinical definitions and intensive care unit (ICU) observational cohort designs instead of administrative databases and definitions. Incidence of sepsis has increased over years, probably due to progressive aging of population, the existence of more comorbidities and maybe the liberal use of sepsis codification, by including patients with less severity. Notwithstanding, mortality due to sepsis is clearly decreasing over years, probably to improvement in ICU care, although absolute mortality is growing on account of the raise in incidence. Risk factors for sepsis are the two ends of life, male sex, US black race, presence of comorbidities and certain genetic variants. Respiratory tract infections are the most common source of sepsis, and, nowadays, Gram-positive infections are more frequent that Gram-negative sepsis in most prospective studies. PMID:27713883

  1. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices.

  2. Drug therapy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1989-03-01

    In contrast to adults, cardiopulmonary arrest in infants and children is rarely an acute, primary cardiac event. Instead, it is often the terminal event in a progressive deterioration of respiratory or circulatory function. Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest therefore is unusual in the paediatric patient and most survivors have persistent neurological impairment. Rapid vascular access and recall of drug dosages are major obstacles in treating paediatric emergencies. This paper reviews vascular access and alternative drug delivery methods. The endotracheal and intraosseous routes provide alternative sites for drug delivery, but the optimal doses and methods of drug administration via these routes are unknown. Indeed, although great progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) research has been made over the past 10 years, there are only limited data on paediatric arrest mechanisms and drug treatment. In this paper, recommended dosages and mechanisms of action of drugs useful during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are reviewed, highlighting recent data which suggest that changes in current drug recommendations may be needed. To avoid delays in management, precalculated tables of drugs should be readily available in emergency departments and other care areas where paediatric cases are likely to be seen. Adrenaline (epinephrine) remains the drug of choice in a cardiac arrest, but the most effective dose may be higher than currently used. Treatment of acidosis during the arrest concentrates on restoration of ventilation and blood flow and not on bicarbonate administration. In the post-arrest setting increasing data suggest bicarbonate may not be beneficial and may actually be detrimental. Calcium and atropine also have relatively minor roles in resuscitation pharmacology. Calcium is only indicated to treat hypocalcaemia, counteract the effects of hyperkalaemia or hypermagnesaemia, or reverse calcium channel blocker toxicity. Finally, the role of isoprenaline

  3. Advances in fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Lorraine N.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The optimal fluid for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock would combine the volume expansion and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood without the need for cross-matching or the risk of disease transmission. Although the ideal fluid has yet to be discovered, current options are discussed in this review, including crystalloids, colloids, blood and blood substitutes. The future role of blood substitutes is not yet defined, but the potential advantages in trauma or elective surgery may prove to be enormous. PMID:11407826

  4. Naloxone during neonatal resuscitation: acknowledging the unknown.

    PubMed

    Guinsburg, Ruth; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2006-03-01

    There are no studies to support or to refute the current recommendations regarding naloxone concentration, routes for administration, and doses in neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. Given the lack of supporting evidence, naloxone should not be given routinely in the delivery room to depressed neonates whether or not they are exposed to opioids before delivery because no important improvement has been documented and the drug may have potential short- and long-term harmful effects.

  5. Design and implementation of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART).

    PubMed

    Wang, Henry E; Prince, David K; Stephens, Shannon W; Herren, Heather; Daya, Mohamud; Richmond, Neal; Carlson, Jestin; Warden, Craig; Colella, M Riccardo; Brienza, Ashley; Aufderheide, Tom P; Idris, Ahamed H; Schmicker, Robert; May, Susanne; Nichol, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Airway management is an important component of resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The optimal approach to advanced airway management is unknown. The Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART) will compare the effectiveness of endotracheal intubation (ETI) and Laryngeal Tube (LT) insertion upon 72-h survival in adult OHCA. Encompassing United States Emergency Medical Services agencies affiliated with the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC), PART will use a cluster-crossover randomized design. Participating subjects will include adult, non-traumatic OHCA requiring bag-valve-mask ventilation. Trial interventions will include (1) initial airway management with ETI and (2) initial airway management with LT. The primary and secondary trial outcomes are 72-h survival and return of spontaneous circulation. Additional clinical outcomes will include airway management process and adverse events. The trial will enroll a total of 3000 subjects. Results of PART may guide the selection of advanced airway management strategies in OHCA. PMID:26851059

  6. Saline resuscitation after fixed-volume hemorrhage. Role of resuscitation volume and rate of infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, M P; Gala, G J; Carlson, D E; Sutherland, B E; Gann, D S

    1992-01-01

    The authors have reported previously that small-volume resuscitation (1.8 x bled volume) with 0.9% NaCl restores blood volume and attenuates hormonal responses after large hemorrhage without correction of arterial hypotension. The authors studied the role of rate of infusion in this observation in chronically prepared dogs (aortic flow probe, right atrial pressure and volume, and arterial catheters) after 30% hemorrhage (24.1 +/- 0.4 mL/kg). After 30 minutes, subjects were observed either without treatment (no resuscitation) or with infusion of 43 mL/kg 0.9% NaCl over 3 hours by one of three protocols: (1) impulse infusion over 10 minutes, (2) variable rate infusion, bolus with tapering infusion, or (3) constant rate infusion. Significant improvement in cardiac output and in blood volume and significant decreases of vasopressin and arterial catecholamines were observed in all fluid-treated groups. This benefit was relatively independent of rate of infusion, although impulse infusion produced greater early improvement, which dissipated with time, and constant rate infusion produced better late results. In none of the fluid-treated groups were these improvements reflected in improved mean arterial pressure compared with the no resuscitation group. The authors conclude that small-volume, slow-rate saline infusion produces physiologic benefits that cannot be assessed by easily measured clinical parameters. Thus, early resuscitation after trauma could aid patients even if arterial pressure is unchanged. This benefit might be even greater in patients with uncontrolled bleeding because arterial pressure, and hence bleeding, may not be increased by resuscitation of this type. A reassessment of the value of prehospital fluid resuscitation in the injured patient is warranted. PMID:1503518

  7. Management of sepsis and septic shock in infants and children.

    PubMed

    von Rosenstiel, N; von Rosenstiel, I; Adam, D

    2001-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Thus, the systemic response to infection and its management remains a major challenge in clinical medicine. Apart from antibiotic administration, the majority of available therapies are limited to supportive strategies, although considerable efforts are being undertaken to devise innovative approaches that modulate host inflammatory responses. In suspected sepsis, 2 or 3 days' empiric antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting results. Antibiotics should be re-evaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. The initial antibiotic (combination) is determined by the likely causative agent, susceptibility patterns within a specific institution, CNS penetration, toxicity, and the patient's hepatic and renal function. The likely offending micro-organism in turn depends primarily on the patient's age, coexistence of any premorbid condition leading to impaired immune response, and the presenting signs and symptoms. Close attention to cardiovascular, respiratory, fluid and electrolyte, haematological, renal and metabolic/nutritional support is essential to optimise outcome. Fluid resuscitation is of utmost importance to overcome hypovolaemia on the basis of a diffuse capillary leak. Monitoring and normalisation of the heart rate is essential. In case of nonresponse to fluid resuscitation, inotropic and vasoactive agents are commonly used to increase cardiac output, maintain adequate blood pressure and enhance oxygen delivery to the tissue. Because respiratory distress syndrome is seen in about 40% of critically ill children with septic shock, increased inspired oxygen is essential. To provide optimal relief from respiratory muscle fatigue and facilitate the provision of positive airway pressure, early intubation and mechanical ventilation should be considered. Renal support is

  8. Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: insights and comparisons to ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Jayaprakash, Namita; Semler, Matthew W; Hegab, Sara; Yataco, Angel Coz; Tatem, Geneva; Salem, Dhafer; Moore, Steven; Boka, Kamran; Gill, Jasreen Kaur; Gardner-Gray, Jayna; Pflaum, Jacqueline; Domecq, Juan Pablo; Hurst, Gina; Belsky, Justin B; Fowkes, Raymond; Elkin, Ronald B; Simpson, Steven Q; Falk, Jay L; Singer, Daniel J; Rivers, Emanuel P

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 2001 there was no standard for early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In the presence of standard or usual care, the prevailing mortality was over 40-50 %. In response, a systems-based approach, similar to that in acute myocardial infarction, stroke and trauma, called early goal-directed therapy was compared to standard care and this clinical trial resulted in a significant mortality reduction. Since the publication of that trial, similar outcome benefits have been reported in over 70 observational and randomized controlled studies comprising over 70,000 patients. As a result, early goal-directed therapy was largely incorporated into the first 6 hours of sepsis management (resuscitation bundle) adopted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and disseminated internationally as the standard of care for early sepsis management. Recently a trio of trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe), while reporting an all-time low sepsis mortality, question the continued need for all of the elements of early goal-directed therapy or the need for protocolized care for patients with severe and septic shock. A review of the early hemodynamic pathogenesis, historical development, and definition of early goal-directed therapy, comparing trial conduction methodology and the changing landscape of sepsis mortality, are essential for an appropriate interpretation of these trials and their conclusions. PMID:27364620

  9. Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: insights and comparisons to ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Jayaprakash, Namita; Semler, Matthew W; Hegab, Sara; Yataco, Angel Coz; Tatem, Geneva; Salem, Dhafer; Moore, Steven; Boka, Kamran; Gill, Jasreen Kaur; Gardner-Gray, Jayna; Pflaum, Jacqueline; Domecq, Juan Pablo; Hurst, Gina; Belsky, Justin B; Fowkes, Raymond; Elkin, Ronald B; Simpson, Steven Q; Falk, Jay L; Singer, Daniel J; Rivers, Emanuel P

    2016-07-01

    Prior to 2001 there was no standard for early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In the presence of standard or usual care, the prevailing mortality was over 40-50 %. In response, a systems-based approach, similar to that in acute myocardial infarction, stroke and trauma, called early goal-directed therapy was compared to standard care and this clinical trial resulted in a significant mortality reduction. Since the publication of that trial, similar outcome benefits have been reported in over 70 observational and randomized controlled studies comprising over 70,000 patients. As a result, early goal-directed therapy was largely incorporated into the first 6 hours of sepsis management (resuscitation bundle) adopted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and disseminated internationally as the standard of care for early sepsis management. Recently a trio of trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe), while reporting an all-time low sepsis mortality, question the continued need for all of the elements of early goal-directed therapy or the need for protocolized care for patients with severe and septic shock. A review of the early hemodynamic pathogenesis, historical development, and definition of early goal-directed therapy, comparing trial conduction methodology and the changing landscape of sepsis mortality, are essential for an appropriate interpretation of these trials and their conclusions.

  10. SvO(2)-guided resuscitation for experimental septic shock: effects of fluid infusion and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rosário, André Loureiro; Park, Marcelo; Brunialti, Milena Karina; Mendes, Marialice; Rapozo, Marjorie; Fernandes, Denise; Salomão, Reinaldo; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Schettino, Guilherme Paula; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar P

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms associated to the beneficial effects of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2))-guided resuscitation during sepsis are unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of an algorithm of SvO(2)-driven resuscitation including fluids, norepinephrine and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress during a clinically resembling experimental model of septic shock. Eighteen anesthetized and catheterized pigs (35-45 kg) were submitted to peritonitis by fecal inoculation (0.75 g/kg). After hypotension, antibiotics were administered, and the animals were randomized to two groups: control (n = 9), with hemodynamic support aiming central venous pressure 8 to 12 mmHg, urinary output 0.5 mL/kg per hour, and mean arterial pressure greater than 65 mmHg; and SvO(2) (n = 9), with the goals above, plus SvO(2) greater than 65%. The interventions lasted 12 h, and lactated Ringer's and norepinephrine (both groups) and dobutamine (SvO(2) group) were administered. Inflammatory response was evaluated by plasma concentration of cytokines, neutrophil CD14 expression, oxidant generation, and apoptosis. Oxidative stress was evaluated by plasma and myocardial nitrate concentrations, myocardial and vascular NADP(H) oxidase activity, myocardial glutathione content, and nitrotyrosine expression. Mixed venous oxygen saturation-driven resuscitation was associated with improved systolic index, oxygen delivery, and diuresis. Sepsis induced in both groups a significant increase on IL-6 concentrations and plasma nitrate concentrations and a persistent decrease in neutrophil CD14 expression. Apoptosis rate and neutrophil oxidant generation were not different between groups. Treatment strategies did not significantly modify oxidative stress parameters. Thus, an approach aiming SvO(2) during sepsis improves hemodynamics, without any significant effect on inflammatory response and oxidative stress. The beneficial effects associated

  11. Factors associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates of very-low-birth-weight infants in 34 Malaysian neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Nem-Yun; Cheah, Irene Guat-Sim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine whether patient loads, infant status on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants in the Malaysian National Neonatal Registry (MNNR). METHODS This was a retrospective study of 3,880 VLBW (≤ 1,500 g) infants admitted to 34 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the MNNR. Sepsis was diagnosed in symptomatic infants with positive blood culture. RESULTS Sepsis developed in 623 (16.1%) infants; 61 (9.8%) had early-onset sepsis (EOS) and 562 (90.2%) had late-onset sepsis (LOS). The median EOS rate of all NICUs was 1.0% (interquartile range [IQR] 0%, 2.0%). Compared with NICUs reporting no EOS (n = 14), NICUs reporting EOS (n = 20) had significantly higher patient loads (total live births, admissions, VLBW infants, outborns); more mothers with a history of abortions, and antenatal steroids and intrapartum antibiotic use; more infants requiring resuscitation procedures at birth; higher rates of surfactant therapy, pneumonia and insertion of central venous catheters. The median LOS rate of all NICUs was 14.5% (IQR 7.8%, 19.2%). Compared with NICUs with LOS rates below the first quartile (n = 8), those above the third quartile (n = 8) used less intrapartum antibiotics, and had significantly bigger and more mature infants, more outborns, as well as a higher number of sick infants requiring ventilator support and total parenteral nutrition. CONCLUSION Patient loads, resuscitation at birth, status of infants on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis. PMID:26996633

  12. Improving management of sepsis in the community.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Fiona

    2016-08-31

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Pathological changes in the circulation reduce the blood supply to major organs, causing them to fail. This may lead to death, therefore rapid recognition and treatment of sepsis is vital. Sepsis research has focused on patients in acute hospital settings. However, most cases of sepsis originate in the community, suggesting that the identification of sepsis and delivery of timely care is necessary before hospital admission. Therefore, it is essential that nurses practising in the community are provided with appropriate sepsis guidelines that can be implemented immediately. The UK Sepsis Trust has developed the General Practice Sepsis Decision Support Tool, which has been designed specifically for use in the community. This article provides an overview of how the tool is used in the community and how it works in conjunction with the 'Sepsis Six' care bundle and care bundles for hospital settings. Changes to the terminology used in relation to sepsis and recent guidelines are also explained. PMID:27577313

  13. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2005-10-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a frequent complication of sepsis. Coagulation activation, inhibition of fibrinolysis, and consumption of coagulation inhibitors lead to a procoagulant state resulting in inadequate fibrin removal and fibrin deposition in the microvasculature. As a consequence, microvascular thrombosis contributes to promotion of organ dysfunction. Recently, three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigated the efficacy of antithrombin, activated protein C (APC), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, respectively, in sepsis patients. A significant reduction in mortality was demonstrated in the APC trial. In this article, we first discuss the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis activation. Then, the pathophysiology of coagulation activation, consumption of coagulation inhibitors, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis leading to a procoagulant state are described in more detail. Moreover, therapeutic concepts as well as the three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are discussed.

  15. Should relatives witness resuscitation? Ethical issues and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rosenczweig, C

    1998-01-01

    In winning second prize in the Logie Medical Ethics Essay Contest in 1997, Carolyn Rosenczweig raised questions about the role patients' family members should be allowed to play during resuscitative efforts by medical staff. She concluded that even though their presence might complicate resuscitation attempts, "blanket policies that exclude all relatives from being present seem a knee-jerk reaction." PMID:9526478

  16. Sepsis: Medical errors in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rorat, Marta; Jurek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Health, safety and medical errors are currently the subject of worldwide discussion. The authors analysed medico-legal opinions trying to determine types of medical errors and their impact on the course of sepsis. The authors carried out a retrospective analysis of 66 medico-legal opinions issued by the Wroclaw Department of Forensic Medicine between 2004 and 2013 (at the request of the prosecutor or court) in cases examined for medical errors. Medical errors were confirmed in 55 of the 66 medico-legal opinions. The age of victims varied from 2 weeks to 68 years; 49 patients died. The analysis revealed medical errors committed by 113 health-care workers: 98 physicians, 8 nurses and 8 emergency medical dispatchers. In 33 cases, an error was made before hospitalisation. Hospital errors occurred in 35 victims. Diagnostic errors were discovered in 50 patients, including 46 cases of sepsis being incorrectly recognised and insufficient diagnoses in 37 cases. Therapeutic errors occurred in 37 victims, organisational errors in 9 and technical errors in 2. In addition to sepsis, 8 patients also had a severe concomitant disease and 8 had a chronic disease. In 45 cases, the authors observed glaring errors, which could incur criminal liability. There is an urgent need to introduce a system for reporting and analysing medical errors in Poland. The development and popularisation of standards for identifying and treating sepsis across basic medical professions is essential to improve patient safety and survival rates. Procedures should be introduced to prevent health-care workers from administering incorrect treatment in cases.

  17. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  18. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  19. Early-onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kari A; Anderson-Berry, Ann L; Delair, Shirley F; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS.

  20. Fatal purpura fulminans and Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome from fulminant Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis in an asplenic young adult.

    PubMed

    Hale, Andrew J; LaSalvia, Mary; Kirby, James E; Kimball, Allison; Baden, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Asplenic patients are at increased risk for sepsis and fulminant infection. Sepsis in these patients is typically secondary to encapsulated bacteria, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most frequent pathogen. Rare complications of severe sepsis include purpura fulminans and bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome). We present the case of a 36-year-old woman, healthy except for splenectomy years prior for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura treatment, who presented with fever. Upon presentation to our hospital, three hours after symptoms onset, she had purpura fulminans and shock. Despite timely antimicrobials and maximal resuscitative efforts, her disease progressed and she expired 12 hours after symptoms onset. Autopsy revealed bilateral adrenal hemorrhage; acute adrenal crisis likely contributed to her refractory shock. Prior to her presentation, she had not received guideline-based post-splenectomy care. Sepsis in asplenic patients can be fulminant and rapidly fatal. Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most frequent cause, despite decreasing rates in recent years related to widespread pneumococcal vaccination. Guideline-based vaccinations and "pill-in-pocket" therapy can be life-saving for asplenic patients. Purpura fulminans represents an extreme manifestation of disseminated intravascular coagulation, is more common in asplenic patients, and portends a poor prognosis. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome can be seen concurrently with purpura fulminans and further portends a poor prognosis; pre-mortem diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. PMID:27583208

  1. Age and disability biases in pediatric resuscitation among future physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rocksheng; Knobe, Joshua; Feigenson, Neal; Mercurio, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    This study examined whether biases concerning age and/or disability status influenced resuscitation decisions. Medical students were randomly chosen to read 1 of 4 vignettes, organized in a 2 (age: infant vs school-age) × 2 (disability: preexisting vs no preexisting) between-subjects design. The vignettes described a pediatric patient experiencing an acute episode who required resuscitation. Following resuscitation, patients with existing disability would continue to have disability, whereas those without would develop disability. Participants indicated whether they would resuscitate, given a 10% chance of success. There was a significant main effect of disability: Medical students displayed a preference for resuscitating previously disabled children compared with previously healthy children when prognosis was held constant, F(1, 121) = 4.89, p = .03. This differential treatment of the two groups cannot easily be morally justified and poses a quandary for educators.

  2. Should relatives be denied access to the resuscitation room?

    PubMed

    Ardley, Christine

    2003-02-01

    Within a health care system that promotes choice and autonomy, it no longer seems appropriate to exclude relatives from the resuscitation room. There is a growing body of research that suggests there are indeed many long-term benefits to be gained from witnessing the resuscitation of a loved one. There seems no doubt that relatives would like the opportunity to spend the last few valuable minutes with their loved one to say goodbye. However, it is the views of many staff working in the critical care setting that appear to be preventing witnessed resuscitation from becoming normal practice. This paper considers the staffs', the relatives' and the patients' perspectives on witnessed resuscitation and concludes that the majority of relatives should not be denied access to the resuscitation room.

  3. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature.

  4. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiqun; Cheng, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. PMID:25878517

  5. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team. PMID:24109139

  6. Systems for Paediatric Sepsis: A Global Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kang, KT; Chandler, HK; Espinosa, V; Kissoon, N

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for early diagnosis and treatment of paediatric sepsis at hospitals in developing and developed countries. Methods: This was a voluntary online survey involving 101 hospitals from 41 countries solicited through the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies contact list and website. The survey was designed to assess the spectrum of sepsis epidemiology, patterns of applied therapies, availability of resources and barriers to optimal sepsis treatment. Results: Ninety per cent of respondents represented a tertiary or general hospital with paediatric intensive care facilities, including 63% from developed countries. Adequate triage services were absent in more than 20% of centres. Insufficiently trained personnel and lack of a sepsis protocol was reported in 40% of all sites. While there were specific guidelines for sepsis management in 78% of centres (n = 100), protocols for assessing sepsis patients were not applied in nearly 70% of centres. Lack of parental recognition of sepsis and failure of referring centres to diagnose sepsis were identified as major barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Conclusions: Even among centres with no significant resource constraints and advanced medical systems, significant deficits in sepsis care exist. Early recognition and management remains a key issue and may be addressed through improved triage, augmented support for referring centres and public awareness. Focussed research is necessary at the institutional level to identify and address specific barriers. PMID:25867557

  7. Autophagy in sepsis: Degradation into exhaustion?

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffery; Yu, Jun; Wong, Sunny H; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wong, Wai T; Leung, Czarina C H; Choi, Gordon; Wang, Maggie H T; Gin, Tony; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William K K

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against microbial challenges. Previous in vitro and in vivo models of sepsis demonstrated that autophagy was activated initially in sepsis, followed by a subsequent phase of impairment. Autophagy modulation appears to be protective against multiple organ injuries in these murine sepsis models. This is achieved in part by preventing apoptosis, maintaining a balance between the productions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and preserving mitochondrial functions. This article aims to discuss the role of autophagy in sepsis and the therapeutic potential of autophagy enhancers.

  8. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team.

  9. MFHAS1 Is Associated with Sepsis and Stimulates TLR2/NF-κB Signaling Pathway Following Negative Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Shi, Qi-Qing; Zhu, Min-Min; Shen, Jian; Wang, Hui-Hui; Ma, Duan; Miao, Chang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequence 1 (MFHAS1) has a potential immunoregulatory role dependent on Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLR2, associated with deleterious systemic inflammation, cardiac dysfunction, and acute kidney injury, acts synergistically in sepsis. The role of MFHAS1 in targeting TLR2 involved in sepsis has not been examined thus far. This study aimed to examine the relationship of MFHAS1 and sepsis, and the effect of MFHAS1 on the TLR2 signaling pathway. Blood samples were collected from eight sepsis patients after surgery and eight patients undergoing selective surgery to determine blood MFHAS1 levels. HEK 293 cells, RAW 264.7 macrophages and THP-1 monocytes were used to confirm the effect of MFHAS1 on TLR2 signaling pathway. Our study showed that blood MFHAS1 was significantly elevated in septic patients, and MFHAS1 was more increased in mononuclear cells from septic patients. Pam3CSK4 (TLR2 ligand) was found to induce MFHAS1 production in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and THP-1 human monocytes in a time-dependent manner. MFHAS1 has dual effects on TLR2 signaling pathway and inflammation, i.e., inhibitory effect at 6 hours, and then stimulatory effect after 24 hours through the activation of TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway, and MFHAS1 induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 after TLR2 stimulation. PMID:26599367

  10. Development of oxidative stress in the peritubular capillary microenvironment mediates sepsis-induced renal microcirculatory failure and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Holthoff, Joseph H; Seely, Kathryn A; Pathak, Elina; Spencer, Horace J; Gokden, Neriman; Mayeux, Philip R

    2012-02-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication of sepsis. To better understand the development of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury, we performed the first time-dependent studies to document changes in renal hemodynamics and oxidant generation in the peritubular microenvironment using the murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. CLP caused an increase in renal capillary permeability at 2 hours, followed by decreases in mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal capillary perfusion at 4 hours, which were sustained through 18 hours. The decline in hemodynamic parameters was associated with hypoxia and oxidant generation in the peritubular microenvironment and a decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The role of oxidants was assessed using the superoxide dismutase mimetic/peroxynitrite scavenger MnTMPyP [Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin]. At 10 mg/kg administered 6 hours after CLP, MnTMPyP did not alter blood pressure, but blocked superoxide and peroxynitrite generation, reversed the decline in RBF, capillary perfusion, and glomerular filtration rate, preserved tubular architecture, and increased 48-hour survival. However, MnTMPyP administered at CLP did not prevent capillary permeability or the decrease in RBF and capillary perfusion, which suggests that these early events are not mediated by oxidants. These data demonstrate that renal hemodynamic changes occur early after sepsis and that targeting the later oxidant generation can break the cycle of injury and enable the microcirculation and renal function to recover.

  11. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients.

  12. Crystalloids and colloids in critical patient resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Garnacho-Montero, J; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrer-Roca, R; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Lorente, J A; Ruiz-Santana, S; Artigas, A

    2015-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is essential for the survival of critically ill patients in shock, regardless of the origin of shock. A number of crystalloids and colloids (synthetic and natural) are currently available, and there is strong controversy regarding which type of fluid should be administered and the potential adverse effects associated with the use of these products, especially the development of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Recently, several clinical trials and metaanalyses have suggested the use of hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4) to be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure, and data have been obtained showing clinical benefit with the use of crystalloids that contain a lesser concentration of sodium and chlorine than normal saline. This new information has increased uncertainty among clinicians regarding which type of fluid should be used. We therefore have conducted a review of the literature with a view to developing practical recommendations on the use of fluids in the resuscitation phase in critically ill adults. PMID:25683695

  13. [Ethics of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions].

    PubMed

    Monzón, J L; Saralegui, I; Molina, R; Abizanda, R; Cruz Martín, M; Cabré, L; Martínez, K; Arias, J J; López, V; Gràcia, R M; Rodríguez, A; Masnou, N

    2010-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) must be attempted if indicated, not done if it is not indicated or if the patient does not accept or has previously rejected it and withdrawn it if it is ineffective. If CPR is considered futile, a Do-Not-Resuscitate Order (DNR) will be recorded. This should be made known to all physicians and nurses involved in patient care. It may be appropriate to limit life-sustaining-treatments for patients with severe anoxic encephalopathy, if the possibility of clinical evolution to brain death is ruled out. After CPR it is necessary to inform and support families and then review the process in order to make future improvements. After limitation of vital support, certain type of non-heart-beating-organ donation can be proposed. In order to acquire CPR skills, it is necessary to practice with simulators and, sometimes, with recently deceased, always with the consent of the family. Research on CPR is essential and must be conducted according to ethical rules and legal frameworks.

  14. Resuscitation algorithm for management of acute emergencies.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, W C; Hopkins, J A; Greenfield, S; Chang, P C; Umof, P; Shabot, M M; Spenler, C W; State, D

    1978-10-01

    Assuming that unrecognized or inadequately corrected hypovolemia results in higher mortality and morbidity rates, we developed a systematic approach to resuscitation that would: 1) identify criteria to aid in the recognition of hypovolemia and ensure the expeditious correction of this defect without interfering with diagnostic workup and management; 2) define criteria to prevent fluid overload which may jeopardize the patient's course, and 3) express these criteria in an explicit, systematic, patient care algorithm, ie, protocol, useful to both the resident and the practicing physician. We are now conducting prospective clinical trials with one service using the algorithm and the others acting as the control group. Preliminary results comparing patient outcomes suggest that the algorithm improves patient care by shortening resuscitation time and results in fewer hospital days, intensive care unit days, febrile days, and days on mechanical ventilation as well as reduced mortality. The algorithm provides a systematic plan to organize patient care so that the most urgently needed procedures are not delayed or overlooked.

  15. [Successful resuscitation in accidental hypothermia following drowning].

    PubMed

    Fritz, K W; Kasperczyk, W; Galaske, R

    1988-05-01

    After breaking through thin ice, a 4-year-old boy drowned in a lake. A quickly alerted rescue helicopter found and recovered the child, drifting underneath the clear, thin ice. Primary resuscitation by the helicopter crew was unsuccessful. Upon arrival in the hospital the child had fixed, dilated pupils and asystole. Core temperature was 19.8 degrees C. Rewarming was conducted slowly while cardiopulmonary resuscitation was continued. Twenty minutes after arrival at the hospital, ventricular complexes appeared in the ECG (temperature 22.1 degrees C); after another 10 min this converted to sinus rhythm. At short intervals, blood gas analyses and electrolyte determinations were carried out and corrected adequately. For cerebral protection methohexital was given and the child was hyperventilated. Seventy minutes after arrival at the hospital the child was brought to the pediatric ICU with stable circulation. There, further rewarming (centrally/peripherally combined) was carried out, aiming at 1 degree C rewarming per hour until a normal temperature was reached. The patient had to be kept on the ventilator for 10 days and after another 2 weeks was discharged home. He had recovered completely without any cerebral damage. One of the reasons why 88 min of cardiac arrest were tolerated by this patient without sequelae may have been rapid and deep hypothermia.

  16. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients. PMID:15321562

  17. Crystalloids and colloids in critical patient resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Garnacho-Montero, J; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrer-Roca, R; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Lorente, J A; Ruiz-Santana, S; Artigas, A

    2015-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is essential for the survival of critically ill patients in shock, regardless of the origin of shock. A number of crystalloids and colloids (synthetic and natural) are currently available, and there is strong controversy regarding which type of fluid should be administered and the potential adverse effects associated with the use of these products, especially the development of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Recently, several clinical trials and metaanalyses have suggested the use of hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4) to be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure, and data have been obtained showing clinical benefit with the use of crystalloids that contain a lesser concentration of sodium and chlorine than normal saline. This new information has increased uncertainty among clinicians regarding which type of fluid should be used. We therefore have conducted a review of the literature with a view to developing practical recommendations on the use of fluids in the resuscitation phase in critically ill adults.

  18. [Quality of care in adult resuscitation unit].

    PubMed

    Romero Cabrera, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays the quality of care has become a key piece in medical assistance. Apart from doing things correctly we should have an objective knowledge of the opinion of the user That opinion could be known thanks to the analysis of the perceived quality care from the patient. From October to December of 2008 a descriptive, transversal and retrospective research has been developed in a resuscitation unit at a third level hospital of the Community of Madrid. This research has been for all the registrations to the service, through the Servqhos questionnaire. The aims of the research were to evaluate the quality perceived at the resuscitation unit; to know the profile of the patient treated and to identify the possible improvements and problems as well. The patients were anonymous and they presented themselves voluntary 19 of 42 registrations in total answered the questionnaire with a rate of reply of 45%. The average age registered were 57 years old with an average of stay of 11 days. The most prevalent pathologies were neoplasias and polytraumatisms. According to the quality perceived by the unity there has not been any relationship among gender study level, labor activity marital status and previous hospital stay. At the area of information to the patient there have been some deficiencies as well as some discrimination from the attending staff. Noise is valuated negatively by the patients. Further to the professionalism, is valuated positively at all the social classes. The global quality perceived of the unity were very good from the patient. PMID:25551917

  19. Dialysis complications in acute kidney injury patients treated with prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy sessions lasting 10 versus 6 hours: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Albino, Bianca Ballarin; Balbi, André Luis; Abrão, Juliana Maria Gera; Ponce, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT) has emerged as an alternative to continuous renal replacement therapy in the management of acute kidney injury (AKI) patients. This trial aimed to compare the dialysis complications occurring during different durations of PIRRT sessions in critically ill AKI patients. We included patients older than 18 years with AKI associated with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit and using noradrenaline doses ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 µg/kg/min. Patients were divided into two groups randomly: in G1, 6-h sessions were performed, and in G2, 10-h sessions were performed. Seventy-five patients were treated with 195 PIRRT sessions for 18 consecutive months. The prevalence of hypotension, filter clotting, hypokalemia, and hypophosphatemia was 82.6, 25.3, 20, and 10.6%, respectively. G1 was composed of 38 patients treated with 100 sessions, whereas G2 consisted of 37 patients treated with 95 sessions. G1 and G2 were similar in male predominance (65.7 vs. 75.6%, P = 0.34), age (63.6 ± 14 vs. 59.9 ± 15.5 years, P = 0.28) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (SOFA; 13.1 ± 2.4 vs. 14.2 ± 3.0, P = 0.2). There was no significant difference between the two groups in hypotension (81.5 vs. 83.7%, P = 0.8), filter clotting (23.6 vs. 27%, P = 0.73), hypokalemia (13.1 vs. 8.1%, P = 0.71), and hypophosphatemia (18.4 vs. 21.6%, P = 0.72). However, the group treated with sessions of 10 h were refractory to clinical measures for hypotension, and dialysis sessions were interrupted more often (9.5 vs. 30.1%, P = 0.03). Metabolic control and fluid balance were similar between G1 and G2 (blood urea nitrogen [BUN]: 81 ± 30 vs. 73 ± 33 mg/dL, P = 1.0; delivered Kt/V: 1.09 ± 0.24 vs. 1.26 ± 0.26, P = 0.09; actual ultrafiltration: 1731 ± 818 vs. 2332 ± 947 mL, P = 0.13) and fluid balance (-731 ± 125 vs. -652 ± 141

  20. A Randomized Controlled Study of Manikin Simulator Fidelity on Neonatal Resuscitation Program Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; White, Susan; Bessell, Clare; Deshpandey, Akhil; Drover, Anne; Hayward, Mark; Valcour, James

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) has been developed to educate physicians and other health care providers about newborn resuscitation and has been shown to improve neonatal resuscitation skills. Simulation-based training is recommended as an effective modality for instructing neonatal resuscitation and both low and high-fidelity manikin…

  1. Damage control resuscitation: permissive hypotension and massive transfusion protocols.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Naomi T; Burd, Randall S; Teach, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Evidence for changes in adult trauma management often precedes evidence for changes in pediatric trauma management. Many adult trauma centers have adopted damage-control resuscitation management strategies, which target the metabolic syndrome of acidosis, coagulopathy, and hypothermia often found in severe uncontrolled hemorrhage. Two key components of damage-control resuscitation are permissive hypotension, which is a fluid management strategy that targets a subnormal blood pressure, and hemostatic resuscitation, which is a transfusion strategy that targets coagulopathy with early blood product administration. Acceptance of damage-control resuscitation strategies is reflected in recent changes in the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support curriculum; the most recent edition has decreased its initial fluid recommendation to 1 L from 2 L, and it now recommends early administration of blood products without specifying any specific ratio. These recommendations are not advocating permissive hypotension or hemostatic resuscitation directly but represent an initial step toward limiting fluid resuscitation and using blood products to treat coagulopathy earlier. Evidence for permissive hypotension exists in animal studies and few adult clinical trials. There is no evidence to support permissive hypotension strategies in pediatrics. Evidence for hemostatic resuscitation in adult trauma management is more comprehensive, and there are limited data to support its use in pediatric trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Additional studies on the management of children with severe uncontrolled hemorrhage are needed.

  2. Philosophical, ethical, and legal aspects of resuscitation medicine. I. Deferred consent and justification of resuscitation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, B L

    1988-10-01

    Informed prospective consent for clinical resuscitation research may not be possible. Deferred consent is an untenable notion. Consent to continue in research cannot be used to support a claim that there was, or would have been, consent to the initiation of research. The conditions for the justifiability of resuscitation research without informed consent are: a) patient is comatose; b) lifesaving treatment must be given immediately; c) given all available evidence, there is reason to believe that the probability of death or severe deficit with experimental or control therapy is not greater than the probability of death or severe deficit on usual therapy; d) given all available evidence, there is reason to believe that the probability of normal or near-normal outcome is greater on experimental or control therapy than on usual therapy; and e) the study can provide evidence on whether there is a significant difference between experimental and control therapies in the incidence of normal or near-normal survival.

  3. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, S.S.; Adhikari, K.M.; Rajeev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. Methods 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Results Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3–6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. Conclusion It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users. PMID:25609858

  4. Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis ... Threatening Bacterial Infection Remains Mysterious This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  5. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  6. Pseudomonas sepsis with Noma: an association?

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, S; Tullu, M S; Lahiri, K R; Deshmukh, C T

    2005-08-01

    We report here a 2.5-year-old male child with community-acquired Pseudomonal sepsis showing the characteristic lesions of ecthyma gangrenosum. The child had development of gangrenous changes of the nose and face - the 'cancrum oris' or 'Noma'. We highlight the possible association of Pseudomonas sepsis and Noma, with malnutrition playing a central role in causing both the diseases.

  7. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  8. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  9. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  10. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  11. Benefits and pitfalls of family presence during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harteveldt, Rob

    The witnessing of resuscitation by a close family member is becoming increasingly common (Booth et al, 2004), yet the area remains under-researched. Findings from a limited number of studies show mixed feelings among health care staff about the benefits to the relative. However, family members who were present during the resuscitation attempt believed they had contributed in some way to the treatment. Health care providers should be aware of the benefits and pitfalls of family witnessed resuscitation (FWR) so they can make evidence-based decisions.

  12. History of neonatal resuscitation - part 3: endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation to resuscitate neonates was used by Scheel in 1798. A century before endotracheal anesthesia was developed, inventive obstetricians constructed devices for endotracheal intubation of infants and mastered their insertion, localization, and airtight sealing. Fell's laryngoscope, Magill's intubation forceps and tissue-friendly materials were significant contributions of the 20th century to endotracheal intubation of the newborn. The striking absence of scientific studies on the most efficient resuscitation techniques for neonates can be explained by the difficulty to adjust for the personal skills of the resuscitator.

  13. Do relatives have a right to witness resuscitation?

    PubMed

    Walker, W M

    1999-11-01

    A relative's right to witness resuscitation is the subject of considerable discussion and debate. This paper explores the presence of relatives in the resuscitation room from a moral and ethical perspective. The focus of discussion is essentially upon the principle of respect for autonomy vs. what appears to be the counter-argument, benevolent paternalism. It is concluded that recognition of a relative's right to witness resuscitation is dependent upon health care professionals' willingness to promote the principle of respect for autonomy. PMID:10827608

  14. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance. PMID:24215731

  15. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance.

  16. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arghya

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common sequel of sepsis in the intensive care unit. It is being suggested that sepsis-induced AKI may have a distinct pathophysiology and identity. Availability of biomarkers now enable us to detect AKI as early as four hours after it's inception and may even help us to delineate sepsis-induced AKI. Protective strategies such as preferential use of vasopressin or prevention of intra-abdominal hypertension may help, in addition to the other global management strategies of sepsis. Pharmacologic interventions have had limited success, may be due to their delayed usage. Newer developments in extracorporeal blood purification techniques may proffer effects beyond simple replacement of renal function, such as metabolic functions of the kidney or modulation of the sepsis cascade.

  17. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  18. Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in intensive care unit interventions, including the use of specific antibiotics and anti-inflammation treatment, sepsis with concomitant multiple organ failure is the most common cause of death in many acute care units. In order to understand the mechanisms of clinical sepsis and develop effective therapeutic modalities, there is a need to use effective experimental models that faithfully replicate what occurs in patients with sepsis. Several models are commonly used to study sepsis, including intravenous endotoxin challenge, injection of live organisms into the peritoneal cavity, establishing abscesses in the extremities, and the induction of polymicrobial peritonitis via cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Here, we describe the surgery procedure of CLP in mice, which has been proposed to closely replicate the nature and course of clinical sepsis in humans. PMID:23824895

  19. Hemostasis and endothelial damage during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Maria Egede

    2015-08-01

    The sepsis syndrome represents a disease continuum, including severe sepsis and septic shock associated with high mortality. One of the main problems in severe sepsis and septic shock, resulting in organ failure and death, are disturbances in the hemostasis due to sepsis-related coagulopathy. Sepsis-related coagulopathy affects not only traditional coagulation factors, but also the platelets and endothelium. Functional testing of the hemostatic system has found application in critical illness. Thrombelastography (TEG) provides an overview of the hemostatic system allowing for an evaluation of interactions between coagulation factors and platelets. Additionally, the role of the endothelium during sepsis can be explored through testing of biomarkers of endothelial damage. The three studies comprising this PhD thesis all investigate important aspects of the disturbed hemostasis during sepsis, including endothelial damage. Together, the specific findings from the three studies improve the existing understanding of sepsis-related coagulopathy, and the possible influences of some of the treatments offered these patients. The first study investigates the occurrence of antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia among critically ill patients. In sepsis, thrombocytopenia is a predictor of poor outcome, and reports, of mainly casuistic nature, have previously hypothesized that specific antimicrobial agents could induce in sepsis-related thrombocytopenia. This hypothesis was tested using a randomized designed set-up, encompassing 1147 critically ill patients, and no significant difference in risk of thrombocytopenia was observed among patients receiving large amounts of antimicrobials vs. patients receiving standard-of-care. As a consequence, the risk of antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia in the general population of critically ill patients seemingly does not represent a substantial problem and thrombocytopenia during critical illness is most likely due to other factors such

  20. Redox regulation of mitophagy in the lung during murine S. aureus sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alan L.; Ulrich, Allison; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative mitochondrial damage is closely linked to inflammation and to cell death, but low levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species serve as signals that involve mitochondrial repair and resolution of inflammation. More specifically, cytoprotection relies on the elimination of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy) during mitochondrial quality control. Objective To identify and localize mitophagy in mouse lung as a potentially up-regulatable redox response to S. aureus sepsis. Methods Anesthetized C57BL/6 and B6.129X1-Nfe2l2tm1Ywk/J (Nrf2−/−) mice had fibrin clots loaded with S. aureus (1×107 CFU) implanted abdominally. At the time of implantation, mice were given Vancomycin (6mg/kg) and fluid resuscitation. Mouse lungs were harvested at 0, 6, 24, and 48 hours for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR. To localize mitochondria with autophagy protein LC3, we used lung immunofluorescence staining in LC3-GFP transgenic mice. Results In C57BL/6 mice, sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammation was detected by significant increases in mRNA for the inflammatory markers IL-1β and TNF-α at 6h and 24h respectively hours. BAL cell count and protein increased. Sepsis suppressed lung Beclin-1 protein, but not mRNA, suggesting activation of canonical autophagy. Notably sepsis also increased the LC3-II autophagosome marker, as well as the lung’s non-canonical autophagy pathway as evidenced by loss of p62, a redox-regulated scaffolding protein of the autophagosome. In LC3-GFP mice lungs, immunofluorescence staining showed co-localization of LC3-II to mitochondria, mainly in Type 2 epithelium and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, marked accumulation of p62, as well as attenuation of LC3-II in Nrf2 KO mice supported an overall decrease in autophagic turnover. Conclusions The down-regulation of canonical autophagy during sepsis may contribute to lung inflammation while the switch to non-canonical autophagy selectively

  1. Simplified Severe Sepsis Protocol: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Modified Early Goal-Directed Therapy in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ben; Muchemwa, Levy; Kelly, Paul; Lakhi, Shabir; Heimburger, Douglas C; Bernard, Gordon R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a simple, goal-directed sepsis treatment protocol for reducing mortality in patients with severe sepsis in Zambia. Design Single center non-blinded randomized controlled trial Setting Emergency room, ICU, and medical wards of the national referral hospital in Lusaka, Zambia Patients 112 patients enrolled within 24 hours of admission with severe sepsis, defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome with suspected infection and organ dysfunction Interventions Simplified Severe Sepsis Protocol (SSSP) consisting of up to 4 liters of intravenous fluids within 6 hours, guided by jugular venous pressure assessment, and dopamine and/or blood transfusion in selected patients. Control group was managed as usual care. Blood cultures were collected and early antibiotics administered for both arms. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. 109 patients were included in the final analysis. 88 (80.7%) were HIV positive. Pulmonary infections were the most common source of sepsis. In-hospital mortality rate was 64.2% in the intervention group and 60.7% in the control group (RR 1.05, 95%CI:0.79-1.41). Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was isolated from 31 of 82 (37.8%) HIV positive patients with available mycobacterial blood culture results. SSSP patients received significantly more IV fluids in the first 6 hours (2.7 liters vs. 1.7 liters, p=0.002). The study was stopped early because of high mortality rate among patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure in the intervention arm (8/8, 100%) compared with the control arm [7/10, 70%, RR 1.43 (95%CI:0.95-2.14)]. Conclusion Factors other than tissue hypoperfusion probably account for much of the end organ dysfunction in African patients with severe sepsis. Studies of fluid-based interventions should utilize inclusion criteria to accurately capture patients with hypovolemia and tissue hypoperfusion who are most likely to benefit from fluids. Exclusion of

  2. The efficacy and safety of colloid resuscitation in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane S; Bauer, Michael; Reinhart, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Despite evidence from clinical studies and meta-analyses that resuscitation with colloids or crystalloids is equally effective in critically ill patients, and despite reports from high-quality clinical trials and meta-analyses regarding nephrotoxic effects, increased risk of bleeding, and a trend toward higher mortality in these patients after the use of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions, colloids remain popular and the use of HES solutions is increasing worldwide. We investigated the major rationales for colloid use, namely that colloids are more effective plasma expanders than crystalloids, that synthetic colloids are as safe as albumin, that HES solutions have the best risk/benefit profile among the synthetic colloids, and that the third-generation HES 130/0.4 has fewer adverse effects than older starches. Evidence from clinical studies shows that comparable resuscitation is achieved with considerably less crystalloid volumes than frequently suggested, namely, <2-fold the volume of colloids. Albumin is safe in intensive care unit patients except in patients with closed head injury. All synthetic colloids, namely, dextran, gelatin, and HES have dose-related side effects, which are coagulopathy, renal failure, and tissue storage. In patients with severe sepsis, higher doses of HES may be associated with excess mortality. The assumption that third-generation HES 130/0.4 has fewer adverse effects is yet unproven. Clinical trials on HES 130/0.4 have notable shortcomings. Mostly, they were not performed in intensive care unit or emergency department patients, had short observation periods of 24 to 48 hours, used cumulative doses below 1 daily dose limit (50 mL/kg), and used unsuitable control fluids such as other HES solutions or gelatins. In conclusion, the preferred use of colloidal solutions for resuscitation of patients with acute hypovolemia is based on rationales that are not supported by clinical evidence. Synthetic colloids are not superior in critically ill

  3. [RESUSCITATION MEASURES IN CASE OF CARDIAC ARREST].

    PubMed

    Lamhaut, Lionel; Cariou, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Improving the survival rate of sudden cardiac death victims mainly relies in the prompt activation of the "chain of survival", resulting in efficient performance at basic life support maneuvers by bystanders. Among these maneuvers, cardiac compressions and use of automated external defibrillation are the most important components. Since basic life support is easy to learn, spreading its practice throughout the general population should be a priority for public health policy. Following initial resuscitation, the last step of the "chain of survival" is ensured by expert pre-hospital and ICU teams, which are able to provide appropriate care. Organization and sequence of these different steps are the object of regularly updated guidelines, summarized in the form of algorithms that facilitate their application. PMID:26619726

  4. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  5. Resuscitation of the newly born infant: an advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours following birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. PMID:10206142

  6. The use of multiple intraosseous catheters in combat casualty resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debjeet; Philbeck, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    During the current military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, establishing intravenous (IV) access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties remains a persistent challenge. Intraosseous (IO) access has emerged as a viable alternative in resuscitation. In this case report, a 19 year-old male soldier was severely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq. Given the heavy initial blood loss, anatomic location of the injuries and gross wound contamination, peripheral IV access could not be established. Instead, multiple IO catheters were used to initiate fluid resuscitation prior to transfer to a combat support hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such extensive usage of IO catheters. Multiple IO catheters can be placed rapidly and safely and may help solve the challenge of establishing vascular access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties. PMID:19317188

  7. Extensive injury after use of a mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation device.

    PubMed

    Wind, J; Bekkers, S C A M; van Hooren, L J H; van Heurn, L W E

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old woman with a ruptured liver and spleen found at autopsy, which may have been related to the use of a mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device (AutoPulse, ZOLL Medical Corporation, Chelmsford, Mass). She was admitted because of an out-of-hospital resuscitation, and under the suspicion of a pulmonary embolism, a thrombolytic agent was administered. Despite prolonged continuation of mechanical CPR, she died of persistent asystole. The evidence for improved outcomes after the use of a mechanical CPR device during resuscitation is still scarce. To prevent the unique complications reported here, regular checking of proper position of the chest band during resuscitation is advised.

  8. Technique of Automated Control Over Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh; Kiseleva, E. Yu; Kutsov, M. S.; Zhdanov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a technique of automated control over cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures on the basis of acoustic data. The research findings have allowed determining the primary important characteristics of acoustic signals (sounds of blood circulation in the carotid artery and respiratory sounds) and proposing a method to control the performance of resuscitation procedures. This method can be implemented as a part of specialized hardware systems.

  9. Witnessed resuscitation: staff issues and benefits to parents.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hazel

    2009-07-01

    Should relatives be made welcome in a resuscitation room to witness emergency medical treatment of a family member? This is a major issue in emergency departments worldwide. Attitudes of staff and relatives are mixed, and the benefits suggest further long-term research is needed to review the psychological effects on loved ones. This article will considers the background of witnessed resuscitation, as well as the views of both staff and relatives involved. The research will be evaluated and implications for practice explored.

  10. Colloid administration normalizes resuscitation ratio and ameliorates "fluid creep".

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Amanda; Faraklas, Iris; Watkins, Holly; Allen, Ashlee; Cochran, Amalia; Morris, Stephen; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Although colloid was a component of the original Parkland formula, it has been omitted from standard Parkland resuscitation for over 30 years. However, some burn centers use colloid as "rescue" therapy for patients who exhibit progressively increasing crystalloid requirements, a phenomenon termed "fluid creep." We reviewed our experience with this procedure. With Institutional Review Board approval, we reviewed all adult patients with > or =20%TBSA burns admitted from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2007, who completed formal resuscitation. Patients were resuscitated using the Parkland formula, adjusted to maintain urine output of 30 to 50 ml/hr. Patients who required greater amounts of fluid than expected were given a combination of 5% albumin and lactated Ringer's until fluid requirements normalized. Results were expressed as an hourly ratio (I/O ratio) of fluid infusion (ml/kg/%TBSA/hr) to urine output (ml/kg/hr). Predicted values for this ratio vary for individual patients but are usually less than 0.5 to 1.0. Fifty-two patients were reviewed, of whom 26 completed resuscitation using crystalloid alone, and the remaining 26 required albumin supplementation (AR). The groups were comparable in age, gender, weight, mortality, and time between injury and admission. AR patients had larger total and full-thickness burns and more inhalation injuries. Patients managed with crystalloid alone maintained mean resuscitation ratios from 0.13 to 0.40, whereas AR patients demonstrated progressively increasing ratios to a maximum mean of 1.97, until albumin was started. Administration of albumin produced a dramatic and precipitous return of ratios to within predicted ranges throughout the remainder of resuscitation. No patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Measuring hourly I/O ratios is an effective means of expressing and tracking fluid requirements. The addition of colloid to Parkland resuscitation rapidly reduces hourly fluid requirements, restores normal

  11. Five additions to the list of Sepsidae Diptera for Vietnam: Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n., Perochaeta lobo sp. n., Sepsis spura sp. n., Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003 and Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yuchen; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent collecting trip to Vietnam yielded three new species and two new records of Sepsidae (Diptera) for the country. Here we describe two new species in the species-poor genus Perochaeta (Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n. andPerochaeta lobo sp. n.) and one to the largest sepsid genus Sepsis (Sepsis spura sp. n.) which is also found in Sumatra and Sulawesi. Two additional Sepsis species are new records for Vietnam (Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003; Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869). We conclude with a discussion of the distribution of Perochaeta and the three Sepsis species. PMID:21594042

  12. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies. PMID:24966015

  13. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies.

  14. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluids are given through a vein. Other medical treatments include: Medicines that increase blood pressure Dialysis if there is kidney failure A breathing machine ( mechanical ventilation ) if there is lung failure

  15. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 100.4°F [38°C] and above rectal temperature) in newborns and young infants labored or unusual breathing change in skin color (paler than usual or mildly bluish) or a rash listlessness or lethargy change in the sound of the baby's cry or excessive crying change ...

  16. Diagnostic Value of Presepsin for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zhi-De; Song, Jia; Shao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several individual studies have reported the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST) for sepsis, but the results are inconsistent. The present systematic review and meta-analysis pooled data to better ascertain the value of circulatory presepsin as a biomarker for sepsis. Studies published in English before November 7, 2014 and assessing the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis were retrieved from medical databases. The quality of eligible studies was assessed using a revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2). The overall diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis was pooled according to a bivariate model. Publication bias was assessed using Deek funnel plot asymmetry test. Eleven studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The overall diagnostic sensitivity of presepsin for sepsis was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77–0.88), and specificity was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.72–0.83). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84–0.90). The pretest probability of sepsis was 0.56 among all subjects. When presepsin was introduced as the diagnostic test for sepsis, the posttest probabilities were 0.81 for a positive result and 0.19 for a negative. The major design deficits of the included studies were lack of prespecified thresholds and patient selection bias. The publication bias was negative. Presepsin is an effective adjunct biomarker for the diagnosis of sepsis, but is insufficient to detect or rule out sepsis when used alone. PMID:26632748

  17. Dysglycemia and Glucose Control During Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Mark P; Deane, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis predisposes to disordered metabolism and dysglycemia; the latter is a broad term that includes hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability. Dysglycemia is a marker of illness severity. Large randomized controlled trials have provided considerable insight into the optimal blood glucose targets for critically ill patients with sepsis. However, it may be that the pathophysiologic consequences of dysglycemia are dynamic throughout the course of a septic insult and also altered by premorbid glycemia. This review highlights the relevance of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability in patients with sepsis with an emphasis on a rational approach to management. PMID:27229647

  18. Morganella morganii sepsis with massive hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Chong Rae; Um, Tae Hyun; Rhu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Eu Suk; Jeong, Jae Won; Lee, Hye Ran

    2007-12-01

    Morganella morganii is a facultative gram-negative and anaerobic rod. It may be a cause of devastating infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Some bacterial infections such as Clostridium and Vibrio are associated with hemolysis. However, massive hemolysis caused by M. morganii sepsis has not yet been reported. We observed a 59-yr-old man who had chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and was found to have massive hemolysis and metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. He died 6 hr after admission in spite of aggressive treatment. Two sets of blood cultures revealed the growth of M. morganii. We report here that M. morganii sepsis can cause fatal massive hemolysis leading to death.

  19. Prognostic value of gasometric parameters of carbon dioxide in resuscitation of septic patients. A bibliography review.

    PubMed

    Lamsfus-Prieto, J Á; de Castro-Fernández, R; Hernández-García, A M; Marcano-Rodriguez, G

    2016-04-01

    The anaerobic metabolism is the cornerstone in physiopathology of septic shock. Nowadays we have both the central or mixed venous oxygen saturation and lactate levels to monitoring the metabolism in septic patients. Some studies have shown that normalization of systemic hemodynamic and oxygen metabolism variables not prevent progression to multiorgan damage and death. Recently has been proposed the venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (ΔpvaCO2) as an alternative marker of tissue hypoperfusion, like Cardiac Index. High ΔpvaCO2 predicts adverse outcomes. Also has been proposed both, the ratio between the ΔpvaCO2 and arterial-to-venous oxygen content difference (ΔCavO2): ΔpvaCO2/ΔCavO2; and, the ratio between venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (ΔCvaCO2) and ΔCavO2: ΔCvaCO2/ΔCavO2, as markers of anaerobic metabolism. Both of high ratios are related to high levels of lactate and worse prognosis. Therefore in patients with sepsis the combination of markers of resuscitation could be important to improve the outcomes.

  20. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  1. A prospective treatment for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi Bonjar, Mohammad Rashid; Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principal component to this approach is a bacterial polyvalent antibody-column (BPVAC), which selectively traps wide spectrum of BATs from blood in an extracorporeal circuit, and detoxified blood returns back to the patient's body. BPVAC treatment would be a device of targeted medicine. Detoxification is performed under supervision of trained personnel using simple blood-circulating machines in which blood circulates from the patient to BPVAC and back to the patient aseptically. BPVACs' reactive sites consist of carbon nanotubes on which a vast spectra of polyvalent BATs-antibodies are bond to. The devise acts as a biological filter that selectively immobilizes harmful BATs from intoxicated blood; however, no dialysis is involved. For effective neutralization, BPVAC provides large contact surface area with blood. BPVAC approach would have advantages of: 1) urgent neutralization of notorious BATs from blood of septic patients; 2) applicability in parallel with conventional treatments; 3) potential to minimize side effects of the malady; 4) applicability for a vast range of BATs; 5) potential to eliminate contact of BATs with internal tissues and organs; 6) tolerability by patients sensitive to antiserum injections; 7) capability for universal application; 8) affectivity when antibiotic-resistant bacteria are involved and the physician has no or limited access to appropriate antibiotics; and 10) being a single-use, disposable, and stand-alone device. Before using it for clinical trials in human beings, it should pass animal evaluations accurately; however, research works should optimize its implementation in human beings. For optimization, it needs appropriate

  2. A prospective treatment for sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Mohammad Rashid; Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principal component to this approach is a bacterial polyvalent antibody-column (BPVAC), which selectively traps wide spectrum of BATs from blood in an extracorporeal circuit, and detoxified blood returns back to the patient’s body. BPVAC treatment would be a device of targeted medicine. Detoxification is performed under supervision of trained personnel using simple blood-circulating machines in which blood circulates from the patient to BPVAC and back to the patient aseptically. BPVACs’ reactive sites consist of carbon nanotubes on which a vast spectra of polyvalent BATs-antibodies are bond to. The devise acts as a biological filter that selectively immobilizes harmful BATs from intoxicated blood; however, no dialysis is involved. For effective neutralization, BPVAC provides large contact surface area with blood. BPVAC approach would have advantages of: 1) urgent neutralization of notorious BATs from blood of septic patients; 2) applicability in parallel with conventional treatments; 3) potential to minimize side effects of the malady; 4) applicability for a vast range of BATs; 5) potential to eliminate contact of BATs with internal tissues and organs; 6) tolerability by patients sensitive to antiserum injections; 7) capability for universal application; 8) affectivity when antibiotic-resistant bacteria are involved and the physician has no or limited access to appropriate antibiotics; and 10) being a single-use, disposable, and stand-alone device. Before using it for clinical trials in human beings, it should pass animal evaluations accurately; however, research works should optimize its implementation in human beings. For optimization, it needs appropriate

  3. Seeking Sepsis in the Emergency Department- Identifying Barriers to Delivery of the Sepsis 6.

    PubMed

    Bentley, James; Henderson, Susan; Thakore, Shobhan; Donald, Michael; Wang, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    The Sepsis 6 is an internationally accepted management bundle that, when initiated within one hour of identifying sepsis, can reduce morbidity and mortality. This management bundle was advocated by the Scottish Patient Safety Programme as part of its Acute Adult campaign launched in 2008 and adopted by NHS Tayside in 2012. Despite this, the Emergency Department (ED) of Ninewells Hospital, a tertiary referral centre and major teaching hospital in Scotland, was displaying poor success in the Sepsis 6. We therefore set out to improve compliance by evaluating the application of all aspects of the NHS Tayside Sepsis 6 bundle within one hour of ED triage time, to identify what human factors may influence achieving the one hour The Sepsis 6 bundle. This allowed us to tailor a number of specific interventions including educational sessions, regular audit and personal feedback and check list Sepsis 6 sticker. These interventions promoted a steady increase in compliance from an initial rate of 51.0% to 74.3%. The project highlighted that undifferentiated patients create a challenge in initiating the Sepsis 6. Pyrexia is a key human factor-trigger for recognising sepsis with initial nursing assessment being vital in recognition and identifying the best area (resus) of the department to manage severely septic patients. EDs need to recognise these challenges and develop educational and feedback plans for staff and utilise available resources to maximise the Sepsis 6 compliance. PMID:27239303

  4. Seeking Sepsis in the Emergency Department- Identifying Barriers to Delivery of the Sepsis 6

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, James; Henderson, Susan; Thakore, Shobhan; Donald, Michael; Wang, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    The Sepsis 6 is an internationally accepted management bundle that, when initiated within one hour of identifying sepsis, can reduce morbidity and mortality. This management bundle was advocated by the Scottish Patient Safety Programme as part of its Acute Adult campaign launched in 2008 and adopted by NHS Tayside in 2012. Despite this, the Emergency Department (ED) of Ninewells Hospital, a tertiary referral centre and major teaching hospital in Scotland, was displaying poor success in the Sepsis 6. We therefore set out to improve compliance by evaluating the application of all aspects of the NHS Tayside Sepsis 6 bundle within one hour of ED triage time, to identify what human factors may influence achieving the one hour The Sepsis 6 bundle. This allowed us to tailor a number of specific interventions including educational sessions, regular audit and personal feedback and check list Sepsis 6 sticker. These interventions promoted a steady increase in compliance from an initial rate of 51.0% to 74.3%. The project highlighted that undifferentiated patients create a challenge in initiating the Sepsis 6. Pyrexia is a key human factor-trigger for recognising sepsis with initial nursing assessment being vital in recognition and identifying the best area (resus) of the department to manage severely septic patients. EDs need to recognise these challenges and develop educational and feedback plans for staff and utilise available resources to maximise the Sepsis 6 compliance. PMID:27239303

  5. Resuscitation of the trauma patient: tell me a trigger for early haemostatic resuscitation please!

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Lone, Nazir; Walsh, Timothy S

    2011-01-01

    The management of trauma-related coagulopathy and haemorrhage is changing from a reactive strategy to a proactive early intervention with blood products and haemostatic agents. Although major haemorrhage and massive transfusion are associated with higher mortality, the pattern of this association with modern trauma care is poorly described. In addition, early predictors of massive transfusion, which might trigger a proactive haemostatic resuscitation strategy, are not currently available. We review recent literature relating to predictors of massive transfusions and the relationship between transfusion and mortality. PMID:21371347

  6. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Councils of Southern Africa).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-11-23

    Outcome after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002, a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (ie, essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conferences. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage

  7. Role of suPAR and Lactic Acid in Diagnosing Sepsis and Predicting Mortality in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Walaa S.; Salah-Eldeen, Noha N.; Khater, Mohamed S.; Saleh, Asghraf N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the diagnostic value of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and serum lactate in elderly patients with sepsis and evaluated their capacity to predict mortality and their correlation to Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. The study included 80 participants, divided into two groups: 40 cases (mean age, 68.9 ± 5.9) admitted to the intensive care unit and 40 healthy controls (mean age, 67.1 ± 6.2). Elderly patients with sepsis had significantly higher levels of serum suPAR and lactic acid compared to healthy controls. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that suPAR (cutoff value, ≥4.37 ng/ml) has higher area under the curve (AUC) than lactic acid (cutoff value, ≥1.95 mmol/l) for diagnosing sepsis. Serum lactate has superior prognostic value compared to suPAR with AUC of 0.82 (cutoff value, 2.2 mmol/l) and 0.72 (cutoff value, 6.3 ng/ml), respectively. The diagnostic power of combined usage of suPAR and lactate serum concentrations showed AUC of 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.934 to 1.0). The combination of both biomarkers either together or with SOFA score may serve as a useful guide to patients who need more intensive resuscitation. PMID:27766166

  8. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis: a rationale for vitamin C administration in severe sepsis and septic shock?

    PubMed

    Carr, Anitra C; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Fowler, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2015-11-27

    Severe systemic inflammatory response to infection results in severe sepsis and septic shock, which are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients. Septic shock is characterised by refractory hypotension and is typically managed by fluid resuscitation and administration of catecholamine vasopressors such as norepinephrine. Vasopressin can also be administered to raise mean arterial pressure or decrease the norepinephrine dose. Endogenous norepinephrine and vasopressin are synthesised by the copper-containing enzymes dopamine β-hydroxylase and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase, respectively. Both of these enzymes require ascorbate as a cofactor for optimal activity. Patients with severe sepsis present with hypovitaminosis C, and pre-clinical and clinical studies have indicated that administration of high-dose ascorbate decreases the levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, attenuates organ dysfunction and improves haemodynamic parameters. It is conceivable that administration of ascorbate to septic patients with hypovitaminosis C could improve endogenous vasopressor synthesis and thus ameliorate the requirement for exogenously administered vasopressors. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis represents a currently underexplored biochemical mechanism by which ascorbate could act as an adjuvant therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock.

  9. Damage control immunoregulation: is there a role for low-volume hypertonic saline resuscitation in patients managed with damage control surgery?

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Simms, Eric; Guidry, Chrissy; Duke, Marquinn; Beeson, Esther; McSwain, Norman E; Cotton, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is beneficial in the treatment of head-injured patients as a result of its potent cytoprotective effects on various cell lines. We hypothesize that low-volume resuscitation with 3 per cent HTS, when used after damage control surgery (DCS), improves outcomes compared with standard resuscitation with isotonic crystalloid solution (ICS). This is a 4-year retrospective review from two Level I trauma centers. Patients included had 10 units or more of packed red blood cells during initial DCS. On arrival to the trauma intensive care unit (TICU), patients were resuscitated with low-volume 3 per cent HTS or with conventional ICS. A cohort analysis was performed comparing resuscitation strategies. Univariate analysis of continuous data was done with Student t test followed by multivariate analysis. Of 188 patients included, 76 were in the low-volume HTS group and 112 in the ICS group. Demographics were similar between the groups. Over the next 48 hours after DCS in HTS versus ISC groups, intravenous fluids were given: 1920 ± 455 mL versus 8400 ± 1200 mL (P < 0.0001); urine output was 4320 ± 480 mL versus 1940 ± 480 mL(P < 0.0001); mean TICU length of stay was 10 ± 8 versus 16 ± 15 days (P < 0.01); prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 4.0 versus 13.4 per cent (P = 0.02); sepsis was 6.6 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.06); multisystem organ failure was: 2.6 versus 16.1 per cent (P < 0.01); and 30-day mortality was 5.3 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.03). There was no difference for prevalence of renal failure at 5.3 versus 3.6 per cent (P = 0.58). Low-volume resuscitation with HTS administered after DCS on arrival to the TICU may have a protective effect on the polytrauma patient. We believe that this study demonstrates a role for low-volume resuscitation with HTS to improve outcomes in patients undergoing DCS.

  10. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  11. [Pediatric trauma life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Sampedro, P; de Lucas García, N; Balcells Ramírez, J; Martínez Ibáñez, V

    2002-06-01

    Accidents are the most frequent cause of mortality among children older than one year. Thus, the need to proceed to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during the early phases of trauma life support (TLS) is always a possibility. Trauma is a special situation in CPR: expected problems (i.e., hemorrhage, pneumo-hemothorax, hypothermia, and difficult intubation and vascular access), specific therapeutic actions (i.e., helmet retrieval and cervical spine immobilization), and exceptions to standard CPR guidelines (i.e., contraindication for the head tilt-chin lift manoeuvre) can arise. Therefore, TLS and CPR interventions must be appropriately integrated. TLS is considered a method (much like CPR). It combines organization and leadership with competent, structured and timely actions. Appropriate intervention within the first few moments ("platinum half-hour" and " golden hour") and first day ("silver day") is essential. As in CPR, two modalities can be distinguished: basic TLS (on the scene, without technical resources) and advanced TLS (with resources). The acronym PAA summarizes basic TLS: Protect-Alert-Aid. The advanced TLS sequence includes the following: primary survey and initial stabilization, secondary survey, triage, transport, and definitive care. The main objective of the primary survey and initial stabilization phase is the identification and treatment of injuries with immediate potential to cause death. CPR in the context of TLS should be adapted to the special features of trauma. Particular attention should be paid to the cervical spine. While not specific for trauma care, the early and generous administration of oxygen should be emphasized.

  12. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  13. Sepsis: From Pathophysiology to Individualized Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    László, Ildikó; Trásy, Domonkos; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis has become a major health economic issue, with more patients dying in hospitals due to sepsis related complications compared to breast and colorectal cancer together. Despite extensive research in order to improve outcome in sepsis over the last few decades, results of large multicenter studies were by-and-large very disappointing. This fiasco can be explained by several factors, but one of the most important reasons is the uncertain definition of sepsis resulting in very heterogeneous patient populations, and the lack of understanding of pathophysiology, which is mainly based on the imbalance in the host-immune response. However, this heroic research work has not been in vain. Putting the results of positive and negative studies into context, we can now approach sepsis in a different concept, which may lead us to new perspectives in diagnostics and treatment. While decision making based on conventional sepsis definitions can inevitably lead to false judgment due to the heterogeneity of patients, new concepts based on currently gained knowledge in immunology may help to tailor assessment and treatment of these patients to their actual needs. Summarizing where we stand at present and what the future may hold are the purpose of this review. PMID:26258150

  14. Raftlin: a new biomarker in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-06-01

    Raftlin is a major protein in lipid raft. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of raftlin in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice) or subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of raftlin in LPS-treated HUVECs, and LPS-injected and CLP-mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of raftlin were significantly elevated, compared with control donors. Raftlin levels were higher in patients with septic shock, 891.6 (789.7-1,087.8, n = 30) than in patients with severe sepsis, 681.6 (480.1-819.6, n = 22) or sepsis, 496.1 (418.1-738.9, n = 30), compared with healthy volunteers 364.9 (312.1-392.4, n = 21). These results suggest that in septic patients, raftlin blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and the outcome of the patient and may represent a novel marker of endothelial cell dysfunction, and that raftlin can be used as a biomarker for determining the severity of sepsis.

  15. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  16. Effects of terlipressin on patients with sepsis via improving tissue blood flow.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xudong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yaoli; Zhou, Jian; Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Dongpo; Liu, Liangming; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin (TP), an analog of arginine vasopressin, was reported beneficial in sepsis patients when combined use with norepinephrine (NE), but the undetermined action, mechanism, and safety limited it to become the first-line vasopressor for sepsis patients. With 32 septic shock patients, we investigated the effects of a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) on hemodynamic, tissue blood flow, vital organ function, acid-base balance, and coagulation function to systemically know the beneficial effect and side effects of TP on septic shock. The results showed that as compared with the single use of NE group (17 patients), a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) in combination with NE continuous infusion, except for decreasing the mortality and NE requirement, could better improve and stabilize the hemodynamics, improve the tissue blood flow, increase the blood oxygen saturation and urine volume, and decrease the lactate level and complication rate (47% versus 82.3% in NE group). Meanwhile, TP + NE did not induce blood bilirubin increase and platelet count decrease and hyponatremia that vasopressin has. The results show that low dose of TP continuous infusion can help NE achieve the good resuscitation effect by improving tissue blood flow, stabilizing hemodynamics, and protecting organ function in septic shock patients while did not induce the side effects that high dose or bonus of TP or vasopressin induced. Low dose of TP may be recommended as the first-line vasopressor for refractory hypotension after severe sepsis or septic shock.

  17. Selective V(1a) agonism attenuates vascular dysfunction and fluid accumulation in ovine severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sousse, Linda; Bartha, Eva; Jonkam, Collette; Hasselbach, Anthony K; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Westphal, Martin; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2012-11-15

    Vasopressin analogs are used as a supplement to norepinephrine in septic shock. The isolated effects of vasopressin agonists on sepsis-induced vascular dysfunction, however, remain controversial. Because V(2)-receptor stimulation induces vasodilation and procoagulant effects, a higher V(1a)- versus V(2)-receptor selectivity might be advantageous. We therefore hypothesized that a sole, titrated infusion of the selective V(1a)-agonist Phe(2)-Orn(8)-Vasotocin (POV) is more effective than the mixed V(1a)-/V(2)-agonist AVP for the treatment of vascular and cardiopulmonary dysfunction in methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced, ovine sepsis. After the onset of hemodynamic instability, awake, chronically instrumented, mechanically ventilated, and fluid resuscitated sheep were randomly assigned to receive continuous infusions of either POV, AVP, or saline solution (control; each n = 6). AVP and POV were titrated to maintain mean arterial pressure above baseline - 10 mmHg. When compared with that of control animals, AVP and POV reduced neutrophil migration (myeloperoxidase activity, alveolar neutrophils) and plasma levels of nitric oxide, resulting in higher mean arterial pressures and a reduced vascular leakage (net fluid balance, chest and abdominal fluid, pulmonary bloodless wet-to-dry-weight ratio, alveolar and septal edema). Notably, POV stabilized hemodynamics at lower doses than AVP. In addition, POV, but not AVP, reduced myocardial and pulmonary tissue concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine, VEGF, and angiopoietin-2, thereby leading to an abolishment of cumulative fluid accumulation (POV, 9 ± 15 ml/kg vs. AVP, 110 ± 13 ml/kg vs. control, 213 ± 16 ml/kg; P < 0.001 each) and an attenuated cardiopulmonary dysfunction (left ventricular stroke work index, PaO(2)-to-FiO(2) ratio) versus control animals. Highly selective V(1a)-agonism appears to be superior to unselective vasopressin analogs for the treatment of sepsis-induced vascular dysfunction.

  18. Predictors of Acute Hemodynamic Decompensation in Early Sepsis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Im; Smith, Robert L.; Gartshteyn, Yevgeniya; Kwon, Sophia; Caraher, Erin J.; Nolan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of sepsis is hindered by its heterogeneous time course and evolution. A subgroup of patients with severe sepsis develops shock soon after the initiation of treatment while others present hypotensive. We sought to determine the incidence of hypotension after the initiation of treatment for sepsis, and characterize their clinical features and course. Methods A retrospective review of electronic medical record of all septic patients (n = 542) that met the definition of septic shock within 24 hours of admission (2011 - 2012) at an urban Veteran Affairs Hospital was performed. Subjects either had 1) initial normotension (INT) with hypotension developing within 24 hours or 2) initial hypotension (IH). Logistic regression was used to model associated factors of INT/IH. Results INT occurred in 62 patients (11%) with average initial blood pressure of 120/71 mm Hg and developed hypotension to 79/48 mm Hg. IH was identified in 52 patients (10%) with average presenting blood pressure of 81/46 mm Hg. INT showed evidence of increased sympathetic tone with significantly higher heart rate, blood pressure and temperature. INT patients were younger, more frequently on alpha-blockers, and more likely septic from pneumonia compared to IH patients. INT and IH patients had similar timing of antibiotic initiation, amount of 24-hour fluid resuscitation, vasopressor use, organ dysfunction and mortality at 28 days. Using alpha-blockers, being Caucasian, and having higher temperatures were independent predictors of INT. Conclusion INT is a distinctive presentation of septic shock characterized by rapid deterioration during early treatment. By further studying this subgroup, mediators of septic shock may be identified that clarify pathophysiology and provide timely targeted treatment. PMID:27429677

  19. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Evelyn; Barcega, Besh; Kim, Tommy Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations. The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% – 39.3%). On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 – 0.64). Conclusion Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees. PMID:25035756

  20. Newborn resuscitation: defining best practice for low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Newton, Opiyo; English, Mike

    2006-10-01

    Current resuscitation practices are often poor in low-income settings. The purpose of this review was to summarise recent evidence, relevant to developing countries, on best practice in the provision of newborn resuscitation. Potential studies for inclusion were identified using structured searches of MEDLINE via PubMed. Two reviewers independently evaluated retrieved studies for inclusion. The methodological quality of the selected articles was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) levels of evidence, whilst the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was used for subsequent recommendations. Based on available evidence, where there is meconium-stained liquor, routine perineal suction of all babies and endotracheal suction of active babies do not prevent meconium aspiration syndrome and have potential risks. Adequate ventilation is possible with a bag-valve-mask device and room air is just as efficient as oxygen for initial resuscitation. This review supports the view that effective resuscitation is possible with basic equipment and minimal skills. Thus, where resources are limited, it should be possible to improve neonatal outcomes through promotion of the effective use of a bag-valve-mask alone, without access to more sophisticated and expensive technologies. Basic, effective resuscitation should therefore be available at all health facilities and potentially in the community.

  1. New perspectives of volemic resuscitation in polytrauma patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Carmen Alina; Vernic, Corina; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, fluid resuscitation of multiple trauma patients is still a challenging therapy. Existing therapies for volume replacement in severe haemorrhagic shock can lead to adverse reactions that may be fatal for the patient. Patients presenting with multiple trauma often develop hemorrhagic shock, which triggers a series of metabolic, physiological and cellular dysfunction. These disorders combined, lead to complications that significantly decrease survival rate in this subset of patients. Volume and electrolyte resuscitation is challenging due to many factors that overlap. Poor management can lead to post-resuscitation systemic inflammation causing multiple organ failure and ultimately death. In literature, there is no exact formula for this purpose, and opinions are divided. This paper presents a review of modern techniques and current studies regarding the management of fluid resuscitation in trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. According to the literature and from clinical experience, all aspects regarding post-resuscitation period need to be considered. Also, for every case in particular, emergency therapy management needs to be rigorously respected considering all physiological, biochemical and biological parameters. PMID:27574675

  2. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  3. Current Neonatal Resuscitation Practices among Paediatricians in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Satvik C.; Nimbalkar, Archana S.; Patel, Dipen V.; Sethi, Ankur R.; Phatak, Ajay G.; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. We assessed neonatal resuscitation practices among paediatricians in Gujarat. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of 23 questions based on guidelines of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) and Navjaat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram (NSSK) was conducted using web-based tool. Questionnaire was developed and consensually validated by three neonatologists. Results. Total of 142 (21.2%) of 669 paediatricians of Gujarat, India, whose e-mail addresses were available, attempted the survey and, from them, 126 were eligible. Of these, 74 (58.7%) were trained in neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with mechanical ventilation facilities was available for 54% of respondents. Eighty-eight (69.8%) reported correct knowledge and practice regarding effective bag and mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions. Knowledge and practice about continuous positive airway pressure use in delivery room were reported in 18.3% and 30.2% reported use of room air for BMV during resuscitation. Suctioning oral cavity before delivery in meconium stained liquor was reported by 27.8% and 38.1% cut the cord after a minute of birth. Paediatricians with NRP training used appropriate method of tracheal suction in cases of nonvigorous newborns than those who were not trained. Conclusions. Contemporary knowledge about neonatal resuscitative practices in paediatricians is lacking and requires improvement. Web-based tools provided low response in this survey. PMID:24688549

  4. [Limits of resuscitation. I. Thanatophysiologic and therapeutic limits].

    PubMed

    Schneider, D

    1981-05-15

    Neither apodictic demands nor administration measures are suited to satisfy the various problems of the duty of treatment in the borderline region between life and death. An exact knowledge of the thanatophysiologic limits of the possibility of resuscitation during and after an anoxia and ischaemia is necessary. By effective cardiopulmonary measures of resuscitation, such as external heart massage with production of systolic pressure of 8-13 kPa as well as respiration with F1O2 1.0, the cardiac resuscitation time with immediate sufficiency (1. limit 4-41/2 min) may be prolonged to the cerebral resuscitation time from 8-10 minutes. Probably, the new concept of specific measures of cerebral resuscitation may definitively prolong also this 2nd limit. Furthermore, the fundamentals of the decision are discussed, for omitting or finishing a reanimation, or for reducing the intensive treatment. If the clinical syndrome of the dissociated cerebral death is present, without planned taking off an organ there is no necessity to render the finish of the intensive therapy dependent on legal regulations concerning the performance of organ transplantations.

  5. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  6. Plasma arginine correlations in trauma and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chiarla, C; Giovannini, I; Siegel, J H

    2006-02-01

    Arginine (ARG) is an amino acid (AA) with unique properties and with a key-role in the metabolic, immune and reparative response to trauma and sepsis. This study has been performed to characterize the correlations between plasma levels of ARG, of other AA and of multiple metabolic variables in trauma and sepsis. Two-hundred and sixty-three plasma amino-acidograms with a large series of additional biochemical and blood variables were obtained consecutively in 9 trauma patients who developed sepsis, undergoing total parenteral nutrition with dextrose, fat and a mixed AA solution containing 10.4% arginine. ARG was low soon after trauma, then it increased with increasing distance from trauma and with the development of sepsis. ARG was also directly related to the AA infusion rate (AAIR) and for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. ARG was also related directly to the plasma levels of most of the other AA, the best correlation being that with lysine (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001). These correlations were often shifted downwards (showing lower ARG for any given level of the other AA) in measurements performed after trauma, compared to those performed after development of sepsis; this effect was more pronounced for the correlations with branched chain AA. Correlations between ARG and non-AA variables were not particularly relevant. The best simultaneous correlates of ARG, among variables involved in plasma ARG availability, were citrulline level, AAIR and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion (accounting for the effect of endogenous proteolysis) (multiple r(2) = 0.70, p < 0.001). Plasma ornithine (ORN), the AA more specifically linked to ARG metabolism, correlated with AAIR better than ARG and, for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. Correlations of ORN with other AA levels were poorer than those found for ARG, however ORN was directly related to white blood cell and platelet count, fibrinogen

  7. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Predictors of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has shown improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR. The aim of this study was to determine factors predictive of survival in extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR). Methods Consecutive 85 adult patients (median age, 59 years; range, 18 to 85 years; 56 males) who underwent E-CPR from May 2005 to December 2012 were evaluated. Results Causes of arrest were cardiogenic in 62 patients (72.9%), septic in 18 patients (21.2%), and hypovolemic in 3 patients (3.5%), while the etiology was not specified in 2 patients (2.4%). The survival rate in patients with septic etiology was significantly poorer compared with those with another etiology (0% vs. 24.6%, p=0.008). Septic etiology (hazard ratio [HR], 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49 to 5.44; p=0.002) and the interval between arrest and ECLS initiation (HR, 1.05 by 10 minutes increment; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09; p=0.005) were independent risk factors for mortality. When the predictive value of the E-CPR timing for in-hospital mortality was assessed using the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the greatest accuracy was obtained at a cutoff of 60.5 minutes (area under the curve, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.80; p=0.032) with 47.8% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity. The survival rate was significantly different according to the cutoff of 60.5 minutes (p=0.001). Conclusion These results indicate that efforts should be made to minimize the time between arrest and ECLS application, optimally within 60 minutes. In addition, E-CPR in patients with septic etiology showed grave outcomes, suggesting it to be of questionable benefit in these patients. PMID:27525236

  8. Initiation of resuscitation in the delivery room for extremely preterm infants: a profile of neonatal resuscitation instructors

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Cristiane Ribeiro; Sanudo, Adriana; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to examine the decisions of pediatricians who teach neonatal resuscitation in Brazil, particularly those who start resuscitation in the delivery room for newborns born at 23-26 gestational weeks. METHODS: The present study was a cross-sectional study that used electronic questionnaires (Dec/11-Sep/13) sent to instructors of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics. The primary outcome was the gestational age at which the respondent said that he/she would initiate positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room. Latent class analysis was used to identify the major profiles of these instructors, and logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with belonging to one of the derived classes. RESULTS: Of 685 instructors, 82% agreed to participate. Two latent classes were identified: ‘pro-resuscitation' (instructors with a high probability of performing ventilation on infants born at 23-26 weeks) and ‘pro-limitation' (instructors with a high probability of starting ventilation only for infants born at 25-26 weeks). In the multivariate model, compared with the ‘pro-limitation' class, ‘pro-resuscitation' pediatricians were more likely to be board-certified neonatologists and less likely to base their decision on the probability of the infant's death or on moral/religious considerations. CONCLUSION: The pediatricians in the most aggressive group were more likely to be specialists in neonatology and to use less subjective criteria to make delivery room decisions. PMID:27166771

  9. Role of the family support person during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Elita-Mae; James, Jayne Elizabeth

    This article discusses family witnessed resuscitation and describes the need for a healthcare professional to be available to support the family before and during this experience. Careful explanation and emotional support are required during the event and if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is unsuccessful, further explanation and support will be required. A family support person is usually a nurse but could also be a hospital chaplain or social worker. The chaplain's background and ability to interpret medical information, combined with the emotional and spiritual support he or she can offer, make the chaplain suitable for this role. However, for some patients and families a chaplain's involvement might not be appropriate. The authors suggest that further research and evidence-based guidance should be developed to maximise the benefits of a family support person's presence during witnessed resuscitation.

  10. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause.

  11. An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Resuscitation Skills Retention and Performance among Health Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; Greene, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Resuscitation and life support skills training comprises a significant proportion of continuing education programming for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of certified resuscitation providers toward the retention of resuscitation skills, regular skills updating, and methods…

  12. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries. A statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the international liaison committee on resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-12-01

    Outcome following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002 a task force of ILCOR met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (i.e., essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conference. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage, confidentiality, management, and registry

  13. Witnessed resuscitation in critical care: the case against.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alison

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this discussion is to raise awareness of the negative aspects of witnessed resuscitation. The historical precedents associated with the introduction of the concept are outlined. The disadvantages of introducing witnessed resuscitation are delineated. These include issues of human dignity, personal privacy and the provision of adequately trained staff to help relatives cope with the emotional trauma the experience of being a witness may invoke. The paper concludes by calling for more widespread debate and research into the efficacy of introducing such policies into practice.

  14. History of neonatal resuscitation. Part 2: oxygen and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen was used in neonatal resuscitation from 1780, within 5 years of its detection. It rapidly gained general acceptance and infiltrated delivery rooms and, a century later, neonatal special care units. After 217 years without scientific evidence, the use of oxygen for neonatal resuscitation has recently been questioned. Continuous distending airway pressure for oxygen administration was available at the beginning of the 20th century, but was not widely accepted. Alkali and analeptic drugs gained widespread but short-lived use after the Second World War.

  15. Resuscitation of a Pediatric Drowning in Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dragann, Brendan N; Melnychuk, Eric M; Wilson, Christopher J; Lambert, Richard L; Maffei, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of pediatric patients who require prolonged resuscitation after ice water drowning and hypothermic cardiac arrest remains guarded. We report a case of successful prolonged resuscitation of a pediatric patient in hypothermic cardiac arrest who showed severe metabolic derangements and went on to make a rapid and full neurologic recovery without the use of extracoproreal rewarming or mechanical cardiac support. Many ground and air medical emergency medical service programs have policies against interfacility transfer of patients in hypothermic cardiac arrest, calling into question the need to revise current protocols. PMID:27021675

  16. Assessing the damage control resuscitation: development, drivers and direction.

    PubMed

    Quinn, David; Frith, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) has become a more widely adopted acute management strategy over the past decade. A cornerstone of this strategy is the performance of an initial limited surgical intervention for the control of active bleeding and contamination. This technique is indicated where significant physiological compromise exists and immediate surgical intervention is required. This damage control surgery itself is completed judiciously to allow a period of resuscitative stabilisation before later definitive surgical solutions. This discussion describes the three further principles of DCR and then explores the rationale and drivers behind the development of this approach. PMID:26315261

  17. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  18. Neonatal sepsis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Koutouby, A; Habibullah, J

    1995-06-01

    The case records of all neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of Al Wasl Hospital (Dubai) in a period of 60 months (May 1987-April 1992) were analysed. One-hundred-and-six neonates had confirmed sepsis. The most common causative organisms were Group B Streptococci (23 per cent), E. coli (17 per cent), Staph. epidermidis (17 per cent), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16 per cent). Group B Streptococcus presented as the most common organism in very early (< or = 24 hours) and early onset (2-6 days) of sepsis (34 per cent, 21/61), Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 per cent), Staphylococcal epidermidis (18 per cent) and Candida (13 per cent) were most common organisms causing late onset of sepsis (7-30 days). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae had highest mortality (71 per cent, 5/7; and 59 per cent, 10/17, respectively). Lowest mortality (4 per cent, 1/25) was observed in Group B Streptococcus sepsis. Prematurity, low birth weight, and nosocomial sepsis were high risk factors associated with fatal outcome.

  19. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  20. Year in review 2008: Critical Care - sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the most important papers appearing in Critical Care and other major journals about severe sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction over the past year. A number of these clinical and laboratory studies will have a considerable impact on the sepsis research agenda for years to come. The steroid controversy, the debate over tight glycemic control, the colloid versus crystalloid issue, the value of selective decontamination of the digestive tract, the enlarging role of biomarkers, the value of genomics and rapid diagnostic techniques have all been prominently featured in recent publications. Basic research into novel predictive assays, genetic polymorphisms, and new molecular methods to risk-stratify and to determine treatment options for sepsis have occupied much of the Critical Care publications relating to sepsis pathophysiology in 2008. We will attempt to briefly summarize what we consider to be the most significant contributions to the sepsis literature over the last year, and their likely ramifications in the future, for critical care clinicians, clinical investigators and basic researchers alike. PMID:19886974

  1. Endotoxins and other sepsis triggers.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Endotoxin, or more accurately termed bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is recognized as the most potent microbial mediator implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock. Yet despite its discovery well over a century ago, the fundamental role of circulating endotoxin in the blood of most patients with septic shock remains enigmatic and a subject of considerable controversy. LPS is the most prominent 'alarm molecule' sensed by the host's early warning system of innate immunity presaging the threat of invasion of the internal milieu by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. In small doses within a localized tissue space, LPS signaling is advantageous to the host in orchestrating an appropriate antimicrobial defense and bacterial clearance mechanisms. Conversely, the sudden release of large quantities of LPS into the bloodstream is clearly deleterious to the host, initiating the release of a dysregulated and potentially lethal array of inflammatory mediators and procoagulant factors in the systemic circulation. The massive host response to this single bacterial pattern recognition molecule is sufficient to generate diffuse endothelial injury, tissue hypoperfusion, disseminated intravascular coagulation and refractory shock. Numerous attempts to block endotoxin activity in clinical trials with septic patients have met with inconsistent and largely negative results. Yet the groundbreaking discoveries within the past decade into the precise molecular basis for LPS-mediated cellular activation and tissue injury has rekindled optimism that a new generation of therapies that specifically disrupt LPS signaling might succeed. Other microbial mediators found in Gram-positive bacterial and viral and fungal pathogens are now appreciated to activate many of the same host defense networks induced by LPS. This information is providing novel interventions in the continuing effots to improve the care of septic patients.

  2. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  3. Host innate immune responses to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Leopold, Stije J; Cranendonk, Duncan R; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to sepsis can be seen as a pattern recognition receptor-mediated dysregulation of the immune system following pathogen invasion in which a careful balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses is vital. Invasive infection triggers both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host responses, the magnitude of which depends on multiple factors, including pathogen virulence, site of infection, host genetics, and comorbidities. Toll-like receptors, the inflammasomes, and other pattern recognition receptors initiate the immune response after recognition of danger signals derived from microorganisms, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or derived from the host, so-called danger-associated molecular patterns. Further dissection of the role of host–pathogen interactions, the cytokine response, the coagulation cascade, and their multidirectional interactions in sepsis should lead toward the development of new therapeutic strategies in sepsis. PMID:23774844

  4. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  5. Anticoagulant modulation of inflammation in severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Karen S; Sawheny, Eva; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are so tightly linked that the cytokine storm which accompanies the development of sepsis initiates thrombin activation and the development of an intravascular coagulopathy. This review examines the interaction between the inflammatory and coagulation cascades, as well as the role of endogenous anticoagulants in regulating this interaction and dampening the activity of both pathways. Clinical trials attempting to improve outcomes in patients with severe sepsis by inhibiting thrombin generation with heparin and or endogenous anticoagulants are reviewed. In general, these trials have failed to demonstrate that anticoagulant therapy is associated with improvement in mortality or morbidity. While it is possible that selective patients who are severely ill with a high expected mortality may be shown to benefit from such therapy, at the present time none of these anticoagulants are neither approved nor can they be recommended for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25938026

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis. Case 7.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, S; Zürcher Zenklusen, R; Hack, C E; Wuillemin, W A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a man (age: 49 years), who died from severe meningococcal sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and extended skin necrosis. We discuss in detail the pathophysiology of the activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during sepsis. The article discusses new therapeutic concepts in the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis, too.

  7. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  8. Ghrelin inhibits sympathetic nervous activity in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongqian; Zhou, Mian; Das, Padmalaya; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Derek; Miksa, Michael; Zhang, Fangming; Ravikumar, Thanjavur S; Wang, Ping

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that norepinephrine (NE) upregulates proinflammatory cytokines by activating alpha(2)-adrenoceptor. Therefore, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system represents a novel treatment for sepsis. We have also shown that a novel stomach-derived peptide, ghrelin, is downregulated in sepsis and that its intravenous administration decreases proinflammatory cytokines and mitigates organ injury. However, it remains unknown whether ghrelin inhibits sympathetic activity through central ghrelin receptors [i.e., growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-la)] in sepsis. To study this, sepsis was induced in male rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Ghrelin was administered through intravenous or intracerebroventricular injection 30 min before CLP. Our results showed that intravenous administration of ghrelin significantly reduced the elevated NE and TNF-alpha levels at 2 h after CLP. NE administration partially blocked the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on TNF-alpha in sepsis. GHSR-la inhibition by the administration of a GHSR-la antagonist, [d-Arg(1),d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7,9),Leu(11)]substance P, significantly increased both NE and TNF-alpha levels even in normal animals. Markedly elevated circulating levels of NE 2 h after CLP were also significantly decreased by intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on NE release was completely blocked by intracerebroventricular injection of the GHSR-1a antagonist or a neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y(1) receptor antagonist. However, ghrelin's downregulatory effect on TNF-alpha release was only partially diminished by these agents. Thus ghrelin has sympathoinhibitory properties that are mediated by central ghrelin receptors involving a NPY/Y1 receptor-dependent pathway. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production in sepsis is partially because of its modulation of the overstimulated sympathetic nerve activation.

  9. Pediatric sepsis: challenges and adjunctive therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, William; Wong, Hector R.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Sepsis remains an important challenge in pediatric critical care medicine. The current review intends to provide an appraisal of adjunctive therapies for sepsis and to highlight opportunities for meeting selected challenges in the field. Future clinical studies should address long-term and functional outcomes, as well as acute outcomes. Potential adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids, hemofiltration, hemoadsorption, and plasmapheresis may have important roles, but still require formal and more rigorous testing by way of clinical trials. Finally, the design of future clinical trials should consider novel approaches for stratifying outcome risks as a means of improving the risk to benefit ratio of experimental therapies. PMID:23537672

  10. An advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours after birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. After careful review of the international resuscitation literature and after discussion of key and controversial issues, consensus was reached on almost all aspects of neonatal resuscitation, and areas of controversy and high priority for additional research were delineated. Consensus on resuscitation for the newly born infant included the following principles: Common or controversial medications (epinephrine, volume expansion, naloxone, bicarbonate), special resuscitation circumstances affecting care of the newly born, continuing care of the newly born after resuscitation, and ethical considerations for initiation and discontinuation of resuscitation are discussed. There was agreement that insufficient data exist to recommend changes to current guidelines regarding the use of 21% versus 100% oxygen, neuroprotective interventions such as cerebral hypothermia, use of a laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and use of high-dose epinephrine. Areas of controversy are identified, as is the need for additional research to improve the scientific justification of each component of current and future resuscitation guidelines. PMID:10103348

  11. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  12. Management of foetal asphyxia by intrauterine foetal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhareddy, S.; Kirankumar, H

    2010-01-01

    Management of foetal distress is a subject of gynaecological interest, but an anaesthesiologist should know about resuscitation, because he should be able to treat the patient, whenever he is directly involved in managing the parturient patient during labour analgesia and before an emergency operative delivery. Progressive asphyxia is known as foetal distress; the foetus does not breathe directly from the atmosphere, but depends on maternal circulation for its oxygen requirement. The oxygen delivery to the foetus depends on the placental (maternal side), placental transfer and foetal circulation. Oxygen transport to the foetus is reduced physiologically during uterine contractions in labour. Significant impairment of oxygen transport to the foetus, either temporary or permanent may cause foetal distress, resulting in progressive hypoxia and acidosis. Intrauterine foetal resuscitation comprises of applying measures to a mother in active labour, with the intention of improving oxygen delivery to the distressed foetus to the base line, if the placenta is functioning normally. These measures include left lateral recumbent position, high flow oxygen administration, tocolysis to reduce uterine contractions, rapid intravenous fluid administration, vasopressors for correction of maternal hypotension and amnioinfusion for improving uterine blood flow. Intrauterine Foetal Resuscitation measures are easy to perform and do not require extensive resources, but the results are encouraging in improving the foetal well-being. The anaesthesiologist plays a major role in the application of intrauterine foetal resuscitation measures. PMID:21189876

  13. First resuscitation of critical burn patients: progresses and problems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M; García-de-Lorenzo, A; Asensio, M J

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the aim of the resuscitation of burn patients is to maintain end-organ perfusion with fluid intake as minimal as possible. To avoid excess intake, we can improve the estimation using computer methods. Parkland and Brooke are the commonly used formulas, and recently, a new, an easy formula is been used, i.e. the 'Rule of TEN'. Fluid resuscitation should be titrated to maintain the urine output of approximately 30-35 mL/h for an average-sized adult. The most commonly used fluids are crystalloid, but the phenomenon of creep flow has renewed interest in albumin. In severely burn patients, monitoring with transpulmonary thermodilution together with lactate, ScvO2 and intraabdominal pressures is a good option. Nurse-driven protocols or computer-based resuscitation algorithms reduce the dependence on clinical decision making and decrease fluid resuscitation intake. High-dose vitamin C, propranolol, the avoidance of excessive use of morphine and mechanical ventilation are other useful resources. PMID:26873418

  14. [Feedback, a pedagogical tool in the emergency department resuscitation room].

    PubMed

    Santos, Olivier; Cerny, Philippe; Guiraudie, Juluette; Spiette, Catherine; Bounes, Vincent; Oliver, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The specific care provided in the emergency department resuscitation room requires a high level of knowledge, skill and competence. The lessons learned methodology is a dynamic approach and an educational tool which promotes the transfer of knowledge and the continuous improvement of the quality and safety of care. PMID:26027182

  15. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  16. Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2001-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when EtCO 2 values are maintained above 25% of prearrest values.

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation interface adapted for postextubation continuous noninvasive ventilatory support.

    PubMed

    Bach, John R; Saporito, Louis Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The authors report that a new oral interface designed for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use during anesthesia permitted the successful extubation of an "unweanable" 27-yr-old woman with nemaline rod myopathy to continuous noninvasive ventilatory support. She had failed two previous extubation attempts. Tracheotomy and institutional care were avoided as a result. PMID:26135377

  18. Fluid resuscitation should respect the endothelial glycocalyx layer.

    PubMed

    Guidet, Bertrand; Ait-Oufella, Hafid

    2014-12-23

    Endothelial glycocalyx degradation induced by fluid overload adds to the concern of a detrimental effect of uncontrolled fluid resuscitation and the risk of unnecessary fluid infusion. As a consequence, the use of new tools for monitoring response to fluids appears promising. From that perspective, the monitoring of plasma concentration of glycocalyx degradation markers could be useful.

  19. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills by Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossel, Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study of preclinical medical students' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills showed students had a very recent CPR course had a significantly lower failure rate than those with courses one or two years previously. The most frequent errors were in chest compression rate and inability to adhere to the single-rescuer compression-to-ventilation…

  20. First resuscitation of critical burn patients: progresses and problems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M; García-de-Lorenzo, A; Asensio, M J

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the aim of the resuscitation of burn patients is to maintain end-organ perfusion with fluid intake as minimal as possible. To avoid excess intake, we can improve the estimation using computer methods. Parkland and Brooke are the commonly used formulas, and recently, a new, an easy formula is been used, i.e. the 'Rule of TEN'. Fluid resuscitation should be titrated to maintain the urine output of approximately 30-35 mL/h for an average-sized adult. The most commonly used fluids are crystalloid, but the phenomenon of creep flow has renewed interest in albumin. In severely burn patients, monitoring with transpulmonary thermodilution together with lactate, ScvO2 and intraabdominal pressures is a good option. Nurse-driven protocols or computer-based resuscitation algorithms reduce the dependence on clinical decision making and decrease fluid resuscitation intake. High-dose vitamin C, propranolol, the avoidance of excessive use of morphine and mechanical ventilation are other useful resources.

  1. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G.; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G.; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%), in Medicine and Nursing (46%), and were surveys (72%) with healthcare team members (67%) as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a) to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b) to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c) to develop a written institutional policy; d) to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes. PMID:24676198

  2. Confronting the Ethical Conduct of Resuscitation Research: a consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Mann, N Clay; Schmidt, Terri A; Richardson, Lynne D

    2005-11-01

    An objective of the 2005 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, "Ethical Conduct of Resuscitation Research," was to identify if consensus exists regarding application of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Final Rule allowing an exception from informed consent in resuscitation research. At the start of the consensus conference, 49 attendees participated in a survey containing three sections: 1) demographic questions characterizing respondents, 2) questions regarding application of the FDA Final Rule, and 3) complexities associated with seeking informed consent in an emergency setting. Consensus analysis was used to determine if a formal consensus was reached, relying on a Bayesian posterior probability of 0.99 to consider survey responses a "consensus." Respondents demonstrated consensus regarding the need to further refine and standardize application of the FDA Final Rule in resuscitation research. However, participants agreed that current regulations provide adequate and appropriate protection to safeguard patients. Complexities associated with seeking informed consent in emergency departments were prevalent among most institutions represented at the conference. There was general agreement that current efforts to safeguard human subjects are effective, but participants agreed that refinements to and standardization of the FDA Final Rule would facilitate resuscitation research and enhance patient safety. PMID:16264078

  3. Should family members be present during cardiopulmonary resuscitation? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Critchell, C Dana; Marik, Paul E

    2007-01-01

    During resuscitation, family members are often escorted out of the room for fear of immediate and long-term consequences to the family, the patient, and the physician. However, mounting evidence suggests that family presence during resuscitation could, in fact, be beneficial. The Emergency Nurses Association and the American Heart Association endorse family-witnessed resuscitation and the development of hospital policies to facilitate this process. However, the opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely, and few hospitals in the United States have developed formal policies on the presence of families during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In this article, we review the current status of family-witnessed resuscitation and provide recommendations on the development of hospital policies for family-witnessed resuscitation.

  4. Antibiotic prescription patterns in the empiric therapy of severe sepsis: combination of antimicrobials with different mechanisms of action reduces mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although early institution of adequate antimicrobial therapy is lifesaving in sepsis patients, optimal antimicrobial strategy has not been established. Moreover, the benefit of combination therapy over monotherapy remains to be determined. Our aims are to describe patterns of empiric antimicrobial therapy in severe sepsis, assessing the impact of combination therapy, including antimicrobials with different mechanisms of action, on mortality. Methods This is a Spanish national multicenter study, analyzing all patients admitted to ICUs who received antibiotics within the first 6 hours of diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. Antibiotic-prescription patterns in community-acquired infections and nosocomial infections were analyzed separately and compared. We compared the impact on mortality of empiric antibiotic treatment, including antibiotics with different mechanisms of action, termed different-class combination therapy (DCCT), with that of monotherapy and any other combination therapy possibilities (non-DCCT). Results We included 1,372 patients, 1,022 (74.5%) of whom had community-acquired sepsis and 350 (25.5%) of whom had nosocomial sepsis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic agents were β-lactams (902, 65.7%) and carbapenems (345, 25.1%). DCCT was administered to 388 patients (28.3%), whereas non-DCCT was administered to 984 (71.7%). The mortality rate was significantly lower in patients administered DCCTs than in those who were administered non-DCCTs (34% versus 40%; P = 0.042). The variables independently associated with mortality were age, male sex, APACHE II score, and community origin of the infection. DCCT was a protective factor against in-hospital mortality (odds ratio (OR), 0.699; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.522 to 0.936; P = 0.016), as was urologic focus of infection (OR, 0.241; 95% CI, 0.102 to 0.569; P = 0.001). Conclusions β-Lactams, including carbapenems, are the most frequently prescribed antibiotics in empiric

  5. Strategies to sustain a quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    van Heerden, Carlien; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many neonatal deaths can be prevented globally through effective resuscitation. South Africa (SA) committed towards attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, SA’s district hospitals have the highest early neonatal mortality rates. Modifiable and avoidable causes associated with patient-related, administrative and health care provider factors contribute to neonatal mortality. A quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation could contribute towards decreasing neonatal mortality, thereby contributing towards the attainment of the MDG4. Aim The aim of this study was, (1) to explore and describe the existing situation regarding neonatal resuscitation in a district hospital, (2) to develop strategies to sustain a neonatal resuscitation quality improvement initiative and (3) to decrease neonatal mortality. Changes that occurred and the sustainability of strategies were evaluated. Setting A maternity section of a district hospital in South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Sustainability Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. The Problem Resolving Action Research model was applied and the study was conducted in three cycles. Purposive sampling was used for the quantitative and qualitative aspects of data collection. Data was analysed accordingly. Results The findings indicated that the strategies formulated and implemented to address factors related to neonatal resuscitation (training, equipment and stock, staff shortages, staff attitude, neonatal transport and protocols) had probable sustainability and contributed towards a reduction in neonatal mortality in the setting. Conclusion These strategies had the probability of sustainability and could potentially improve neonatal outcomes and reduce neonatal mortality to contribute toward South Africa’s’ drive to attain the MDG4. PMID:27380840

  6. Liver response to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent resuscitation: MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Matot, Idit; Cohen, Keren; Pappo, Orit; Barash, Hila; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2008-01-01

    The liver is a target for injury in low flow states. Markers of liver injury are either invasive or not rapidly responding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may offer a noninvasive alternative to evaluate liver injury due to reduced perfusion. Recently, we reported an MRI method (functional MRI [fMRI]) that enables us to follow liver perfusion by changing the enrichment of inspired gas (air, air-5% carbon dioxide, 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide). Rats were subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS) (bleeding to a MAP of 25 mmHg) and randomized to no resuscitation or resuscitation with Ringer lactate (RL) or adrenaline infusion targeted to a MAP of 50 mmHg or baseline. Significantly decreased fMRI responses to hyperoxia and hypercapnia were observed immediately after HS. Liver enzymes levels, liver histology, and apoptosis assessments were normal immediately after hemorrhage, however, showed significant changes after 6 h. Functional MRI revealed that adrenaline, but not RL infusion, significantly (P < 0.01) improved liver perfusion. Similarly, liver injury, as assessed by liver enzyme levels, liver histology, and apoptosis, was attenuated to a greater extent with adrenaline resuscitation. No significant differences in liver perfusion and injury were noted between resuscitation to low (50 mmHg) versus high (baseline) MAP. This study shows that fMRI enables early assessment of changes in liver perfusion, resulting in liver injury or recovery, and therefore, it may be considered as a noninvasive, rapidly responding tool for following liver outcome subsequent to hemorrhage and resuscitation. Using fMRI, we showed that adrenaline may be preferable to RL as an initial measure to attenuate liver injury after HS.

  7. [International guidelines of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign : update 2012].

    PubMed

    Briegel, J; Möhnle, P

    2013-04-01

    An update of the international guidelines for therapy of sepsis was published in February 2012 by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). The update includes a further development of the guidelines from 2004 and 2008. The guidelines are divided into three sections, sepsis-specific therapeutic measures, recommendations on general intensive care measures for sepsis and finally special features of sepsis in pediatric intensive care medicine are presented in detail. This article discusses the most important amendments in the first two sections and delving deeper into the guidelines.

  8. Therapeutic Targets in Sepsis: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Eric J; Bernard, Gordon R

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics and fluids have been standard treatment for sepsis since World War II. Many molecular mediators of septic shock have since been identified. In models of sepsis, blocking these mediators improved organ injury and decreased mortality. Clinical trials, however, have failed. The absence of new therapies has been vexing to clinicians, clinical researchers, basic scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry. This article examines the evolution of sepsis therapy and theorizes about why so many well-reasoned therapies have not worked in human trials. We review new molecular targets for sepsis and examine trial designs that might lead to successful treatments for sepsis. PMID:27229636

  9. Elucidating the role of genomics in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kirpalani, Haresh; Cotten, Charles Michael

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable preterm populations. Immature immune defenses, and environmental and maternal factors contribute to this risk, with as many as a third of very preterm infants experiencing sepsis during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Epidemiologic and twin studies have suggested that there is a genetic contribution to sepsis predilection. Several investigators have conducted candidate gene association studies on variants of specific interest and potential functional significance in neonatal sepsis. In this review, we describe details of studies that have evaluated genetic susceptibility in neonatal sepsis, and summarize findings from a review of candidate gene association studies.

  10. Global Epidemiology of Pediatric Severe Sepsis: The Sepsis Prevalence, Outcomes, and Therapies Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Pappachan, John; Wheeler, Derek; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C.; Salloo, Asma; Singhi, Sunit C.; Erickson, Simon; Roy, Jason A.; Bush, Jenny L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Thomas, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Limited data exist about the international burden of severe sepsis in critically ill children. Objectives: To characterize the global prevalence, therapies, and outcomes of severe sepsis in pediatric intensive care units to better inform interventional trials. Methods: A point prevalence study was conducted on 5 days throughout 2013–2014 at 128 sites in 26 countries. Patients younger than 18 years of age with severe sepsis as defined by consensus criteria were included. Outcomes were severe sepsis point prevalence, therapies used, new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction, ventilator- and vasoactive-free days at Day 28, functional status, and mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Of 6,925 patients screened, 569 had severe sepsis (prevalence, 8.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.6–8.9%). The patients’ median age was 3.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.7–11.0) years. The most frequent sites of infection were respiratory (40%) and bloodstream (19%). Common therapies included mechanical ventilation (74% of patients), vasoactive infusions (55%), and corticosteroids (45%). Hospital mortality was 25% and did not differ by age or between developed and resource-limited countries. Median ventilator-free days were 16 (IQR, 0–25), and vasoactive-free days were 23 (IQR, 12–28). Sixty-seven percent of patients had multiorgan dysfunction at sepsis recognition, with 30% subsequently developing new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Among survivors, 17% developed at least moderate disability. Sample sizes needed to detect a 5–10% absolute risk reduction in outcomes within interventional trials are estimated between 165 and 1,437 patients per group. Conclusions: Pediatric severe sepsis remains a burdensome public health problem, with prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates similar to those reported in critically ill adult populations. International clinical trials targeting children with severe sepsis are warranted. PMID:25734408

  11. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  12. Immunomodulation during sepsis in organ transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Angele, M K; Loehe, F; Faist, E

    2005-10-01

    Newer immunosuppressive agents have dramatically reduced the rates of acute graft rejection over the last decade but may have exacerbated the problem of post-transplant infections. Causes of early mortality include graft dysfunction and sepsis. Late mortality occurs mainly due to sepsis. An excessive inflammatory response followed with a dramatic paralysis of cell-mediated immunity has been documented in septic patients. In transplanted individuals the pathophysiological changes of the immune response are further complicated by immunosuppressive agents. This article will focus on the effect of immunosuppressive agents and sepsis on cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, potentially promising immunomodulatory approaches, i.e. human activated protein C, immunomodulatory diets containing L-arginine and fish oil, selective cytokine blockade, platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, LPS receptor CD14 blockade and G-CSF, for the treatment of immunodysfunction in septic patients will be outlined in this review article. Most of them, however, have not been tested in the clinical arena in transplanted patients. Thus, the main part of the article, immunomodulation during sepsis in organ transplanted children is quite speculative and based on immunomodulatory strategies in other non-transplanted septic patients.

  13. Current treatment of sepsis and endotoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Periti, P

    2000-09-01

    This article reviews the new criteria for selecting the proper antimicrobial agent and dosage regimen for standard treatment of severe sepsis, with the intention of preventing septic shock. After introducing new concepts on the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock, the authors analyse the parameters of beta-lactam antibacterial activity, the antibiotic-induced release of bacterial endotoxin and the interrelationships between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in the search for an optimum dosage regimen of antimicrobial mono- or polytherapy for severely ill septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The mortality rate resulting from severe bacterial sepsis, particularly that associated with shock, still approaches 50% in spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and optimum supportive care. Bacterial endotoxins that are part of the cell wall are one of the cofactors in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock and are often induced by antimicrobial chemotherapy, even if administered rationally. Not all antimicrobial agents are equally capable of inducing septic shock; this is dependent on their mechanism of action rather than on the causative pathogen species. The quantity of endotoxin released depends on the drug dose and whether filaments or spheroplast formation predominate. Some antibiotics, such as carbapenems, ceftriaxone, cefepime, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and quinolones, do not have the propensity to provoke septic shock because their rapid bacterial activity induces mainly spheroplast or fragile spheroplast-like bacterial forms.

  14. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome.

  15. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome. PMID:24021703

  16. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  17. Role of biomarkers in sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Samraj, Ravi S; Zingarelli, Basilia; Wong, Hector R

    2013-11-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, even with the current availability of extended-spectrum antibiotics and advanced medical care. Biomarkers offer a tool in facilitating early diagnosis, in identifying patient populations at high risk of complications, and in monitoring progression of the disease, which are critical assessments for appropriate therapy and improvement in patient outcomes. Several biomarkers are already available for clinical use in sepsis; however, their effectiveness in many instances is limited by the lack of specificity and sensitivity to characterize the presence of an infection and the complexity of the inflammatory and immune processes and to stratify patients into homogenous groups for specific treatments. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of novel biomarkers, which can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluids to genes and proteins in circulating blood cells. The purpose of this review was to examine the current status of sepsis biomarkers, with special emphasis on emerging markers, which are undergoing validation and may transition into clinical practice for their informative value in diagnosis, prognosis, or response to therapy. We will also discuss the new concept of combination biomarkers and biomarker risk models, their existing challenges, and their potential use in the daily management of patients with sepsis.

  18. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  19. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-01

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  20. Cardiac Output Monitoring Managing Intravenous Therapy (COMMIT) to Treat Emergency Department Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Peter C.; Filbin, Michael R.; Napoli, Anthony; Feldman, Joseph; Pang, Peter S.; Sankoff, Jeffrey; Lo, Bruce M.; Dickey-White, Howard; Birkhahn, Robert H.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Fluid responsiveness is proposed as a physiology-based method to titrate fluid therapy based on preload dependence. The objectives of this study were to determine if a fluid responsiveness protocol would decrease progression of organ dysfunction, and a fluid responsiveness protocol would facilitate a more aggressive resuscitation. Methods: Prospective, 10-center, randomized interventional trial. Inclusion criteria: suspected sepsis and lactate 2.0 to 4.0 mmol/L. Exclusion criteria (abbreviated): systolic blood pressure more than 90 mmHg, and contraindication to aggressive fluid resuscitation. Intervention: fluid responsiveness protocol using Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Monitor (NICOM) to assess for fluid responsiveness (>10% increase in stroke volume in response to 5 mL/kg fluid bolus) with balance of a liter given in responsive patients. Control: standard clinical care. Outcomes: primary—change in Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at least 1 over 72 h; secondary—fluids administered. Trial was initially powered at 600 patients, but stopped early due to a change in sponsor's funding priorities. Results: Sixty-four patients were enrolled with 32 in the treatment arm. There were no significant differences between arms in age, comorbidities, baseline vital signs, or SOFA scores (P > 0.05 for all). Comparing treatment versus Standard of Care—there was no difference in proportion of increase in SOFA score of at least 1 point (30% vs. 33%) (note bene underpowered, P = 1.0) or mean preprotocol fluids 1,050 mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 786–1,314) vs. 1,031 mL (95% CI: 741–1,325) (P = 0.93); however, treatment patients received more fluids during the protocol (2,633 mL [95% CI: 2,264–3,001] vs. 1,002 mL [95% CI: 707–1,298]) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of a “preshock” population, there was no change in progression of organ dysfunction with a fluid responsiveness protocol

  1. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  2. Potentially Inadvertent Immunomodulation: Norepinephrine Use in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Roeland F; van der Poll, Tom; Angus, Derek C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Pickkers, Peter; Kox, Matthijs

    2016-09-01

    Septic shock is a major cause of death worldwide and a considerable healthcare burden in the twenty-first century. Attention has shifted from damaging effects of the proinflammatory response to the detrimental role of antiinflammation, a phenomenon known as sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. Sepsis-induced immunoparalysis may render patients vulnerable to secondary infections and is associated with impaired outcome. The immunoparalysis hypothesis compels us to reevaluate the current management of septic shock and to assess whether we are inadvertently compromising or altering the host immune response. In this perspective, we discuss the potential detrimental role of norepinephrine, the cornerstone treatment for septic shock, in sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. We provide a short overview of the current understanding of the immunologic pathophysiology of sepsis, followed by a detailed description of the immunomodulatory effects of norepinephrine and alternative vasopressors. We conclude that although the development of novel therapies aimed at reversing immunoparalysis is underway, the use of norepinephrine may aggravate the development, extent, and duration of sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. Current in vitro and animal data indicate that norepinephrine treatment exerts immunosuppressive and bacterial growth-promoting effects and may increase susceptibility toward infections. However, evidence in humans is circumstantial, as immunologic effects of norepinephrine have not been investigated properly in experimental or clinical studies. Alternatives such as vasopressin/selepressin, angiotensin II, and phenylephrine could have a fundamental advantage over norepinephrine with respect to their immunologic properties. However, also for these agents, in vivo immunologic data in humans are largely lacking. As such, human studies on the immunomodulatory properties of norepinephrine and viable alternatives are highly warranted. PMID:27398737

  3. Hospitalization Type and Subsequent Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Hospitalization is associated with microbiome perturbation (dysbiosis), and this perturbation is more severe in patients treated with antimicrobials. Objectives: To evaluate whether hospitalizations known to be associated with periods of microbiome perturbation are associated with increased risk of severe sepsis after hospital discharge. Methods: We studied participants in the U.S. Health and Retirement Study with linked Medicare claims (1998–2010). We measured whether three hospitalization types associated with increasing severity of probable dysbiosis (non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with Clostridium difficile infection [CDI]) were associated with increasing risk for severe sepsis in the 90 days after hospital discharge. We used two study designs: the first was a longitudinal design with between-person comparisons and the second was a self-controlled case series design using within-person comparison. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 43,095 hospitalizations among 10,996 Health and Retirement Study–Medicare participants. In the 90 days following non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with CDI, adjusted probabilities of subsequent admission for severe sepsis were 4.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8–4.4%), 7.1% (95% CI, 6.6–7.6%), and 10.7% (95% CI, 7.7–13.8%), respectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of severe sepsis was 3.3-fold greater during the 90 days after hospitalizations than during other observation periods. The IRR was 30% greater after an infection-related hospitalization versus a non–infection-related hospitalization. The IRR was 70% greater after a hospitalization with CDI than an infection-related hospitalization without CDI. Conclusions: There is a strong dose–response relationship between events known to result in dysbiosis and subsequent severe sepsis hospitalization that is not present

  4. Plasma soluble Tim-3 emerges as an inhibitor in sepsis: sepsis contrary to membrane Tim-3 on monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Li, J; Jiang, X; Xiao, K; Zhang, D; Zhao, Z; Ai, J; Hou, C; Jia, Y; Han, G; Xie, L

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction is the main characteristic of sepsis. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) on the monocytes has been reported to promote immune homeostasis during sepsis, but the influences of plasm soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) on the immune system during sepsis remain unknown. Here, 100 patients with different severities of sepsis (40 sepsis, 42 severe sepsis, and 18 septic shock) were enrolled in this study. The Tim-3 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) on the circulating monocytes were detected using flow cytometry. Plasma sTim-3 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Inflammatory factors and two kinds of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) - ADAM10 and ADAM17 were assessed. The Tim-3 and HLA-DR on the monocytes decreased with increasing sepsis severity. The sTim-3 was reduced in the sepsis and severe sepsis patients but was elevated in the septic shock patients who exhibited significant immunosuppression as predicted by HLA-DR. sTim-3 levels were negatively correlated with IL-12 and TNF-α. ADAM10 and ADAM17, sheddases of Tim-3, exhibited trends toward elevations in the septic shock group. In conclusion, sTim-3 was involved in the development of sepsis. The homeostasis-promoting role of the Tim-3 on the monocytes was disrupted, while the inhibitory role of sTim-3 emerged during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

  5. Coefficient of Variation of Coarsely Sampled Heart Rate Is Associated with Early Vasopressor Independence in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Samuel M.; Tate, M. Quinn; Jones, Jason P.; Kuttler, Kathryn G.; Lanspa, Michael; Rondina, Matthew T.; Grissom, Colin K.; Mathews, V.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine whether variability of coarsely sample heart rate and blood pressure early in the course of severe sepsis and septic shock predicts successful resuscitation, defined as vasopressor independence at 24 hours after admission. Methods In an observational study of patients admitted with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2009 to 2011 to one of two ICUs at a tertiary-care hospital, in whom blood pressure was measured via an arterial catheter, we sampled heart rate and blood pressure every 30 seconds over the first six hours of ICU admission and calculated coefficient of variability of those measurements. Primary outcome was vasopressor independence at 24 hours; secondary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results We studied 165 patients, of which 97 (59%) achieved vasopressor independence at 24 hours. Overall 28-day mortality was 15%. Significant predictors of vasopressor independence at 24 hours included the coefficient of variation of heart rate, age, APACHE II, the number of increases in vasopressor dose, mean vasopressin dose, mean blood pressure, and time-pressure integral of mean blood pressure below 60mm Hg. Lower sampling frequencies (up to once every 5 minutes) did not affect the findings. Conclusions Increased variability of coarsely sampled heart rate was associated with vasopressor independence at 24 hours after controlling for possible confounders. Sampling frequencies of once in five minutes may be similar to once in 30 seconds. PMID:24578465

  6. Sirtuin-2 Regulates Sepsis Inflammation in ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianfeng; Buechler, Nancy L.; Martin, Ayana; Wells, Jonathan; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles E.; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity increases morbidity and resource utilization in sepsis patients. Sepsis transitions from early/hyper-inflammatory to late/hypo-inflammatory phase. Majority of sepsis-mortality occurs during the late sepsis; no therapies exist to treat late sepsis. In lean mice, we have shown that sirtuins (SIRTs) modulate this transition. Here, we investigated the role of sirtuins, especially the adipose-tissue abundant SIRT-2 on transition from early to late sepsis in obese with sepsis. Methods Sepsis was induced using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in ob/ob mice. We measured microvascular inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide/normal saline re-stimulation as a “second-hit” (marker of immune function) at different time points to track phases of sepsis in ob/ob mice. We determined SIRT-2 expression during different phases of sepsis. We studied the effect of SIRT-2 inhibition during the hypo-inflammatory phase on immune function and 7-day survival. We used a RAW264.7 (RAW) cell model of sepsis for mechanistic studies. We confirmed key findings in diet induced obese (DIO) mice with sepsis. Results We observed that the ob/ob-septic mice showed an enhanced early inflammation and a persistent and prolonged hypo-inflammatory phase when compared to WT mice. Unlike WT mice that showed increased SIRT1 expression, we found that SIRT2 levels were increased in ob/ob mice during hypo-inflammation. SIRT-2 inhibition in ob/ob mice during the hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis reversed the repressed microvascular inflammation in vivo via activation of endothelial cells and circulating leukocytes and significantly improved survival. We confirmed the key finding of the role of SIRT2 during hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis in this project in DIO-sepsis mice. Mechanistically, in the sepsis cell model, SIRT-2 expression modulated inflammatory response by deacetylation of NFκBp65. Conclusion SIRT-2 regulates microvascular inflammation in obese mice with sepsis and may

  7. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  8. Intraosseous approach to vascular access in adult resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Rob

    2010-07-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital to maximise resuscitation in critically ill children and adults (LaRocco and Wang 2003), and failure can result in delays in life-saving treatment (Nutbeam and Daniels 2010). The traditional intravenous access method can be difficult to achieve in patients with circulatory collapse (LaRocco and Wang 2003) and failure rates in emergency situations vary between 10 and 40 per cent (Lewis 1986). Other routes, such as endotracheal and intramuscular, do not provide controlled and reliable administration rates (Leidel et al 2009). This article focuses on the increased use of intraosseous (IO) access in adult resuscitation. The IO route is described and the indications and contraindications considered. Common insertion sites and devices of IO access are discussed. PMID:20662405

  9. Vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and blood transfusion in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel; Bhananker, Sanjay; Ramaiah, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    Trauma care in the general population has largely become protocol-driven, with an emphasis on fast and efficient treatment, good team communication at all levels of care including prehospital care, initial resuscitation, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Most available literature on trauma care has focused on adults, allowing the potential to apply concepts from adult care to pediatric care. But there remain issues that will always be specific to pediatric patients that may not translate from adults. Several new devices such as intraosseous (IO) needle systems and techniques such as ultrasonography to cannulate central and peripheral veins have become available for integration into our pre-existing trauma care system for children. This review will focus specifically on the latest techniques and evidence available for establishing intravenous access, rational approaches to fluid resuscitation, and blood product transfusion in the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:23181207

  10. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  11. The ebb and flow of fluid (as in resuscitation).

    PubMed

    Mattox, K L

    2015-04-01

    Since the early 1960's "resuscitation" following major trauma involved use of replacement crystalloid fluid/estimated blood loss in volumes of 3/1, in the ambulance, emergency room, operating room and surgical intensive care unit. During the past 20 years, MAJOR paradigm shifts have occurred in this concept. As a result hypotensive resuscitation with a view towards restriction of crystalloid, and prevention of complications has occurred. Improved results in both civilian and military environments have been reported. As a result there is new focus on trauma surgical involvement in all aspects of trauma patient management, focus on early aggressive surgical approaches (which may or may not involve an operation), and movement from crystalloid to blood, plasma, and platelet replacement therapy.

  12. Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seokhwa; Faraj, Samer; Sims, Henry P

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating in a high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the basis of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the situation. Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was more effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced. Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this article is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by relatively specific situational contingencies.

  13. [Coronary revascularization during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The bridge code].

    PubMed

    Serrano Moraza, A; Del Nogal Sáez, F; Alfonso Manterola, F

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the major current challenges, due to both its high incidence and mortality and the fact that it leads to severe brain dysfunction in over half of the survivors. The so-called coronary origin Bridge Code is presented, based on the international resuscitation recommendations (2005, 2010). In accordance with a series of strict predictive criteria, this code makes it possible to: (1) select refractory CPR patients with a high or very high presumption of underlying coronary cause; (2) evacuate the patient using mechanical chest compressors [LucasTM, Autopulse®], maintaining coronary and brain perfusion pressures; (3) allow coronary revascularization access during resuscitation maneuvering (PTCA during ongoing CPR); (4) induce early hypothermia; and (5) facilitate post-cardiac arrest intensive care. In the case of treatment failure, the quality of hemodynamic support makes it possible to establish a second bridge to non-heart beating organ donation.

  14. Vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and blood transfusion in pediatric trauma

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nathaniel; Bhananker, Sanjay; Ramaiah, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Trauma care in the general population has largely become protocol-driven, with an emphasis on fast and efficient treatment, good team communication at all levels of care including prehospital care, initial resuscitation, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Most available literature on trauma care has focused on adults, allowing the potential to apply concepts from adult care to pediatric care. But there remain issues that will always be specific to pediatric patients that may not translate from adults. Several new devices such as intraosseous (IO) needle systems and techniques such as ultrasonography to cannulate central and peripheral veins have become available for integration into our pre-existing trauma care system for children. This review will focus specifically on the latest techniques and evidence available for establishing intravenous access, rational approaches to fluid resuscitation, and blood product transfusion in the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:23181207

  15. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function.

  16. Cardiorespiratory Monitoring during Neonatal Resuscitation for Direct Feedback and Audit

    PubMed Central

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J.; van Zanten, Henriëtte A.; Schilleman, Kim; Hooper, Stuart B.; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Witlox, Ruben S. G. M.; te Pas, Arjan B.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures, and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, color, and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can not only be used directly to guide care but also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this narrative review, we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation. PMID:27148507

  17. Severe sepsis and septic shock: defining the clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that severe sepsis/septic shock is a major problem in clinical medicine, yet the extent of the problem and its basic immunology remain poorly defined. The generation of accurate statistics about sepsis is confounded by the imprecise and highly variable terminology used to describe sepsis by clinicians around the world. The problem of sepsis is further complicated by the remarkably diverse spectrum of illness encompassed under the term 'sepsis'. Sepsis may range in severity from mild systemic inflammation without significant clinical consequences to multisystem failure in septic shock with an exceedingly high mortality rate. Sepsis connotes a clinical syndrome that may occur in any age group, in markedly different patient populations, and in response to a multitude of microbial pathogens from multiple different anatomical sites within the human body. A concerted effort has been made to standardize definitions of sepsis by the use of international committees and consensus opinions from panels of experts in sepsis research. While consensus definitions of sepsis have proven to be of value, the lack of uniformity in interpretation of these definitions continues to be problematic by clinicians and basic researchers alike. Recently, a new conceptual framework for understanding sepsis has been developed, called the PIRO concept (predisposition, infection, response and organ dysfunction). This has been conceptually modeled from the TNM classification (tumor size, nodal spread, metastases) which has been successfully used in defining treatment and prognostic indicators in clinical oncology. Further refinements in the definitions and predisposing factors of severe sepsis should improve the understanding and management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the near future.

  18. Microcirculatory dysfunction and resuscitation: why, when, and how.

    PubMed

    Moore, J P R; Dyson, A; Singer, M; Fraser, J

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular resuscitation is a cornerstone of critical care practice. Experimental advances have increased our understanding of the role of the microcirculation in shock states and the development of multi-organ failure. Strategies that target the microcirculation in such conditions, while theoretically appealing, have not yet been shown to impact upon clinical outcomes. This review outlines the current understanding of microcirculatory dysfunction in septic, cardiogenic, and hypovolaemic shock and outlines available treatments and strategies with reference to their effects upon the microcirculation.

  19. Changing staff attitudes towards family-witnessed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wendover, Nicole

    2012-11-01

    The benefits of family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) have been described in research, yet many healthcare professionals express reservations about the practice. This article considers the attitudes of staff, relatives and patients towards FWR, and the reasons why the practice is not implemented routinely in emergency departments. It also describes elements of best practice in FWR, including the development of guidelines, provision of staff training programmes and support for families.

  20. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  1. Adrenaline and amiodarone dosages in resuscitation: rectifying misinformation.

    PubMed

    Botha, Martin; Wells, Mike; Dickerson, Roger; Wallis, Lee; Stander, Melanie

    2013-10-01

    Despite the recognition of specialists in emergency medicine and the professionalisation of prehospital emergency care, international guidelines and consensus are often ignored, and the lag between guideline publication and translation into clinical practice is protracted. South African literature should reflect the latest evidence to guide resuscitation and safe patient care. This article addresses erroneous details regarding life-saving interventions in the South African Medicines Formulary, 10th edition. 

  2. Does witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation alter perceived stress in accident and emergency staff?

    PubMed

    Boyd, R; White, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain if the presence of patients' relatives during cardiopulmonary resuscitation altered perceived symptoms of stress in accident and emergency personnel participating in resuscitation attempts. An anonymous structured questionnaire survey of all accident and emergency staff participating in non-traumatic adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation was designed to elicit symptoms of an acute stress reaction within 24 hours based on ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. One hundred and fourteen staff replies were received, a reply rate of 89%. Twenty-five replies had two or more symptoms of an acute stress reaction. The grade or role of the staff member had no influence on the presence of stress symptoms. There was no difference in rates of reporting between staff resuscitating in the presence or absence of relatives. It is concluded that the presence of relatives witnessing resuscitation attempts does not affect self-reported stress symptoms in staff participating in resuscitation attempts.

  3. Fluid resuscitation management in patients with burns: update.

    PubMed

    Guilabert, P; Usúa, G; Martín, N; Abarca, L; Barret, J P; Colomina, M J

    2016-09-01

    Since 1968, when Baxter and Shires developed the Parkland formula, little progress has been made in the field of fluid therapy for burn resuscitation, despite advances in haemodynamic monitoring, establishment of the 'goal-directed therapy' concept, and the development of new colloid and crystalloid solutions. Burn patients receive a larger amount of fluids in the first hours than any other trauma patients. Initial resuscitation is based on crystalloids because of the increased capillary permeability occurring during the first 24 h. After that time, some colloids, but not all, are accepted. Since the emergence of the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee alert from the European Medicines Agency concerning hydroxyethyl starches, solutions containing this component are not recommended for burns. But the question is: what do we really know about fluid resuscitation in burns? To provide an answer, we carried out a non-systematic review to clarify how to quantify the amount of fluids needed, what the current evidence says about the available solutions, and which solution is the most appropriate for burn patients based on the available knowledge. PMID:27543523

  4. [Complicated but successful resuscitation after amniotic fluid embolism].

    PubMed

    Bouman, E A; Gutiérrez y Leon, J A; van der Salm, P C; Christiaens, G C; Bruinse, H W; Broeders, I A

    2001-04-14

    A 33-year-old woman, gravida IV, para III with unexplained polyhydramnios was admitted to give birth at 29 weeks of pregnancy. Directly after the spontaneous breaking of the membranes, asystolia occurred. Following emergency resuscitation the sinus rhythm returned. Upon the relaparotomy due to a large filling requirement and increasing abdomen size, 'crush' lesions to the spleen and liver were visible; following this a splenectomy was carried out and tampons applied to the liver. After seven months the patient had slight residual symptoms; three weeks after his birth her son was transferred in good condition to another hospital. Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare complication of pregnancy with often serious complications for mother and child. The diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms of cardiac arrest or sudden profound shock, acute respiratory failure, and/or disseminated intravascular coagulation, occurring in most cases during or soon after delivery, in the absence of an alternative cause (in particular primary cardiopulmonary causes). If the clinical picture deviates from the expected post-resuscitation course alternative diagnoses or resuscitation injuries must be considered.

  5. Glucocorticoids as an emerging pharmacologic agent for cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Stefaniotou, Antonia; Varvaroussis, Dimitrios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although cardiac arrest (CA) constitutes a major health problem with dismal prognosis, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge. CA causes adrenal insufficiency which is associated with poor outcome and increased mortality. Adrenal insufficiency may manifest as an inability to increase cortisol secretion during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Several studies suggest that glucocorticoids during and after CPR seem to confer benefits with respect to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rates and long term survival. They have beneficial hemodynamic effects that may favor their use during CPR and in the early post-resuscitation period. Moreover, they have anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that improve organ function by reducing ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, glucocorticoid supplementation has shown conflicting results with regard to survival to hospital discharge and neurological outcome. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during CPR. Furthermore, this article reviews the effects of glucocorticoids use during CRP and the post-resuscitation phase.

  6. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    PubMed

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  7. Ethical and legal considerations in video recording neonatal resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, B; Barfield, C; Watkins, A

    2009-02-01

    As guidelines for neonatal resuscitation evolve from a growing evidence base, clinicians must ensure that practice is closely aligned with the available evidence, based on methodologically sound and ethically conducted research. This paper reviews ethical, legal and risk-management issues arising during the design of a quality-assurance project to make video recordings of neonatal resuscitations after high-risk deliveries. The issues, which affect patients, researchers, staff and the hospital at large, include the following: 1) Informed consent for research involving emergency procedures is often not possible, for lack of time to provide sufficient information. The mental capacity of the subject or parent may be compromised by the impending emergency, and freedom of choice is threatened by the time pressure to consent. 2) Video recording of the inevitable medical errors raises issues of whether participating staff may be identifiable and accountable, affecting their willingness to participate in such research. The approach to staff participation and identification is reviewed. 3) The use of video data for education threatens the privacy of research subjects. The ethics of maintaining privacy is balanced with the ethics of using the data to improve practice of resuscitation. 4) The research subjects (patients, or the staff whose performance is being monitored) must be defined. 5) There are legal and ethical aspects of management and ownership of data. 6) The role of the Human Research Ethics Committee in protecting the research subject and possibly the medicolegal interests of the hospital is discussed. This paper reviews the literature and discusses the issues.

  8. The origins of bioethics: advances in resuscitations techniques.

    PubMed

    Niebroj, L

    2008-12-01

    During the last years there has been an increasing interest in meta-bioethical issues. This turn in the research focus is regarded as a sign of the maturation of bioethics as a distinct area of an academic inquiry. The role of historic-philosophical reflection is often emphasized. It should be noted that there is a rather common agreement that the future of bioethics lies in the critical reflection on its past, in particular, on the very origins of this discipline. Sharing Caplan's opinion, advances in medicine technologies, especially the introduction of respirators and artificial heart machines, is considered as one of the main issues that started bioethics. Using methods of historical as well as meta-ethical research, this article aims at describing the role of advances in resuscitation techniques in the emergence of bioethics and at exploring how bioethical reflection has been shaped by technological developments. A brief historical analysis permits to say that there is a close bond between the emergence of bioethics and the introduction of sophisticated resuscitation technologies into medical practice. The meta-ethical reflection reveals that advances in resuscitation techniques not only initiated bioethics in the second half of the 20(th) century but influenced its evolution by (i) posing a question of justice in health care, (ii) altering commonly accepted ontological notions of human corporeality, and (iii) reconsidering the very purpose of medicine.

  9. [New guidelines on resuscitation in adults: What has changed?].

    PubMed

    Klein, Hermann H

    2016-03-01

    In October 2015, new guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were published, which represent a revision of the guidelines 2010. The new recommendations are based on an update of knowledge on resuscitation, which was evaluated for the first time by GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). The key messages of the guidelines 2010 were retained in 2015. Adult basic life support consists of a sequence of 30 chest compressions at a rate of 100-120/min with a depth of 5 to maximally 6 cm and 2 ventilations. As soon as possible, an automated external defibrillator (AED) should be applied. Interruptions of chest compressions should be minimized. To improve bystander CPR emergency medical dispatchers should diagnose cardiac arrest when informed about unconscious persons not breathing normally. In this case, emergency medical staff should inform bystanders to resuscitate with compression only CPR until the arrival of an emergency team. In postresuscitation care, mild hypothermia (body temperature 32-34 °C) has been replaced by targeted temperature management in unconscious patients. Now, the guidelines recommend a constant body temperature between 32-36 °C for at least 24 h. Fever should be prevented or treated. PMID:26754534

  10. As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P N; Williamson, S; Lawler, P G

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and accuracy with which cardiopulmonary resuscitation is portrayed in British television medical dramas. Design: Observational study. Subjects: 64 episodes of three major British television medical dramas: Casualty, Cardiac Arrest, and Medics. Main outcome measures: Frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation shown on television; age, sex, and diagnosis of the patients undergoing resuscitation; rate of survival through resuscitation. Results: Overall 52 patients had a cardiorespiratory arrest on screen and 3 had a respiratory arrest alone, all the arrests occurring in 40 of the 64 episodes. Of the 52 patients having cardiorespiratory arrest, 32 (62%) underwent an attempt at cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 8 attempts were successful. All 3 of the patients having respiratory arrests alone received ventilatory support and survived. On 48% of occasions, victims of cardiac arrest seemed to be less than 35 years old. Conclusions: Cardiorespiratory resuscitation is often depicted in British television medical dramas. Patients portrayed receiving resuscitation are likely to be in a younger age group than in real life. Though the reasons for resuscitation are more varied and more often associated with trauma than in reality, the overall success rate is nevertheless realistic. Widespread overoptimism of patients for survival after resuscitation cannot necessarily be blamed on British television medical dramas. Key messagesA quarter of patients in British television medical dramas who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation on screen seemed to surviveThis figure is comparable to initial survival rates in a series of patients in real lifePatients on television are more likely to suffer cardiac arrest as a result of trauma than in real life, and patients undergoing resuscitation are likely to be younger than patients in real lifeThe overall survival rate of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical drama seems

  11. Sepsis in the severely immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Opal, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    The prevention and treatment of sepsis in the immunocompromised host present a challenging array of diagnostic and management issues. The neutropenic patient has a primary defect in innate immune responses and is susceptible to conventional and opportunistic pathogens. The solid organ transplant patient has a primary defect in adaptive immunity and is susceptible to a myriad of pathogens that require an effective cellular immune response. Risk for infections in organ transplant recipients is further complicated by mechanical, vascular, and rejection of the transplanted organ itself. The immune suppressed state can modify the cardinal signs of inflammation, making accurate and rapid diagnosis of infection and sepsis difficult. Empiric antimicrobial agents can be lifesaving in these patients, but managing therapy in an era of progressive antibiotic resistance has become a real issue. This review discusses the challenges faced when treating severe infections in these high-risk patients.

  12. Sepsis in the severely immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Opal, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    The prevention and treatment of sepsis in the immunocompromised host present a challenging array of diagnostic and management issues. The neutropenic patient has a primary defect in innate immune responses and is susceptible to conventional and opportunistic pathogens. The solid organ transplant patient has a primary defect in adaptive immunity and is susceptible to a myriad of pathogens that require an effective cellular immune response. Risk for infections in organ transplant recipients is further complicated by mechanical, vascular, and rejection of the transplanted organ itself. The immune suppressed state can modify the cardinal signs of inflammation, making accurate and rapid diagnosis of infection and sepsis difficult. Empiric antimicrobial agents can be lifesaving in these patients, but managing therapy in an era of progressive antibiotic resistance has become a real issue. This review discusses the challenges faced when treating severe infections in these high-risk patients. PMID:25939918

  13. Carbon monoxide in the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-12-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low-molecular-weight gas, is endogenously produced in the body as a product of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. As the beneficial roles of HO system have been elucidated in vitro and in vivo, CO itself has also been reported as a potent cytoprotective molecule. Whereas CO represents a toxic inhalation hazard at high concentration, low-dose exogenous CO treatment (~250-500 parts per million) demonstrates protective functions including but not limited to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects in preclinical models of human diseases. Of note, CO exposure confers protection in animal models of sepsis by inhibiting inflammatory responses and also enhancing bacterial phagocytosis in leukocytes. These unique functions of CO including both dampening inflammation and promoting host defense mechanism are mediated by multiple pathways such as autophagy induction or biosynthesis of specialized proresolving lipid mediators. We suggest that CO gas may represent a novel therapy for patients with sepsis.

  14. Haemophilus influenzae sepsis resulting from pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marinella, M A

    1997-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a pleomorphic gram-negative bacterium that causes a myriad of infections in both adults and children. The organism frequently causes respiratory infections in patients with obstructive lung disease but may on occasion cause invasive infections including pneumonia with bacteremia. We report the case of a patient with underlying lung disease and metastatic malignancy in whom sepsis related to pneumonia caused by H. influenzae developed.

  15. Relatives in the resuscitation room: a review of benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Clift, Louise

    2006-06-01

    In the rare circumstance when a child is resuscitated there is great debate over whether to allow parents and relatives to remain present. Research reveals both positive and negative family responses to witnessing a resuscitation attempt and the rights and needs of the child/young person must be considered. Staff are generally positive about the benefits of witnessed resuscitation but report a lack of knowledge and skills in supporting the presence of relatives. Scenarios used in resuscitation training need to include the presence of family members and local policies should be developed based on the available evidence.

  16. Induction of CYP2E1 in liver, kidney, brain and intestine during chronic ethanol administration and withdrawal: evidence that CYP2E1 possesses a rapid phase half-life of 6 hours or less.

    PubMed

    Roberts, B J; Shoaf, S E; Jeong, K S; Song, B J

    1994-12-15

    Controversy exists as to whether the induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol occurs via increased protein synthesis or protein stabilization. To address these issues in vivo, we chronically administered ethanol to rats and determined levels of immunoreactive CYP2E1 in liver, kidney, brain and upper gastro-intestinal tract (GI). Our data shows that chronic ethanol administration induces hepatic (5-6-fold over pair-fed controls) and extra-hepatic CYP2E1, an effect which is strikingly absent 12 hours after ethanol withdrawal. No changes in CYP2E1 mRNA were observed at any time, suggesting these changes are mainly post-translational at a blood ethanol concentration of 0.15% w/v. Our experimental data indicates that CYP2E1 possesses a half-life of 6 hours or less in the liver and is rapidly degraded following the removal of ethanol. This pattern of CYP2E1 turnover was also observed in other tissues, suggestive of a similar mode of regulation.

  17. Combination of low-dose gemcitabine in 6-hour infusion and carboplatin is a favorable option for patients in poor performance status with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Yong; Guan, Hui-Hong; Lin, Ze-Xiao; Yang, Hong-Kai; Zhou, Lan; Cai, Qi-Chun

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of the regimen of low-dose gemcitabine combined with carboplatin in chemo-naïve patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study involved 37 chemo-naive patients with unresectable stage IIIB or stage IV NSCLC. The predominant histological type was squamous carcinoma (22/37), and the performance status (PS) was 2 in 23 patients (62%). All received gemcitabine, 250 mg/m(2) in 6-hour infusion on days 1 and 8 plus carboplatin area under the curve (AUC)  =  5 on day 1, every 28 days. The overall response rate (ORR) was 62·2% and disease stabilization was achieved in 21·6% of the patients. After a median follow-up duration of 13 months, the median overall survival (OS) time was 14·0 months (95% CI 13·3-16·6 months), and the median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 7·0 months (95% CI 6·1-8·9 months). Hematological toxicities were well-tolerated with the development of grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 10·3 and 10·3% of patients respectively, and the gastrointestinal toxicities were mild.

  18. Neonatal Resuscitation Program and Pediatric Advanced Life Support.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, C

    1995-05-01

    The need for delivery resuscitation of the newborn cannot be predicted in most cases; therefore it is judicious to train all providers who may be involved in the delivery of newborns to follow guidelines developed to improve outcome, especially in the presence of transitional asphyxia. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program emphasizes basic steps of warming, drying, suctioning, and adequately ventilating the newborn. It also addresses current theories regarding resuscitation of the low birthweight newborns, infants with meconium aspiration, and medication use. The NRP applies to all acute-care hospitals that provide delivery services and those at which a respiratory therapist is likely to be present in the high-risk delivery or unanticipated delivery-room resuscitation. Outcomes have not been well documented and more clinical research is needed to identify which therapeutic strategies promote the best survival in this population. A topic that should be included in the NRP of the future is exogenous surfactant delivery. Respiratory distress syndrome has been a significant cause of death and morbidity in prematurely born neonates. Exogenous surfactant therapy has had a dramatic effect on the death rate of premature infants and on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome. Current methods of surfactant administration demand that personnel proficient in management of the low birthweight newborn be present. As hospitals with all levels of nurseries continue to receive the prematurely delivered newborn and better methods to administer surfactant are discovered, the NRP could add information and a skills laboratory on surfactant administration. A trained cadre of health professionals who are proficient in the specific resuscitation skills required in pediatric patients can make a difference. The infant and child have different anatomy, physiology, and disease etiology that need to be emphasized and understood by the pediatric caregiver. The Pediatric Advanced Life

  19. THE EPITHELIUM AS A TARGET IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Fink, Mitchell; Goldstein, Stuart L; Opal, Steven; Gómez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Gómez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2016-03-01

    Organ dysfunction induced by sepsis has been consistently associated with worse outcome and death. Regardless of the organ compromised, epithelial dysfunction is present throughout the body, affecting those organs that contain epithelia like the skin, lungs, liver, gut, and kidneys. Despite their obvious differences, sepsis seems to alter common features of all epithelia, such as barrier function and vectorial ion transport. Such alterations in the lung, the gut, and the kidney have direct implications that may explain the profound organ functional impairments in the absence of overt cell death. Epithelial injury in this context is not only an explanatory real pathophysiologic event, but also represents a source of biomarkers that have been explored to identify organ compromise earlier, predict outcome, and even to test novel therapeutic interventions such as blood purification. However, this remains largely experimental, and despite promising results, work is still required to better understand the response of the epithelial cells to sepsis, to define their role in adaptation to insults, to comprehend the interorgan cross-talk that occurs in these circumstances, and to exploit these aspects in pursuit of targeted therapies like blood purification, which may improve outcome for these patients in the future. PMID:26863125

  20. Reduction in maternal mortality due to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Kaipa, A; Kakani, A

    2005-02-01

    The present study was undertaken at a rural medical institute in India to analyse the trends in maternal mortality due to sepsis and the factors associated with change, if any. During the study period of 20 years, a total of 37,155 women delivered, 192 deaths occurred and forty deaths (20.83%) were due to sepsis and it's sequlae. It was revealed that there is a definite decrease in the proportion of deaths due to sepsis, to 10% in the last five years from 35% in earlier years. The change seems to be due to the advocacy of clean deliveries and reduction in case fatality because of alterations in medication and earlier surgical intervention. However the percentage contribution of septic abortion has remained the same. Septic abortion continues to exist inspite of all the current laws and discussion about the availability of a liberal law, which permits abortion almost on request. Most of the women who had died due to septic abortion were married (65%). Deaths due to septic abortion, are persisting even in married women and it is a matter of concern for health providers, policy makers and governments. PMID:15814392

  1. Sepsis and Meningitis due to Listeria Monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Aygen, Bilgehan; Esel, Duygu; Kayabas, Uner; Alp, Emine; Sumerkan, Bulent; Doganay, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study focused on the effect of immuno-compromising conditions on the clinical presentation of severe listerial infection. Patients and Methods Nine human listeriosis cases seen from 1991-2002 were reviewed. All adult patients, from whose blood, peritoneal fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) the L. monocytogenes was isolated, were included in this retrospective study. Results Listeriosis presented as primary sepsis with positive blood cultures in 5 cases and meningitis with positive CSF cultures in 4 cases. All of these patients had at least one underlying disease, most commonly, hematologic malignancy, diabetes mellitus, amyloidosis and hepatic cirrhosis; 55.6% had received immunosuppressive or corticosteroid therapy within a week before the onset of listeriosis. The patients were adults with a mean age of 60 years. Fever, night sweats, chills and lethargy were the most common symptoms; high temperature (> 38℃), tachycardia, meningeal signs and poor conditions in general were the most common findings on admission. The mortality rate was 33.3% and was strictly associated with the severity of the underlying disease. Mortality differences were significant between sepsis (20%) and meningitis (50%) patients. Conclusion Listeriosis as an uncommon infection in our region and that immuno-suppressive therapy is an important pre-disposing factor of listeriosis. Sepsis and meningitis were more common in this group of patients and had the highest case-fatality rate for food-borne illnesses. PMID:17594151

  2. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways. PMID:25590524

  3. Resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf) from Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T) promotes growth and resuscitates non-dividing cells.

    PubMed

    Dewi Puspita, Indun; Uehara, Moe; Katayama, Taiki; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Asano, Kozo; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Tanaka, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    Functional variation of Rpf, a growth factor found exclusively in Actinobacteria, is differentiated by its source and amino acid sequences. Only purified Rpf proteins from three species have been studied so far. To seek new Rpfs for use in future studies to understand their role in Actinobacteria, the objective of this study was to identify rpf gene homologs in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), a novel Actinobacteria isolated from permafrost ice wedge. Amplification using degenerate primers targeting the essential Rpf domain led to the discovery of a new rpf gene in T. biformata. Gene structure and the deduced Rpf domain amino acid sequence indicated that this rpf gene was not identical to previously studied Rpf. Phylogenetic analysis placed T. biformata Rpf in a monophyletic branch in the RpfB subfamily. The deduced amino acid sequence was 44.9% identical to RpfB in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the closest functionally tested Rpf. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli; the recombinant Rpf protein (rRpf) promoted the growth of dividing cells and resuscitated non-dividing cells of T. biformata. Compared to other studies, this Rpf was required at higher concentrations to promote its growth and to resuscitate itself from a non-dividing state. The resuscitation function was likely due to the highly conserved Rpf domain. This study provides evidence that a genetically unique but functional Rpf can be found in novel members of Actinobacteria and can lead to a better understanding of bacterial cytokines in this phylum.

  4. The pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model: potential implications for sepsis therapy and biology.

    PubMed

    Alder, Matthew N; Lindsell, Christopher J; Wong, Hector R

    2014-07-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adult and pediatric intensive care units. Heterogeneity of demographics, comorbidities, biological mechanisms, and severity of illness leads to difficulty in determining which patients are at highest risk of mortality. Determining mortality risk is important for weighing the potential benefits of more aggressive interventions and for deciding whom to enroll in clinical trials. Biomarkers can be used to parse patients into different risk categories and can outperform current methods of patient risk stratification based on physiologic parameters. Here we review the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model that has also been modified and applied to estimate mortality risk in adult patients. We compare the two models and speculate on the biological implications of the biomarkers in patients with sepsis.

  5. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  6. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  7. Factor v Leiden mutation in severe infection and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Schouten, Marcel; van't Veer, Cees; van der Poll, Tom

    2011-11-01

    In severe infection and sepsis, activation of coagulation frequently occurs, which contributes to the development of multiple organ dysfunction. Factor V Leiden is a relatively common mutation resulting in a mild prohemostatic state and consequently with an increased tendency to develop thrombosis. Hypothetically, patients with factor V Leiden may suffer from more severe coagulopathy in cases of severe infection or sepsis. Aggravation of the procoagulant state in sepsis may subsequently result in more severe organ dysfunction and an increased risk of death. In this article we review the experimental and clinical evidence regarding the relationship between the presence of a factor V Leiden mutation and the incidence and outcome of sepsis.

  8. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guilang; Lyu, Juanjuan; Huang, Jingda; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1) Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2) drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3) drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4) hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials. PMID:25983774

  9. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Young; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2016-04-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  10. Erythropoietin improves skeletal muscle microcirculation and tissue bioenergetics in a mouse sepsis model

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Raymond; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Rui, Tao; Yu, Pei; Huang, Weixiong; Rose, James; Martin, Claudio M

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The relationship between oxygen delivery and consumption in sepsis is impaired, suggesting a microcirculatory perfusion defect. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) regulates erythropoiesis and also exerts complex actions promoting the maintenance of homeostasis of the organism under stress. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that rHuEPO could improve skeletal muscle capillary perfusion and tissue oxygenation in sepsis. Methods Septic mice in three experiments received rHu-EPO 400 U/kg subcutaneously 18 hours after cecal ligation and perforation (CLP). The first experiment measured the acute effects of rHuEPO on hemodynamics, blood counts, and arterial lactate level. The next two sets of experiments used intravital microscopy to observe capillary perfusion and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence post-CLP after treatment with rHuEPO every 10 minutes for 40 minutes and at 6 hours. Perfused capillary density during a three-minute observation period and NADH fluorescence were measured. Results rHuEPO did not have any effects on blood pressure, lactate level, or blood cell numbers. CLP mice demonstrated a 22% decrease in perfused capillary density compared to the sham group (28.5 versus 36.6 capillaries per millimeter; p < 0.001). Treatment of CLP mice with rHuEPO resulted in an immediate and significant increase in perfused capillaries in the CLP group at all time points compared to baseline from 28.5 to 33.6 capillaries per millimeter at 40 minutes; p < 0.001. A significant increase in baseline NADH, suggesting tissue hypoxia, was noted in the CLP mice compared to the sham group (48.3 versus 43.9 fluorescence units [FU]; p = 0.03) and improved with rHuEPO from 48.3 to 44.4 FU at 40 minutes (p = 0.02). Six hours after treatment with rHuEPO, CLP mice demonstrated a higher mean perfused capillary density (39.4 versus 31.7 capillaries per millimeter; p < 0.001) and a lower mean NADH fluorescence as compared to CLP

  11. Different regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 expression on blood CD14+ monocytes by simvastatin in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huanzhang; Wang, Cunzhen; Zhu, Wenliang; Huang, Xiaopei; Guo, Zhisong; Zhang, Huifeng; Qin, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) surface expression levels on blood CD14+ monocytes by simvastatin treatment in patient with sepsis is different from that in patients with severe sepsis. In patients with sepsis simvastatin treatment statistically significantly decreased TLR4 surface expression level on blood CD14+ monocytes, while in patients with severe sepsis simvastatin treatment had no significant influence on TLR4 surface expression level on blood CD14+ monocytes. The changes of plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced by simvastatin in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis were similar with that of TLR4. Our results indicated simvastatin treatment differently influenced inflammation process in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis, which might partially explain the discrepancy, presented by previous trials, about the therapeutic effects of simvastatin treatment in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis. PMID:26550333

  12. Immunomodulatory and Antimicrobial Activity of Babassu Mesocarp Improves the Survival in Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Dayanna S.; Barcellos, Priscila S.; Gonçalves, Azizedite G.

    2016-01-01

    Attalea speciosa syn Orbignya phalerata Mart. (babassu) has been used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Aim of the study. To investigate the antimicrobial and immunological activity of babassu mesocarp extract (EE). Material and Methods. The in vitro antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disk diffusion assay and by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The flavonoids and phenolic acids content were determined by chromatography. The in vivo assays were performed in Swiss mice submitted to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice received EE subcutaneously (125 or 250 mg/Kg), 6 hours after the CLP. The number of lymphoid cells was quantified and the cytokines production was determined by ELISA after 12 h. Results. EE was effective as antimicrobial to E. faecalis, S. aureus, and MRSA. EE is rich in phenolic acids, a class of compounds with antimicrobial and immunological activity. An increased survival can be observed in those groups, possibly due to a significant inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6. Conclusions. The EE showed specific antimicrobial activity in vitro and an important antiseptic effect in vivo possibly due to the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity.

  13. Immunomodulatory and Antimicrobial Activity of Babassu Mesocarp Improves the Survival in Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Dayanna S.; Barcellos, Priscila S.; Gonçalves, Azizedite G.

    2016-01-01

    Attalea speciosa syn Orbignya phalerata Mart. (babassu) has been used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Aim of the study. To investigate the antimicrobial and immunological activity of babassu mesocarp extract (EE). Material and Methods. The in vitro antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disk diffusion assay and by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The flavonoids and phenolic acids content were determined by chromatography. The in vivo assays were performed in Swiss mice submitted to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice received EE subcutaneously (125 or 250 mg/Kg), 6 hours after the CLP. The number of lymphoid cells was quantified and the cytokines production was determined by ELISA after 12 h. Results. EE was effective as antimicrobial to E. faecalis, S. aureus, and MRSA. EE is rich in phenolic acids, a class of compounds with antimicrobial and immunological activity. An increased survival can be observed in those groups, possibly due to a significant inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6. Conclusions. The EE showed specific antimicrobial activity in vitro and an important antiseptic effect in vivo possibly due to the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity. PMID:27630733

  14. Immunomodulatory and Antimicrobial Activity of Babassu Mesocarp Improves the Survival in Lethal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Barroqueiro, Elizabeth S B; Prado, Dayanna S; Barcellos, Priscila S; Silva, Tonicley A; Pereira, Wanderson S; Silva, Lucilene A; Maciel, Márcia C G; Barroqueiro, Rodrigo B; Nascimento, Flávia R F; Gonçalves, Azizedite G; Guerra, Rosane N M

    2016-01-01

    Attalea speciosa syn Orbignya phalerata Mart. (babassu) has been used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Aim of the study. To investigate the antimicrobial and immunological activity of babassu mesocarp extract (EE). Material and Methods. The in vitro antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disk diffusion assay and by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The flavonoids and phenolic acids content were determined by chromatography. The in vivo assays were performed in Swiss mice submitted to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice received EE subcutaneously (125 or 250 mg/Kg), 6 hours after the CLP. The number of lymphoid cells was quantified and the cytokines production was determined by ELISA after 12 h. Results. EE was effective as antimicrobial to E. faecalis, S. aureus, and MRSA. EE is rich in phenolic acids, a class of compounds with antimicrobial and immunological activity. An increased survival can be observed in those groups, possibly due to a significant inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6. Conclusions. The EE showed specific antimicrobial activity in vitro and an important antiseptic effect in vivo possibly due to the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity. PMID:27630733

  15. Oral and Enteral Resuscitation of Burn Shock The Historical Record and Implications for Mass Casualty Care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, George C.; Michell, Michael W.; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H.; Herndon, David; Baker, R. David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10–40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in “peripheral circulatory collapse”. The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  16. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Logistic constraints on combat casualty care preclude traditional resuscitation strategies which can require volumes and weights 3 fold or greater than hemorrhaged volume. We present a review of quantitative analyses of clinical and animal data on small volume strategies using 1) hypertonic-hyperosmotic solutions (HHS); 2) hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and 3) closed-loop infusion regimens.Methods and Results: Literature searches and recent queries to industry and academic researchers have allowed us to evaluate the record of 81 human HHS studies (12 trauma trials), 19 human HBOCs studies (3trauma trials) and two clinical studies of closed-loop resuscitation.There are several hundreds animal studies and at least 82 clinical trials and reports evaluating small volume7.2%-7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) most often combined with colloids, e.g., dextran (HSD) or hetastarch(HSS). HSD and HSS data has been published for 1,108 and 392 patients, respectively. Human studies have documented volume sparing and hemodynamic improvements. Meta-analyses suggest improved survival for hypotensive trauma patients treated with HSD with significant reductions in mortality found for patients with blood pressure < 70 mmHg, head trauma, and penetrating injury requiring surgery. HSD and HSS have received regulatory approval in 14 and 3 countries, respectively, with 81,000+ units sold. The primary reported use was head injury and trauma resuscitation. Complications and reported adverse events are surprisingly rare and not significantly different from other solutions.HBOCs are potent volume expanders in addition to oxygen carriers with volume expansion greater than standard colloids. Several investigators have evaluated small volume hyperoncotic HBOCs or HS-HBOC formulations for hypotensive and normotensive resuscitation in animals. A consistent finding in resuscitation with HBOCs is depressed cardiac output. There is some evidence that HBOCs more efficiently unload

  17. Fertility after two doses of PGF2α concurrently or at 6-hour interval on the day of CIDR removal in 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocols in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie S; Kasimanickam, Ramanathan K; Kasimanickam, Vanmathy R

    2016-08-01

    Timed artificial insemination protocols in beef cattle are designed to synchronize ovulation in a greater proportion of females while simultaneously achieving acceptable pregnancy rates and a concise calving season. Protocols achieving such goals reduce time and labor associated with estrus detection and make advanced reproductive technologies implementable for beef producers. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of three different PGF2α (PGF) dosage schemes on artificial insemination (AI) pregnancy rates in beef heifers. We hypothesized that two doses of PGF administered concurrently at the time of controlled internal drug release (CIDR) removal would attain similar pregnancy rates compared with two doses given 6-hours apart-one at CIDR removal and the next 6 hours later in the 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocol. Angus heifers (n = 875) at six locations in Washington, Idaho, and Oregon states were included in this study. Heifers within locations were assigned a body condition score (BCS). All heifers received a CIDR (1.38 g of progesterone) and 100 μg IM of GnRH on Day 0. The CIDRs were removed on Day 5, heifers were randomly allocated to one of three protocol groups: 1PGF (n = 291), received 25 mg IM of dinoprost (PGF); 2CO-PGF (n = 291), received 50 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal, 2PGF (n = 293), received 25 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal, and an additional 25 mg IM of dinoprost 6 hours later. Each heifer was given GnRH (100 μg, IM) and artificially inseminated at 56 hours after CIDR removal. Heifers were examined for pregnancy status between 50 and 70 days after AI to determine time of conception. A mixed-model procedure (PROC GLIMMIX of SAS) was used to evaluate the effect of treatments (1PGF, 2CO-PGF, and 2PGF) on AI pregnancy rates. Models included were treatments, BCS categories (≤5 and >5), and treatment by BCS category interaction. Location (state), handling facilities, handlers

  18. Fertility after two doses of PGF2α concurrently or at 6-hour interval on the day of CIDR removal in 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocols in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie S; Kasimanickam, Ramanathan K; Kasimanickam, Vanmathy R

    2016-08-01

    Timed artificial insemination protocols in beef cattle are designed to synchronize ovulation in a greater proportion of females while simultaneously achieving acceptable pregnancy rates and a concise calving season. Protocols achieving such goals reduce time and labor associated with estrus detection and make advanced reproductive technologies implementable for beef producers. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of three different PGF2α (PGF) dosage schemes on artificial insemination (AI) pregnancy rates in beef heifers. We hypothesized that two doses of PGF administered concurrently at the time of controlled internal drug release (CIDR) removal would attain similar pregnancy rates compared with two doses given 6-hours apart-one at CIDR removal and the next 6 hours later in the 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocol. Angus heifers (n = 875) at six locations in Washington, Idaho, and Oregon states were included in this study. Heifers within locations were assigned a body condition score (BCS). All heifers received a CIDR (1.38 g of progesterone) and 100 μg IM of GnRH on Day 0. The CIDRs were removed on Day 5, heifers were randomly allocated to one of three protocol groups: 1PGF (n = 291), received 25 mg IM of dinoprost (PGF); 2CO-PGF (n = 291), received 50 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal, 2PGF (n = 293), received 25 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal, and an additional 25 mg IM of dinoprost 6 hours later. Each heifer was given GnRH (100 μg, IM) and artificially inseminated at 56 hours after CIDR removal. Heifers were examined for pregnancy status between 50 and 70 days after AI to determine time of conception. A mixed-model procedure (PROC GLIMMIX of SAS) was used to evaluate the effect of treatments (1PGF, 2CO-PGF, and 2PGF) on AI pregnancy rates. Models included were treatments, BCS categories (≤5 and >5), and treatment by BCS category interaction. Location (state), handling facilities, handlers

  19. Attitudes and perceptions of the general Malaysian public regarding family presence during resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Keng Sheng; Ghani, Zuhailah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Family presence (FP) during resuscitation is an increasingly favoured trend, as it affords many benefits to the critically ill patient’s family members. However, a previously conducted study showed that only 15.8% of surveyed Malaysian healthcare staff supported FP during resuscitation. METHODS This cross-sectional study used a bilingual self-administered questionnaire to examine the attitudes and perceptions of the general Malaysian public toward the presence of family members during resuscitation of their loved ones. The questionnaires were randomly distributed to Malaysians in three different states and in the federal territory of Kuala Lumpur. RESULTS Out of a total of 190 survey forms distributed, 184 responses were included for analysis. Of the 184 respondents, 140 (76.1%) indicated that they favoured FP during resuscitation. The most common reason cited was that FP during resuscitation provides family members with the assurance that everything possible had been done for their loved ones (n = 157, 85.3%). Respondents who had terminal illnesses were more likely to favour FP during resuscitation than those who did not, and this was statistically significant (95.0% vs. 73.8%; p = 0.04). CONCLUSION FP during resuscitation was favoured by a higher percentage of the general Malaysian public as compared to Malaysian healthcare staff. This could be due to differences in concerns regarding the resuscitation process between members of the public and healthcare staff. PMID:25189307

  20. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  1. New Low Volume Resuscitation Solutions Containing PEG-20k

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Dan; Plant, Valerie; Lindell, Susanne L.; Limkemann, Ashley; Reichstetter, Heather; Aboutanos, Michel; Mangino, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypovolemic shock reduces oxygen delivery and compromises energy dependent cell volume control. Consequent cell swelling compromises microcirculatory flow, which reducing oxygen exchange further. The importance of this mechanism is highlighted by the effectiveness of cell impermeants in low volume resuscitation (LVR) solutions in acute studies. The objective of this study was to assess impermeants in survival models and compare them to commonly used crystalloid solutions. Methods Adult rats were hemorrhaged to a pressure of 30–35 mm Hg, held there until the plasma lactate reached 10 mM, and given an LVR solution (5–10% blood volume) with saline alone (control), saline with various concentrations of Polyethylene glycol-20k (PEG-20k), hextend or albumin. When lactate again reached 10 mM following LVR, full resuscitation was started with crystalloid and red cells. Rats were either euthanized (acute) or allowed to recover (survival). The LVR time, which is the time from the start of the LVR solution until the start of full resuscitation was measured as was survival and diagnostic labs. In some studies, the capillary oncotic reflection coefficient was determined for PEG-20k to determine its relative impermeant and oncotic effects. Results PEG-20k (10%) significantly increased LVR times relative to saline (8 fold), hextend, and albumin. Lower amounts of PEG-20k (5%) were also effective but less so than 10% doses. PEG-20k maintained normal arterial pressure during the low volume state. Survival of a 180 minute LVR time challenge was 0% in saline controls and 100% in rats given PEG-20k as the LVR solution. Surviving rats had normal labs 24 hours later. PEG-20k had an oncotic reflection coefficient of 0.65, which indicates that the molecule is a hybrid cell impermeant with significant oncotic properties. Conclusions PEG-20k based LVR solutions are highly effective for inducing tolerance to the low volume state and for improving survival. PMID:26091310

  2. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  3. Whole blood for hemostatic resuscitation of major bleeding.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Pidcoke, Heather F; Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor; Fisher, Andrew; Jenkins, Donald; Yazer, Mark; Stubbs, James; Murdock, Alan; Sailliol, Anne; Ness, Paul M; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Recent combat experience reignited interest in transfusing whole blood (WB) for patients with life-threatening bleeding. US Army data indicate that WB transfusion is associated with improved or comparable survival compared to resuscitation with blood components. These data complement randomized controlled trials that indicate that platelet (PLT)-containing blood products stored at 4°C have superior hemostatic function, based on reduced bleeding and improved functional measures of hemostasis, compared to PLT-containing blood products at 22°C. WB is rarely available in civilian hospitals and as a result is rarely transfused for patients with hemorrhagic shock. Recent developments suggest that impediments to WB availability can be overcome, specifically the misconceptions that WB must be ABO specific, that WB cannot be leukoreduced and maintain PLTs, and finally that cold storage causes loss of PLT function. Data indicate that the use of low anti-A and anti-B titer group O WB is safe as a universal donor, WB can be leukoreduced with PLT-sparing filters, and WB stored at 4°C retains PLT function during 15 days of storage. The understanding that these perceived barriers are not insurmountable will improve the availability of WB and facilitate its use. In addition, there are logistic and economic advantages of WB-based resuscitation compared to component therapy for hemorrhagic shock. The use of low-titer group O WB stored for up to 15 days at 4°C merits further study to compare its efficacy and safety with current resuscitation approaches for all patients with life-threatening bleeding. PMID:27100756

  4. Dr. William Thornton's views on sleep, dreams, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Paulson, George

    2009-01-01

    William Thornton, MD, was a polymath who designed the Capitol of the U.S. Capital and the Octagon House, present home of the American Institute of Architecture. He was the founding director of the U.S. Patent Office. His collected papers, which are now preserved at the U.S. Library of Congress, though pruned by the wife who lived almost 40 years after him, are extensive and include comments on science, education, slavery, and politics. His views on sleep and dreaming and his concepts of resuscitation are reviewed as the opinions of an educated man early in the nineteenth century.

  5. Review of evidence about family presence during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Sonya A; Strasen, Jessica H

    2014-12-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) has not been implemented consistently as standard practice across health care settings despite the availability of supporting research and recommendations from professional organizations. Health care providers, patients, families, and the public have divergent attitudes about FPDR. Inconsistencies in if, when, and how FPDR is offered can lead to inequities in care. This article presents relevant research on attitudes about FPDR and interventions to help change practice. The authors also share their experience with a project to implement FPDR in a medical intensive care unit.

  6. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  7. A method of automatic control procedures cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Kutsov, M. S.; Trifonov, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study is to present the results of works on creation of methods of automatic control procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A method of automatic control procedure of CPR by evaluating the acoustic data of the dynamics of blood flow in the bifurcation of carotid arteries and the dynamics of air flow in a trachea according to the current guidelines for CPR is presented. Evaluation of the patient is carried out by analyzing the respiratory noise and blood flow in the interspaces between the chest compressions and artificial pulmonary ventilation. The device operation algorithm of automatic control procedures of CPR and its block diagram has been developed.

  8. Dr. William Thornton's views on sleep, dreams, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Paulson, George

    2009-01-01

    William Thornton, MD, was a polymath who designed the Capitol of the U.S. Capital and the Octagon House, present home of the American Institute of Architecture. He was the founding director of the U.S. Patent Office. His collected papers, which are now preserved at the U.S. Library of Congress, though pruned by the wife who lived almost 40 years after him, are extensive and include comments on science, education, slavery, and politics. His views on sleep and dreaming and his concepts of resuscitation are reviewed as the opinions of an educated man early in the nineteenth century. PMID:19160112

  9. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  10. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures. PMID:27699168

  11. Late mortality after sepsis: propensity matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Osterholzer, John J; Langa, Kenneth M; Angus, Derek C; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether late mortality after sepsis is driven predominantly by pre-existing comorbid disease or is the result of sepsis itself. Deign Observational cohort study. Setting US Health and Retirement Study. Participants 960 patients aged ≥65 (1998-2010) with fee-for-service Medicare coverage who were admitted to hospital with sepsis. Patients were matched to 777 adults not currently in hospital, 788 patients admitted with non-sepsis infection, and 504 patients admitted with acute sterile inflammatory conditions. Main outcome measures Late (31 days to two years) mortality and odds of death at various intervals. Results Sepsis was associated with a 22.1% (95% confidence interval 17.5% to 26.7%) absolute increase in late mortality relative to adults not in hospital, a 10.4% (5.4% to 15.4%) absolute increase relative to patients admitted with non-sepsis infection, and a 16.2% (10.2% to 22.2%) absolute increase relative to patients admitted with sterile inflammatory conditions (P<0.001 for each comparison). Mortality remained higher for at least two years relative to adults not in hospital. Conclusions More than one in five patients who survives sepsis has a late death not explained by health status before sepsis. PMID:27189000

  12. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures.

  13. Severe sepsis and septic shock in the elderly: An overview.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Juneja, Deven; Singh, Omender

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing in the older population leading to increased admissions to the intensive care units (ICUs). The elderly are predisposed to sepsis due to co-existing co-morbidities, repeated and prolonged hospitalizations, reduced immunity, functional limitations and above all due to the effects of aging itself. A lower threshold and a higher index of suspicion is required to diagnose sepsis in this patient population because the initial clinical picture may be ambiguous, and aging increases the risk of a sudden deterioration in sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Management is largely based on standard international guidelines with a few modifications. Age itself is an independent risk factor for death in patients with severe sepsis, however, many patients respond well to timely and appropriate interventions. The treatment should not be limited or deferred in elderly patients with severe sepsis only on the grounds of physician prejudice, but patient and family preferences should also be taken into account as the outcomes are not dismal. Future investigations in the management of sepsis should not only target good functional recovery but also ensure social independence and quality of life after ICU discharge. PMID:24701398

  14. Effects of family-witnessed resuscitation after trauma prior to hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Leske, Jane S; Brasel, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to the examine the effects of family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) in patients experiencing trauma from motor vehicle crashes and gunshot wounds prior to hospitalization. Family members of 33 patients (motor vehicle crashes: n = 19, 57%; gunshot wounds: n = 14, 43%) participated in this study. Within 1 to 2 days after admission to critical care, families who witnessed resuscitation and those who did not witness resuscitation were asked to participate. Reliable and valid measures for family resources, coping, problem-solving communication, and well-being were used. Results indicated that scores for family resources, coping, problem-solving communication, and well-being were no different in families who witnessed resuscitation compared with those who did not witness resuscitation prior to hospitalization in this study. The effects of FWR during the prehospital time period are not detrimental to family members. Further research needs to be conducted to examine the effects of FWR.

  15. Cardiac Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Kimberly E; Parker, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function and dysfunction are important in the clinical outcomes of sepsis and septic shock. Cardiac dysfunction is not a single entity, but is a broad spectrum of syndromes that result in biventricular cardiac dysfunction manifested by both systolic and diastolic dysfunction and is influenced by cardiac loading conditions (ie, preload and afterload). Elucidating the underlying pathophysiology has proved to be complex. This article emphasizes the underlying pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction and explores recent evidence related to diagnosis, including the utility of biomarkers, the role of echocardiography, and management goals and treatment. PMID:27229645

  16. Science review: The brain in sepsis – culprit and victim

    PubMed Central

    Sharshar, Tarek; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2005-01-01

    On one side, brain dysfunction is a poorly explored complication of sepsis. On the other side, brain dysfunction may actively contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The current review aimed at summarizing the current knowledge about the reciprocal interaction between the immune and central nervous systems during sepsis. The immune-brain cross talk takes part in circumventricular organs that, being free from blood-brain-barrier, interface between brain and bloodstream, in autonomic nuclei including the vagus nerve, and finally through the damaged endothelium. Recent observations have confirmed that sepsis is associated with excessive brain inflammation and neuronal apoptosis which clinical relevance remains to be explored. In parallel, damage within autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems may contribute to sepsis induced organ dysfunction. PMID:15693982

  17. How Can the Microbiologist Help in Diagnosing Neonatal Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Michela; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon whether the onset of symptoms is before 72 hours of life (early-onset neonatal sepsis—EONS) or later (late-onset neonatal sepsis—LONS). These definitions have contributed greatly to diagnosis and treatment by identifying which microorganisms are likely to be responsible for sepsis during these periods and the expected outcomes of infection. This paper focuses on the tools that microbiologist can offer to diagnose and eventually prevent neonatal sepsis. Here, we discuss the advantages and limitation of the blood culture, the actual gold standard for sepsis diagnosis. In addition, we examine the utility of molecular techniques in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:22319539

  18. Targeting HMGB1 in the treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Ward, Mary F.; Sama, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis refers to the host’s deleterious and non-resolving systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections, and represents the leading cause of death in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex, but partly mediated by a newly identified alarmin molecule, the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). Areas covered Here we review the evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis with a wider therapeutic window, and discuss the therapeutic potential of HMGB1-neutralizing antibodies and small molecule inhibitors (herbal components) in experimental sepsis. Expert opinion It will be important to evaluate the efficacy of HMGB1-targeting strategies for the clinical management of human sepsis in the future. PMID:24392842

  19. Correlation of American Burn Association sepsis criteria with the presence of bacteremia in burned patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian K; Wolf, Steven E; Hospenthal, Duane R; D'Avignon, Laurie C; Chung, Kevin K; Yun, Heather C; Mann, Elizabeth A; Murray, Clinton K

    2012-01-01

    Severe burn injury is accompanied by a systemic inflammatory response, making traditional indicators of sepsis both insensitive and nonspecific. To address this, the American Burn Association (ABA) published diagnostic criteria in 2007 to standardize the definition of sepsis in these patients. These criteria include temperature (>39°C or <36°C), progressive tachycardia (>110 beats per minute), progressive tachypnea (>25 breaths per minute not ventilated or minute ventilation >12 L/minute ventilated), thrombocytopenia (<100,000/μl; not applied until 3 days after initial resuscitation), hyperglycemia (untreated plasma glucose >200 mg/dl, >7 units of insulin/hr intravenous drip, or >25% increase in insulin requirements over 24 hours), and feed intolerance >24 hours (abdominal distension, residuals two times the feeding rate, or diarrhea >2500 ml/day). Meeting >3 of these criteria should "trigger" concern for infection. In this initial assessment of the ABA sepsis criteria correlation with infection, the authors evaluated the ABA sepsis criteria's correlation with bacteremia because bacteremia is not associated with inherent issues of diagnosis as occurs with pneumonia or soft tissue infections, and blood cultures are typically obtained due to concern for ongoing infections falling within the definition of "septic." A retrospective electronic records review was performed to evaluate episodes of bacteremia in the United States Army Institute of Research from 2006 through 2007. A total of 196 patients were admitted during the study period who met inclusion criteria. The first positive and negative cultures, if present, from each patient were evaluated. This totaled 101 positive and 181 negative cultures. Temperature, heart rate, insulin resistance, and feed intolerance criteria were significant on univariate analysis. Only heart rate and temperature were found to significantly correlate with bacteremia on multivariate analysis. The receiver operating characteristic

  20. Comparing 1997 Resuscitation Council (UK) recovery position with recovery position of 1992 European Resuscitation Council guidelines: a user's perspective.

    PubMed

    Doxey, J

    1998-12-01

    Both the 1992 and the 1997 recovery positions were demonstrated to 100 employees attending for Basic Life Support resuscitation training at a district general hospital (Chesterfield and North Derbyshire Royal Hospital NHS Trust). They used both positions, experiencing being the first-aider and the casualty and then completed a closed questionnaire. The results were evaluated from this 100% response. In every aspect the 1992 or 'How' position was preferred both in terms of ease of use and comfort during the procedure by the majority of each sample group. In every comparison the 1992 position was preferred highly significantly, (P < 0.001) using chi-square statistical analysis. PMID:10078805

  1. Improving Sepsis Management in the Acute Admissions Unit.

    PubMed

    Adcroft, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. We therefore wanted to investigate and improve how the acute admission unit (AAU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH) is managing patients who present directly to the unit with sepsis. In order to obtain this information, an audit was undertaken against the College of Emergency Medicine standards used by the emergency department within GWH and across the UK. Data was retrospectively collected for 30 patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. The notes were scrutinized with regard to the implementation of College of Emergency Medicine standards for the management of sepsis. This meant that performance in the AAU was compared against the emergency department at GWH and national figures. The data collected shows performance is below national standards with regard to documentation of high flow oxygen use (AAU: 24%, ED 100%; national median: 50%; CEM standard 95%), crystalloid fluid boluses (AAU: 52%; ED: 90%; national median: 83%; CEM standard 100%), lactate measurements (AAU: 66%, ED: 93%; national median: 80%; CEM standard 95%), and obtainment of blood cultures (AAU: 52%; ED 73%; national median: 77%; CEM standard: 95%). Only 3% of patients received all six parts of the sepsis bundle. Since auditing in 2012/2013 we have introduced a sepsis proforma based on a current proforma being used within Severn Deanery. This proforma uses the 'Sepsis Six' bundle appropriate to ward based care. We have raised awareness of sepsis implications and management through the creation of a 'sepsis working group' to educate both junior doctors and nurses. In turn, this has led to education through the use of posters, pocket reference cards, and teaching sessions. Re-audit shows significant improvement in administering all parts of the Sepsis Six bundle and an 8% improvement in patients receiving all six of the bundle.

  2. Sepsis-induced alterations in sleep of rats.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Ingiosi, Ashley M; Raymond, Richard M; Opp, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    Sepsis is a systemic immune response to infection that may result in multiple organ failure and death. Polymicrobial infections remain a serious clinical problem, and in the hospital, sepsis is the number-one noncardiac killer. Although the central nervous system may be one of the first systems affected, relatively little effort has been made to determine the impact of sepsis on the brain. In this study, we used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to determine the extent to which sepsis alters sleep, the EEG, and brain temperature (Tbr) of rats. Sepsis increases the amount of time rats spend in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during the dark period, but not during the light period. Rapid eye movements sleep (REMS) of septic rats is suppressed for about 24 h following CLP surgery, after which REMS increases during dark periods for at least three nights. The EEG is dramatically altered shortly after sepsis induction, as evidenced by reductions in slow-frequency components. Furthermore, sleep is fragmented, indicating that the quality of sleep is diminished. Effects on sleep, the EEG, and Tbr persist for at least 84 h after sepsis induction, the duration of our recording period. Immunohistochemical assays focused on brain stem mechanisms responsible for alterations in REMS, as little information is available concerning infection-induced suppression of this sleep stage. Our immunohistochemical data suggest that REMS suppression after sepsis onset may be mediated, in part, by the brain stem GABAergic system. This study demonstrates for the first time that sleep and EEG patterns are altered during CLP-induced sepsis. These data suggest that the EEG may serve as a biomarker for sepsis onset. These data also contribute to our knowledge of potential mechanisms, whereby infections alter sleep and other central nervous system functions.

  3. Selected concepts and controversies in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Although more than 80 years of research in cardiac resuscitation produced many important findings and greatly enhanced our understanding of the arrest state, outcome following pediatric cardiac arrest remains poor. Resuscitation guidelines have recently been published, but they may not reflect optimal therapy. Closed-chest compression-induced cardiac output may be higher in pediatric patients, particularly infants, than that previously reported in adults. To achieve higher cardiac outputs, direct cardiac compression is important; the recommended compression location has therefore been changed based on recent data. The optimal rate of compression, however, is uncertain, so further research is needed. Alternative vascular access sites, such as the endotracheal and intraosseous route for drug administration may permit more rapid drug delivery, but data suggest that a larger epinephrine dose than currently recommended should be used. It may also be helpful to dilute the drug in normal saline before endotracheal administration. Although experimental data suggest that a pure alpha-adrenergic agonist may be beneficial in a cardiac arrest, recent data show that epinephrine remains the drug of choice. Finally, the role of sodium bicarbonate in both the arrest and postarrest setting has become controversial. Recent data suggest that bicarbonate may be detrimental and that therapy of acidosis is best directed at improving perfusion, oxygenation, and ventilation. Alternative forms of therapy for acidosis, such as THAM and dichloroacetate may prove beneficial in the postarrest setting. PMID:3052707

  4. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: who should decide?

    PubMed

    Lederman, Zohar; Garasic, Mirko; Piperberg, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Whether to allow the presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been a highly contentious topic in recent years. Even though a great deal of evidence and professional guidelines support the option of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), many healthcare professionals still oppose it. One of the main arguments espoused by the latter is that family members should not be allowed for the sake of the patient's best interests, whether it is to increase his chances of survival, respect his privacy or leave his family with a last positive impression of him. In this paper, we examine the issue of FPDR from the patient's point of view. Since the patient requires CPR, he is invariably unconscious and therefore incompetent. We discuss the Autonomy Principle and the Three-Tiered process for surrogate decision making, as well as the Beneficence Principle and show that these are limited in providing us with an adequate tool for decision making in this particular case. Rather, we rely on a novel principle (or, rather, a novel specification of an existing principle) and a novel integrated model for surrogate decision making. We show that this model is more satisfactory in taking the patient's true wishes under consideration and encourages a joint decision making process by all parties involved.

  5. In-hospital resuscitation: opioids and other factors influencing survival

    PubMed Central

    Fecho, Karamarie; Jackson, Freeman; Smith, Frances; Overdyk, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: “Code Blue” is a standard term used to alertt hospital staff that a patient requires resuscitation. This study determined rates of survival from Code Blue events and the role of opioids and other factors on survival. Methods: Data derived from medical records and the Code Blue and Pharmacy databases were analyzed for factors affecting survival. Results: During 2006, rates of survival from the code only and to discharge were 25.9% and 26.4%, respectively, for Code Blue events involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; N = 216). Survival rates for events not ultimately requiring CPR (N = 77) were higher, with 32.5% surviving the code only and 62.3% surviving to discharge. For CPR events, rates of survival to discharge correlated inversely with time to chest compressions and defibrillation, precipitating event, need for airway management, location and age. Time of week, witnessing, postoperative status, gender and opioid use did not influence survival rates. For non-CPR events, opioid use was associated with decreased survival. Survival rates were lowest for patients receiving continuous infusions (P < 0.01) or iv boluses of opioids (P < 0.05). Conclusions: One-quarter of patients survive to discharge after a CPR Code Blue event and two-thirds survive to discharge after a non-CPR event. Opioids may influence survival from non-CPR events. PMID:20057895

  6. Hypertonic resuscitation after severe injury: is it of benefit?

    PubMed

    Bulger, Eileen M; Hoyt, David B

    2012-01-01

    There is a wealth of preclinical data suggesting potential benefit from the administration of hypertonic solutions after severe injury with hypovolemic shock, including improved tissue perfusion, improved flow through the microcirculation, and modulation of the inflammatory response, which may mitigate subsequent organ failure. However, despite these potential advantages, clinical trials of hypertonic resuscitation early after injury have failed to demonstrate significant benefit for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock, and although there is no difference in overall mortality, there appears to be a trend toward earlier mortality among those receiving hypertonic fluids. Likewise, for TBI there are data suggesting that hypertonic fluids should support cerebral perfusion and mitigate intracranial hypertension, yet the clinical trials of early administration to these patients have also failed to show benefit. Further study is warranted in this patient population, as a longer period of hypertonicity may be required to show a clinical effect. Assessment of long-term neurologic outcome in this patient population remains the gold standard in determining benefit.

  7. Use of the impedance threshold device in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Demestiha, Theano D; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Xanthos, Theodoros T

    2010-01-01

    Although approximately one million sudden cardiac deaths occur yearly in the US and Europe, cardiac arrest (CA) remains a clinical condition still characterized by a poor prognosis. In an effort to improve the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) technique, the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for CPR gave the impedance threshold device (ITD) a Class IIa recommendation. The AHA recommendation means that there is strong evidence to demonstrate that ITD enhances circulation, improves hemodynamics and increases the likelihood of resuscitation in patients in CA. During standard CPR, venous blood return to the heart relies on the natural elastic recoil of the chest which creates a transient decrease in intrathoracic pressure. The ITD further decreases intrathoracic pressure by preventing respiratory gases from entering the lungs during the decompression phase of CPR. Thus, although ITD is placed into the respiratory circuit it works as a circulatory enhancer device that provides its therapeutic benefit with each chest decompression. The ease of use of this device, its ability to be incorporated into a mask and other airway devices, the absence of device-related adverse effects and few requirements in additional training, suggest that ITD may be a favorable new device for improving CPR efficiency. Since the literature is short of studies with clinically meaningful outcomes such as neurological outcome and long term survival, further evidence is still needed. PMID:21160680

  8. Do-not-resuscitate order: a view throughout the world.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Cristina; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Gullo, Antonino; Weil, Max Harry

    2013-02-01

    Resuscitation has the ability to reverse premature death. It can also prolong terminal illness, increase discomfort, and consume resources. The do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order and advance directives are still a debated issue in critical care. This review will focus on several aspects, regarding withholding and/or withdrawing therapies and advance directives in different continents. It is widely known that there is a great diversity of cultural and religious beliefs in society, and therefore, some critical ethical and legal issues have still to be solved. To achieve a consensus, we believe in the priority of continuing education and training programs for health care professionals. It is our opinion that a serious reflection on ethical values and principles would be useful to understand the definition of medical professionalism to make it possible to undertake the best way to avoid futile and aggressive care. There is evidence of the lack of DNR order policy worldwide. Therefore, it appears clear that there is a need for standardization. To improve the attitude about the DNR order, it is necessary to achieve several goals such as: increased communication, consensus on law, increased trust among patients and health care systems, and improved standards and quality of care to respect the patient's will and the family's role.

  9. Vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kampmeier, T G; Rehberg, S; Westphal, M; Lange, M

    2010-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its synthetic, long-acting analog terlipressin (TP) are potent alternative vasoconstrictors in the treatment of septic patients with catecholamine-refractive vasodilatatory shock. The results from one large randomized clinical trial suggest that AVP plus norepinephrine (NE) infusion is as safe and effective as treatment with NE alone in patients with septic shock. Because the desired effects of vasopressin analogs are basically related to their vasopressinergic effects via the V1a receptor, more selective V1 agonists, such as TP, may be more potent in reversing sepsis-related arterial hypotension. In this regard, recent evidence from small-scale studies suggests that continuous low-dose infusion rather than intermittent bolus injection of TP is associated with fewer side effects, such as depression of cardiac output and rebound arterial hypotension. However, because clinical data on the administration of TP in patients with sepsis are limited, it should not currently be used beyond the scope of controlled trials. The optimal time point for the initiation of therapy with vasopressin analogs has yet to be determined. While AVP and TP are commonly used as last-resort therapies in severe septic shock, some evidence supports the initiation of treatment in a less severe state of the disease.

  10. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  11. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  12. IgM-Enriched Immunoglobulin Attenuates Systemic Endotoxin Activity in Early Severe Sepsis: A Before-After Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kirbach, Christin; Warszawska, Joanna; Meybohm, Patrick; Zacharowski, Kai; Koch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis remains associated with a high mortality rate. Endotoxin has been shown to influence viscoelastic coagulation parameters, thus suggesting a link between endotoxin levels and the altered coagulation phenotype in septic patients. This study evaluated the effects of systemic polyspecific IgM-enriched immunoglobulin (IgM-IVIg) (Pentaglobin® [Biotest, Dreieich, Germany]) on endotoxin activity (EA), inflammatory markers, viscoelastic and conventional coagulation parameters. Methods Patients with severe sepsis were identified by daily screening in a tertiary, academic, surgical ICU. After the inclusion of 15 patients, the application of IgM-IVIg (5 mg/kg/d over three days) was integrated into the unit’s standard operation procedure (SOP) to treat patients with severe sepsis, thereby generating “control” and “IgM-IVIg” groups. EA assays, thrombelastometry (ROTEM®) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate®) were performed on whole blood. Furthermore, routine laboratory parameters were determined according to unit’s standards. Results Data from 26 patients were included. On day 1, EA was significantly decreased in the IgM-IVIg group following 6 and 12 hours of treatment (0.51 ±0.06 vs. 0.26 ±0.07, p<0.05 and 0.51 ±0.06 vs. 0.25 ±0.04, p<0.05) and differed significantly compared with the control group following 6 hours of treatment (0.26 ±0.07 vs. 0.43 ±0.07, p<0.05). The platelet count was significantly higher in the IgM-IVIg group following four days of IgM-IVIg treatment (200/nl ±43 vs. 87/nl ±20, p<0.05). The fibrinogen concentration was significantly lower in the control group on day 2 (311 mg/dl ±37 vs. 475 mg/dl ±47 (p = 0.015)) and day 4 (307 mg/dl ±35 vs. 420 mg/dl ±16 (p = 0.017)). No differences in thrombelastometric or aggregometric measurements, or inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukocyte, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)) were observed. Conclusion Treatment with IgM-enriched immunoglobulin

  13. Families’ Stressors and Needs at Time of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation: A Jordanian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background: During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such polices yet. This study explores family members’ needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. Methods: This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. Findings: The study findings revealed three main categories: families’ need for reassurance; families’ need for proximity; and families’ need for support. The need for information about patient’s condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient’s condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should

  14. Does witnessing resuscitation help parents come to terms with the death of their child? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kathryn; Ritchie, Dawn; Adams, Gary

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this review is to determine if witnessed resuscitation helps parents come to terms with the death of their child. Witnessed resuscitation is a controversial subject. There is disagreement in the literature and the opinions of healthcare professionals, as to whether parents should be present during the resuscitation of their children. This is an international problem that occurs consistently, when caring for patients requiring resuscitation. Despite this, however, research indicates that the advantages of this form of resuscitation for parents far outweigh the disadvantages. Electronic searches of PubMed, CINAHL and OVID were performed, with a manual search of retrieved articles. Primary studies, which were included, examined parents' views of witnessed resuscitation in children. Of 1038 articles, eight met the inclusion criteria. These included qualitative and quantitative studies, which explored whether parents wanted to be present. The benefits and detrimental effects were explored, in order to determine whether witnessed resuscitation helps parents come to terms with the death of their child. Of 1253 parents, 87.1% wanted to be present. All but one parent believed witnessing resuscitation should be the choice of the parent and all but one parent who was present would do so again indicating that witnessed resuscitation is beneficial to parents. Effective parental support is needed whatever their choice and policies need to be in place to support witnessed resuscitation. More research is required to establish the long term outcomes of witnessed resuscitation as no randomised controlled trials have yet been completed.

  15. Survival after Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Providing an Evidence Base for Ethical Management of Do-not-resuscitate Orders.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Shona; Hooft, Lotty; Meijerman, Johanne M; Knape, Johannes T A; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-03-01

    Automatic suspension of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders during general anesthesia does not sufficiently address a patient's right to self-determination and is a practice still observed among anesthesiologists today. To provide an evidence base for ethical management of DNR orders during anesthesia and surgery, the authors performed a systematic review of the literature to quantify the survival after perioperative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Results show that the probability of surviving perioperative CPR ranged from 32.0 to 55.7% when measured within the first 24 h after arrest with a neurologically favorable outcome expectancy between 45.3 and 66.8% at follow-up, which suggests a viable survival of approximately 25%. Because CPR generally proves successful in less than 15% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the altered outcome probabilities that the conditions in the operating room bring on warrant reevaluation of DNR orders during the perioperative period. By preoperatively communicating the evidence to patients, they can make better informed decisions while reducing the level of moral distress that anesthesiologists may experience when certain patients decide to retain their DNR orders.

  16. Out-of-hospital resuscitation in East Sussex: 1981 to 1989.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S J; Holmberg, S; Quinn, E; Baker, K; Grainger, R; Vincent, R; Chamberlain, D A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the impact of extended training in advanced life support on the outcome of resuscitation. DESIGN--Analysis of the successful resuscitations from 1981 to 1989. SETTING--Brighton and East Sussex. RESULTS--248 patients were resuscitated from cardiac or respiratory arrest in the community and subsequently survived to leave hospital. Their mean age was 64 years and one year survival was 77%. In most cases the cause of collapse was cardiac but 38 (15%) suffered a respiratory arrest. In 140 of the successful resuscitations (56%) collapse occurred before the arrival of the ambulance. Basic life support, with ventilation and chest compression where necessary, was sufficient to revive 35 (14%) of the patients. Defibrillation was also required in 107 patients (43%), and in a further 106 patients (43%) who had prolonged cardiorespiratory arrest requiring endotracheal intubation and the use of several drugs. Review of ambulance forms and case notes showed that in 87 cases (35%) the abilities of the paramedical ambulance staff in advanced resuscitation techniques contributed decisively to the success of resuscitation. These skills are illustrated by eight case reports. CONCLUSIONS--Extended training for ambulance staff increases the likelihood of successful resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Though instruction in defibrillation must have the highest priority, full paramedical training can bring appreciable additional benefits. Images PMID:8280528

  17. [Implementation of post-resuscitation care in adult cardiac arrest patients - Experts' opinion].

    PubMed

    Pellis, Tommaso; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Semeraro, Federico; Grieco, Niccolò; Fabbri, Andrea; Balzanelli, Mario; Berruto, Elisa; Scapigliati, Andrea; Sciretti, Massimiliano; Cerchiari, Erga

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence on post-resuscitation care suffers from important knowledge gaps on new treatments and prognostication, mainly because of the lack of large multicenter randomized trials. However, optimization of post-resuscitation care is crucial, and the establishment of a treatment easy to be accepted and implemented locally, based on currently available evidence, is advisable. The present article is a multisociety experts' opinion on post-cardiac arrest that aims (i) to provide schematic and clear suggestions on therapeutic interventions to be delivered following resuscitation from cardiac arrest, so as to implement local protocols with a standardized post-resuscitation care; (ii) to suggest post-resuscitation therapeutic interventions that may result in improved survival with good neurological recovery, intended as a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 1-2; and finally (iii) to propose a pragmatic and schematic approach to post-resuscitation care for rapid initiation of intensive treatments (i.e. temperature management). The suggestions reported in this document are intended for adult patients resuscitated from both out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest. They should be considered solely as an experts' opinion aimed to improve post-cardiac arrest care and they do not represent an official national guideline.

  18. Resuscitation and quantification of stressed Escherichia coli K12 NCTC8797 in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Saribiyik, F; Isik, K; Sahin, N; Kariptas, E; Flint, K P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact on numbers of using different media for the enumeration of Escherichia coli subjected to stress, and to evaluate the use of different resuscitation methods on bacterial numbers. E. coli was subjected to heat stress by exposure to 55 degrees C for 1h or to light-induced oxidative stress by exposure to artificial light for up to 8h in the presence of methylene blue. In both cases, the bacterial counts on selective media were below the limits of detection whereas on non-selective media colonies were still produced. After resuscitation in non-selective media, using a multi-well MPN resuscitation method or resuscitation on membrane filters, the bacterial counts on selective media matched those on non-selective media. Heat and light stress can affect the ability of E. coli to grow on selective media essential for the enumeration as indicator bacteria. A resuscitation method is essential for the recovery of these stressed bacteria in order to avoid underestimation of indicator bacteria numbers in water. There was no difference in resuscitation efficiency using the membrane filter and multi-well MPN methods. This study emphasises the need to use a resuscitation method if the numbers of indicator bacteria in water samples are not to be underestimated. False-negative results in the analysis of drinking water or natural bathing waters could have profound health effects. PMID:17418553

  19. Global health and emergency care: a resuscitation research agenda--part 1.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Tom P; Nolan, Jerry P; Jacobs, Ian G; van Belle, Gerald; Bobrow, Bentley J; Marshall, John; Finn, Judith; Becker, Lance B; Bottiger, Bernd; Cameron, Peter; Drajer, Saul; Jung, Julianna J; Kloeck, Walter; Koster, Rudolph W; Huei-Ming Ma, Matthew; Shin, Sang Do; Sopko, George; Taira, Breena R; Timerman, Sergio; Eng Hock Ong, Marcus

    2013-12-01

    At the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine global health consensus conference, a breakout session on a resuscitation research agenda was held. Two articles focusing on cardiac arrest and trauma resuscitation are the result of that discussion. This article describes the burden of disease and outcomes, issues in resuscitation research, and global trends in resuscitation research funding priorities. Globally, cardiovascular disease and trauma cause a high burden of disease that receives a disproportionately smaller research investment. International resuscitation research faces unique ethical challenges. It needs reliable baseline statistics regarding quality of care and outcomes; data linkages between providers; reliable and comparable national databases; and an effective, efficient, and sustainable resuscitation research infrastructure to advance the field. Research in resuscitation in low- and middle-income countries is needed to understand the epidemiology, infrastructure and systems context, level of training needed, and potential for cost-effective care to improve outcomes. Research is needed on low-cost models of population-based research, ways to disseminate information to the developing world, and finding the most cost-effective strategies to improve outcomes. PMID:24341584

  20. Neonatal resuscitation 3: manometer use in a model of face mask ventilation

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Adequate ventilation is the key to successful neonatal resuscitation. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is initiated with manual ventilation devices via face masks. These devices may be used with a manometer to measure airway pressures delivered. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To assess the effect of viewing a manometer on the peak inspiratory pressures used, the volume delivered, and leakage from the face mask during PPV with two manual ventilation devices in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Participants gave PPV to a modified resuscitation mannequin using a Laerdal infant resuscitator and a Neopuff infant resuscitator at specified pressures ensuring adequate chest wall excursion. Each participant gave PPV to the mannequin with each device twice, viewing the manometer on one occasion and unable to see the manometer on the other. Data from participants were averaged for each device used with the manometer and without the manometer separately. Results: A total of 7767 inflations delivered by the 18 participants were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressures delivered were lower with the Laerdal device. There were no differences in leakage from the face mask or volumes delivered. Whether or not the manometer was visible made no difference to any measured variable. Conclusions: Viewing a manometer during PPV in this model of neonatal resuscitation does not affect the airway pressure or tidal volumes delivered or the degree of leakage from the face mask. PMID:15871988

  1. Neonatal resuscitation 2: an evaluation of manual ventilation devices and face masks

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: The key to successful neonatal resuscitation is effective ventilation. Little evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of manual ventilation device or face mask. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To compare the efficacy of (a) the Laerdal infant resuscitator and the Neopuff infant resuscitator, used with (b) round and anatomically shaped masks in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Thirty four participants gave positive pressure ventilation to a mannequin at specified pressures with each of the four device-mask combinations. Flow, inspiratory tidal volume at the face mask (VTI(mask)), VTE(mask), and airway pressure were recorded. Leakage from the mask was calculated from VTI(mask) and VTE(mask). Results: A total of 10 780 inflations were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressure targets were achieved equally with the Laerdal and Neopuff resuscitators. Positive end expiratory pressure was delivered with the Neopuff but not the Laerdal device. Despite similar peak pressures, VTE(mask) varied widely. Mask leakage was large for each combination of device and mask. There were no differences between the masks. Conclusion: During face mask ventilation of a neonatal resuscitation mannequin, there are large leaks around the face mask. Airway pressure is a poor proxy for volume delivered during positive pressure ventilation through a mask. PMID:15871989

  2. Closed-loop and decision-assist resuscitation of burn patients.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Jose; Drew, Guy; Gallagher, James; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Herndon, David N; Kramer, George C

    2008-04-01

    Effective resuscitation is critical in reducing mortality and morbidity rates of patients with acute burns. To this end, guidelines and formulas have been developed to define infusion rates and volume requirements during the first 48 hours postburn. Even with these standardized resuscitation guidelines, however, over- and under-resuscitation are not uncommon. Two approaches to adjust infusion rate are decision-assist and closed-loop algorithms based on levels of urinary output. Specific decision assist guidelines or a closed-loop system using computer-controlled feedback technology that supplies automatic control of infusion rates can potentially achieve better control of urinary output. In a properly designed system, closed-loop control has the potential to provide more accurate titration rates, while lowering the incidence of over- and under-resuscitation. Because the system can self-adjust based on monitoring inputs, the technology can be pushed to environments such as combat zones where burn resuscitation expertise is limited. A closed-loop system can also assist in the management of mass casualties, another scenario in which medical expertise is often in short supply. This article reviews the record of fluid balance of contemporary burn resuscitation and approaches, as well as the engineering efforts, animal studies, and algorithm development of our most recent autonomous systems for burn resuscitation. PMID:18385584

  3. Is there a place for crystalloids and colloids in remote damage control resuscitation?

    PubMed

    Medby, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Crystalloids and colloids are used in prehospital fluid resuscitation to replace blood loss and preserve tissue perfusion until definite surgical control of bleeding can be achieved. However, large volumes of fluids will increase bleeding by elevating blood pressure, dislodging blood clots, and diluting coagulation factors and platelets. Hypotensive fluid resuscitation strategies are used to avoid worsening of uncontrolled bleeding. This is largely supported by animal studies. Most clinical evidence suggests that restricting fluid therapy is associated with improved outcome. Remote damage control resuscitation emphasizes the early use of blood products and restriction of other fluids to support coagulation and tissue oxygenation. Controversy regarding the optimal choice and composition of resuscitation fluids is ongoing. Compared with crystalloids, less colloid is needed for the same expansion of intravascular volume. On the other hand, colloids may cause coagulopathy not only related to dilution. The most important advantage of using colloids is logistical because less volume and weight are needed. In conclusion, prehospital fluid resuscitation is considered the standard of care, but there is little clinical evidence supporting the use of either crystalloids or colloids in remote damage control resuscitation. Alternative resuscitation fluids are needed.

  4. Mast Cell Stabilization Improves Survival by Preventing Apoptosis in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laura; Peña, Geber; Cai, Bolin; Deitch, E. A.; Ulloa, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Inhibiting single cytokines produced modest effects in clinical trials, in part because the cytokines werenot specific for sepsis, and sepsis may require cellular strategies. Previous studies reported that mast cells (MCs) fight infections in early sepsis. In this study, we report that MC stabilizers restrain serum TNF levels and improve survival in wild-type but not in MC-deficient mice. Yet, MC depletion in knockout mice attenuates serum TNF but does not improve survival in sepsis. Serum HMGB1 was the only factor correlating with survival. MC stabilizers inhibit systemic HMGB1 levels and rescue mice from established peritonitis. MC stabilizers fail to inhibit HMGB1 secretion from macrophages, but they prevent apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in sepsis. These results suggest that MC stabilization provides therapeutic benefits in sepsis by inhibiting extracellular release of HMGB1 from apoptotic cells. Our study provides the first evidence that MCs have major immunological implications regulating cell death in sepsis and represent a pharmacological target for infectious disorders in a clinically realistic time frame. PMID:20519642

  5. Angiopoietin-2 associations with the underlying infection and sepsis severity.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulou, Korina; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Kotsaki, Antigone; Antypa, Elli; Georgiadou, Sara; Tsaganos, Thomas; Koulenti, Despina; Paggalou, Evgenia; Damoraki, Georgia; Karagiannidis, Napoleon; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2015-05-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is an important mediator in sepsis. We have previously shown that endotoxemia levels are related to the underlying infection and affect septic patients' outcome. Based on this background we now investigated if circulating Ang-2 (cAng-2) and monocyte Ang-2 expression in septic patients are associated with the underlying infection and organ failure. We measured cAng-2 in 288 septic patients (121 with sepsis, 167 with severe sepsis/septic shock) at less than 24h post study inclusion (day 1) and on days 3 and 7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were additionally isolated; Ang-2 gene expression was estimated by means of real-time PCR. Levels of cAng-2 were higher under severe sepsis and septic shock, as compared to uncomplicated sepsis; PBMC Ang-2 copies were higher in severe sepsis. On day 1, cAng-2 and Ang-2 gene copies were greater under severe sepsis/septic shock in sufferers from all types of infections with the exception of community-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia. cAng-2 increased proportionally to the number of failing organs, and was higher under metabolic acidosis and acute coagulopathy as compared to no failing organ. On day 1, copies of Ang-2 were higher in survivors, whereas cAng-2 was higher in non-survivors. In a large cohort of septic patients, cAng-2 kinetics appears associated with the underlying infection and organ failure type.

  6. The role of arginine in infection and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Ramsay, Graham; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to an infection, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Metabolic changes during infection and sepsis could be related to changes in metabolism of the amino acid L-arginine. In sepsis, protein breakdown is increased, which is a key process to maintain arginine delivery because both endogenous de novo arginine production from citrulline and food intake are reduced. Arginine catabolism, on the other hand, is markedly increased by enhanced use of arginine via the arginase and nitric oxide pathways. As a result, lowered plasma arginine levels are usually found. Arginine may therefore be considered as an essential amino acid in sepsis, and supplementation could be beneficial in sepsis by improving microcirculation and protein anabolism. L-Arginine supplementation in a hyperdynamic pig model of sepsis prohibits the increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure, improves muscle and liver protein metabolism, and restores the intestinal motility pattern. Arguments raised against arginine supplementation are mainly pointed at stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production, with concerns about toxicity of increased NO and hemodynamic instability with refractory hypotension. NO synthase inhibition, however, increased mortality. Arginine supplementation in septic patients has transient effects on hemodynamics when supplied as a bolus but seems without hemodynamic side effects when supplied continuously. In conclusion, arginine could have an essential role in infection and sepsis.

  7. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  8. Neonatal sepsis: an old problem with new insights.

    PubMed

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW<1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount.

  9. Mortality in Sepsis and its relationship with Gender

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Nosheen; Jamil, Bushra; Siddiqui, Shahla; Talat, Najeeha; Khan, Fauzia A.; Hussain, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Sepsis remains a leading cause of death across the world, carrying a mortality rate of 20–50%. Women have been reported to be less likely to suffer from sepsis and to have a lower risk of mortality from sepsis compared to men. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between gender and mortality in sepsis, and compare cytokine profiles of male and female patients. Methods: This was a prospective case series on 97 patients admitted with sepsis. Clinical and microbiological data was gathered, blood samples were collected for cytokine (IL-10, IL-6 and TNFα) levels and patients were followed up for clinical outcome. Results: There were 54% males and 46% females, with no significant difference of age or comorbids between genders. Respiratory tract infection was the commonest source of sepsis, and was more common in females (60%) compared to males (39%) (p=0.034). Males had a higher mortality (p=0.048, RR 1.73) and plasma IL-6 level(p=0.040) compared to females. Mean IL-6 plasma level was significantly (p<0.01) higher in patients who died vs. who recovered. Conclusion: Our study shows that males with sepsis have a 70% greater mortality rate, and mortality is associated with a higher IL-6 plasma level. PMID:26649014

  10. Estrogen fails to facilitate resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yang; Edelheit, Ari; Velmurugan, Sathya; Borovnik-Lesjak, Vesna; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    Administration of 17β-estradiol has been shown to exert myocardial protective effects in hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that similar protective effects could help improve resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Three series of 18, 40, and 12 rats each, underwent ventricular fibrillation for 8 minutes followed by 8 minutes of chest compression and delivery of electrical shocks. In series-1, rats were randomized 1:1 to receive a bolus dose of 17β-estradiol (1 mg/kg) or 0.9% NaCl before chest compression; in series-2, rats were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive a continuous infusion of 0.9% NaCl or a 17β-estradiol solution designed to attain a plasma level of 100, 102, or 104 nM during chest compression; and in series-3, rats were randomized 1:1 to receive a continuous infusion of 17β-estradiol to attain a plasma level of 102 nM or 0.9% NaCl during chest compression, providing inotropic support during the post-resuscitation interval using dobutamine infusion. 17β-estradiol failed to facilitate resuscitation in each of the 3 series. In series-1 and series-2, resuscitability and short-term survival was reduced in 17β-estradiol groups attaining statistical significance in series-2 when the three 17β-estradiol groups were combined (p = 0.035). In series-3, all rats were resuscitated and survived for 180 minutes aided by dobutamine which partially reversed post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction but without additional benefits on myocardial function in the 17β-estradiol group. The present study failed to support a beneficial effect of 17β-estradiol for resuscitation from cardiac arrest and raised the possibility of detrimental cardiac effects compromising initial resuscitability and subsequent survival in a male rat model of ventricular fibrillation and closed chest resuscitation. PMID:26045892

  11. Resuscitation Prior to Emergency Endotracheal Intubation: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Green, Robert S.; Fergusson, Dean A.; Turgeon, Alexis F.; McIntyre, Lauralyn A.; Kovacs, George J.; Griesdale, Donald E.; Zarychanski, Ryan; Butler, Michael B.; Kureshi, Nelofar; Erdogan, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory failure is a common problem in emergency medicine (EM) and critical care medicine (CCM). However, little is known about the resuscitation of critically ill patients prior to emergency endotracheal intubation (EETI). Our aim was to describe the resuscitation practices of EM and CCM physicians prior to EETI. Methods A cross-sectional survey was developed and tested for content validity and retest reliability by members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. The questionnaire was distributed to all EM and CCM physician members of three national organizations. Using three clinical scenarios (trauma, pneumonia, congestive heart failure), we assessed physician preferences for use and types of fluid and vasopressor medication in pre-EETI resuscitation of critically ill patients. Results In total, 1,758 physicians were surveyed (response rate 50.2%, 882/1,758). Overall, physicians would perform pre-EETI resuscitation using either fluids or vasopressors in 54% (1,193/2,203) of cases. Most physicians would “always/often” administer intravenous fluid pre-EETI in the three clinical scenarios (81%, 1,484/1,830). Crystalloids were the most common fluid physicians would “always/often” administer in congestive heart failure (EM 43%; CCM 44%), pneumonia (EM 97%; CCM 95%) and trauma (EM 96%; CCM 96%). Pre-EETI resuscitation using vasopressors was uncommon (4.9%). Training in CCM was associated with performing pre-EETI resuscitation (odds ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, [1.44–3.36], p<0.001). Conclusion Pre-EETI resuscitation is common among Canadian EM and CCM physicians. Most physicians use crystalloids pre-EETI as a resuscitation fluid, while few would give vasopressors. Physicians with CCM training were more likely to perform pre-EETI resuscitation. PMID:27625717

  12. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  13. Colloids in sepsis: evenly distributed molecules surrounded by uneven questions.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2013-05-01

    Colloids are frequently used for fluid expansion in the intensive care unit, although its use on several clinical scenarios remains unproven of any relevant clinical benefit. The purpose of this article was to carry out a narrative review regarding the safety and efficacy of colloids in patients with sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the most commonly used colloids, albumin and starches. Colloids are effective fluid expanders and are able to restore the hemodynamic profile with less total volume than crystalloids. These properties appear to be preserved even in patients with sepsis with increased capillary permeability. However, some colloids are associated with renal impairment and coagulation abnormalities. Starch use was associated with increased mortality in two large clinical trials. Also, starches probably have significant renal adverse effects and may be related to more need for renal replacement therapy in severe sepsis. Albumin is the only colloid that has been shown safe in patients with sepsis and that may be associated with improved outcomes on specific subpopulations. No trial so far found any robust clinical end point favoring colloid use in patients with sepsis. Because there is no proven benefit of the use of most colloids in patients with sepsis, its use should not be encouraged outside clinical trials. Albumin is the only colloid solution that has proven to be safe, and its use may be considered on hypoalbuminemic patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, there are no robust data to recommend routine albumin administration in sepsis. Starch use should be avoided in patients with sepsis because of the recent findings of a multicenter randomized study until further evidence is available.

  14. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  15. Potential of surface acoustic wave biosensors for early sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Csete, Marie; Hunt, William D

    2013-08-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis is a difficult problem for intensivists and new biomarkers for early diagnosis have been difficult to come by. Here we discuss the potential of adapting a technology from the electronics industry, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, for diagnosis of multiple markers of sepsis in real time, using non-invasive assays of exhaled breath condensate. The principles and advantages of the SAW technology are reviewed as well as a proposed plan for adapting this flexible technology to early sepsis detection. PMID:23471596

  16. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Kalin M; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A; Haase, Krystal K; Maxvill, Kristen; Pass, Steven E; Alvarez, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis and offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population.

  17. Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Nutritional Support of Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Joshua A; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is characterized by profound changes in systemic and cellular metabolism that disrupt normal metabolic homeostasis. These metabolic changes can serve as biomarkers for disease severity. Lactate, a metabolite of anaerobic metabolism, is the most widely used ICU biomarker and it is incorporated into multiple management algorithms. Technological advances now make broader metabolic profiling possible, with early studies identifying metabolic changes associated with sepsis mortality. Finally, given the marked changes in metabolism in sepsis and the association of worse prognosis in patients with severe metabolic derangements, we summarize the seminal trials conducted to optimize nutrition in the ICU. PMID:27229648

  18. Novel Approaches to Neonatal Resuscitation and the Impact on Birth Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Te Pas, Arjan B; Sobotka, Kristina; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Historically, recommendations for neonatal resuscitation were largely based on dogma, but there is renewed interest in performing resuscitation studies at birth. The emphasis for resuscitation following birth asphyxia is administering effective ventilation, as adequate lung aeration leads not only to an increase in oxygenation but also increased pulmonary blood flow and heart rate. To aerate the lung, an initial sustained inflation can increase heart rate, oxygenation, and blood pressure recovery much faster when compared with standard ventilation. Hyperoxia should be avoided, and extra oxygen given to restore cardiac function and spontaneous breathing should be titrated based on oxygen saturations. PMID:27524447

  19. Vascular access in resuscitation: is there a role for the intraosseous route?

    PubMed

    Anson, Jonathan A

    2014-04-01

    Intraosseous vascular access is a time-tested procedure which has been incorporated into the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Intravenous access is often difficult to achieve in shock patients, and central line placement can be time consuming. Intraosseous vascular access, however, can be achieved quickly with minimal disruption of chest compressions. Newer insertion devices are easy to use, making the intraosseous route an attractive alternative for venous access during a resuscitation event. It is critical that anesthesiologists, who are often at the forefront of patient resuscitation, understand how to properly use this potentially life-saving procedure. PMID:24481418

  20. Review article: Part one: Goal-directed resuscitation--which goals? Haemodynamic targets.

    PubMed

    Holley, Anthony; Lukin, William; Paratz, Jennifer; Hawkins, Tracey; Boots, Robert; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    The use of appropriate resuscitation targets or end-points may facilitate early detection and appropriate management of shock. There is a fine balance between oxygen delivery and consumption, and when this is perturbed, an oxygen debt is generated. In this narrative review, we explore the value of global haemodynamic resuscitation end-points, including pulse rate, blood pressure, central venous pressure and mixed/central venous oxygen saturations. The evidence supporting the reliability of these parameters as end-points for guiding resuscitation and their potential limitations are evaluated. PMID:22313555

  1. Recommendations in dispatcher-assisted bystander resuscitation from emergency call center.

    PubMed

    García del Águila, J; López-Messa, J; Rosell-Ortiz, F; de Elías Hernández, R; Martínez del Valle, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; López-Herce, J; Cerdà-Vila, M; Roza-Alonso, C L; Bernardez-Otero, M

    2015-01-01

    Dispatch-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been shown as an effective measure to improve the survival of this process. The development of a unified protocol for all dispatch centers of the different emergency medical services can be a first step towards this goal in our environment. The process of developing a recommendations document and the realization of posters of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, agreed by different actors and promoted by the Spanish Resuscitation Council, is presented.

  2. Vasoactive agents for the treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes some commonly used vasoactive agents in patients with septic shock. Depending on their distinct pharmacological properties, their effects on vascular bed and cardiac function are different. For example, dopamine has equivalent effect on heart and vasculature, which can result in increases in cardiac output, mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Dobutamine is considered as inodilator because it has potent effect on cardiac systole and vasculature. Patients with sepsis and septic shock sometimes have coexisting cardiac dysfunction that justifies the use of dobutamine. Levosimendan is a relatively new agent exerting its inodilator effect by increasing sensitivity of myocardium to calcium. Some preliminary studies showed a promising result of levosimendan on reducing mortality. PMID:27713891

  3. Time course of cytokine levels in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1995-11-01

    In severe sepsis, a network of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8) is activated and blood levels of these cytokines are elevated, albeit inconsistently and with large individual variations. In addition, elevated blood levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), as well as of soluble cytokine receptors (sTNF-RI and II, IL-1ra), have been found. They seem to have a regulatory function in the host response. Levels of TNF and IL-6 are usually highest at the time of admission, whereas the time course of IL-1 beta levels (when detectable) can vary considerably. Limited data on IL-8 levels suggest that they may remain elevated for longer periods. Elevated levels of sTNFR and IL-1ra may also persist for a prolonged period of time. The pathogenetic significance of these observations is still unclear, but persistingly high levels of proinflammatory cytokines may be associated with organ failure and mortality.

  4. Sepsis: From Pattern to Mechanism and Back

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Namas, Rami A.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical entity in which complex inflammatory and physiological processes are mobilized, not only across a range of cellular and molecular interactions, but also in clinically relevant physiological signals accessible at the bedside. There is a need for a mechanistic understanding that links the clinical phenomenon of physiologic variability with the underlying patterns of the biology of inflammation, and we assert that this can be facilitated through the use of dynamic mathematical and computational modeling. An iterative approach of laboratory experimentation and mathematical/computational modeling has the potential to integrate cellular biology, physiology, control theory, and systems engineering across biological scales, yielding insights into the control structures that govern mechanisms by which phenomena, detected as biological patterns, are produced. This approach can represent hypotheses in the formal language of mathematics and computation, and link behaviors that cross scales and domains, thereby offering the opportunity to better explain, diagnose, and intervene in the care of the septic patient. PMID:23140124

  5. [Community acquired sepsis by Serratia rubidaea].

    PubMed

    Okada, Takanori; Yokota, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Isao

    2002-02-01

    A 48-year-old male who had a past history of alcoholic pancreatitis and diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital due to chills and vomiting, on August 13, 1998. His body temperature was 38.0 degrees C, and he had the disturbance of consciousness, tachypnea, tachycardia and hepatomegaly with tenderness. Laboratory findings showed highly inflammatory reactions, DIC and hepatorenal dysfunction. Abdominal CT and US revealed multiple liver abscess with portal vein thrombus. Serratia rubidaea was detected in the blood culture. SBT/CPZ and TOB were administered and he recovered. This is a rare case of Serratia rubidaea sepsis. It is also necessary to pay attention to Serratia infections as well as S. marcescens.

  6. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  7. Interprofessional sepsis education module: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Han-Oh; Medina, Damien; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2016-03-01

    Although there is an increasing emphasis on interprofessional collaboration for safer health care systems, there remains a paucity of opportunities for postgraduate trainees to engage in formal interprofessional education (IPE). Current opportunities for interprofessional learning, such as simulation sessions, typically do not provide true IPE because they often utilize actors or confederates as support staff, making residents the only stakeholders in the education experience. Here, we describe a flexible educational module designed to provide genuine IPE for physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. We outline how simulation, feedback, and group discussions can be used to teach interprofessional team communication, collaboration, and crew resource management skills-while, at the same time, also teaching a highly relevant medical topic (sepsis management) and thus resulting in learner engagement and motivation.

  8. A latent class approach for sepsis diagnosis supports use of procalcitonin in the emergency room for diagnosis of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the acknowledged problems in sepsis diagnosis, we use a novel way with the application of the latent class analysis (LCA) to determine the operative characteristics of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer (DD) and Procalcitonin (PCT) as diagnostic tests for sepsis in patients admitted to hospital care with a presumptive infection. Methods Cross-sectional study to determine the diagnostic accuracy of three biological markers against the gold standard of clinical definition of sepsis provided by an expert committee, and also against the likelihood of sepsis according to LCA. Patients were recruited in the emergency room within 24 hours of hospitalization and were follow-up daily until discharge. Results Among 765 patients, the expert committee classified 505 patients (66%) with sepsis, 112 (15%) with infection but without sepsis and 148 (19%) without infection. The best cut-offs points for CRP, DD, and PCT were 7.8 mg/dl, 1616 ng/ml and 0.3 ng/ml, respectively; but, neither sensitivity nor specificity reach 70% for any biomarker. The LCA analysis with the same three tests identified a “cluster” of 187 patients with several characteristics suggesting a more severe condition as well as better microbiological confirmation. Assuming this subset of patients as the new prevalence of sepsis, the ROC curve analysis identified new cut-off points for the tests and suggesting a better discriminatory ability for PCT with a value of 2 ng/ml. Conclusions Under a “classical” definition of sepsis three typical biomarkers (CRP, PCT and DD) are not capable enough to differentiate septic from non-septic patients in the ER. However, a higher level of PCT discriminates a selected group of patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24050481

  9. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and its carrier apolipoprotein M in human sepsis and in Escherichia coli sepsis in baboons.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Linder, Adam; Happonen, Kaisa E; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of vascular integrity and immune cell migration, carried in plasma by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) and by albumin. In sepsis, the protein and lipid composition of HDL changes dramatically. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in S1P and its carrier protein apoM during sepsis. For this purpose, plasma samples from both human sepsis patients and from an experimental Escherichia coli sepsis model in baboons were used. In the human sepsis cohort, previously studied for apoM, plasma demonstrated disease-severity correlated decreased S1P levels, the profile mimicking that of plasma apoM. In the baboons, a similar disease-severity dependent decrease in plasma levels of S1P and apoM was observed. In the lethal E. coli baboon sepsis, S1P decreased already within 6-8 hrs, whereas the apoM decrease was seen later at 12-24 hrs. Gel filtration chromatography of plasma from severe human or baboon sepsis on Superose 6 demonstrated an almost complete loss of S1P and apoM in the HDL fractions. S1P plasma concentrations correlated with the platelet count but not with erythrocytes or white blood cells. The liver mRNA levels of apoM and apoA1 decreased strongly upon sepsis induction and after 12 hr both were almost completely lost. In conclusion, during septic challenge, the plasma levels of S1P drop to very low levels. Moreover, the liver synthesis of apoM decreases severely and the plasma levels of apoM are reduced. Possibly, the decrease in S1P contributes to the decreased endothelial barrier function observed in sepsis. PMID:26990127

  10. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  11. Physicians' refusal to resuscitate at borderline gestational age.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-11-01

    Most neonatologists believe there is a minimal gestational age, below which it is appropriate to refuse to provide resuscitation or intensive care. Determination of this threshold should involve knowledge of the outcome data, but also an understanding of the potential for misuse of these data. In particular, there is a risk of deception, of the parents and of ourselves, due to the uncertainty of the true gestational age, and the "self-fulfilling prophecy" that may occur when a center refuses to try below a certain gestational age because they have had no survivors below that age. Finally, any refusal to treat requires ethical justification. Concepts such as futility and patient's best interest should play a role in the determination of the gestational age threshold, applied in light of the data's inherent weaknesses.

  12. Resuscitation great. Willem Einthoven: the development of the human electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Cajavilca, Christian; Varon, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    The electrocardiogram is one of the most commonly used diagnostic tools in healthcare. This ingenious device was developed and created in the early 1900s by Willem Einthoven, MD, PhD after studying the mechanisms of electromagnetism and Waller's capillary electrometer. Einthoven dedicated most of his research and clinical activities to improve the early versions of the electrical current recording medical devices. Einthoven's most notable invention was the string galvanometer which we now know as the electrocardiogram. Although the idea of using the string galvanometer as a diagnostic tool faced opposition by scientists and physicians of his time, he remained convinced of the potential of his machine to improve patient care. Einthoven's string galvanometer subsequently became the standard diagnostic tool for recognition and differentiation of heart conditions through the interpretation of cardiac waves, and has become standard practice in the field of resuscitation. In 1924, Einthoven received the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his development of the string galvanometer.

  13. Resuscitation of extremely preterm infants - controversies and current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja N; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in perinatal medicine, the management of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room remains a challenge. There is an increasing evidence for improved outcomes regarding the resuscitation and stabilisation of extremely preterm infants but there is a lack of evidence in the periviable (gestational age 23-25 wk) preterm subgroup. Presence of an experienced team during the delivery of extremely preterm infant to improve outcome is reviewed. Adaptation from foetal to neonatal cardiorespiratory haemodynamics is dependent on establishing an optimal functional residual capacity in the extremely preterm infants, thus enabling adequate gas exchange. There is sufficient evidence for a gentle approach to stabilisation of these fragile infants in the delivery room. Evidence for antenatal steroids especially in the periviable infants, delayed cord clamping, strategies to establish optimal functional residual capacity, importance of temperature control and oxygenation in delivery room in extremely premature infants is reviewed in this article. PMID:27170925

  14. Carbachol promotes gastrointestinal function during oral resuscitation of burn shock

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sen; Che, Jin-Wei; Tian, Yi-Jun; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of carbachol on gastrointestinal function in a dog model of oral resuscitation for burn shock. METHODS: Twenty Beagle dogs with intubation of the carotid artery, jugular vein and jejunum for 24 h were subjected to 35% total body surface area full-thickness burns, and were divided into three groups: no fluid resuscitation (NR, n = 10), in which animals did not receive fluid by any means in the first 24 h post-burn; oral fluid resuscitation (OR, n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with glucose-electrolyte solution (GES) with volume and rate consistent with the Parkland formula; and oral fluid with carbachol group (OR/CAR, n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with GES containing carbachol (20 μg/kg), with the same volume and rate as the OR group. Twenty-four hours after burns, all animals were given intravenous fluid replacement, and 72 h after injury, they received nutritional support. Hemodynamic and gastrointestinal parameters were measured serially with animals in conscious and cooperative state. RESULTS: The mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and plasma volume dropped markedly, and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion was reduced obviously after the burn injury in all the three groups. Hemodynamic parameters and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion in the OR and OR/CAR groups were promoted to pre-injury level at 48 and 72 h, respectively, while hemodynamic parameters in the NR group did not return to pre-injury level till 72 h, and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion remained lower than pre-injury level until 120 h post-burn. CO2 of the gastric mucosa and intestinal mucosa blood flow of OR/CAR groups were 56.4 ± 4.7 mmHg and157.7 ± 17.7 blood perfusion units (BPU) at 24 h post-burn, respectively, which were significantly superior to those in the OR group (65.8 ± 5.8 mmHg and 127.7 ± 11.9 BPU, respectively, all P < 0.05). Gastric emptying and intestinal absorption rates of GES were significantly reduced to the lowest level (52.8% and

  15. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care.

  16. Resuscitation great. Willem Einthoven: the development of the human electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Cajavilca, Christian; Varon, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    The electrocardiogram is one of the most commonly used diagnostic tools in healthcare. This ingenious device was developed and created in the early 1900s by Willem Einthoven, MD, PhD after studying the mechanisms of electromagnetism and Waller's capillary electrometer. Einthoven dedicated most of his research and clinical activities to improve the early versions of the electrical current recording medical devices. Einthoven's most notable invention was the string galvanometer which we now know as the electrocardiogram. Although the idea of using the string galvanometer as a diagnostic tool faced opposition by scientists and physicians of his time, he remained convinced of the potential of his machine to improve patient care. Einthoven's string galvanometer subsequently became the standard diagnostic tool for recognition and differentiation of heart conditions through the interpretation of cardiac waves, and has become standard practice in the field of resuscitation. In 1924, Einthoven received the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his development of the string galvanometer. PMID:18164799

  17. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care. PMID:20642055

  18. Long-Lasting Effects of Sepsis on Circadian Rhythms in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, Emma K.; Anderson, Sean T.; Moynagh, Paul N.; Coogan, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Daily patterns of activity and physiology are termed circadian rhythms and are driven primarily by an endogenous biological timekeeping system, with the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Previous studies have indicated reciprocal relationships between the circadian and the immune systems, although to date there have been only limited explorations of the long-term modulation of the circadian system by immune challenge, and it is to this question that we addressed ourselves in the current study. Sepsis was induced by peripheral treatment with lipopolysaccharide (5 mg/kg) and circadian rhythms were monitored following recovery. The basic parameters of circadian rhythmicity (free-running period and rhythm amplitude, entrainment to a light/dark cycle) were unaltered in post-septic animals compared to controls. Animals previously treated with LPS showed accelerated re-entrainment to a 6 hour advance of the light/dark cycle, and showed larger phase advances induced by photic stimulation in the late night phase. Photic induction of the immediate early genes c-FOS, EGR-1 and ARC was not altered, and neither was phase-shifting in response to treatment with the 5-HT-1a/7 agonist 8-OH-DPAT. Circadian expression of the clock gene product PER2 was altered in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of post-septic animals, and PER1 and PER2 expression patterns were altered also in the hippocampus. Examination of the suprachiasmatic nucleus 3 months after treatment with LPS showed persistent upregulation of the microglial markers CD-11b and F4/80, but no changes in the expression of various neuropeptides, cytokines, and intracellular signallers. The effects of sepsis on circadian rhythms does not seem to be driven by cell death, as 24 hours after LPS treatment there was no evidence for apoptosis in the suprachiasmatic nucleus as judged by TUNEL and cleaved-caspase 3 staining. Overall these data provide novel insight into how septic shock exerts chronic effects on the

  19. A plethora of angiopoietin-2 effects during clinical sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The interesting study by Davis and colleagues in the current issue of Critical Care expands on the increasingly recognized role of angiopoietins in human sepsis but raises a number of questions, which are discussed in this commentary. The authors describe an association between elevated angiopoietin (ang)-2 levels and impaired vascular reactivity, measured by the partly nitric oxide-dependent finger hyperemic response to forearm vascular occlusion, in patients with sepsis. This suggests that the ang-1/2-Tie2 system is involved in a number of pathophysiologic, phenotypic and perhaps prognostic alterations in human sepsis, on top of the effect on pulmonary endothelial barrier function. The novel inflammatory route may be a target for future therapeutic studies in human sepsis and acute lung injury, including those with activated protein C. PMID:20587077

  20. Paradoxical Roles of the Neutrophil in Sepsis: Protective and Deleterious

    PubMed Central

    Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Leite, Caio Abner Vitorino Gonçalves; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Colón, David Fernando; Borges, Vanessa de Fátima; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, an overwhelming inflammatory response syndrome secondary to infection, is one of the costliest and deadliest medical conditions worldwide. Neutrophils are classically considered to be essential players in the host defense against invading pathogens. However, several investigations have shown that impairment of neutrophil migration to the site of infection, also referred to as neutrophil paralysis, occurs during severe sepsis, resulting in an inability of the host to contain and eliminate the infection. On the other hand, the neutrophil antibacterial arsenal contributes to tissue damage and the development of organ dysfunction during sepsis. In this review, we provide an overview of the main events in which neutrophils play a beneficial or deleterious role in the outcome of sepsis. PMID:27199981

  1. Development of an e-learning package for sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anna; Henderson, James; Langmack, Gill

    Severe sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This article describes the collaborative development and implementation of an interactive online learning package to understand the key role nurses have in recognising and then starting to apply the Sepsis Six care bundle in clinical practice. The e-learning package, developed in a UK teaching hospital, uses a case study approach to address the knowledge that is required to be able to recognise sepsis, to understand the processes that occur and the ongoing care and treatment required. The package is relevant to final-year student nurses, newly registered nurses in preceptorship and other health professionals involved in assessing and treating patients who may be developing sepsis.

  2. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis. PMID:27413421

  3. Biomarkers for sepsis: a review with special attention to India.

    PubMed

    Nelson, George E; Mave, Vidya; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious infection and still a common cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-limited settings such as India. Even when microbiologic diagnostics are available, bacteremia is only identified in a proportion of patients who present with sepsis and bloodstream infections. Biomarkers have been used in a variety of disease processes and can help aid in diagnosing bacterial infections. There have been numerous biomarkers investigated to aid with diagnosis and prognostication in sepsis with the majority suffering from lack of sensitivity or specificity. Procalcitonin has been heralded as the biomarker that holds the most promise for bloodstream infections. Data are emerging in India, and in this review, we focus on the current data of biomarkers in sepsis with particular attention to how biomarkers could be used to augment diagnosis and treatment in India.

  4. Biomarkers for Sepsis: What Is and What Might Be?

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Bethany M.; Ayala, Alfred; Lomas-Neira, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Every year numerous individuals develop the morbid condition of sepsis. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are sorely needed. Difficulty in identifying such markers is in part due to the complex heterogeneity of sepsis, resulting from the broad and vague definition of this state/condition based on numerous possible clinical signs and symptoms as well as an incomplete understanding of the underlying pathobiology of this complex condition. This review considers some of the attempts that have been made so far, looking at both the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to sepsis, as well as genomic analysis, as sources of potential biomarkers. Irrespective, for functional biomarker(s) of sepsis to successfully translate from the laboratory to a clinical setting, the biomarker must be target specific and sensitive as well as easy to implement/interpret, and be cost effective, such that they can be utilized routinely in patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26417200

  5. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    PubMed

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care. PMID:23236089

  6. Translating teamwork behaviours from aviation to healthcare: development of behavioural markers for neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, E; Sexton, J; Helmreich, R

    2004-01-01

    Improving teamwork in healthcare may help reduce and manage errors. This paper takes a step toward that goal by (1) proposing a set of teamwork behaviours, or behavioural markers, for neonatal resuscitation; (2) presenting a data form for recording observations about these markers; and (3) comparing and contrasting different sets of teamwork behaviours that have been developed for healthcare. Data from focus groups of neonatal providers, surveys, and video recordings of neonatal resuscitations were used to identify some new teamwork behaviours, to translate existing aviation team behaviours to this setting, and to develop a data collection form. This behavioural marker audit form for neonatal resuscitation lists and defines 10 markers that describe specific, observable behaviours seen during the resuscitation of newborn infants. These markers are compared with those developed by other groups. Future research should determine the relations among these behaviours and errors, and test their usefulness in measuring the impact of team training interventions. PMID:15465957

  7. Resuscitation injuries complicating the interpretation of premortem trauma and natural disease in children.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, John

    2006-01-01

    Minor soft tissues injuries are common in both adults and children who have had cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Potentially life-threatening injuries are rare. The pre-arrest history in a resuscitated adult often assists the pathologist to interpret autopsy findings. In contrast, an infant or child may not have a reliable history. In this situation, it may be difficult if not impossible to distinguish resuscitation injuries from pre-existing accidental or inflicted trauma. I describe two children who had significant autopsy-documented injuries initially attributed to abuse. The State filed murder charges against the caretaker in each case. However, further history and review of the medical records suggested that resuscitation rather than pre-arrest trauma caused almost all of the injuries. The State dismissed the charges in the first case. A jury returned a "not guilty" verdict in the second. It is essential to consider the entire history and not just autopsy findings when performing a death investigation.

  8. Use of high-dose epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate during neonatal resuscitation: is there proven benefit?

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Myra H; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-01

    For adults and pediatric age patients, high-dose intravenous epinephrine was recommended if standard-dose epinephrine failed to achieve return of spontaneous circulation. More recent trials suggest that high-dose epinephrine is not beneficial and may result in increased harm. There are no randomized clinical studies of high-dose versus standard-dose intravenous epinephrine in neonates. Routine use of high-dose epinephrine during neonatal resuscitation cannot be recommended. Although sodium bicarbonate has been used during neonatal resuscitation, the only randomized controlled trial of its use during brief neonatal resuscitation showed no benefit. Sodium bicarbonate infusion during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has several known and potential side effects. The use of sodium bicarbonate infusion should be discouraged during brief CPR. Whether sodium bicarbonate is beneficial for infants who require prolonged CPR despite adequate ventilation is unknown.

  9. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    PubMed

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care.

  10. Nurses' responses to do-not-resuscitate orders in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Savage, T A; Cullen, D L; Kirchhoff, K T; Pugh, E J; Foreman, M D

    1987-01-01

    A statewide survey of nurses in perinatal centers was conducted to assess the prevalence of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and to examine factors influencing nurses in those centers in their compliance with DNR orders. Three nurses in each of 10 perinatal centers were asked to complete a questionnaire on DNR policies and nurses' compliance and to respond to four hypothetical clinical situations. Eighteen of the 27 responding nurses reported the existence of a DNR policy. Factors affecting compliance with DNR orders were agreement that the infant should not be resuscitated (n = 24) or respect for the parents' wishes (n = 19). Nurses' intention to resuscitate despite a DNR order varied, depending on the description of the infant. Multiple regression analyses showed that subjective norms (beta = .41 to .82) rather than attitudes (beta = .17 to .39) exerted a more powerful influence on nurses' decisions not to resuscitate.

  11. Resuscitation duration inequality by patient characteristics in emergency department out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minoo; Kim, Joonghee; Kim, Kyuseok

    2014-01-01

    Objective Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients unresponsive to basic life support are frequently transferred to emergency departments (EDs) for further resuscitation. Although some survive with good neurologic outcomes, additional resuscitation in EDs is often futile. Without a dedicated termination of resuscitation (TOR) rule for ED resuscitation, the decision when to stop the resuscitation is up to emergency physicians. In this study, we assessed the association between patient characteristics and duration of resuscitation in EDs to understand how emergency physicians decide when to terminate cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods A retrospective analysis of the OHCA registry of a single ED was conducted. Adult (18 years or older) patients without any return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after unsuccessful ED advanced cardiac life support were included. The primary endpoint was duration of resuscitation attempts. Prehospital and demographic factors were assessed as independent variables. The relationship between these factors and duration of resuscitative attempts was analyzed with multivariable quantile regression. Results From January 2008 to August 2012, ED resuscitation was terminated without ROSC in 266 patients (53.5%). The duration of resuscitative attempts was significantly shorter if any of the currently recognized poor prognostic factors was present. Interestingly, controversial factors such as female sex and older age were significantly associated with shorter resuscitation duration, while factors definitively indicating poor prognosis, such as severe trauma and poor baseline neurological status, showed no significant association. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that physicians adjust the resuscitation duration according to their subjective prediction of futility despite the absence of evidence-based TOR guidelines.

  12. Heart Rate Variability in Porcine Progressive Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Sviglerova, Jitka; Florova, Blanka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) alterations could serve as an indicator of sepsis progression and outcome, however, the relationships of HRV and major pathophysiological processes of sepsis remain unclear. Therefore, in this experimental study HRV was investigated in a clinically relevant long-term porcine model of severe sepsis/septic shock. HRV was analyzed by several methods and the parameters were correlated with pathophysiological processes of sepsis. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented domestic pigs of either gender, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. Experimental subjects were screened up to the refractory shock development or death. ECG was continuously recorded throughout the experiment, afterwards RR intervals were detected and HRV parameters computed automatically using custom made measurement and analysis MATLAB routines. In all septic animals, progressive hyperdynamic septic shock developed. The statistical measures of HRV, geometrical measures of HRV and Poincaré plot analysis revealed a pronounced reduction of HRV that developed quickly upon the onset of sepsis and was maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis demonstrated a decrease in the high frequency component and increase in the low frequency component together with an increase of the low/high frequency component ratio. The reduction of HRV parameters preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes including heart rate increase or shock progression. In a clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced progressive septic shock, reduction of HRV parameters heralded sepsis development. HRV reduction was associated with a pronounced parasympathetic inhibition and a shift of sympathovagal balance. Early reduction of HRV may serve as a non-invasive and sensitive marker of systemic inflammatory syndrome, thereby widening the therapeutic window for early interventions. PMID:26779039

  13. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis. PMID:25153878

  14. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2015-12-01

    Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID:26683913

  15. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  16. Opsonic Fibronectin Deficiency and Sepsis: Cause or Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Lanser, Marc E.; Saba, Thomas M.

    1982-01-01

    Opsonic fibronectin is known to modulate macrophage (RE cell) and neutrophil Phagocytic function. Its depletion has been documented following trauma, burn, and operation in patients with rapid restoration of normal levels unless bacteremia and/or wound sepsis intervenes. Sepsis is associated with a secondary phase of opsonic fibronectin deficiency. We have observed in burn patients that this secondary phase of opsonic fibronectin depletion following trauma and burn is seen two to three days prior to the onset of clinical sepsis, raising the question of whether this deficiency sensitized the host to the subsequent development of sepsis or whether its deplection was merely an unsuspected sensitive indication of preclinical sepsis. To address the possibility that opsonic fibronectin deficiency might lower resistance to sepsis, Sprague-Dawley rats (200 gm) were partially depleted (35%) of their opsonic fibronectin prior to intraperitoneal inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus. Mortality to S. aureus peritonitis was significantly (p < 0.05) increased in animals with fibronectin deficiency. Furthermore, in control animals, nonsurvival was also associated with significantly (p < 0.05) lower initial fibronectin levels than survival. However, peritonitis itself also resulted in an early (within one hour) depletion of opsonic fibronectin followed by a marked “hyperopsonemia” within 12 hours in both groups. Thus, opsonic fibronectin depletion decreases resistance to sepsis, and the development of sepsis itself will initiate opsonic fibronectin deficiency. Host defense against infection may depend on early restoration and maintenance of normal opsonic fibronectin levels following trauma, burn, and operation, as well as the ability of the host to mount an appropriate hyperopsonemic elevation of fibronectin levels in response to infection. PMID:7059244

  17. Functional outcomes of general medical patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is a common cause for admission to the general medical ward. Previous work has demonstrated substantial new long-term disability in patients with severe sepsis, but the short-term functional outcomes of patients admitted to the general medical floor -- where the majority of severe sepsis is treated -- are largely unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients initially admitted to non-ICU medical wards at a tertiary care academic medical center. Severe sepsis was confirmed by three physician reviewers, using the International Consensus Conference definition of sepsis. Baseline functional status, disposition location, and receipt of post-acute skilled care were recorded using a structured abstraction instrument. Results 3,146 discharges had severe sepsis by coding algorithm; from a random sample of 111 patients, 64 had the diagnosis of severe sepsis confirmed by reviewers. The mean age of the 64 patients was 63.5 years +/- 18.0. Prior to admission, 80% of patients lived at home and 50.8% of patients were functionally independent. Inpatient mortality was 12.5% and 37.5% of patients were discharged to a nursing facility. Of all patients in the cohort, 50.0% were discharged home, and 66.7% of patients who were functionally independent at baseline were discharged to home. Conclusions New physical debility is a common feature of severe sepsis in patients initially cared for on the general medical floor. Debility occurs even in those with good baseline physical function. Interventions to improve the poor functional outcomes of this population are urgently needed. PMID:24330544

  18. Manatí Medical Center Sepsis Management Epidemiological Study.

    PubMed

    Morales Serrano, Tamara; Ramos, Shirley; Lara Gonzalez, Yanira; Torres Colberg, Heileene; Vera Quiñones, Alexis; Miranda Santiago, Roberto; Amill, Samuel; Otero, Marielys; Cintron, Vielka; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the combination of infection and physiological changes known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There have been improvements in mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients based on "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" guidelines. Current management of sepsis at our Institution follows no specific mandatory protocols. This study aimed to verify the incidence and outcome of sepsis in Manati Medical Center, Puerto Rico. An observational retrospective study was conducted. All the Emergency Department admissions from May 1/ to October 31/ 2013 were screened for sepsis per ICD-9 code. For all included patients, demographic and clinical data at ED admission were collected. During this period 8931 patients were admitted and 148 met criteria for sepsis and related conditions. The overall mortality rate was 43.91%. Mortality increased with age, from 10.52% among ≤ 44 years old to 68.75% in those ≥ 85 years old. The main infection sources were respiratory (32.66%) and urinary tract (24.62%). Mean age among non-survivors was 10.8 years higher than the survivor group (95% Cl 5.2-1 6.5, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed an increased fatality rate associated to severity of sepsis (HR 1.33; 95% Cl; 1.03-1.72, p = 0.02) and the APACHE2 score (HR 1.05; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.09 p = 0.03). Our data suggests that sepsis is an important problem to consider. We strongly encourage an institutional standardized protocol to diminish the mortality impact. Our results will allow adequate preventive strategies to improve early diagnosis, mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients.

  19. Molecular diagnosis of sepsis: New aspects and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, L.; Hunfeld, K.-P.; Kost, G.

    2014-01-01

    By shortening the time to pathogen identification and allowing for detection of organisms missed by blood culture, new molecular methods may provide clinical benefits for the management of patients with sepsis. While a number of reviews on the diagnosis of sepsis have recently been published we here present up-to-date new developments including multiplex PCR, mass spectrometry and array techniques. We focus on those techniques that are commercially available and for which clinical studies have been performed and published. PMID:24678402

  20. Effect of early goal-directed therapy on mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Chi, Dongmei; Wang, Siyang; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patients with severe sepsis or septic shock could benefit from a strict and early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol recommended by Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) Guidelines. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE/OVID and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched between March 1983 and March 2015. Eligible studies evaluated the outcomes of EGDT versus usual care or standard therapy in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The primary outcomes were mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days. Included studies must report at least one metric of mortality. Results 5 studies that enrolled 4303 patients with 2144 in the EGDT group and 2159 in the control group were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, there were slight decreases of mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days in the random-effect model in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock receiving EGDT resuscitation. However, none of the differences reached statistical significance (RR=0.86; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.06; p=0.16; p for heterogeneity=0.008, I2=71%; RR=0.94; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.10; p=0.46; p for heterogeneity=0.16, I2=43%; RR=0.98; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.10; p=0.75; p for heterogeneity=0.87, I2=0%, respectively). Conclusions The current meta-analysis pooled data from five RCTs and found no survival benefit of EGDT in patients with sepsis. However, the included trials are not sufficiently homogeneous and potential confounding factors in the negative trials (ProCESS, ARISE and ProMISe) might bias the results and diminish the treatment effect of EGDT. Further well-designed studies should eliminate all potential source of bias to determine if EGDT has a mortality benefit. PMID:26932135