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Sample records for 6-hydroxydopamine 6-ohda induced

  1. Protective effects of quercetin glycosides, rutin, and isoquercetrin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    PubMed

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that free radicals induced oxidative stress is a major causative agent in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease. Quercetin glycosides, namely rutin and isoquercitrin, are flavonoid polyphenol compounds found ubiquitously in fruits and vegetables and have been known to possess antioxidant effects. This study was designed to compare the neuroprotective effects of quercetin glycosides rutin and isoquercitrin in 6-OHDA-induced rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells. The results showed that both rutin and isoquercitrin significantly increased antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione level that were attenuated by 6-OHDA in PC-12 cells. There was no significant difference in the activation of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase enzymes between rutin and isoquercitrin. These two glycosides were equally effective in suppressing lipid peroxidation in 6-OHDA-induced PC-12 cells as both compounds suppressed the malondialdehyde generation and prevented cell damage. In conclusion, quercetin glycosides rutin and isoquercetrin are having a significant neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA toxicity in PC-12 cells. PMID:26542606

  2. Adafenoxate abolishes the amnesia induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Genkova-Papazova, M G; Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G; Lazarova-Bakarova, M B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment on learning and memory and on the levels of biogenic monoamines in some brain structures, as well as the influence of the nootropic drug adafenoxate on 6-OHDA effect was studied in shuttle box and step down trained rats. In mature rats injected with 6-OHDA postnatal, learning and retention were impaired and the noradrenaline (NA) level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was decreased. Adafenoxate abolished the amnestic effect of 6-OHDA and restored the NA level to normal in the above-mentioned brain structures. This finding suggests the important role of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system in 6-OHDA-induced amnesia and the favorable effect of adafenoxate on learning and memory impaired by 6-OHDA. PMID:8412411

  3. EGCG Protects against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurotoxicity in a Cell Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Reddy, Manju B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes severe brain dopamine depletion. Disruption of iron metabolism may be involved in the PD progression. Objective. To test the protective effect of (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) induced neurotoxicity by regulating iron metabolism in N27 cells. Methods. Protection by EGCG in N27 cells was assessed by SYTOX green assay, MTT, and caspase-3 activity. Iron regulatory gene and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Intracellular iron uptake was measured using 55Fe. The EGCG protection was further tested in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by immunocytochemistry. Results. EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced cell toxicity. 6-OHDA treatment significantly (p < 0.05) increased divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and hepcidin and decreased ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) level, whereas pretreatment with EGCG counteracted the effects. The increased 55Fe (by 96%, p < 0.01) cell uptake confirmed the iron burden by 6-OHDA and was reduced by EGCG by 27% (p < 0.05), supporting the DMT1 results. Pretreatment with EGCG and 6-OHDA significantly increased (p < 0.0001) TH+ cell count (~3-fold) and neurite length (~12-fold) compared to 6-OHDA alone in primary mesencephalic neurons. Conclusions. Pretreatment with EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by regulating genes and proteins involved in brain iron homeostasis, especially modulating hepcidin levels. PMID:26770869

  4. Alpha-linolenic acid suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shashikumar, S; Pradeep, H; Chinnu, Salim; Rajini, P S; Rajanikant, G K

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the specific and massive loss of dopamine (DA) containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and aggregation of protein α-synuclein. There are a few animal studies, which indirectly implicate the neuroprotective action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we exposed Caenorhabditis elegans (both wild type N2, and transgenic strain, UA44) to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, the model neurotoxicant) and evaluated the extent of protection offered by alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Larval stage worms (L1/L2) of N2 and transgenic strains were exposed to 6-OHDA (25 mM) with or without ALA (10, 50 and 100 μM) for 48 h at 20 °C. After 48 h, while the N2 worms were assessed for their responses in terms of locomotion, pharyngeal pumping, lifespan and AChE activity, the transgenic worms were monitored for dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. Worms exposed to 6-OHDA exhibited a significant reduction (48%) in the locomotion rate. Interestingly, supplementation with ALA increased the locomotion rate in 6-OHDA treated worms. A marked decrease (45%) in thrashing was evident in worms exposed to 6-OHDA while thrashing was slightly improved in worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA and higher concentrations of ALA. Interestingly, worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA with ALA (100 μM) exhibited a significant increase in thrashing (66 ± 1.80 thrashes/30s). The pharyngeal pumping rate declined significantly in the case of worms exposed to 6-OHDA (35%). However, the worms co-treated with ALA exhibited significant recovery in pharyngeal pumping. The mean survival for the control worms was 26 days, while the worms exposed to 6-OHDA, showed a marked reduction in survival (21 days). Worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA and ALA showed a concentration-dependent increase in lifespan compared to those exposed to 6-OHDA alone (23, 25 and 26 days respectively). Transgenic worms

  5. Cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity via its antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by degeneration and loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Increasing evidence has indicated that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therapeutic options that target the antioxidant machinery may have potential in the treatment of PD. Cordycepin, a nucleoside isolated from Cordyceps species displayed potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity as well as underlying mechanisms is still unclear. In this present study, we investigated the protective effect of cordycepin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism. We observed that cordycepin effectively inhibited 6-OHDA-induced cell death, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cordycepin also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA as observed in the reduction of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial as well as the inhibition of caspase-3. In addition cordycepin markedly reduced cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Cordycepin also significantly increased the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in 6-OHDA-treated cells. The results obtained unambiguously demonstrated that cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity through its potent antioxidant activity. PMID:27261571

  6. AMPHETAMINE-, SCOPOLAMINE-, AND CAFFEINE-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY FOLLOWING 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE LESIONS OF THE MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As previously reported, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions to the region of the nucleus accumbens blocked the locomotor activation induced by low doses of d-amphetamine, and produced a supersensitive locomotor response to the dopamine (DA) agonist, apomorphine. This same lesion, ...

  7. Duration of drug action of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Oana, Fumiki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Ijiro, Tomoyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hiratochi, Masahiro

    2015-12-16

    Although 6-hydroxydopamine-induced (6-OHDA-induced) rats are a well-known Parkinson's disease model, the effects of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions are not completely understood. We produced mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions and measured their total locomotion counts following administration of several dopamine D2 agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole, cabergoline, rotigotine, apomorphine, talipexole, and quinelorane). Cabergoline showed the longest duration of drug action, which was in agreement with its long-lived anti-Parkinson effects in rats and humans. In contrast, pramipexole and ropinirole had notably short durations of drug action. We demonstrated that mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions accompanied with significant lesions in the striatum may be reasonable models to predict the action duration of anti-Parkinson drug candidates in humans. PMID:26559726

  8. Antagonism of quercetin against tremor induced by unilateral striatal lesion of 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xin; Yuan, Xia; Du, Li-Da; He, Guo-Rong; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in many plants, is reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tremor effects of quercetin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. In rats, quercetin had no effect on apomorphine-induced rotations, but it could significantly attenuate muscle tremor of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Interestingly, quercetin could decrease the burst frequency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that quercetin may have a protective effect on models to mimic muscle tremors of Parkinson's disease. This effect of quercetin may be associated with serotonergic system, but further study is needed. PMID:26217978

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) mediates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Bower, Kimberly A; Ma, Cuiling; Fang, Shengyun; Thiele, Carol J; Luo, Jia

    2004-07-01

    The causes of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) are poorly understood. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a PD mimetic, is widely used to model this neurodegenerative disorder in vitro and in vivo; however, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. We demonstrate here that 6-OHDA evoked endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which was characterized by an up-regulation in the expression of GRP78 and GADD153 (Chop), cleavage of procaspase-12, and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 alpha in a human dopaminergic neuronal cell line (SH-SY5Y) and cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3beta) responds to ER stress, and its activity is regulated by phosphorylation. 6-OHDA significantly inhibited phosphorylation of GSK3beta at Ser9, whereas it induced hyperphosphorylation of Tyr216 with little effect on GSK3beta expression in SH-SY5Y cells and PC12 cells (a rat dopamine cell line), as well as CGNs. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the expression of cyclin D1, a substrate of GSK3beta, and dephosphorylated Akt, the upstream signaling component of GSK3beta. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an ER stress-responsive phosphatase, was involved in 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta dephosphorylation (Ser9). Blocking GSK3beta activity by selective inhibitors (lithium, TDZD-8, and L803-mts) prevented 6-OHDA-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), DNA fragmentations and cell death. With a tetracycline (Tet)-controlled TrkB inducible system, we demonstrated that activation of TrkB in SH-SY5Y cells alleviated 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta dephosphorylation (Ser9) and ameliorated 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. TrkB activation also protected CGNs against 6-OHDA-induced damage. Although antioxidants also offered neuroprotection, they had little effect on 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta activation. These results suggest that GSK3beta is a critical intermediate in pro-apoptotic signaling cascades that are associated with

  10. Echinacoside Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Inflammatory Responses in PC12 Cells via Reducing ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hua; Xuan, Zhao-Hong; Tian, Shuo; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses are involved in the mechanism of cell damage in PD. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a dopamine analog, specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Echinacoside (ECH) is a phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the stems of Cistanche salsa, showing a variety of neuroprotective effects in previous studies. The present study was to investigate its effect against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity and possible mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced cell viability, decreased oxidation-reduction activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis compared with untreated PC12 cells. However, echinacoside treatment significantly attenuated these changes induced by 6-OHDA. In addition, echinacoside also could significantly alleviate the inflammatory responses induced by 6-OHDA. Further research showed that echinacoside could reduce 6-OHDA-induced ROS production in PC12 cells. These results suggest that the underlying mechanism of echinacoside against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity may be involve in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses by reducing ROS production. PMID:25788961

  11. Effect of WR-1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced catalepsy and IL-6 level in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play a key role in pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger WR-1065 on catalepsy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of interleukin 6(IL-6) and striatum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental model of PD. Materials and Methods: Seventy two male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups and 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat) was infused unilaterally into substantia nigra pars copmacta (SNc) to induce PD. Catalepsy was measured by standard bar test, CSF level of IL-6 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and SOD activity measured by spectrophotometric method. In pre-treatment groups WR-1065 (20, 40 and 80 μg/2 μl/rat/day, for 3 days) was infused into the SNc before 6-OHDA administration and 21 days later, as a recovery period, behavioral and molecular assay tests were done. Results: Our results showed that pre-treatment with WR-1065 improved (P<0.001) 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in a dose dependent manner. In 6-OHDA-lesioned animals SOD activity in SNc and CSF level of IL-6 was decreased markedly (P<0.001) when compared with non-lesioned group, while pre-treatment with WR-1065(P<0.001) restored their levels up to the normal range. Conclusion: Our study indicated that pre-treatment with WR-1065 could modulate catalepsy and IL-6 level in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Also WR1065 could increase SOD activity up to normal range. It can be regarded as an anti-oxidative drug in prevention or adjunctive therapy of PD. PMID:27403255

  12. Chemoreflex and baroreflex alterations in Parkinsonism induced by 6-OHDA in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Deborah; Lopes, Fernanda Novi Cortegoso; Crestani, Carlos Cesar; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2015-10-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is mainly characterized by motor signals. However, non-motor signals also affect and decrease the quality of life of PD patients. Among these non-motor signs are cardiovascular disorders as orthostatic hypotension, postprandial hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias, which may be due to the involvement of both central nervous system and peripheral autonomic nervous system. In the present study we investigated the cardiovascular function, evaluating cardiovascular reflexes (chemoreflex and baroreflex), in an animal model of Parkinsonism induced by bilateral infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The results showed that the animals induced to Parkinsonism had lower arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate HR) compared to control animals. We showed that after activation of the baroreceptors by phenylephrine (Phe) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the baroreflex sensitivity index was not changed between the groups. However, there was a greater increase in the AP when stimulated with Phe and greater tachycardia when stimulated with SNP in 6-OHDA animals. After activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors through KCN injection (cytotoxic hypoxia), there was a higher increase in pressor and bradycardic response in injured animals with bilateral 6-OHDA. These changes in the cardiovascular reflexes may be important adjustments mechanisms to maintain the cerebral blood flow in those animals, and may be a result of denervation supersensitivity to catecholamines in autonomic targets. PMID:26409036

  13. Neurosteroid allopregnanolone attenuates cognitive dysfunctions in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nezhadi, Akram; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh; Shabani, Mohammad; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2016-05-15

    Cognitive deficits have an extensive influence on the quality of life of the Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Previous studies have shown that lack of steroid hormones have an important role in the development of PD. Therefore, in this study the effects of neurosteroid allopregnanolone (Allo) on the PD-induced cognitive disorders were assessed. To simulate PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was injected into the rat's substantia nigra. Allo (5 and 20mg/kg, orally) were administered on the day after the 6-OHDA injection and continued during the entire treatment period (two months). Cognitive behaviors were assessed by Moris water maze (MWM), novel object recognition (NOR) and object location tasks. The data indicated that Allo significantly improved the 6-OHDA-induced cognitive impairment which revealed by the reduction of time spent to find out platform (escape latency) and the increase of retention time in MWM test and also with increase in the exploration index in NOR and object location tasks. Present study strongly supports the pro-cognitive property of allopregnanolone in PD. PMID:26970579

  14. R-apomorphine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Liang, Li-Wu; Chen, Zheng-Jing; Ji, Hui-Ru; Wang, Mei-Kang; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Li, Cao; Xu, Jian-Yang

    2006-11-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was not only to assess the retrograde degenerative changes in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, but also to use this 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of R-apomorphine (R-APO). Methods The partial lesion was obtained by intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA. R-APO administration (10 mg/kg, s.c.) started 15 min prior to lesioning and continued daily for another 22 days post surgery. Testing was carried out 5 weeks after lesioning. We investigated the histology and associated behavior and neurochemical changes. Structural and functional deficits were quantified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) / Nissl-staining cell number counting, striatal dopamine (DA) content determination and amphetamine-induced rotation analysis. Results R-APO-treatment attenuated the amphetamine-induced ipsiversive rotation 5 weeks after the lesion induction. R-APO administration for 22 days significantly reduced the size of the lesion at the level of the SN from 50% (control group) to 69%. Moreover, the cell shape resembled that observed in the intact animals. R-APO treatment significantly increased the number of cells in both the lesion and the intact sides of VTA by 60%, suggesting selective neurotrophic effect of R-APO in this area. Finally, R-APO-treatment significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion and normalized dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios. Conclusion We conclude that R-APO has neuroprotective and possible neurotrophic effect on a striatal lesion with 6-OHDA, suggesting that this drug may have rescuing properties in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease. These effects are more pronounced in VTA and enhance with duration of treatment. PMID:17690718

  15. Myricitrin Ameliorates 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the Substantia Nigra of Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, resulting from the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of DA neuronal loss in PD is still unclear; however, accumulating evidence suggests that treatment with certain flavonoids can induce neuroprotective properties, such as activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models of PD. The bioflavonoid myricitrin is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is unclear whether systemic treatment with myricitrin can protect neurons against neurotoxin-induced DA degeneration in vivo via the preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the induction of mTORC1 activation. Our results found no significant neuroprotective effect of 30 mg/kg myricitrin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. However, myricitrin treatment with 60 mg/kg protected DA neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, myricitrin treatment preserved TH enzyme activity and mTORC1 activation in nigral DA neurons in the SN of 6-OHDA-treated mice, and its treatment suppressed an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α expression in activated microglia. These results suggest that myricitrin may have neuroprotective properties linked to mTORC1 activation, preservation of TH enzyme activity, and anti-neuroinflammation for preventing DA neuronal degeneration in vivo. PMID:26991235

  16. Cortex Fraxini (Qingpi) Protects Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ya; Zhang, Huan; Lam, Kim-Hung; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder having close relationship with oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cortex Fraxini (QP) is a kind of traditional Chinese medicinal herb with antioxidant properties. It may be a potential candidate for preventing the development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the key objective of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of QP water extract on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. It was found that QP water extract possesses strong antioxidant property with SC50 = 0.15 mg/mL. Total phenolic content of QP water extract was found to be 200.78 ± 2.65 mg GAE/g. QP water extract's free radical scavenging capacity was demonstrated by reversing the increased level of intracellular ROS induced by 6-OHDA, using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Moreover, QP water extract (0.5 mg/mL) could remarkably increase the viability of PC12 cells treated with 6-OHDA. The protective effect of QP water extract was found to be via inhibiting MEK/ERK pathway and reversing PI3-K/Akt/GSK3β pathway. The current results suggest that QP might be a potential candidate for preventing the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD. PMID:26347850

  17. Beneficial effects of sodium butyrate in 6-OHDA induced neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities: Modulation of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev; Singh, Sumel

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have investigated the involvement of epigenetic modifications in PD. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to be beneficial in cognitive and motor deficit states. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - induced experimental PD like symptoms in rats. To produce motor deficit, 6-OHDA was administered unilaterally in the right medial forebrain bundle. Three weeks after 6-OHDA administration, the rats were challenged with apomorphine. Following this, the animals were treated with sodium butyrate (150 and 300 mg/kg i.p.) once daily for 14 days. Movement abnormalities were assessed by battery of behavioral tests. Biochemically, oxidative stress markers, neuroinflammation and dopamine were measured in striatal brain homogenate. Further, to explore the molecular mechanism(s), we measured the level of global H3 histone acetylation and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). 6-OHDA administration results in significant motor deficit along with reduction in striatal dopamine level. 6-OHDA treated rats showed elevated oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. Treatment with sodium butyrate results in significant attenuation of motor deficits and increased striatal dopamine level. Moreover, sodium butyrate treatment attenuated the oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. These effects occur concurrently with increased global H3 histone acetylation and BDNF levels. Thus, the observed results of the present study are indicative for the therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in PD. PMID:26048426

  18. Neuroprotective effects of tenuigenin in a SH-SY5Y cell model with 6-OHDA-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhigang; Shi, Fang; Wang, Yong; Lu, Li; Zhang, Zhanjun; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiaomin

    2011-06-22

    Tenuigenin, an active component of Polygala tenuifolia root extracts, has been shown to provide antioxidative and anti-aging effects in Alzheimer's disease, as well as to promote proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells. However, the effects of tenuigenin on Parkinson's disease remain unclear. In the present study, SH-SY5Y cells were utilized to determine the effects of tenuigenin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced injury. Results showed that 1.0 × 10⁻¹-10 μM tenuigenin significantly promoted cell viability and reduced cell death. In addition, tenuigenin protected mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) against 6-OHDA damage and significantly increased glutathione and superoxide dismutase expression. At the mRNA level, tenuigenin resulted in down-regulation of caspase-3, but up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression in 6-OHDA damaged cells. These results suggested that tenuigenin provides neuroprotection to dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA-induced damage. The neuroprotective mechanisms might involve antioxidative effects, maintenance of mitochondrial function, and regulation of caspase-3 and tyrosine hydroxylase expression and activity. Tenuigenin could provide a novel antioxidative strategy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:21536104

  19. Salicylic acid protects against chronic L-DOPA-induced 6-OHDA generation in experimental model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Borah, Anupom; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2010-07-16

    The present study evaluated the ability of salicylic acid (SA) to attenuate long-term L-DOPA-induced 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) formation in the striatum of mice, and to protect against the resulting dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The production of 6-OHDA from dopamine in vitro from ferrous-ascorbate-dopamine (FAD) hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) generating system or in vivo in the striatum following prolonged administration of L-DOPA in mice were found to be significantly attenuated by SA. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of FAD, but not equivalent dose of ferrous ion or dopamine individually, caused significant striatal dopamine depletion, which was blocked by SA administration. The dose- and time-dependent increase in the formation of 6-OHDA following L-DOPA treatment in the mouse striatum was synergistically enhanced to the systemic administration of the parkinsonian neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. SA treatment significantly attenuated the L-DOPA plus the parkinsonian neurotoxin-induced striatal 6-OHDA generation, and protected against striatal dopamine loss. The present study demonstrated a novel mode of dopaminergic neuroprotection by SA and its possible therapeutic implication in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:20470760

  20. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence. PMID:27034665

  1. Tetraspanin (TSP-17) Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Neda; Holmes, Alexander; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1) and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling. PMID:25474638

  2. Inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by l-carnosine in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun-Mi; Jang, Eun-Hee; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Ju-Hee; Park, Chang-Shin; Han, Seung Baik; Kim, Jun Sig; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Pie, Jae-Eun; Shin, Dong Wun

    2009-07-31

    Conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum malfunction (ER stress) play a key role in the development of various human diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Carnosine is an endogenous peptide, present in excitable tissues such as brain and skeletal muscle. Although there are reports suggesting that carnosine has a biological role independent of its antioxidant activity, there have been no reports of the effects of carnosine on the ER stress response. We investigated the effects of carnosine on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death and ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells. After assessing control cell viability in serum-free conditions for 24h (100% viability), we found that 50 microM 6-OHDA reduced cell viability to 76.4% of control values, whereas addition of 10mM carnosine significantly reduced cell death to 96.1% viability in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with its cytoprotective action, carnosine markedly inhibited subsequent ER stress responses, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) and c-jun, expression of glucose regulatory protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein, and mRNA splicing of X-box protein 1. The measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by 6-OHDA showed that addition of 10mM carnosine slightly but obviously inhibits the 6-OHDA-induced ROS production. In conclusion, our results show that carnosine almost completely inhibits 6-OHDA-induced ER stress responses and cytotoxicity, and that slight antioxidant activity of carnosine against 6-OHDA is observed. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate clinical uses for carnosine. PMID:19394406

  3. Agmatine Protects Against 6-OHDA-Induced Apoptosis, and ERK and Akt/GSK Disruption in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmat; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Moosavi, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a metabolite of dopamine is known to induce dopaminergic cell toxicity which makes that a suitable agent inducing an experimental model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Agmatine has been shown to protect against some cellular and animal PD models. This study was aimed to assess whether agmatine prevents 6-OHDA-induced SH-SY5Y cell death and if yes, then how it affects Akt/glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signals. The cells were treated with different drugs, and their viability was examined via MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay and morphological observation. Western blot studies were done to assess cleaved caspase-3, Akt/GSK-3β, and ERK proteins. 6-OHDA-induced cell death and caspase-3 cleavage, while agmatine prevented those changes. 6-OHDA also decreased the amount of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt)/Akt while increased GSK-3β activity which was prevented by agmatine. Additionally, this toxin increased pERK/ERK ratio which was averted again by agmatine. The PI3/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, impeded the changes induced by agmatine, while ERK inhibitor (PD98059) did not disturb the effects of agmatine, and by itself, it preserved the cells against 6-OHDA toxicity. This study revealed that agmatine is protective in 6-OHDA model of PD and affects Akt/GSK-3β and ERK pathways. PMID:26346882

  4. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  5. Time course study of microglial and behavioral alterations induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Pereira da; Poli, Anicleto; Hara, Daniela Balz; Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto

    2016-05-27

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial in the search for new therapeutic approaches. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the time course of behavioral, neurochemical, and microglial responses after a retrograde partial lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by bilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The results showed that 6-OHDA was able to produce both anhedonic and anxiety behaviors; however, an increase of microglial density in some brain areas (substantia nigra, hippocampus and striatum) and deficits in locomotor activity was observed only one week after the lesion. Striatal levels of dopamine (DA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were reduced by approximately 60% at all times tested. Conversely, increased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite were also noted in the striatum only at the first week. These data extend our previous findings and suggest that the retrograde and partial damage of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra can induce effects resembling premotor symptoms of PD, two and three weeks after injury. PMID:27113204

  6. Intrathecal noradrenaline restores 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine induced antinociception abolished by intrathecal 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Minor, B G; Persson, M L; Post, C; Jonsson, G; Archer, T

    1988-01-01

    Intrathecal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) abolished the antinociceptive effects of acute administration of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) in the hot-plate, tail-flick and shock titration tests of nociception. The antinociceptive effects of 5-MeODMT, abolished by the prior intrathecal 6-OHDA treatment, were restored by intrathecal administration (2 or 1 microgram) of noradrenaline (NA), immediately prior to 5-MeODMT, in all three tests of nociception. Biochemical analysis confirmed severe NA depletions (95 percent loss) in the lumbar and thoracic regions of the spinal and much lesser dopamine depletions (25-35 percent loss). Intrathecal 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) attenuated 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the tail-flick test and combined NA + 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests. Intrathecal administration of 5,7-DHT caused a severe depletion of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the lumbar region of the spinal cord. The present findings demonstrate further the modulatory role of NA upon serotonergic systems in nociception and indicate the necessity of NA availability for induction of 5-MeODMT analgesia. PMID:3133452

  7. Short-Term Treatment with Silymarin Improved 6-OHDA-Induced Catalepsy and Motor Imbalance in Hemi-Parkisonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Rasool; Eyvari Brooshghalan, Shahla; Farajniya, Safar; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Sharifi, Hamdolah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by disabling motor abnormalities, which include tremor, muscle stiffness, paucity of voluntary movements, and postural instability. Silymarin (SM) or milk thistle extract, is known to own antioxidative, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of SM, on 6-OHDA-induced motor-impairments (catalepsy and imbalance) in the rats. Methods: Experimental model of PD was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 8 μg/2 μl/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Catalepsy and motor coordination were assessed by using of bar test and rotarod respectively. Results: The results showed a significant (p<0.001) increase in catalepsy of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats whereas; in SM (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p for 5 days) treated hemi-parkinsonian rats catalepsy was decreased markedly (p<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant (p<0.001) increase in motor-imbalance of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. SM improved motor coordination significantly (p<0.001) in a dose dependent manner and increased motor balance. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that short-term treatment with SM could improve 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy and motor imbalance in rats. We suggest that SM can be used as adjunctive therapy along with commonly used anti-parkinsonian drugs. However, further clinical trial studies should be carried out to prove this hypothesis. PMID:26819917

  8. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine-induced hypo/hyperactivity: blockade by dopamine reuptake inhibitors and effect of acute D-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Palomo, Tomas; Fredriksson, Anders

    2002-05-01

    Five experiments were performed to assess the changes in motor activity resulting from neonatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on Days 1 or 2 postnatal, at doses of either 75 or 100 micro g in a volume of 10 micro l vehicle, following pretreatment with either GBR 12909 (40 mg/kg, s.c.) or amphonelic acid (4.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline. Motor activity was measured either over 60-min test periods on five consecutive days of testing or at 12-min intervals within a single 60-min test session. The initial extent of locomotor hyperactivity was dependent upon the neonatal dose of 6-OHDA: the 100 micro g, but not 75 micro g, dose induced marked hyperactivity from test day 1 onwards whereas the 75 micro g dose did so from test day 3 onwards. The initial hypoactivity for rearing behaviour was observed for both doses of 6-OHDA: this hypoactivity was altered over successive test days so that by test day 5 an hyperactivity by the 75 micro g, but not 100 micro g, was observed. Pretreatment with either GBR 12909 or amphonelic acid abolished the effects of both doses of 6-OHDA. In the within-60-min test session procedure, 6-OHDA treated rats (both 75 and 100 micro g) showed initial hyperactivity for locomotion that intensified, in relation to the other groups, over each 12-min interval and initial hypoactivity for rearing that developed into hyperactivity over each 12-min interval. Pretreatment with either GBR 12909 or amphonelic acid again abolished the effects of both doses of 6-OHDA. Habituation quotients derived in each case for both procedures indicated severe habituation deficits by 6-OHDA (75 and 100 micro g) rats, compared to the control groups in all four experiments. In Experiment V, a low dose of D-amphetamine abolished the hyperactivity of 6-OHDA (75 micro g) treated rats whereas a higher dose did so only transiently. Pretreatment with GBR 12909 abolished these effects. These findings underline the neuropharmacological utility of the neonatal 6-OHDA

  9. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Jin, Huajun; Reddy, Manju B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P < 0.0001) upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P < 0.05) and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P = 0.086) and increased cell viability by 22% (P < 0.05). In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P < 0.05) and intracellular iron by 28% (P < 0.01), indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1. PMID:27298749

  10. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Jin, Huajun; Reddy, Manju B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P < 0.0001) upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P < 0.05) and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P = 0.086) and increased cell viability by 22% (P < 0.05). In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P < 0.05) and intracellular iron by 28% (P < 0.01), indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1. PMID:27298749

  11. 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction are mediated by early modulation of intracellular signals and interaction of Nrf2 and NF-κB factors.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio C; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Macías-Silva, Marina; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2013-02-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin that generates an experimental model of Parkinson's disease in rodents and is commonly employed to induce a lesion in dopaminergic pathways. The characterization of those molecular mechanisms linked to 6-OHDA-induced early toxicity is needed to better understand the cellular events further leading to neurodegeneration. The present work explored how 6-OHDA triggers early downstream signaling pathways that activate neurotoxicity in the rat striatum. Mitochondrial function, caspases-dependent apoptosis, kinases signaling (Akt, ERK 1/2, SAP/JNK and p38) and crosstalk between nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated at early times post-lesion. We found that 6-OHDA initiates cell damage via mitochondrial complex I inhibition, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release, as well as activation of caspases 9 and 3 to induce apoptosis, kinase signaling modulation and NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses, accompanied by inhibition of antioxidant systems regulated by the Nrf2 pathway. Our results suggest that kinases SAP/JNK and p38 up-regulation may play a role in the early stages of 6-OHDA toxicity to trigger intrinsic pathways for apoptosis and enhanced NF-κB activation. In turn, these cellular events inhibit the activation of cytoprotective mechanisms, thereby leading to a condition of general damage. PMID:23274087

  12. Carnosic acid protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro model of Parkinson's disease: involvement of antioxidative enzymes induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Rei; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Li-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), have been widely investigated in recent years, however, its protection in in vivo still unclear. In this study, we investigated the behavioral activity and neuroprotective effects of CA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Rats were treated with 20mg/kg body weight of CA for 3 weeks before 6-OHDA exposure. Results indicated that CA improved the locomotor activity and reduced the apomorphine-caused rotation in 6-OHDA-stimulated rats. Significant protection against lipid peroxidation and GSH reduction was observed in the 6-OHDA rats pretreated with CA. Pretreatment with CA increased the protein expression of γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase compared with 6-OHDA-stimulated rats and SH-SY5Y cells. Immunoblots showed that the reduction of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the induction of caspase 3 cleavage, and the induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage by 6-OHDA was reversed in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) in SH-SY5Y cells. Rats treated with CA reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38, the down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3/caspase 3 and cleaved PARP/PARP ratio, and the down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. However, BAM7, an activator of Bax, attenuated the effect of CA on apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that CA protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity is attributable to its anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative action. The present findings may help to clarify the possible mechanisms of rosemary in the neuroprotection of PD. PMID:25446857

  13. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-01

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. PMID:27222379

  15. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound, inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells via mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Sze, Cho-Wing; Tong, Yao; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Some naturally occurring bibenzyl compounds have been reported as free radical scavengers. The present study tested our hypothesis that bibenzyl compounds may be neuroprotective against apoptosis induced by the neurotoxins. Five structurally similar bibenzyl derivatives were tested for their protective effect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced toxicity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. The results showed that one bibenzyl compound, namely chrysotoxine, significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced cell death. The subsequent mechanism study demonstrated that chrysotoxine significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis characterized by DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation in a dose-dependent manner. 6-OHDA-induced intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, and mitochondrial dysfunctions, including the decrease of membrane potential, increase of intracellular free Ca2+, release of cytochrome c, imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and activation of caspase-3 were strikingly attenuated by chrysotoxine pretreatment. Meanwhile, chrysotoxine counteracted NF-κB activation by blocking its translocation to the nucleus, thereby preventing up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and intracellular NO release. The data provide the first evidence that chrysotoxine protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity possibly through mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation. Chrysotoxine is thus a candidate for further evaluation of its protection against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20708055

  16. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  17. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the free radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value for

  18. Gelatin nanoparticle-mediated intranasal delivery of substance P protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis: an in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Rong-Rong; Jiang, Yi-Na; Lin, Qian; Yu, Wen-Ze; Mao, Kai-Li; Tian, Fu-Rong; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of intranasally administered substance P-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNPs) against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and to provide a new strategy for treating brain pathology, such as Parkinson’s disease. Methods SP-GNPs were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method, and their stability, encapsulating efficiency, and loading capacity were evaluated. PC-12 cells were used to examine the enhancement of growth and inhibition of apoptosis by SP-GNPs in vitro using MTT assays. In the in vivo study, hemiparkinsonian rats were created by intracerebroventricular injection of 6-OHDA. The rats then received intranasal SP-GNPs daily for 2 weeks. Functional improvement was assessed by quantifying rotational behavior, and the degree of apoptosis was assessed by immunohistochemical staining for caspase-3 in the substantia nigra region. Results PC-12 cells with 6-OHDA-induced disease treated with SP-GNPs showed higher cell viability than their untreated counterparts, and cell viability increased as the concentration of substance P (SP) increased, indicating that SP could enhance cell growth and inhibit the cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA. Rats with 6-OHDA-induced hemiparkinsonism treated with SP-GNPs made fewer rotations and showed less staining for caspase-3 than their counterparts not treated with SP, indicating that SP protects rats with 6-OHDA-induced hemiparkinsonism from apoptosis and therefore demonstrates their functional improvement. Conclusion Intranasal delivery of SP-GNPs protects against 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25897205

  19. Hydroxytyrosol induces phase II detoxifying enzyme expression and effectively protects dopaminergic cells against dopamine- and 6-hydroxydopamine induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Deng, Ajun; Tang, Wanbin; Ma, Junzhi; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common late-age onset neurodegenerative disease. Except for the symptomatic alleviating treatment, no disease modifying therapy is currently available. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective role of hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major phenolic compound present in olive oil, against dopaminergic cell death. We found that HT effectively protected dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells against dopamine (DA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced cell death, but had no apparent effect on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we have shown that HT efficiently induced the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Using an NQO1 inhibitor, we revealed that increased NQO1 expression contributed to the protective effect of HT against dopaminergic cell death. Together, our findings suggest that HT has a protective effect against DA- and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death, supporting the beneficial effect of olive oil in preventing DA-metabolism related dopaminergic neuron dysfunction. PMID:26970393

  20. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells and in animal model of Parkinson's disease by enhancing Nrf2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; Shi, H; Zhang, C; Ren, M; Han, M; Wei, X; Zhang, X; Lou, H

    2015-02-12

    Oxidative stress is central to the pathology of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), and therapeutics designed to enhance antioxidant potential could have clinical value. In this study, we investigated whether dimethyl fumarate (DMF) has therapeutic effects in cellular and animal model of PD, and explore the role of nuclear transcription factor related to NF-E2 (Nrf2) in this process. Treatment of animals and dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells with DMF resulted in increased nuclear levels of active Nrf2, with subsequent upregulation of antioxidant target genes. The cytotoxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was reduced by pre-treatment with DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The increase in the reactive oxygen species caused by 6-OHDA treatment was also attenuated by DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The neuroprotective effects of DMF against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity were dependent on Nrf2, since treatment with Nrf2 siRNA failed to block against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity and induce Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes in SH-SY5Y cells. In vivo, DMF oral administration was shown to upregulate mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective genes, attenuate 6-OHDA induced striatal oxidative stress and inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, DMF ameliorated dopaminergic neurotoxicity in 6-OHDA-induced PD animal models as evidenced by amelioration of locomotor dysfunction, loss in striatal dopamine, and reductions in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that DMF may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD. PMID:25449120

  1. 6-OHDA-Induced Changes in Parkinson's Disease-Related Gene Expression are not Affected by the Overexpression of PGAM5 in In Vitro Differentiated Embryonic Mesencephalic Cells.

    PubMed

    Stępkowski, Tomasz Maciej; Wasyk, Iwona; Grzelak, Agnieszka; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    LUHMES cells, a recently established line of immortalized embryonic mesencephalic cells, are the novel in vitro model for studying Parkinson's disease (PD) and dopaminergic neuron biology. Phosphoglyceromutase 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein involved in mitophagy, mitochondria dynamics, and other processes important for PD pathogenesis. We tested the impact of lentiviral overexpression of PGAM5 protein in LUHMES cells on their differentiation and expression of 84 PD-related genes. LUHMES cells were transduced with PGAM5 or mock and treated with 100 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a model PD neurotoxin. Real-Time PCR analysis revealed that the treatment with 6-OHDA-induced changes in expression of 44 PD-related genes. PGAM5 transduction alone did not cause alternations in PD-related genes expression, nor it affected changes in gene expression mediated by 6-OHDA. The 6-OHDA-induced PD-related gene expression profile of LUHMES cells is presented for the first time and widely discussed. PMID:25986246

  2. Effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of Parkinson's disease rat models.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jin; Zhao, Ting Ting; Lee, Kyung Sook; Lee, Seung Ho; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Keun Hong; Choi, Hyun Sook; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity using PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In PC12 cells, treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM) reduced 6-OHDA (100 µM)-induced cell death and induced transient extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and Bad phosphorylation at Ser112 (BadSer112). In contrast, sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) phosphorylation, and cleaved-caspase-3 activity, all of which were induced by 6-OHDA (100 µM), were inhibited by treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM). Furthermore, co-treatment with (-)-sesamin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) once a day for 28 days significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive neuronal cells and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid in the substantia nigra-striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. These results suggest that (-)-sesamin protects 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity via the activation of transient ERK1/2-BadSer112 system and the inhibition of sustained ERK-p38MAPK-JNK1/2-caspase-3 system in PC12 cells. (-)-Sesamin also shows protective effects on long-term L-DOPA therapy in dopaminergic neuronal cells of PD rat models. (-)-Sesamin may serve as adjuvant therapeutics in PD. PMID:25747493

  3. Involvement of Mu Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Protective Effect of Opioid against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar-Vaghefi, Shahrzad; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Elyasi, Leila; Abbasnejad, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The neuroprotective role of opioid morphine against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death has been demonstrated. However, the exact mechanism(s) underlying such neuroprotection, especially the role of subtype receptors, has not yet been fully clarified. Methods: Here, we investigated the effects of different opioid agonists on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of Parkinson’s disease. Cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-OHDA and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblot technique was used to evaluate cytochrome-c and activated caspase-3 as biochemical markers of apoptosis induction. Results: The data showed that 6-OHDA caused significant cell damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium levels as well as activated caspase-3 and cytochrome-c release. Incubation of SH-SY5Y cells with μ-opioid agonists, morphine and DAMGO, but not with δ-opioid agonist, DADLE, elicited protective effect and reduced biochemical markers of cell damage and death. Discussion: The results suggest that μ-opioid receptors signaling participate in the opioid neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26904174

  4. A novel synthetic activator of Nurr1 induces dopaminergic gene expression and protects against 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Sean L; Safe, Stephen; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2015-10-21

    Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with decreased expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 (NR4A2), which is critical for both homeostasis and development of dopamine (DA) neurons. The synthetic, phytochemical-based compound, 1,1-bis (3'-indolyl)-1-(p-chlorophenyl) methane (C-DIM12) activates Nurr1 in cancer cells and prevents loss of dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD in mice. In the present study, we examined the capacity of C-DIM12 to induce expression of Nurr1-regulated genes in two dopaminergic neuronal cell lines (N2A, N27) and to protect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxicity. C-DIM12 induced expression of Nurr1-regulated genes that was abolished by Nurr1 knockdown. C-DIM12 increased expression of transfected human Nurr1, induced Nurr1 protein expression in primary dopaminergic neurons and enhanced neuronal survival from exposure to 6-OHDA. These data indicate that C-DIM12 stimulates neuroprotective expression Nurr1-regulated genes in DA neurons. PMID:26383113

  5. Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in the Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by Unilateral Stereotaxic Injection of 6-Ohda in Rat

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; De Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Araújo, Paulo Victor Pontes; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo de Souza; Sousa Rodrigues, Francisca Taciana; Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Lima, Nicole Brito Cortez; Patrocínio, Manoel Claúdio Azevedo; Aguiar, Lissiana Magna Vasconcelos; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg) alone or associated with L-DOPA using an animal model of Parkinson's disease induced by stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rat striatum. Motor behavior was assessed by monitoring body rotations induced by apomorphine, open field test and cylinder test. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method, concentration of nitrite and evaluation of catalase activity. α-Lipoic acid decreased body rotations induced by apomorphine, as well as caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open field test and use of contralateral paw (in the opposite side of the lesion produced by 6-OHDA) at cylinder test. α-lipoic acid showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and interacting with antioxidant system by decreasing of endogenous catalase activity. Therefore, α-lipoic acid prevented the damage induced by 6-OHDA or by chronic use of L-DOPA in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that α-lipoic could be a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease prevention and treatment. PMID:24023579

  6. A novel therapeutic approach to 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease in rats via supplementation of PTD-conjugated tyrosine hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shaoping; Fu Ailing; Wang Yuxia; Yu Leiping; Jia Peiyuan; Li Qian; Jin Guozhang; Sun Manji . E-mail: Sunmj@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-07-21

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether the protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) fusion protein was effective on the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats. An expression vector pET-PTD-TH harbouring the PTD-TH gene was constructed and transformed to the Escherichia coli BL21 cells for expression. The expressed recombinant PTD-TH with a molecular weight of 61 kD was successfully transduced (1 {mu}M) into the dopaminergic SH-sy5y human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and visualized by immunohistochemical assay. An in vivo experiment in rats showed that the iv administered PTD-TH protein (8 mg/kg) permeated across the blood-brain barrier, penetrated into the striatum and midbrain, and peaked at 5-8 h after the injection. The behavioral effects of PTD-TH on the apomorphine-induced rotations in the PD model rats 8 weeks after the 6-OHDA lesion showed that a single bolus of PTD-TH (8 mg/kg) iv injection caused a decrement of 60% of the contralateral turns on day 1 and 40% on days 5-17. The results imply that iv delivery of PTD-TH is therapeutically effective on the 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats, the PTD-mediated human TH treatment opening a promising therapeutic direction in treatment of PD.

  7. Alteration of enteric monoamines with monoamine receptors and colonic dysmotility in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Yun; Liu, Chenzhe; Fan, Ruifang; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Lifei; Hong, Feng; Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Lisheng; Zhu, Jinxia

    2015-08-01

    Constipation is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), in which monoamines (dopamine [DA], norepinephrine [NE], and 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) play an important role. Rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral substantia nigra (SN) exhibit constipation, but the role of monoamines and their receptors is not clear. In the present study, colonic motility, monoamine content, and the expression of monoamine receptors were examined using strain gauge force transducers, ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. The 6-OHDA rats displayed a significant reduction in dopaminergic neurons in the SN and a decreased time on rota-rod test and a marked decrease in daily fecal production and fecal water content. The amplitude of colonic spontaneous contraction was obviously decreased in 6-OHDA rats. Blocking D1-like receptor and β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) significantly reduced the inhibition of DA and NE on the colonic motility, respectively, whereas the 5-HT and 5-HT4 receptor agonists promoted the colonic motility. Moreover, DA content was increased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β3-ARs was notably upregulated, but 5-HT4 receptors were significantly decreased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. We conclude that enhanced DA and β3-ARs and decreased 5-HT4 receptors may be contributed to the colonic dysmotility and constipation observed in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:25766133

  8. Small molecule TrkB agonist deoxygedunin protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA and MPTP induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuke; Xu, Yan; Chen, Guiqin; Ma, Kai; Han, Chao; Guo, Zhenli; Zhang, Zhentao; Ye, Keqiang; Cao, Xuebing

    2015-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and dopamine (DA) content loss in the striatum correlate well with disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophin family and is necessary for the survival and development of DA neurons in the SN. Deficits in BDNF/TrkB receptors signaling contribute to the dysfunction of PD. Deoxygedunin, a derivative of gedunin produced from Indian neem tree, binds TrkB receptor and activates TrkB and its downstream signaling cascades in a BDNF-independent manner, and possesses neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of deoxygedunin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were treated with deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for one month started two weeks before 6-OHDA lesion (pre-treatment), or for two weeks right after lesion (post-treatment), with isovolumetric vehicle as control and normal. Mice were given deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for 2 weeks and administrated with MPTP twice at the dose of 20 mg/kg (i.p.) on day 7. The results revealed that pretreatment with deoxygedunin improved PD models' behavioral performance and reduced dopaminergic neurons loss in SN, associated with the activation of TrkB receptors and its two major signaling cascades involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Thus, our current study indicates that deoxygedunin, as a small molecule TrkB agonist, displays prominent neuroprotective properties, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:26282118

  9. Impairment of Atg5-Dependent Autophagic Flux Promotes Paraquat- and MPP+-Induced Apoptosis But Not Rotenone or 6-Hydroxydopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Controversial reports on the role of autophagy as a survival or cell death mechanism in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins exist. We investigated the alterations in autophagic flux and the role of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5)-dependent autophagy in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Dopaminergic cell death induced by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitors 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and rotenone, the pesticide paraquat, and the dopamine analog 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was paralleled by increased autophagosome accumulation. However, when compared with basal autophagy levels using chloroquine, autophagosome accumulation was a result of impaired autophagic flux. Only 6-OHDA induced an increase in autophagosome formation. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Atg5 increased paraquat- and MPP+-induced cell death. Stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent signaling protected against cell death induced by paraquat, whereas MPP+-induced toxicity was enhanced by wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase class III inhibitor, rapamycin, and trehalose, an mTOR-independent autophagy activator. Modulation of autophagy by either pharmacological or genetic approaches had no effect on rotenone or 6-OHDA toxicity. Cell death induced by parkinsonian neurotoxins was inhibited by the pan caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD), but only caspase-3 inhibition was able to decrease MPP+-induced cell death. Finally, inhibition of the lysosomal hydrolases, cathepsins, increased the toxicity by paraquat and MPP+, supporting a protective role of Atg5-dependent autophagy and lysosomes degradation pathways on dopaminegic cell death. These results demonstrate that in dopaminergic cells, Atg5-dependent autophagy acts as a protective mechanism during apoptotic cell death induced by paraquat and MPP+ but not during rotenone or 6-OHDA toxicity. PMID:23997112

  10. Adaptive down-regulation of the serotonin transporter in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease and after chronic pramipexole treatment.

    PubMed

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, K; Wardas, J; Kosmowska, B; Domin, H; Śmiałowska, M; Głowacka, U; Ossowska, K

    2016-02-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion induced by bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections into the ventrolateral region of the caudate-putamen (CP) in rats, modeling preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease, induces a "depressive-like" behavior which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole (PRA). The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of the above lesion and chronic PRA treatment on binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT) in different brain regions. As before, 6-OHDA (15 μg/2.5 μl) was administered bilaterally into the CP. PRA (1mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously twice a day for 2 weeks. Serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons of the dorsal raphe (DR) were immunostained for tryptophan hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively, and were counted stereologically. Binding of [(3)H]GBR 12,935 to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and [(3)H]citalopram to SERT was analyzed autoradiographically. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA injections decreased the number of dopaminergic, but not serotonergic neurons in the DR. 6-OHDA reduced the DAT binding in the CP, and SERT binding in the nigrostriatal system (CP, substantia nigra (SN)), limbic system (ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAC), amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFCX), habenula, hippocampus) and DR. A significant positive correlation was found between DAT and SERT binding in the CP. Chronic PRA did not influence DAT binding but reduced SERT binding in the above structures, and deepened the lesion-induced losses in the core region of the NAC, SN, VTA and PFCX. The present study indicates that both the lesion of dopaminergic neurons and chronic PRA administration induce adaptive down-regulation of SERT binding. Moreover, although involvement of stimulation of dopaminergic transmission by chronic PRA in its "antidepressant" effect seems to be prevalent, additional contribution of SERT inhibition cannot be excluded. PMID:26628402

  11. Protective effect of L-kynurenine and probenecid on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced striatal toxicity in rats: implications of modulating kynurenate as a protective strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; González-Herrera, Irma Gabriela; García, Esperanza; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The neuroactive metabolite at the kynunerine pathway, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a well-known competitive antagonist at the co-agonist glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), and also decreases the extracellular levels of glutamate by blocking α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAchr) located on glutamatergic terminals. KYNA has been often reported to be neuroprotective in different neurotoxic models. The systemic administration of L-kynurenine (L-KYN)--the precursor of KYNA--together with probenecid (PROB)--an inhibitor of organic acids transport--to rodents increases KYNA levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. The striatal infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to rodents is one of the common models used to simulate Parkinson's disease (PD). Different studies have linked PD alterations with excessive glutamatergic transmission in the striatum since NMDAr antagonists exert beneficial effects in PD models. In this work we investigated the effect that a systemic administration of L-KYN+PROB exerted on the toxic model induced by 6-OHDA in rats. PROB (50 mg/kg, i.p.) + L-KYN (75 mg/kg, i.p.) were given to rats for seven consecutive days. On day two of treatment, the animals were infused with a single injection of 6-OHDA (20 μg/2 μl) into the right striatum. Fourteen days post-lesion, rotation behavior was assessed as a marker of motor impairment. The total levels of dopamine (DA) were also estimated in striatal tissue samples of 6-OHDA-treated animals as a neurochemical marker of damage. In addition, twenty eight days post-lesion, the striatal damage was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohistochemistry against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the same animals. Neurodegeneration was also assessed by Fluoro Jade staining. 6-OHDA infusion increased rotation behavior, striatal reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration, while DA levels were decreased. For all markers evaluated, we observed protective

  12. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of bFGF in the 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Pingtao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Johnson, Noah R.; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Cao, Guodong; Xiao, Jian; Ye, Junming; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complicated pathophysiologic mechanisms. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress appears to play a critical role in the progression of PD. We demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), as a neurotropic factor, inhibited ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis and that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced ER stress was involved in the progression of PD in rats. bFGF administration improved motor function recovery, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuron survival, and upregulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. The 6-OHDA-induced ER stress response proteins were inhibited by bFGF treatment. Meanwhile, bFGF also increased expression of TH. The administration of bFGF activated the downstream signals PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways by specific inhibitors partially reduced the protective effect of bFGF. This study provides new insight towards bFGF translational drug development for PD involving the regulation of ER stress. PMID:27493838

  13. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of bFGF in the 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pingtao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Cao, Guodong; Xiao, Jian; Ye, Junming; Lin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complicated pathophysiologic mechanisms. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress appears to play a critical role in the progression of PD. We demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), as a neurotropic factor, inhibited ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis and that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced ER stress was involved in the progression of PD in rats. bFGF administration improved motor function recovery, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuron survival, and upregulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. The 6-OHDA-induced ER stress response proteins were inhibited by bFGF treatment. Meanwhile, bFGF also increased expression of TH. The administration of bFGF activated the downstream signals PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways by specific inhibitors partially reduced the protective effect of bFGF. This study provides new insight towards bFGF translational drug development for PD involving the regulation of ER stress. PMID:27493838

  14. A partial lesion model of Parkinson's disease in mice--characterization of a 6-OHDA-induced medial forebrain bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Padel, Thomas; Paul, Gesine

    2015-05-01

    The most frequently used animal models for Parkinson's disease (PD) utilize unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), which results in total denervation of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. However, neuroprotective interventions in PD require models resembling earlier stages of PD, where some dopaminergic cells and fibres remain. The aim of the present study was therefore to establish a MFB partial lesion model in mice. We tested four different 6-OHDA doses, and our results show a dose-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic cells and striatal fibres that correlated with behavioural impairment in several behavioural tests. Specifically, doses of 0.7 μg and 1 μg of 6-OHDA induced a partial denervation of the nigrostriatal pathway, associated with a mild but quantifiable behavioural impairment. We identified the amphetamine-induced rotation, stepping, corridor and cylinder test to be sensitive enough to select partial lesion animals. Based on our data, we proposed a range of cut-off values for these different behavioural tests to select partial lesion mice. Using a statistical prediction model we identified two behavioural tests (the stepping test and amphetamine-induced rotation test) that with a high sensitivity and specificity predict the extent of nigral dopaminergic cell loss and select mice with a partial nigrostriatal lesion prior to further interventions. This model can serve as an important tool to study neuroprotective therapies for PD in mouse models, especially when the treatment targets the substantia nigra and/or the striatum. PMID:25698603

  15. Neuroprotective effects of dimerumic acid and deferricoprogen from Monascus purpureus NTU 568-fermented rice against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in differentiated pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Context Oxidative stress plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Rice fermented with Monascus purpureus Went (Monascaceae) NTU 568 (red mould rice) was found to contain antioxidants, including dimerumic acid (DMA) and deferricoprogen (DFC). Objective The effects of DMA and DFC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cytotoxicity and potential protective mechanisms in differentiated PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were investigated. Materials and methods DMA (0-60 μM) or DFC (0-10 μM) was co-treated with 6-OHDA (200 μM, 24 h exposure) in differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell viability and intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assays, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide staining by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of cell protein expression. Results DMA and DFC significantly increased cell viability to 72% and 81% in 6-OHDA-induced differentiated PC-12 cell cultures, respectively. Furthermore, DMA and DFC reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of extracellular and intercellular ROS by 25% and 20%, respectively, and decreased NADPH oxidase-2 expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and decreased activation of caspase-3 via regulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 protein expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. Conclusion DMA and DFC may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting ROS formation and apoptosis. These results showed that the metabolites from M. purpureus NTU 568 fermentation were potential therapeutic agents for PD induced by oxidative damage and should be encouraged for further research. PMID:26794209

  16. Striatal mRNA expression patterns underlying peak dose l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, L M; Parr-Brownlie, L C; Duncan, E J; Black, M A; Gemmell, N J; Dearden, P K; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-06-01

    l-DOPA is the primary pharmacological treatment for relief of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). With prolonged treatment (⩾5years) the majority of patients will develop abnormal involuntary movements as a result of l-DOPA treatment, known as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of dyskinesia is a crucial step toward developing treatments for this debilitating side effect. We used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD treated with a three-week dosing regimen of l-DOPA plus the dopa decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide (4mg/kg and 7.5mg/kgs.c., respectively) to induce dyskinesia in 50% of individuals. We then used RNA-seq to investigate the differences in mRNA expression in the striatum of dyskinetic animals, non-dyskinetic animals, and untreated parkinsonian controls at the peak of dyskinesia expression, 60min after l-DOPA administration. Overall, 255 genes were differentially expressed; with significant differences in mRNA expression observed between all three groups. In dyskinetic animals 129 genes were more highly expressed and 14 less highly expressed when compared with non-dyskinetic and untreated parkinsonian controls. In l-DOPA treated animals 42 genes were more highly expressed and 95 less highly expressed when compared with untreated parkinsonian controls. Gene set cluster analysis revealed an increase in expression of genes associated with the cytoskeleton and phosphoproteins in dyskinetic animals compared with non-dyskinetic animals, which is consistent with recent studies documenting an increase in synapses in dyskinetic animals. These genes may be potential targets for drugs to ameliorate l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia or as an adjunct treatment to prevent their occurrence. PMID:26968766

  17. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor. PMID:27431098

  18. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26730494

  19. 7-nitroindazole attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced spatial learning deficits and dopamine neuron loss in a presymptomatic animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haik, Kristi L; Shear, Deborah A; Hargrove, Chad; Patton, Jared; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Sandstrom, Michael I; Dunbar, Gary L

    2008-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons (>50%) in the substantia nigra (SN) precedes most of the overt motor symptoms, making early diagnosis and treatment interventions difficult. Because PD has been associated with free radicals generated by nitric oxide, this study tested whether treatments of 7-nitroindazole (7NI), a nitric-oxide-synthase inhibitor, could reduce cognitive deficits that often emerge before overt motor symptoms in a presymptomatic rat model of PD. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg 7NI (or vehicle) just before receiving bilateral, intrastriatal injections of the DA-toxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The rats were then given a battery of motor tasks, and their learning ability was assessed using a spatial reversal task in a water-T maze. Results indicate that 7NI treatments attenuate 6-OHDA-induced spatial learning deficits and protect against DA cell loss in the SN, suggesting that 7NI may have potential as an early, presymptomatic pharmacotherapy for PD. PMID:18489022

  20. Pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons through paraplegin against 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun Ki; Park, Hyeon Soo; Cho, Jea Hyeon; Kim, Gon Sup; Won, Chungkil

    2015-01-21

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates various physiological and psychological functions, such as movement, motivation, behavior, and learning. DA exerts its function through DA receptors and a series of studies have reported the role of DAergic receptors in preventing DAergic neuronal degeneration. Here, we studied the DA receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of the D2-like receptor agonists against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced DAergic neurodegeneration. D2-like receptor agonists were administered in the substantia nigra in vivo and to primary cultured neurons. Treatment of 6-OHDA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and paraplegin (mitochondrial regulation protein) immunoreactivity, whereas pretreatment with quinpirole (a full D2-like receptor agonist) preserved TH and paraplegin reactivity. This led us to test which DA receptors were necessary for the neuroprotective effect and whether paraplegin can be regulated by D2 or D3 receptor agonists. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor selective agonist, sumanirole, did not preserve TH and paraplegin reactivity from 6-OHDA. However, the D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole, protected TH reactivity and restored paraplegin expression to the control level in the presence of 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pretreatment with the D3 receptor antagonist GR103691 reduced TH and paraplegin expression levels. These results suggest that the D3 receptor agonist may protect DA neurons from the effect of 6-OHDA through the modulation of the mitochondrial regulation protein paraplegin. PMID:25514384

  1. Enhanced cystatin C and lysosomal protease expression following 6-hydroxydopamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Close, Fran T; Goodman, Carl B; Jackson, Inneke M; Wight-Mason, Ceceile; Wells, Lateesha M; Womble, Tracy A; Palm, Donald E

    2006-03-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a selective neurotoxin used to induce apoptosis in catecholamine-containing neurons. Although biochemical products and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of 6-OHDA have been well documented, the activation of cellular pathways following exposure are not well understood. Apoptosis in PC12 (Pheochromocytoma) cells was induced by 6-OHDA in a dose (10-150 microM) and time-dependent (24-72 h) manner compared to experimental controls (no treatment). PC 12 cells exposed to 50 microM 6-OHDA demonstrated the involvement of caspase 3 and lysosomal protease alterations. Following 6-OHDA exposure, the caspase 3-like inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly decreased 6-OHDA induced cell death. In addition, alterations in expression of the lysosomal cysteine and aspartic proteases, cathepsin B (CB) and cathepsin D (CD) and the endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C were observed utilizing immunocytochemical analysis at 24, 48, and 72 h following 6-OHDA exposure. Furthermore, CB and CD and cystatin C immuno-like reactivity was more pronounced in TUNEL positive cells. Moreover, Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in protein expression for CB and CD at 72 h and a temporal and concentration dependent increase in cystatin C in response to 6-OHDA. Cells treated with pepstatin A, an inhibitor for CD, showed a significant decrease in cell death, however, CA-074ME, a specific inhibitor for CB, failed to protect cells from 6-OHDA induced cell death. Thus, these results suggest that apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA exposure is mediated in part through caspase 3 activation and lysosomal protease CD. PMID:16414118

  2. ACTIVATION OF PPAR GAMMA RECEPTORS REDUCES LEVODOPA-INDUCED DYSKINESIAS IN 6-OHDA-LESIONED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A. A.; Morgese, M. G.; Pisanu, A.; Macheda, T.; Paquette, M. A.; Seillier, A.; Cassano, T.; Carta, A.R.; Giuffrida, A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (levodopa), the mainstay treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD), is accompanied by fluctuations in its duration of action and motor complications (dyskinesia) that dramatically affect the quality of life of patients. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) can be modeled in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions via chronic administration of levodopa, which causes increasingly severe axial, limb and oro-facial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) over time. In previous studies, we showed that direct activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors alleviated rat AIMs. Interestingly, elevation of the endocannabinoid anandamide by URB597 (URB), an inhibitor of endocannabinoid catabolism, produced an anti-dyskinetic response that was only partially mediated via CB1 receptors and required the concomitant blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels by capsazepine (CPZ) [1]. In this study, we showed that stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), a family of transcription factors activated by anandamide, contributes to the anti-dyskinetic effects of URB+CPZ, and that direct activation of the PPARγ subtype by rosiglitazone (RGZ) alleviates levodopa-induced AIMs in 6-OHDA rats. AIM reduction was associated with an attenuation of levodopa-induced increase of dynorphin, zif-268 and of ERK phosphorylation in the denervated striatum. RGZ treatment did not decrease striatal levodopa and dopamine bioavailability, nor did it affect levodopa antiparkinsonian activity. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ may represent a new pharmacological target for the treatment of LID. PMID:25486547

  3. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist reduces L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lu; Yang, Xinxin; Ma, Yaping; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) has been used as an effective drug for treating dopamine depletion-induced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, long-term administration of L-DOPA produces motor complications. L-DOPA has also been found to modify the two key signaling cascades, protein kinase A/dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), in striatal neurons, which are thought to play a pivotal role in forming motor complications. In the present study, we tested the possible effect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist on L-DOPA-stimulated abnormal behavioral and signaling responses in vivo. Intermittent L-DOPA administration for 3 weeks induced motor fluctuation in a rat model of PD induced by intrastriatal infusion of dopamine-depleting neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A single injection of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 had no effect on L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation. However, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 significantly attenuated abnormal behavioral responses to L-DOPA in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Similarly, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 influence the L-DOPA-induced alteration of DARPP-32 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation status in striatal neurons. These data provide evidence for the active involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of L-DOPA action during PD therapy. PMID:25395834

  4. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  5. AGE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE ON LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experiment examined the effects on locomotor activity of intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administered to developing and adult rats. 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to pargyline treatment at 3 and 6 days of age; or 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to desmethy...

  6. Cardiac Dysregulation and Myocardial Injury in a 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Rat Model of Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-long; Ma, Du-Fang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Su, Wen-ge; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac sympathetic denervation is found in various cardiac pathologies; however, its relationship with myocardial injury has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods Twenty-four rats were assigned to the normal control group (NC), sympathectomy control group (SC), and a sympathectomy plus mecobalamin group (SM). Sympathectomy was induced by injection of 6-OHDA, after which, the destruction and distribution of sympathetic and vagal nerve in the left ventricle (LV) myocardial tissue were determined by immunofluorescence and ELISA. Heart rate variability (HRV), ECG and echocardiography, and assays for myocardial enzymes in serum before and after sympathectomy were examined. Morphologic changes in the LV by HE staining and transmission electron microscope were used to estimate levels of myocardial injury and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were used to reflect the inflammatory reaction. Results Injection of 6-OHDA decreased NE (933.1 ± 179 ng/L for SC vs. 3418.1± 443.6 ng/L for NC, P < 0.01) and increased NGF (479.4± 56.5 ng/mL for SC vs. 315.85 ± 28.6 ng/mL for NC, P < 0.01) concentrations. TH expression was reduced, while ChAT expression showed no change. Sympathectomy caused decreased HRV and abnormal ECG and echocardiography results, and histopathologic examinations showed myocardial injury and increased collagen deposition as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in the cardiac tissue of rats in the SC and SM groups. However, all pathologic changes in the SM group were less severe compared to those in the SC group. Conclusions Chemical sympathectomy with administration of 6-OHDA caused dysregulation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and myocardial injuries. Mecobalamin alleviated inflammatory and myocardial damage by protecting myocardial sympathetic nerves. PMID:26230083

  7. 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopamine Reductions in the Nucleus Accumbens, but not the Medial Prefrontal Cortex, Impair Cincinnati Water Maze Egocentric and Morris Water Maze Allocentric Navigation in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H; Seroogy, Kim B; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (Nacc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) receive dopaminergic innervation from the ventral tegmental area and are involved in learning. Male rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions in the Nacc or mPFC were tested for allocentric and egocentric learning to determine their role in these forms of neuroplasticity. mPFC dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions did not result in changes to either type of learning or memory. Nacc dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions resulted in allocentric learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze (MWM) on acquisition, reversal, and probe trials. MWM cued performance was also affected, but straight-channel swim times and swim speed during hidden platform trials in the MWM were not affected. Nacc dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions also impaired egocentric learning in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). Nacc-lesioned animals tested in the CWM in an alternate path through the maze were not significantly affected. 6-OHDA injections in the Nacc resulted in 63 % dopamine and 62 % norepinephrine reductions in the Nacc and 23 % reductions in adjacent dorsal striatum. 6-OHDA injections in the mPFC resulted in 88 % reductions in dopamine and 59 % reductions in norepinephrine. Hence, Nacc dopamine and/or norepinephrine play a role in egocentric and allocentric learning and memory, while mPFC dopamine and norepinephrine do not. PMID:27003940

  8. An enteric nervous system progenitor cell implant promotes a behavioral and neurochemical improvement in rats with a 6-OHDA-induced lesion.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cid, Carmen; García-López, Julieta; García, Esperanza; Ibarra, Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of mammals is derived from neural crest (NC) cells during embryogenesis and at the beginning of postnatal life. However, neural progenitor cells from the ENS (or ENSPC) are also found in the adult intestine and can be used for neuronal regeneration in diseases that lead to a loss of cell population, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which there is a decrease of dopaminergic neurons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of ENSPC to restore damaged nervous tissue and to show that they are functional for a behavioral and neurochemical recovery. We found that animals with ENSPC implants exhibited a motor recovery of 35% vs. the lesion group. In addition, DA levels were partially restored in 34%, while Homovanillic acid (HVA) levels remained at 21% vs. the group with a 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion, suggesting that ENSPC represent a possible alternative in the study of cell transplants and the preservation of functional dopaminergic neurons in PD. PMID:24686028

  9. Eriocaulon buergerianum extract protects PC12 cells and neurons in zebrafish against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ericaulon buergerianum (Gujingcao) is an ophthalmic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial Chinese medicinal herb. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Ericaulon buergerianum ethanol extract (EBE) and to elucidate its underlying action mechanism. Methods The viability of dopaminergic (DA) neuron in zebrafish was examined by anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining. The locomotor activity of zebrafish was assessed with a digital video tracking system. The viability and cellular damage of the PC12 cells were determined by MTT and LDH assays respectively. The nuclear morphological changes in apoptotic cells were evaluated with DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 dye. Intracellular nitric oxide (NO) was quantified by DAF-FM diacetate staining. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was determined by Western blot. Results EBE inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced decrease in total distance of movement in zebrafish. Pretreatments of EBE (25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml) increased the viability of 6-OHDA-damaged PC12 cells in a dose dependent manner. Protection against 6-OHDA-induced nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of apoptotic bodies was also observed in EBE pretreated cells. Anti-oxidative (inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression in PC12 cells in vitro) activities of EBE are related to its neuroprotective effects in 6-OHDA-induced DA neuron damage. Conclusion EBE exhibited significant neuroprotective activities in zebrafish, including recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss caused by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in vivo, inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced decrease of total distance in movement in zebrafish. The iNOS-NO pathway may be involved. PMID:21527031

  10. Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) Phosphorylation Promotes Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival during 6-OHDA-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Asaithambi, Arunkumar; Ay, Muhammet; Jin, Huajun; Gosh, Anamitra; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathophysiological mediator of degenerative processes in many neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Aberrant cell signaling governed by protein phosphorylation has been linked to oxidative damage of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Although several studies have associated activation of certain protein kinases with apoptotic cell death in PD, very little is known about protein kinase regulation of cell survival and protection against oxidative damage and degeneration in dopaminergic neurons. Here, we characterized the PKD1-mediated protective pathway against oxidative damage in cell culture models of PD. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) was used to induce oxidative stress in the N27 dopaminergic cell model and in primary mesencephalic neurons. Our results indicated that 6-OHDA induced the PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/S748) phosphorylation during early stages of oxidative stress and that PKD1 activation preceded cell death. We also found that 6-OHDA rapidly increased phosphorylation of the C-terminal S916 in PKD1, which is required for PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/748) phosphorylation. Interestingly, negative modulation of PKD1 activation by RNAi knockdown or by the pharmacological inhibition of PKD1 by kbNB-14270 augmented 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, while positive modulation of PKD1 by the overexpression of full length PKD1 (PKD1WT) or constitutively active PKD1 (PKD1S744E/S748E) attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, suggesting an anti-apoptotic role for PKD1 during oxidative neuronal injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PKD1 signaling plays a cell survival role during early stages of oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons and therefore, positive modulation of the PKD1-mediated signal transduction pathway can provide a novel neuroprotective strategy against PD. PMID:24806360

  11. Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation in 6-OHDA-Treated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie; Dilley, Kristine; Rahman, Shahrose; Jones, Corinne; Shultz, Jeanette; Simmons, Heather; Emborg, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic neurodegeneration and dysautonomia affect patients with sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and are currently proposed as prodromal signs of PD. We have recently developed a nonhuman primate model of cardiac dysautonomia by iv 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Our in vivo findings included decreased cardiac uptake of a sympathetic radioligand and circulating catecholamines; here we report the postmortem characterization of the model. Ten adult rhesus monkeys (5–17 yrs old) were used in this study. Five animals received 6-OHDA (50 mg/kg iv) and five were age-matched controls. Three months post-neurotoxin the animals were euthanized; hearts and adrenal glands were processed for immunohistochemistry. Quantification of immunoreactivity (ir) of stainings was performed by an investigator blind to the treatment group using NIH ImageJ software (for cardiac bundles and adrenals, area above threshold and optical density) and MBF StereoInvestigator (for cardiac fibers, area fraction fractionator probe). Sympathetic cardiac nerve bundle analysis and fiber area density showed a significant reduction in global cardiac tyrosine hydroxylase-ir (TH; catecholaminergic marker) in 6-OHDA animals compared to controls. Quantification of protein gene protein 9.5 (pan-neuronal marker) positive cardiac fibers showed a significant deficit in 6-OHDA monkeys compared to controls and correlated with TH-ir fiber area. Semi-quantitative evaluation of human leukocyte antigen-ir (inflammatory marker) and nitrotyrosine-ir (oxidative stress marker) did not show significant changes 3 months post-neurotoxin. Cardiac nerve bundle α-synuclein-ir (presynaptic protein) was reduced (trend) in 6-OHDA treated monkeys; insoluble proteinase-K resistant α-synuclein (typical of PD pathology) was not observed. In the adrenal medulla, 6-OHDA monkeys had significantly reduced TH-ir and aminoacid decarboxylase-ir. Our results confirm that systemic 6-OHDA dosing to nonhuman primates

  12. Alternative splicing of AMPA receptor subunits in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal corticostriatal plasticity is a key mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Antagonists at glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, such as IEM 1460, reduce induction and expression of dyskinesia in rat and non-human primate models of PD. AMPA receptor function is regulated by post-transcriptional splicing of subunit mRNA to produce flip and flop isoforms, which may therefore influence corticostriatal plasticity. The aim of this work was to evaluate alterations in alternative splicing of striatal AMPA receptor subunits in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID and PD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 12.5 μg 6-OHDA injections into the right medial forebrain bundle. In experiment 1, to assess acute dyskinesia, rats received L-DOPA/benserazide (6/15 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 21 days. In experiment 2, to assess dyskinesia priming, rats received vehicle, L-DOPA+vehicle or L-DOPA+IEM 1460 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) for 21 days. Animals were humanely killed 1h following final treatment in experiment 1, and 48 h following final treatment in experiment 2. Coronal sections of rostral striatum were processed for in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using oligonucleotide probes specific for the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits and their flip and flop isoforms. L-DOPA treatment increased GluR2-flip mRNA expression in the lesioned striatum of both groups; this was blocked by the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist IEM 1460. GluR1-flip expression was increased after 48 h drug washout but not in acute LID. There were no changes in expression of flop isoforms. Alternative splicing of AMPAR subunits contributes to abnormal striatal plasticity in the induction and expression of LID. Increases in GluR2-flip expression depend on activation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, which are a potential target of anti-dyskinetic therapies. PMID:23360800

  13. Neuroprotective effects of aqueous extracts of Uncaria tomentosa: Insights from 6-OHDA induced cell damage and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Lu, Zhongbing; Zhao, Yashuo; Wang, Yueqi; Zhao-Wilson, Xi; Guan, Peng; Duan, Xianglin; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Zhao, Baolu

    2013-06-01

    Previous pharmacological studies have indicated that AC11 (a standardized aqueous extract of Uncaria tomentosa) has beneficial effects on DNA repair and immune function. However, its benefits go beyond this. The present study utilized electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping technique, as well as the 6-OHDA-induced cell damage and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans models, towards exploring the antioxidant and neuroprotective ability of AC11. Our results showed that AC11 could scavenge several types of free radicals, especially hydroxyl radicals (60% of hydroxyl radicals were scavenged by 30 μg/ml of AC11). In SH-SY5Y cells, we found that AC11 could dose dependently protect 6-OHDA induced cell damage by increase cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential. AC11 pretreatment also significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in 6-OHDA treated cells. In NL5901 C. elegans, 10 μg/ml AC11 could reduce the aggregation of α-synuclein by 40%. These findings encourage further investigation on AC11 and its active constituent compounds, as possible therapeutic intervention against Parkinson's disease. PMID:23500604

  14. Impairment of learning and memory in shuttle box-trained rats neonatally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S; Papazova, M; Alova, L; Lazarova-Bakarova, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment on learning and retention and on the level of biogenic monoamines in some brain structures as well as the influence of the nootropic drugs--piracetam, aniracetam, meclofenoxate and fipexide on the 6-OHDA-induced effect was studied. Two- way active avoidance (shuttle box) was used. The levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the frontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus, hippocampus and pons were measured. In mature rats, injected with 6-OHDA (100 mg/kg s.c.) in the first 3 postnatal days learning and retention were impaired and the NA level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was decreased. Piracetam (600 mg/kg), aniracetam (50 mg/kg), meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) and fipexide (10 mg/kg) administered orally 5 days before and 5 days during training, abolished the amnestic effect of 6-OHDA and restored to control values the NA level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. This finding suggests the important role of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system in the 6-OHDA-induced amnesia, as well as in the favorable effect of the nootropic drugs tested on 6-OHDA-impaired memory processes. PMID:8203277

  15. Extracellular toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine on PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, D; Torch, S; Nissou, M F; Benabid, A L; Verna, J M

    2000-04-14

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is usually thought to cross cell membrane through dopamine uptake transporters, to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species. In this study, we show that the anti-oxidants catalase, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine are able to reverse the toxic effects of 6-OHDA. These two latter compounds considerably slow down 6-OHDA oxidation in a cell free system suggesting a direct chemical interaction with the neurotoxin. Moreover, desipramine does not protect PC12 cells and 6-OHDA is also strongly toxic towards non-catecholaminergic C6 and NIH3T3 cells. These results thus suggest that 6-OHDA toxicity on PC12 cells mainly involves an extracellular process. PMID:10754220

  16. Ellagic Acid Protects the Brain Against 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neuroinflammation in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farbood, Yaghoob; Sarkaki, Alireza; Dolatshahi, Mojtaba; Taqhi Mansouri, Seyed Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Neuroinflammation may play as an important risk factor in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic cells. Antioxidants have protective effects against free radicals-induced neural damage in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we examined the effects of ellagic acid (EA) on locomotion and neuroinflammatory biomarkers in a rat model of PD induced by 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA). Methods: 6-OHDA (16 μg/2 μl) was injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in MFB-lesioned rat’s brain. Sham group received vehicle instead of 6-OHDA. PD-model was confirmed by rotational test using apomorphine injection. EA (50 mg/kg/2 ml, by gavages) was administered in PD+EA group. One group of MFB-lesioned rats received pramipexole (PPX; 2 mg/kg/2 ml, by gavages) as positive control group (PD+PPX group). Motor activity was assessed by stride length and cylinder tests. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in both striatum and hippocampus tissues. Results: MFB lesion caused significant reduction of stride-length (P<0.001) and also increased the contralateral rotations (P<0.001) and score of the cylinder test (P<0.001). Use of 6-OHDA to induce the PD significantly increased the levels of TNF-α (P<0.001) and IL-1β (P<0.001) in MFB-lesioned rats. EA significantly restored all of the above parameters. Discussion: EA can improve the motor impairments in the MFB-lesioned rats via reducing the neuroinflammatory biomarkers and protect the brain against free radicals-induced neural damage. The results suggest that EA can be helpful in management of PD treatment. PMID:27307952

  17. An In Vivo Microdialysis Study of FLZ Penetration through the Blood-Brain Barrier in Normal and 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Parkinson's Disease Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jinfeng; Liu, Qian; Li, Yingfei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jinlan

    2014-01-01

    FLZ (N-[2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(2,5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide) is a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative and a potential anti-Parkinson's disease (PD) agent. The objective of the present study was to investigate the penetration of free FLZ across the BBB and the effects of P-gp inhibition on FLZ transport in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced PD model rats. In vivo microdialysis was used to collect FLZ containing brain and blood dialysates following intravenous (i.v.) drug administration either with or without pretreatment with the specific P-gp inhibitor, zosuquidar trihydrochloride (zosuquidar·3HCl). A sensitive, rapid, and reliable ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) technique was developed and validated to quantitate free FLZ levels in the dialysates. No significant differences were observed in the brain/blood FLZ area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratio between normal and PD model rats. However, pretreatment with zosuquidar·3HCl markedly increased the AUC ratio in both rat models. In addition, FLZ penetration was similar in zosuquidar·3HCl-pretreated normal and PD rats. These results suggest that P-gp inhibition increases BBB permeability to FLZ, thereby supporting the hypothesis that P-gp normally restricts FLZ transfer to the brain. These findings could provide reference data for future clinical trials and may aid investigation of the BBB permeability of other CNS-active substances. PMID:25045708

  18. Subthalamic 6-OHDA-induced lesion attenuates levodopa-induced dyskinesias in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J A

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives direct dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra pars compacta that degenerates in Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of dopaminergic denervation of STN in the origin of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats were distributed in four groups which were concomitantly lesioned with 6-OHDA or vehicle (sham) in the STN and in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as follows: a) MFB-sham plus STN-sham, b) MFB-sham plus STN-lesion, c) MFB-lesion plus STN-sham, and d) MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion. Four weeks after lesions, animals were treated with levodopa (6mg/kg with 15mg/kg benserazide i.p.) twice daily for 22 consecutive days. Abnormal involuntary movements were measured. In situ hybridization was performed measuring the expression of striatal preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, STN cytochrome oxidase (CO) and nigral GAD67 mRNAs. STN 6-OHDA denervation did not induce dyskinesias in levodopa-treated MFB-sham animals but attenuated axial (p<0.05), limb (p<0.05) and orolingual (p<0.01) dyskinesias in rats with a concomitant lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The attenuation of dyskinesias was associated with a decrease in the ipsilateral STN CO mRNA levels (p<0.05). No significant differences between MFB-lesion plus STN-sham and MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion groups in the extent of STN dopaminergic denervation were observed. Moreover, intrasubthalamic microinfusion of dopamine in the MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion group triggered orolingual (p<0.01), but not axial or limb, dyskinesias. These results suggest that dopaminergic STN innervation influences the expression of levodopa-induced dyskinesias but also the existence of non dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms. STN noradrenergic depletion induced by 6-OHDA in the STN needs to be taken in account as a possible mechanism explaining the attenuation of dyskinesias in the combined lesion group. PMID:24140562

  19. Early expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in a toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Serratos, Iris N; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Gómez, Isabel; Rangel-López, Edgar; Santamaria, Abel

    2016-04-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is commonly involved in different neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. The cellular signaling associated to RAGE activation may occur upon binding to different ligands. In this study we investigated whether the toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats comprises early noxious responses related to RAGE-mediated signaling cascades. In order to explore a possible interaction between 6-OHDA and RAGE, affinity parameters of RAGE with 6-OHDA were estimated by different means. The possible binding sites of 6-OHDA with the VC1 homodimer for both rat and human RAGE were also modeled. Our results show that the striatal infusion of 6-OHDA recruits RAGE upregulation, as evidenced by an early expression of the receptor. 6-OHDA was also found to bind the VC1 homodimer, although its affinity was moderate when compared to other ligands. This work contributes to the understanding of the role of RAGE activation for 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26902637

  20. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  1. Interhemispheric modulation of dopamine receptor interactions in unilateral 6-OHDA rodent model.

    PubMed

    Lawler, C P; Gilmore, J H; Watts, V J; Walker, Q D; Southerland, S B; Cook, L L; Mathis, C A; Mailman, R B

    1995-12-01

    A critical assumption in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model is that interactions between the intact and denervated hemispheres do not influence the response to insult. The present study examined this issue by assessing the effects of unilateral substantia nigra 6-OHDA lesions in rats that previously had received corpus callosum transections, a treatment designed to minimize interhemispheric influences. Quantitative autoradiography in the caudate-putamen ipsilateral to the lesion revealed that corpus callosum transection did not alter the increase in D2-like receptors ([125I]-epidepride-labeled sites) that is induced by unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. There were no effects of either 6-OHDA lesion or transection on D1 receptor density ([125I]-SCH23982 autoradiography). As a functional endpoint, dopamine-stimulated cAMP efflux was measured in superfused striatal slices. In this paradigm, the net effect of dopamine (DA) represents a combination of D1 receptor-mediated stimulation and D2 receptor-mediated inhibition. 6-OHDA lesion increased cAMP efflux induced by exposure to 100 microM DA alone; corpus callosum transection did not alter this effect. An interaction between 6-OHDA lesion and transection status was revealed, however, by comparison of results obtained with DA alone vs. DA plus the D2 antagonist sulpiride (to block the D2 inhibitory effects of 100 microM DA). This comparison revealed two important effects of 6-OHDA lesion in rats with an intact corpus callosum: 1) a moderate decrease in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated stimulation; and 2) a dramatic decrease in the ability of D2 receptors to inhibit this stimulation. Corpus callosum transection prevented these effects of 6-OHDA. These results provide a biochemical demonstration of D1:D2 receptor uncoupling in unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rats, and suggest that interhemispheric influences (e.g., contralateral cortico-striatal glutamatergic projections) may contribute to lesion-induced alterations in D1:D2

  2. Olomoucine inhibits cathepsin L nuclear translocation, activates autophagy and attenuates toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xi-Feng; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Xiang, Bei; Li, Ling-Yun; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji; Liang, Zhong-Qin

    2009-04-01

    The finding of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and its ability to process the CDP/Cux transcription factor uncovers an important role of cathepsin L in control of cell cycle progression. As the expression of certain cell cycle regulators is associated with nigral neuronal death, the present study was sought to investigate if nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and expression of certain cyclins were induced in DA neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The neuroprotective effects of the cell cycle inhibitor olomoucine against 6-OHDA-induced death of nigral neurons were examined. Using immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR we demonstrated that cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were aberrantly expressed in some dopaminergic neurons after 6-OHDA infusion. The nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and up-regulation of LC3, a protein involved in autophagy, were observed in nigral DA neurons. Olomoucine, a cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, reduced contralateral rotations and the loss of TH-positive neurons in substantia nigra induced by lesion with 6-OHDA. Pretreatment of rats or primary DA neurons with olomoucine resulted in a partial blockade of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L. Olomoucine also increased the expression of punctate LC3 immunoreactivity, indicating activation of autophagy. These findings suggest that olomoucine may exert neuroprotective effects through inhibiting cathepsin L nuclear translocation and activating autophagy. PMID:19368812

  3. Activin A Protects Midbrain Neurons in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kong M.; Vissel, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and a subsequent loss of dopamine (DA) within the striatum. Despite advances in the development of pharmacological therapies that are effective at alleviating the symptoms of PD, the search for therapeutic treatments that halt or slow the underlying nigral degeneration remains a particular challenge. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in vitro, suggesting that activin A may offer similar neuroprotective effects in in vivo models of PD. Using robust stereological methods, we found that intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA results in a significant loss of both TH positive and NeuN positive populations in the SNpc at 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-lesioning in drug naïve mice. Exogenous application of activin A for 7 days, beginning the day prior to 6-OHDA administration, resulted in a significant survival of both dopaminergic and total neuron numbers in the SNpc against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. However, we found no corresponding protection of striatal DA or dopamine transporter (DAT) expression levels in animals receiving activin A compared to vehicle controls. These results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection in a mouse model of PD, however this neuroprotection may be localized to the midbrain. PMID:25902062

  4. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  5. [COMPARISON OF CYTOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF HEMANTANE AND AMANTADINE UNDER CONDITIONS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE NEUROTOXIN ACTION ON CULTURED HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS].

    PubMed

    Logvinov, I O; Antipova, T A; Nepoklonov, A V; Valdman, E A

    2016-01-01

    Potential neuroprotective activity of the novel antiparkinsonian drug hemantane (hydrochloride N-2-(adamantyl)-hexamethylenimine) in comparison to amantadine has been studied in various regimes of administration on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line injury induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which is used as in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease. Two regimes of hemantane and amantadine administration in a range of final concentrations 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M were used either prior to or immediately after 6-OHDA introduction. MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the viability of test cells. Significant decrease in viability of SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA was observed. The addition of hemantane to cell medium produced cytoprotective effects in both regimes of administration--before and after 6-OHDA--at concentrations 10⁻⁷ M and 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M, respectively. Amantadine in con- centrations 10⁻⁷-10⁻⁸ M was effective to increase cell survival only when administered after 6-OHDA. These results show that hemantane has a greater neu-roprotective potential in comparison to amantadine. PMID:27159951

  6. New ghrelin agonist, HM01 alleviates constipation and L-dopa-delayed gastric emptying in 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, H.; Pietra, C.; Giuliano, C.; Garcia-Rubio, S.; Xu, X.; Yakabi, S.; Taché, Y.; Wang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation and L-dopa-induced gastric dysmotility are common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We investigate the novel ghrelin agonist, HM01 influence on GI motor dysfunctions in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rats. Methods HM01 pharmacological profiles were determined in vitro and in vivo in rats. We assessed changes in fecal output and water content, and gastric emptying (GE) in 6-OHDA rats treated or not with orogastric (og) HM01 and L-dopa/carbidopa (LD/CD, 20/2 mg kg−1). Fos immunoreactivity (ir) cells in specific brain and lumbosacral spinal cord were quantified. Key results HM01 displayed a high binding affinity to ghrelin receptor (Ki: 1.42 ± 0.36 nM), 4.3±1.0 h half-life and high brain/plasma ratio. 6-OHDA rats had reduced daily fecal output (22%) and water intake (23%) compared to controls. HM01 (3 and 10 mg kg−1) similarly reversed the decreased 4-h fecal weight and water content in 6-OHDA rats. Basal GE was not modified in 6-OHDA rats, however, LD/CD (once or daily for 8 days) delayed GE in 6-OHDA and control rats that was prevented by HM01 (3 mg kg−1 acute or daily before LD/CD). HM01 increased Fos-ir cell number in the area postrema, arcuate nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius and lumbosacral intermediolateral column of 6-OHDA rats where 6-OHDA had a lowering effect compared to controls. Conclusions & Inferences 6-OHDA rats display constipation- and adipsia-like features of PD and L-dopa-inhibited GE. The new orally active ghrelin agonist, HM01 crosses the blood brain barrier and alleviates these alterations suggesting a potential benefit for PD with GI disorders. PMID:25327342

  7. Gastric dysregulation induced by microinjection of 6-OHDA in the substantia nigra pars compacta of rats is determined by alterations in the brain-gut axis

    PubMed Central

    Toti, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a late-onset, chronic, and progressive motor dysfunction attributable to loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. Patients with PD experience significant gastrointestinal (GI) issues, including gastroparesis. We aimed to evaluate whether 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA)-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) induces gastric dysmotility via dysfunctions of the brain-gut axis. 6-OHDA microinjection into the SNpc induced a >90% decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (IR) on the injection site. The [13C]-octanoic acid breath test showed a delayed gastric emptying 4 wk after the 6-OHDA treatment. In control rats, microinjection of the indirect sympathomimetic, tyramine, in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) decreased gastric tone and motility; this inhibition was prevented by the fourth ventricular application of either a combination of α1- and α2- or a combination of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. Conversely, in 6-OHDA-treated rats, whereas DVC microinjection of tyramine had reduced effects on gastric tone or motility, DVC microinjection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone induced a similar increase in motility as in control rats. In 6-OHDA-treated rats, there was a decreased expression of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-IR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-IR in DVC neurons but an increase in dopamine-β-hydroxylase-IR in the A2 area. Within the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, there were no changes in the total number of neurons; however, the percentage of NOS-IR neurons increased, whereas that of ChAT-IR decreased. Our data suggest that the delayed gastric emptying in a 6-OHDA rat model of PD may be caused by neurochemical and neurophysiological alterations in the brain-gut axis. PMID:25277799

  8. Gastric dysregulation induced by microinjection of 6-OHDA in the substantia nigra pars compacta of rats is determined by alterations in the brain-gut axis.

    PubMed

    Toti, Luca; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-11-15

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a late-onset, chronic, and progressive motor dysfunction attributable to loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. Patients with PD experience significant gastrointestinal (GI) issues, including gastroparesis. We aimed to evaluate whether 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA)-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) induces gastric dysmotility via dysfunctions of the brain-gut axis. 6-OHDA microinjection into the SNpc induced a >90% decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (IR) on the injection site. The [13C]-octanoic acid breath test showed a delayed gastric emptying 4 wk after the 6-OHDA treatment. In control rats, microinjection of the indirect sympathomimetic, tyramine, in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) decreased gastric tone and motility; this inhibition was prevented by the fourth ventricular application of either a combination of α1- and α2- or a combination of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. Conversely, in 6-OHDA-treated rats, whereas DVC microinjection of tyramine had reduced effects on gastric tone or motility, DVC microinjection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone induced a similar increase in motility as in control rats. In 6-OHDA-treated rats, there was a decreased expression of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-IR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-IR in DVC neurons but an increase in dopamine-β-hydroxylase-IR in the A2 area. Within the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, there were no changes in the total number of neurons; however, the percentage of NOS-IR neurons increased, whereas that of ChAT-IR decreased. Our data suggest that the delayed gastric emptying in a 6-OHDA rat model of PD may be caused by neurochemical and neurophysiological alterations in the brain-gut axis. PMID:25277799

  9. β-Asarone Inhibits IRE1/XBP1 Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Baile; Deng, Minzhen; Zhang, Qinxin; Wang, Nanbu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, with genetics and environment contributing to the disease onset. The limited pathological cognize of the disease restrained the approaches to improve the clinical treatment. Recently, studies showed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. There was a neuroprotective effect partly mediated by modulating ER stress. β-Asarone is the essential constituent of Acorus tatarinowii Schott volatile oil. Our team observed that β-asarone could improve the behavior of parkinsonian rats; increase the HVA, Dopacl, and 5-HIAA levels; and reduce α-synuclein levels. Here we assumed that the protective role of β-asarone on parkinsonian rats was mediated via ER stress pathway. To prove the hypothesis we investigated the mRNA levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP) in 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) induced parkinsonian rats after β-asarone treatment. Furthermore, the inositol-requiring enzyme 1/X-Box Binding Protein 1 (IRE1/XBP1) ER stress pathway was also studied. The results showed that β-asarone inhibited the mRNA levels of GRP78 and CHOP, accompanied with the delined expressions of phosphorylated IER1 (p-IRE1) and XBP1. We deduced that β-asarone might have a protective effect on the 6-OHDA induced parkinsonian rats via IRE1/XBP1 Pathway. Collectively, all data indicated that β-asarone might be a potential candidate of medicine for clinical therapy of PD. PMID:27097550

  10. Neuroprotection of microglial conditioned medium on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death: role of transforming growth factor beta-2.

    PubMed

    Polazzi, Elisabetta; Altamira, Luis Emiliano Peña; Eleuteri, Simona; Barbaro, Raffaella; Casadio, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio; Monti, Barbara

    2009-07-01

    Microglia, the immune cells of the CNS, play essential roles in both physiological and pathological brain states. Here we have used an in vitro model to demonstrate neuroprotection of a 48 h-microglial conditioned medium (MCM) towards cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) challenged with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, which induces a Parkinson-like neurodegeneration, and to identify the protective factor(s). MCM nearly completely protects CGNs from 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity and at least some of the protective factor(s) are peptidic in nature. While the fraction of the medium containing molecules < 30 kDa completely protects CGNs, fractions containing molecules < 10 kDa or > 10 kDa are not neuroprotective. We further demonstrate that microglia release high amounts of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) and that its exogenous addition to the fraction of the medium not containing it (< 10 kDa) fully restores the neuroprotective action. Moreover, MCM neuroprotection is significantly counteracted by an inhibitor of TGF-beta2 transduction pathway. Our results identify TGF-beta2 as an essential neuroprotective factor released by microglia in its culture medium that requires to be fully effective the concomitant presence of other factor(s) of low molecular weight. PMID:19457129

  11. Relationship of dopamine to serotonin in the neonatal 6-OHDA rat model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Allen, S M; Davis, W M

    1999-09-01

    Rats were treated as neonates with either 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) 100 micrograms or vehicle intracisternally. Upon maturation, animals receiving 6-OHDA were assigned to four groups, with two of the four groups receiving intraventricular 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) 75 micrograms bilaterally. At 94 days of age, animals were injected with either SKF-38393 (3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), a dopamine D1 agonist, or m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) (3.0 mg/kg, i.p.), a 5-HT2C agonist, in an attempt to evoke behaviors such as stereotypical chewing, head-nodding, self-biting and self-mutilation. Both SKF-38393 and m-CPP induced the target behaviors in animals receiving 6-OHDA alone. Animals receiving additional 5,7-DHT treatment did not show any of the target behaviors in response to SKF-38393, but exhibited a much higher sensitivity to m-CPP. Pre-treatment with SCH-23390 in animals receiving 6-OHDA alone was effective in preventing SKF-38393-induced target behaviors, but not those induced by m-CPP. Pre-treatment with mianserin partially antagonized the effects of both SKF-38393 and m-CPP in these same animals. In groups receiving both neonatal 6-OHDA and adult 5,7-DHT, mianserin was effective in reducing m-CPP-induced behaviors, while SCH-23390 was largely ineffective. These data provide evidence of a serial relationship between the D1 and 5-HT2C receptor systems in the neostriatum of animals receiving neonatal 6-OHDA lesions. PMID:10780253

  12. β-asarone increases MEF2D and TH levels and reduces α-synuclein level in 6-OHDA-induced rats via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway: Chaperone-mediated autophagy activation, macroautophagy inhibition and HSP70 up-expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Liu, Shu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-10-15

    Inactive myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation will cause neuronal death. MEF2D or α-syn degradation is also associated with macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). We found that β-asarone had positive effects on treating 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rats, but mechanisms of β-asarone affecting on MEF2D and α-syn via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway remain unclear. Unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle was used to create PD rats, which were divided into four groups and administered for 30days: 6-OHDA model group, MEF2D inhibitor-treated group (SB203580, 0.5mg/kg, i.p.), MEF2D activator-treated group (LiCl, 100mg/kg, i.p.), β-asarone-treated group (15mg/kg, p.o.). Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α-syn, heat-shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A), MEF2D, HSP70, Beclin-1, light chain 3B (LC3B) and p62 in the mesencephalon were measured after 30-day administration. α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B levels were higher in the 6-OHDA model group, while TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A, p62 levels were lower compared to the sham-operated group. Our results also showed thatβ-asarone treatment reduced protein and mRNA levels of α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B, but increased HSP70, TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A and p62 levels compared to the 6-OHDA model group. Additionally, certain correlations among α-syn, TH, Beclin-1, LC3B, p62, HSP70, LAMP-2A and MEF2D were also discovered in this study. These findings suggested that β-asarone treatment could increase MEF2D and TH as well as reduce α-syn to protect against 6-OHDA induced damage in PD rat mesencephalon via modulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway. PMID:27444243

  13. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone protects 6-OHDA and MPTP induced dopaminergic neurons degeneration through activation of TrkB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dandan; Shi, Ying; Wang, Jun; Lin, Qing; Sun, Yi; Ye, Keqiang; Yan, Qiao; Zhang, Hai

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a notably important neurotrophin which regulates neuronal survival and differentiation in the nervous system. However, its clinical usage is particularly limited. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), which acts as a selective agonist of BDNF receptor TrkB, is reported to possess neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Here we explored the potent neuroprotective effects of 7,8-DHF in 6-OHDA induced rat and MPTP induced mouse model of Parkinsonism. The results demonstrated that treatment with 7,8-DHF in drinking water for four weeks (two weeks before 6-OHDA+two weeks after 6-OHDA lesion) significantly improved dopamine-mediated behaviors in 6-OHDA rat model, and prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Phospho-Y816-TrkB immunostaining showed that TrkB phosphorylation was significantly elevated in the SN in 7,8-DHF pretreated group, indicating 7,8-DHF activated TrkB and likely contributed to its neuroprotective effects. 7,8-DHF also protected acute MPTP neurotoxicity in mice but did not affect the climbing behavior in pole test. Thus our study indicates the neuroprotective properties of 7,8-DHF through the activation of TrkB, which provides a novel therapeutic treatment for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27019033

  14. Electroacupuncture Produces the Sustained Motor Improvement in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiahui; Sun, Min; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and research evidence has shown that electroacupuncture (EA) promotes recovery of motor function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the “efficacy span” of EA treatment, especially the long-term effect of EA that is thought to last after the cessation of EA treatment, has not been investigated. The present study thus investigated and compared the effect of EA during and after chronic EA application on motor activity and dopamine lesions in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD. Chronic EA treatment (30 min a day, 6 days a week for 2 or 4 weeks) significantly attenuated motor deficiency and reduced dopamine neuron degeneration. Remarkably, EA showed a long-lasting effect after the cessation of EA stimulation. At 2 and 4 weeks after the termination of EA, EA continued to improve motor function in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Consistent with sustained behavioral effects, EA induced an enduring increase in the dopamine turnover ratio in the striatum 2 weeks after the cessation of EA treatment. Here we demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of EA outlasted the duration of EA application. During a relatively long period of time after the completion of EA treatment, EA is able to continue to improve motor function and enhance dopamine availability in 6-OHDA-lesioned PD mice. PMID:26894437

  15. Striatal Pleiotrophin Overexpression Provides Functional and Morphological Neuroprotection in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gombash, Sara E; Lipton, Jack W; Collier, Timothy J; Madhavan, Lalitha; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Terpstra, Brian T; Spieles-Engemann, Anne L; Daley, Brian F; Wohlgenant, Susan L; Thompson, Valerie B; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Mandel, Ronald J; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are integrally involved in the development of the nigrostriatal system and in combination with gene therapy, possess great therapeutic potential for Parkinson's disease (PD). Pleiotrophin (PTN) is involved in the development, maintenance, and repair of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The present study examined the ability of striatal PTN overexpression, delivered via psueudotyped recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2/1 (rAAV2/1), to provide neuroprotection and functional restoration from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Striatal PTN overexpression led to significant neuroprotection of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and THir neurite density in the striatum, with long-term PTN overexpression producing recovery from 6-OHDA-induced deficits in contralateral forelimb use. Transduced striatal PTN levels were increased threefold compared to adult striatal PTN expression and approximated peak endogenous developmental levels (P1). rAAV2/1 vector exclusively transduced neurons within the striatum and SNpc with approximately half the total striatal volume routinely transduced using our injection parameters. Our results indicate that striatal PTN overexpression can provide neuroprotection for the 6-OHDA lesioned nigrostriatal system based upon morphological and functional measures and that striatal PTN levels similar in magnitude to those expressed in the striatum during development are sufficient to provide neuroprotection from Parkinsonian insult. PMID:22008908

  16. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Depressive-Like Symptoms and Modulates BDNF Signaling in 6-Hydroxydopamine Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min; Wang, Ke; Yu, Yan; Su, Wen-Ting; Jiang, Xin-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the beneficial effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on motor behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role and potential mechanisms of EA in PD-associated depression remain unclear. In the present study, a rat model of PD with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions in the medial forebrain bundle was treated using EA for 4 weeks. We found that 100 Hz EA improved several motor phenotypes. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical analysis showed that EA had a minimal impact on the TH-positive profiles of the ipsilateral ventral tegmental area. Compared with the 6-OHDA group, long-term EA stimulation significantly increased sucrose solution consumption and decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. EA treatment did not alter dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels in the striatum and hippocampus. Noticeably, EA treatment reversed the 6-OHDA-induced abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the midbrain and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that EA at 100-Hz possesses the ability to improve depressive-like symptoms in PD rats, which is, at least in part, due to the distinct effect of EA on the mesostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways. Moreover, BDNF seems to participate in the effect of EA in PD. PMID:27525025

  17. Characterization of a new low-dose 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease in rat.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Anna-Maija; Suleymanova, Ilida; Albert, Katrina; Anttila, Jenni; Voutilainen, Merja H; Airavaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induces partial degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, mimicking the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Setting up the partial lesion model can be challenging because a number of experimental settings can be altered. This study compares seven experimental settings in a single study on d-amphetamine-induced rotations, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurites in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT)-positive neurites in the striatum, and TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in rats. Moreover, we validate a new algorithm for estimating the number of TH-positive cells. We show that the behavior and immunoreactivity vary greatly depending on the injection settings, and we categorize the lesions as progressive, stable, or regressive based on d-amphetamine-induced rotations. The rotation behavior correlated with the degree of the lesion, analyzed by immunohistochemistry; the largest lesions were in the progressive group, and the smallest lesions were in the regressive group. We establish a new low-dose partial 6-OHDA lesion model in which a total of 6 μg was distributed evenly to three sites in the striatum at a 10° angle. The administration of low-dose 6-OHDA produced stable and reliable rotation behavior and induced partial loss of striatal TH-positive and DAT-positive neurites and TH-positive cells in the SNpc. This model is highly suitable for neurorestoration studies in the search for new therapies for PD, and the new algorithm increases the efficacy for estimating the number of dopamine neurons. This study can be extremely useful for laboratories setting up the partial 6-OHDA model. PMID:26762168

  18. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine exposure on motor activity and biochemical expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Chen, Wu-Fu

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, current treatments for PD are mainly palliative. Recently, researchers discovered that neurotoxins can induce Parkinsonian-like symptoms in zebrafish. No study to date has investigated the characteristics of PD, such as neuroinflammation factors, oxidative stress, or ubiquitin dysfunction, in this model. Therefore, the current study was aimed at utilizing commonly used clinical drugs, minocycline, vitamin E, and Sinemet, to test the usefulness of this model. Previous studies had indicated that DA cell loss was greater with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) than with other neurotoxins. Thus, we first challenged zebrafish with 6-OHDA immersion and found a significant reduction in zebrafish locomotor activity; we then reversed the locomotor disruptions by treatment with vitamin E, Sinemet, or minocycline. The present study also analyzed the mRNA expression of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b, because the expression of these molecular targets has been shown to result in attenuation in mammalian models of PD. Vitamin E, Sinemet, and minocycline significantly reversed 6-OHDA-induced changes of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b mRNA expression in zebrafish. Moreover, we assessed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to confirm the therapeutic effects of vitamin E tested on this PD model and established that vitamin E reversed the 6-OHDA-induced damage on TH expression. Our results provide some support for the validity of this in vivo Parkinson's model, and we hope that this model will be more widely used in the future. PMID:24720843

  19. Effects of 6-Hydroxydopamine Exposure on Motor Activity and Biochemical Expression in Zebrafish (Danio Rerio) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, current treatments for PD are mainly palliative. Recently, researchers discovered that neurotoxins can induce Parkinsonian-like symptoms in zebrafish. No study to date has investigated the characteristics of PD, such as neuroinflammation factors, oxidative stress, or ubiquitin dysfunction, in this model. Therefore, the current study was aimed at utilizing commonly used clinical drugs, minocycline, vitamin E, and Sinemet, to test the usefulness of this model. Previous studies had indicated that DA cell loss was greater with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) than with other neurotoxins. Thus, we first challenged zebrafish with 6-OHDA immersion and found a significant reduction in zebrafish locomotor activity; we then reversed the locomotor disruptions by treatment with vitamin E, Sinemet, or minocycline. The present study also analyzed the mRNA expression of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b, because the expression of these molecular targets has been shown to result in attenuation in mammalian models of PD. Vitamin E, Sinemet, and minocycline significantly reversed 6-OHDA-induced changes of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b mRNA expression in zebrafish. Moreover, we assessed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to confirm the therapeutic effects of vitamin E tested on this PD model and established that vitamin E reversed the 6-OHDA-induced damage on TH expression. Our results provide some support for the validity of this in vivo Parkinson's model, and we hope that this model will be more widely used in the future. PMID:24720843

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 1attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity: an in vitro and in vivo investigation in experimental models of parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojie; He, Songbin; Wang, Zhouguang; Wu, Jiamin; Zhang, Jinjing; Cheng, Yi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Xinlong; Chen, Zaifeng; Ye, Junmin; Chen, Li; Lin, Li; Xiao, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and is characterized by motor system disorders resulting in loss of dopamine producing brain cells. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, also called FGF1, promotes the survival of neurons. The aims of the present study were to confirm FGF1 could protect neurons cultures from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated FGF1 administration improved the motor function recovery, increased the TH-positive neurons survival and up-regulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. Meanwhile, FGF1 prevents the death of DA neuron at least in part by reducing the levels of α-synuclein and ER stress. The administration of FGF1 activated downstream signals PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2. In conclusion, FGF1 diminished α-synuclein neurotoxicity by down regulating ER stress mediators and the level of apoptosis, and these effects may underlying the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signal pathway. PMID:25628778

  1. Acupuncture inhibits oxidative stress and rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Ju, Wei-Ping; Li, Zhen-Guang; Wang, Dao-Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Chen; Xie, An-Mu

    2010-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the beneficial effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease (PD). Although clinical evidence for the acupuncture anti-Parkinson's disease effect has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism still remains elusive. It has been suggested a relationship between PD and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can result in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant enzyme response, and the role of acupuncture stimulation at GB34 (Yanglingquan), LR3 (Taichong), ST36 (Zusanli) and SP10 (Xuehai) acupoints on regulating oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal system in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the left medial forebrain bundle (MFB), an apomorphine induced rotational behavior test was performed. The levels of enzymatic, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and nonenzymatic, viz., reduced glutathione (GSH), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the nigrostriatal system were measured to assess the oxidative stress status. Brain MDA levels significantly increased, while GSH levels were decreased in impaired groups with 6-OHDA injection only, accompanied by a marked reduction in the level of SOD and GSH-Px. The levels of oxidative stress related parameters except CAT, as well as the rotational asymmetry, were reversed by acupuncture stimulation. These results showed that acupuncture treatment displayed antioxidative and/or neuroprotective properties in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat and these protective properties might be mediated, at least in part, by involving regulation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:20399757

  2. Decreased synaptic plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex underlies short-term memory deficits in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Ben, Juliana; Guaita, Gisele O; Pita, Inês R; Sequeira, Ana C; Pereira, Frederico C; Walz, Roger; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor dysfunction associated with dopaminergic degeneration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). However, motor symptoms in PD are often preceded by short-term memory deficits, which have been argued to involve deregulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We now used a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat PD model to explore if alterations of synaptic plasticity in DLS and mPFC underlie short-term memory impairments in PD prodrome. The bilateral injection of 6-OHDA (20μg/hemisphere) in the DLS caused a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (>80%) and decreased monoamine levels in the striatum and PFC, accompanied by motor deficits evaluated after 21 days in the open field and accelerated rotarod. A lower dose of 6-OHDA (10μg/hemisphere) only induced a partial degeneration (about 60%) of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with no gross motor impairments, thus mimicking an early premotor stage of PD. Notably, 6-OHDA (10μg)-lesioned rats displayed decreased monoamine levels in the PFC as well as short-term memory deficits evaluated in the novel object discrimination and in the modified Y-maze tasks; this was accompanied by a selective decrease in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in the mPFC, but not in DLS, without changes of synaptic transmission in either brain regions. These results indicate that the short-term memory dysfunction predating the motor alterations in the 6-OHDA model of PD is associated with selective changes of information processing in PFC circuits, typified by persistent changes of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26707254

  3. Spontaneous locomotor activity and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia are not linked in 6-OHDA parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Sgroi, Stefania; Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Capper-Loup, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Bradykinesia (slowness of movement) and other characteristic motor manifestations of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are alleviated by treatment with L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). Long-term L-DOPA treatment, however, is associated with complications such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesia that severely impair the quality of life. It is unclear whether the effect of L-DOPA on spontaneous motor activity and its dyskinesia-inducing effect share a common mechanism. To investigate the possible connection between these two effects, we analyzed the spontaneous locomotor activity of parkinsonian rats before surgery (unilateral injection of 6-OHDA in the right medial forebrain bundle), before treatment with L-DOPA, during L-DOPA treatment (the “ON” phase), and after the end of L-DOPA treatment (the “OFF” phase). We correlated the severity of dyskinesia (AIM scores) with locomotor responses in the ON/OFF phases of chronic L-DOPA treatment at two different doses. We treated three groups of parkinsonian animals with chronic injections of 8 mg/kg L-DOPA, 6 mg/kg L-DOPA, and saline solution and one group of non-lesioned animals with 8 mg/kg L-DOPA. At the end of the experiment, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity was analyzed in the striatum of all parkinsonian rats. We found no correlation between the severity of dyskinesia and spontaneous locomotor activity in the ON or OFF phase of L-DOPA treatment. The only observed correlation was between the pathological rotation induced by L-DOPA at the highest dose and locomotor activity in the ON phase of L-DOPA treatment. In addition, a L-DOPA withdrawal effect was observed, with worse motor performance in the OFF phase than before the start of L-DOPA treatment. These findings suggest that different neural mechanisms underlie the effect of L-DOPA on spontaneous motor activity and its dyskinesia-inducing effect, with a different dose-response relationship for each of these two effects. PMID:25324746

  4. NAMPT protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells through modulating SIRT1 activity.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Shao-Qing; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Wei-Lang

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate‑limiting step in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthetic pathway in mammals, is a substrate for NAD+‑dependent enzymes, such as sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and contributes to cell fate decisions. However, the role of NAMPT in PD has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, PC12 cells were treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6‑OHDA) to establish an in vitro model of PD, following which an obvious inhibitory effect on the levels of NAMPT and NAD+ as well as the NAD+/NADH ratio was detected. In addition, pre‑incubation with FK866, a highly specific NAMPT inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of 6‑OHDA on the viability of PC12, while pre‑incubation with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), am enzymatic product of NAMPT, had the opposite effect. Furthermore, it was revealed that NMN markedly attenuated 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels, as well as 6‑OHDA‑induced increases in malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase in PC12 cells. Furthermore, 6‑OHDA significantly reduced SIRT1 activity in PC12 cells, which was inhibited by NMN. The pharmacological activator resveratrol also significantly inhibited 6‑OHDA‑mediated decreases in PC12 cell viability while reversing 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in SIRT1 levels. The results of the present study suggested that NMT protected against 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in PC12 cell viability, and that SIRT1 activation had a role in this process. Treatment with NMN to activate SIRT1 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating PD. PMID:27035562

  5. Protective efficacy of P7C3-S243 in the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Miller, Adam D; Britt, Jeremiah K; DeMarco, Anthony J; De Jesús-Cortés, Mayralis; Stuebing, Emily; Naidoo, Jacinth; Vázquez-Rosa, Edwin; Morlock, Lorraine; Williams, Noelle S; Ready, Joseph M; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are currently no therapeutic options for patients with Parkinson’s disease that prevent or slow the death of dopaminergic neurons. We have recently identified the novel P7C3 class of neuroprotective molecules that blocks neuron cell death. AIMS The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with highly active members of the P7C3 series blocks dopaminergic neuron cell death and associated behavioral and neurochemical deficits in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson’s disease. METHODS After unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle, rats were assessed for behavioral function in the open field, cylinder test, and amphetamine-induced circling test. Thereafter, their brains were subjected to neurochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of dopaminergic neuron survival. Analysis was conducted as a function of treatment with P7C3 compounds, with administration initiated either before or after 6-OHDA exposure. RESULTS Animals administered P7C3-A20 or P7C3-S243, two of the most advanced agents in the P7C3 series of neuroprotective compounds, both before and after 6-OHDA exposure showed evidence of protective efficacy in all measures. When P7C3-S243 administration was initiated after 6-OHDA exposure, rats also showed protective efficacy in all measures, which included blocking dopaminergic neuron cell death in ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta, preservation of dopamine and its metabolites in ipsilateral striatum, and preservation of normal motor behavior. CONCLUSIONS The P7C3 series of compounds may form the basis for developing new therapeutic agents for slowing or preventing progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27158662

  6. Neuroprotection by scorpion venom heat resistant peptide in 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng-Ming; Zhao, Dan; Yu, De-Qin; Li, Sheng-Long; An, Dong; Peng, Yan; Xu, Hong; Sun, Yi-Ping; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Wan-Qin

    2014-12-25

    Neuroprotective effect of scorpion venom on Parkinson's disease (PD) has already been reported. The present study was aimed to investigate whether scorpion venom heat resistant peptide (SVHRP) could attenuate ultrastructural abnormalities in mitochondria and oxidative stress in midbrain neurons of early-stage PD model. The early-stage PD model was established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (20 μg/3 μL normal saline with 0.1% ascorbic acid) into the striatum of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats unilaterally. The rats were intraperitoneally administered with SVHRP (0.05 mg/kg per day) or vehicle (saline) for 1 week. Two weeks after 6-OHDA treatment, the rats received behavior tests for validation of model. Three weeks after 6-OHDA injection, the immunoreactivity of dopaminergic neurons were detected by immunohistochemistry staining, and the ultrastructure of neuronal mitochondria in midbrain was observed by electron microscope. In the meantime, the activities of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the mitochondria of the midbrain neurons, as well as the inhibitory ability of hydroxyl free radical and the antioxidant ability in the serum, were measured by corresponding kits. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced the optical density of dopaminergic neurons, induced damage of mitochondrial ultrastructure of midbrain neurons, decreased SOD activity, increased MAO-B activity and MDA content, and reduced the antioxidant ability of the serum. SVHRP significantly reversed the previous harmful effects of 6-OHDA in early-stage PD model. These findings indicate that SVHRP may contribute to neuroprotection by preventing biochemical and ultrastructure damage changes which occur during early-stage PD. PMID:25516514

  7. Diphenyl diselenide reduces mechanical and thermal nociceptive behavioral responses after unilateral intrastriatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Juliana Trevisan; Pinton, Simone; Gai, Bibiana Mozzaquatro; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, in addition to motor dysfunction, also present alterations in pain sensation. The present study characterized the antinociceptive effects of diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2) in a model of nociception induced by unilateral, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection in rats. Male adult Wistar rats received 20 μg/3 μl of 6-OHDA (in saline solution containing 0.02 % of ascorbic acid) or 3 μl of vehicle into the right striatum (1.0 mm anterior, 3.0 mm lateral, and 5.0 mm ventral-with respect to the bregma). Thirty days after injection, rats received (PhSe)2 intragastrically at a dose of 10 mg/kg 1 h before behavioral tests (von Frey hairs, hot plate, tail immersion, formalin, and open field). Our results demonstrated that 6-OHDA injection to rats augmented the response frequency of von Frey hairs (VHF) stimulation, besides reducing the thermal withdrawal latency in the hot plate test. Importantly, the (PhSe)2 treatment decreased the mechanical allodynia measured by the response frequency of VHF stimulation and diminished the thermal nociception in the hot plate test in 6-OHDA-injected rats. In conclusion, these results revealed that a single oral administration of (PhSe)2 1 h prior to the accomplishment of the behavioral tests was effective to attenuate the increased mechanical and thermal nociception caused by a single intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection to rats. Furthermore, other clarifying studies are warranted to improve the evidence bases for future clinical use of (PhSe)2 as a new alternative therapy for the treatment of painful symptoms associated to PD. PMID:23821314

  8. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment. PMID:26991136

  9. Ether-à-go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel expression in dopaminergic neurons of basal ganglia is modulated by 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N R; Mitkovski, M; Stühmer, W; Pardo, L A; Del Bel, E A

    2012-04-01

    The ether à go-go (Eag) gene encodes the voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) ion channel Kv10.1, whose function still remains unknown. As dopamine may directly affect K(+) channels, we evaluated whether a nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion induced by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) would alter Eag1-K(+) channel expression in the rat basal ganglia and related brain regions. Male Wistar rats received a microinjection of either saline or 6-OHDA (unilaterally) into the medial forebrain bundle. The extent of the dopaminergic lesion induced by 6-OHDA was evaluated by apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. The 6-OHDA microinjection caused a partial or complete lesion of dopaminergic cells, as well as a reduction of Eag1+ cells in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. In addition, we observed a decrease in TH immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral striatum. In conclusion, the expression of the Eag1-K(+)-channel throughout the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain, its co-localization with dopaminergic cells and its reduction mirroring the extent of the lesion highlight a physiological circuitry where the functional role of this channel can be investigated. The Eag1-K(+) channel expression in dopaminergic cells suggests that these channels are part of the diversified group of ion channels that generate and maintain the electrophysiological activity pattern of dopaminergic midbrain neurons. PMID:22048886

  10. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson’s Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson’s disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  11. Behavioral differences between neonatal and adult 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats to dopamine agonists: relevance to neurological symptoms in clinical syndromes with reduced brain dopamine.

    PubMed

    Breese, G R; Baumeister, A A; McCown, T J; Emerick, S G; Frye, G D; Crotty, K; Mueller, R A

    1984-11-01

    Administration of L-dopa or apomorphine to neonatal and adult 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats resulted in different behavioral responses depending on the age at which dopaminergic fibers were destroyed. When neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats were tested as adults, they exhibited marked stereotypies, self-biting and self-mutilation behavior (SMB) when given these dopamine agonists. Self-biting as well as the incidence of SMB in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats showed dose-related changes between 10 and 100 mg/kg of L-dopa. This SMB and self-biting after L-dopa was observed as early as 22 to 24 days of age. Adult 6-OHDA-treated rats did not exhibit SMB or self-biting to L-dopa (100 mg/kg) or apomorphine (10 mg/kg), but did display paw treading and head nodding--behaviors not observed in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. In addition, the locomotor response to apomorphine (1 mg/kg) was significantly greater in adult 6-OHDA-treated rats than in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. Brain dopamine was reduced markedly in striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercles in both 6-OHDA treatment groups with the reduction being slightly greater in rats treated with 6-OHDA neonatally. Serotonin content was elevated in striatum of rats treated neonatally with 6-OHDA, but not in adult 6-OHDA-treated rats. SMB and behaviors observed after L-dopa in rats treated neonatally with 6-OHDA were not apparent after L-dopa in rats with brain serotonin or norepinephrine reduced. Rats with brain dopaminergic fibers destroyed neonatally exhibited self-biting and SMB after L-dopa, suggesting that neonatal reduction of this amine is responsible for the SMB and self-biting in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. 5-Hydroxytryptophan administration to neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats did not induce SMB, indicating that release of serotonin by L-dopa is not responsible for this behavior. Because inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase did not alter the SMB response to L-dopa observed in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats

  12. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D. Luke; Collier, Timothy J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1) did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2) did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3) did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation. PMID:26222442

  13. T-Lymphocyte Deficiency Exacerbates Behavioral Deficits in the 6-OHDA Unilateral Lesion Rat Model for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Christopher J; Seksenyan, Akop; Koronyo, Yosef; Rentsendorj, Altan; Sarayba, Danielle; Wu, Henry; Gragg, Ashley; Siegel, Emily; Thomas, Deborah; Espinosa, Andres; Thompson, Kerry; Black, Keith; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya; Pechnick, Robert; Irvin, Dwain K

    2014-01-01

    T-lymphocytes have been previously implicated in protecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantianigra from induced cell death. However, the role of T-cells in neurodegenerative models such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) has not been fully elucidated. To examine the role of T-lymphocytes on motor behavior in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilateral striatal partial lesion PD rat model, we assessed progression of hemi-parkinsonian lesions in the substantia nigra, induced by 6-OHDA striatal injections, in athymic rats (RNU−/−, T-lymphocyte-deficient) as compared to RNU−/+ rats (phenotypically normal). Motor skills were determined by the cylinder and D-amphetamine sulfate-induced rotational behavioral tests. Cylinder behavioral test showed no significant difference between unilaterally lesioned RNU−/− and RNU−/+ rats. However both unilaterally lesioned RNU−/− and RNU−/+ rats favored the use of the limb ipsilateral to lesion. Additionally, amphetamine-induced rotational test revealed greater rotational asymmetry in RNU−/− rats compared to RNU−/+ rats at two- and six-week post-lesion. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed loss of striatal TH-immunopositive fibers in RNU−/− and RNU−/+ rat, as well as blood-brain-barrier changes associated with PD that may influence passage of immune cells into the central nervous system in RNU−/− brains. Specifically, GFAP immunopositive cells were decreased, as were astrocytic end-feet (AQP4) contacting blood vessels (laminin) in the lesioned relative to contralateral striatum. Flow cytometric analysis in 6-OHDA lesioned RNU−/+rats revealed increased CD4+ and decreased CD8+ T cells specifically within lesioned brain. These results suggest that both major T cell subpopulations are significantly and reciprocally altered following 6-OHDA-lesioning, and that global T cell deficiency exacerbates motor behavioral defects in this rat model of PD. PMID:25346865

  14. Neuroprotection by 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate in a 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Morroni, Fabiana; Sita, Giulia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-11-17

    A number of pathogenic factors have been implicated in the progression of Parkinson׳s disease (PD), including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, excitotoxicity, and signals mediating apoptosis cascade. 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) is a major component in wasabi, a very popular spice in Japan and a member of the Brassica family of vegetables. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of 6-MSITC in a PD mouse model. Mice were treated with 6-MSITC (5mg/kg twice a week) for four weeks after the unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). On the 28th day, 6-OHDA-injected mice showed behavioral impairments, a significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, lesioned mice showed reduced glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities. Notably, 6-MSITC demonstrated neuroprotective effects in our experimental model strongly related to the preservation of functional nigral dopaminergic neurons, which contributed to the reduction of motor dysfunction induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that the beneficial effects of 6-MSITC could be attributed to the decrease of apoptotic cell death and to the activation of glutathione-dependent antioxidant systems. These findings may render 6-MSITC as a promising molecule for further pharmacological studies on the investigation for disease-modifying treatment in PD. PMID:25257035

  15. Functionality of NGF-protected PC12 cells following exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Edel T.; Loughlin, John P.; Herbert, Kate Reed; Dockery, Peter; Samali, Afshin; Doyle, Karen M.; Gorman, Adrienne M. . E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie

    2006-12-29

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is often used in models of Parkinson's disease since it can selectively target and kill dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra. In this study, pre-treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibited apoptosis and necrosis by 6-OHDA, including caspase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release. Notably, cells exposed to 6-OHDA in the presence of NGF were subsequently capable of proliferation (when replated without NGF), or neurite outgrowth (with continued presence of NGF). Following 7 days growth in the presence of NGF, expression of {beta}III tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase and increased intracellular catecholamines was detectable in PC12 cells, features characteristic of functional dopaminergic neurons. NGF-pre-treated PC12 cells retained expression of {beta}III-tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase, but not catecholamine content following 6-OHDA exposure. These data indicate that NGF-protected cells maintained some aspects of functionality and were subsequently capable of proliferation or differentiation.

  16. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages. PMID:26700436

  17. Temporal Dissociation of Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex Uncouples Anhedonia and Defense Behaviors Relevant to Depression in 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-08-01

    The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) processes motor and non-motor functions and undergoes extensive dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). The nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration also affects other brain areas including the pre-frontal cortex (PFC), which has been associated with the appearance of anhedonia and depression at pre-motor phases of PD. Using behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological approaches, we investigated the temporal dissociation between the role of the DLS and PFC in the appearance of anhedonia and defense behaviors relevant to depression in rats submitted to bilateral DLS lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 10 μg/hemisphere). 6-OHDA induced partial dopaminergic nigrostriatal damage with no gross motor impairments. Anhedonic-like behaviors were observed in the splash and sucrose consumption tests only 7 days after 6-OHDA lesion. By contrast, defense behaviors relevant to depression evaluated in the forced swimming test and social withdrawal only emerged 21 days after 6-OHDA lesion when anhedonia was no longer present. These temporally dissociated behavioral alterations were coupled to temporal- and structure-dependent alterations in dopaminergic markers such as dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and dopamine transporter, leading to altered dopamine sensitivity in DLS and PFC circuits, evaluated electrophysiologically. These results provide the first demonstration of a dissociated involvement of the DLS and PFC in anhedonic-like and defense behaviors relevant to depression in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which was linked with temporal fluctuations in dopaminergic receptor density, leading to altered dopaminergic system sensitivity in these two brain structures. This sheds new light to the duality between depressive and anhedonic symptoms in PD. PMID:26164273

  18. Intranigral grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue in adult 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats can induce behavioral recovery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R E; Becker, J B

    1997-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions can reduce and even reverse rotational behavior in response to direct and indirect dopamine agonists. These grafts can ameliorate deficits on simple spontaneous behaviors, but do not improve complex behaviors that require the skilled integration of the use of both paws. We report here that rats with grafts into the DA-depleted substantia nigra, that receive cyclosporine A, can experience recovery on spontaneous behaviors that mimic those observed in Parkinson's disease. Specific cyclosporine A treatment conditions can differentially affect whether intranigral grafts normalize paw use during initiation or termination of a movement sequence. These findings may have important implications for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:9171159

  19. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the medial prefrontal cortex on social interactions in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Rong; Huang, Guang-Biao; Sui, Zhi Yan; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Chung, Young-Chul

    2010-07-30

    Bilateral depletion of dopamine (DA) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) following local infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was reported to affect mesolimbic DA neurotransmission and augment spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotion. However, the effects of 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC of adolescent rats have never been investigated. Given that dopaminergic neurons reach the peak of maturation during adolescence, we hypothesized that 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC during adolescence would have greater impact on subsequent behavioral parameters than would such lesioning during adulthood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC on the open-field activities and novel investigative and socially interactive behaviors of adolescent and adult rats. Using a stereotaxic apparatus, 6-OHDA (8.0 microg) was injected bilaterally into the mPFC of adolescent and adult rats. After a 1-week recovery period, rats were placed in an open-field chamber, and spontaneous locomotion and other behaviors were monitored. Next, a novel toy was place in the center and behavioral responses were observed. One day later, socially interactive behaviors were measured by placing the lesioned rats into a cage with four unfamiliar rats matched for age. The tests of locomotor activity and novel investigative behaviors revealed no significant differences between the lesioned and sham groups of adolescent or adult rats. Grooming and socially interactive behaviors were significantly lower in the adolescent and adult lesioned groups than in each sham group. Interestingly, we observed more extensive impairment in socially interactive behaviors among the adolescent lesioned rats compared to the adult lesioned rats. The present study indicates that DA depletion in the mPFC causes significantly reduced grooming and socially interactive behaviors; this phenomenon may be comparable to the negative symptoms observed in schizophrenia. Further research is

  20. CCK-8 injected into the nucleus accumbens attenuates the supersensitive locomotor response to apomorphine in 6-OHDA and chronic-neuroleptic treated rats.

    PubMed

    Weiss, F; Ettenberg, A; Koob, G F

    1989-01-01

    Postsynaptic dopamine-cholecystokinin (CCK) interactions in the nucleus accumbens were studied in two behavioral preparations of DA receptor supersensitivity: chronic-neuroleptic treated and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated rats. Subcutaneous (SC) injections of apomorphine (APO; 0.15 mg/kg) in experiment 1 produced marked hyperlocomotion in rats following 12 days of pretreatment with cis-[Z]-flupenthixol (2 mg/kg; twice per day). Bilateral intra-accumbens (N.Acc.) microinjections of CCK-8 (2 ng and 2 micrograms) reliably reduced APO-stimulated hyperlocomotion. An intermediate CCK dose (20 ng) was without effect. No change in APO responsivity following chronic vehicle treatment was observed and the baseline APO response was not altered by CCK at any dose. Denervation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) terminals by intra-N.Acc. injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 8 micrograms/side) in experiment 2 similarly resulted in intense locomotor hyperactivity after APO stimulation (0.1 mg/kg; SC). Bilateral intra-N.Acc. injections of CCK-8 (1, 10, 100 ng, and 1 micrograms) significantly attenuated the supersensitive locomotor response to APO. As in experiment 1, CCK produced "biphasic" dose-response effects with strong attenuation that persisted throughout the entire 60-min test at both high (1 microgram) and low (1 ng) doses. Intermediate CCK doses (10 and 100 ng) produced only short-term reductions in activity. Hypomotility induced by APO in SHAM-lesioned rats was not effectively reversed by CCK treatments. CCK had no effect on unstimulated baseline locomotor activity in either 6-OHDA or SHAM-lesioned rats. These results provide further evidence that CCK-8 modulates mesolimbic DA activity by functionally opposing the postsynaptic effects of DA in the region of the nucleus accumbens. PMID:2574480

  1. In vivo extracellular recording of striatal neurons in the awake rat following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Morales, M; Woodward, D J; Hoffer, B J; Janak, P H

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the functional effects of dopaminergic input to the dorsal striatum and to compare the effects of dopaminergic lesions in awake and anesthetized animals. We examined the effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the ascending dopaminergic bundle on the firing properties of dorsal striatal neurons in the awake freely moving rat using chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays. We recorded extracellular activity of striatal neurons under baseline conditions and following the systemic injection of apomorphine in awake and anesthetized subjects. Firing rates were higher in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion compared to rates of neurons from the contralateral unlesioned hemisphere. Striatal firing rates from sham and no-surgery control rats were, in general, higher than those from the contralateral unlesioned striatum of experimental subjects. Apomorphine (0.05 mg/kg, sc) normalized the differences in firing rates in lesioned animals by increasing firing of neurons within the contralateral unlesioned side, while simultaneously decreasing firing of neurons within the ipsilateral lesioned side. Mean firing rates were substantially higher in awake animals than in subjects anesthetized with chloral hydrate, perhaps reflecting anesthesia-induced decreases in excitatory input to striatal neurons. Chloral hydrate anesthesia decreased firing rates of neurons in the lesioned, unlesioned, and control striata to a similar degree, although absolute firing rates of neurons from the 6-OHDA-lesioned striata remained elevated over all other groups. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions also altered the pattern of spike output in the awake animal as indicated by an increase in the number of bursts per minute following dopaminergic deafferentation. This and other burst parameters were altered by apomorphine. Our findings show that effects of dopaminergic deafferentation can be measured in the awake behaving

  2. Subtle Cardiovascular Dysfunction in the Unilateral 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Slack, K.; Billing, R.; Matthews, S.; Allbutt, H. N.; Einstein, R.; Henderson, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson's disease produces autonomic deficits. Autonomic parameters were assessed by implanting a small radiofrequency telemetry device which measured heart rate variability (HRV), diurnal rhythms of heart rate (HR), core body temperature (cBT) and locomotor activity (LA). Rats then received 6-OHDA lesion or sham surgery. 6-OHDA lesioned rats exhibited head and body axis biases, defective sensorimotor function (“disengage” test), and prominent apomorphine rotation (all P < .05 versus controls). Diurnal rhythm of HR was lower for 6-OHDA lesioned rats (n = 8) versus controls (n = 6; P < .05). Whilst HR decreased similarly in both groups during the day, there was a greater decrease in HR for the 6-OHDA lesioned rats at night (by 38 b.p.m. relative to 17 b.p.m. for controls). LA and cBT did not differ between surgery groups. This study indicates the unilateral 6-OHDA model of PD shows subtle signs of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. PMID:20976085

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptor changes induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed

    Pan, H S; Penney, J B; Young, A B

    1985-11-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to ascertain alterations in [3H]muscimol, [3H]flunitrazepam (FLU), [3H]naloxone, [3H]D-alanine-D-leucine-enkephalin (DADL), and [3H]spiroperidol binding in basal ganglia 1 week, 4 weeks, and 5 months after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the rat. At 1 and 4 weeks following lesions, [3H]spiroperidol binding increased 33% in striatum. At 5 months, [3H]spiroperidol was only nonsignificantly increased above control. At 1 week, [3H]muscimol binding decreased 39% in ipsilateral globus pallidus (GP), but increased 41% and 11% in entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), respectively. At 4 weeks, [3H]muscimol binding was reduced 19% in striatum and 44% in GP and remained enhanced by 32% in both EPN and SNr. These changes in [3H]muscimol binding persisted at 5 months. [3H]FLU binding was altered in the same direction as [3H]muscimol binding; however, changes were slower in onset and became significant (and remained so) only at 4 weeks after lesions. Decreases in [3H]naloxone and [3H]DADL binding were seen in striatum, GP, EPN, and SNr. Scatchard analyses revealed that only receptor numbers were altered. This study provides biochemical evidence for differential regulation of striatal GABAergic output to GP and EPN/SNr. PMID:2995585

  4. S-allyl cysteine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in the rat striatum: involvement of Nrf2 transcription factor activation and modulation of signaling kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Macías-Silva, Marina; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Maldonado, Perla D; González-Trujano, María Eva; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacological activation at the basal ganglia of the transcription factor Nrf2, guardian of redox homeostasis, holds a strong promise for the slow progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a potent Nrf2 activator in the brain still must be found. In this study, we have investigated the potential use of the antioxidant compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC) in the activation of Nrf2 in 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA)-intoxicated rats. In the rat striatum, SAC by itself promoted the Nrf2 dissociation of Keap-1, its nuclear translocation, the subsequent association with small MafK protein, and further binding of the Nrf2/MafK complex to ARE sequence, as well as the up-regulation of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes HO-1, NQO-1, GR, and SOD-1. In vivo and in vitro experiments to identify signaling pathways activated by SAC pointed to Akt as the most likely kinase participating in Nrf2 activation by SAC. In PC12 cells, SAC stimulated the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and inhibited JNK1/2/3 activation. In the rat striatum, the SAC-induced activation of Nrf2 is likely to contribute to inhibit the toxic effects of 6-OHDA evidenced by phase 2 antioxidant enzymes up-regulation, glutathione recovery, and attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and lipid peroxides formation. These early protective effects correlated with the long-term preservation of the cellular redox status, the striatal dopamine (DA) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and the improvement of motor skills. Therefore, this study indicates that, in addition to direct scavenging actions, the activation of Nrf2 by SAC might confer neuroprotective responses through the modulation of kinase signaling pathways in rodent models of PD, and suggests that this antioxidant molecule may have a therapeutic value in this human pathology. PMID:22781654

  5. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) as potent therapeutic strategy to ameliorates L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-OHDA parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-long; Lin, Jing-Ya; Wang, Mei-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Su-fang; Wang, Xi-Jin; Liu, Zhen-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is the dominating therapy drug for exogenous dopaminergic substitution and can alleviate most of the manifestations of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but long-term therapy is associated with the emergence of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). Evidence points towards an involvement of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in development of LID. In the present study, we found that animals rendered dyskinetic by L-dopa treatment, administration of TDZD8 (2mg/kg) obviously prevented the severity of AIM score, as well as improvement in motor function (P < 0.05). Moreover, the TDZD8-induced reduction in dyskinetic behavior correlated with a reduction in molecular correlates of LID. TDZD8 reduced the phosphorylation levels of tau, DARPP32, ERK and PKA protein, which represent molecular markers of LID, as well as reduced L-dopa-induced FosB mRNA and PPEB mRNA levels in the lesioned striatum. In addition, we found that TDZD8 antidyskinetic properties were overcome by D1 receptor, as pretreatment with SKF38393 (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, reapectively), a D1 receptor agonist, blocked TDZD8 antidyskinetic actions. This study supported the hypothesis that GSK-3β played an important role in the development and expression of LID. Inhibition of GSK-3β with TDZD8 reduced the development of ALO AIM score and associated molecular changes in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. PMID:26997328

  6. Hypericum Perforatum Hydroalcoholic Extract Mitigates Motor Dysfunction and is Neuroprotective in Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with selective and progressive decline of nigral dopaminergic neurons. Hypericum perforatum L. (H. perforatum, St. John's wort) has been traditionally used for management of different disorders, especially mild-to-moderate depression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of H. perforatum extract against unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity and to unmask some involved mechanisms. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were treated with H. perforatum hydroalcoholic extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day started 1 week pre-surgery for 1 week post-surgery. The extract attenuated apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task, lowered striatal level of malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and reduced glutathione content, normalized striatal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tumor necrosis factor α with no significant effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase, lowered nigral DNA fragmentation, and prevented damage of nigral dopaminergic neurons with a higher striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. These findings reveal the beneficial effect of H. perforatum via attenuation of DNA fragmentation, astrogliosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress. PMID:26119304

  7. Low-frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus affects gait and the neurotransmitter level in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus in 6-OHDA Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Peng; Li, Min; Xiao, Hu; Ding, Rui; Chen, Huan; Chang, Jingyu; Zhou, Ming; Yang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Weixin; Zhang, Wangming

    2015-07-23

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is connected to spinal, cerebellar and cerebral motor control structures and can be activated with external electrodes. Intrinsic cholinergic neuronal degeneration in the PPN is associated with postural instabilities and gait disturbances (PIGD) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical studies have demonstrated that PPN stimulation may improve PIGD. We investigated this claim and the underlying mechanisms using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) hemilesion model of PD. In this study, gait-related parameters, including the base of support (BOS), stride length, and maximum contact area, were analyzed via CatWalk gait analysis following PPN-low frequency stimulation (LFS) of rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. Additionally, neurotransmitter concentrations in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (VL) were measured by microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Our data revealed that unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) induced significant gait deficits. PPN-LFS significantly improved the BOS (hindlimb) and maximum contact area (impaired forelimb) scores, whereas no other gait parameters were significantly affected. Unilateral 6-OHDA MFB lesions significantly decreased acetylcholine (ACh) and moderately decreased noradrenaline (NA) concentrations in the VL. PPN-LFS mildly reversed the ACh loss in the VL in the lesioned rats but did not alter the NA levels. Taken together, our data indicate that PPN-LFS is useful for treating gait deficits of PD and that these effects are probably mediated by a rebalancing of ACh levels in the PPN-VL pathway. Thus, our findings provide possible insight into the mechanisms underlying PIGD in PD. PMID:26054938

  8. Expression of Tgfβ1 and Inflammatory Markers in the 6-hydroxydopamine Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stefan Jean-Pierre; Zhou, Xiaolai; Machado, Venissa; Wree, Andreas; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been described as a common hallmark of PD and is believed to further trigger the progression of neurodegenerative events. Injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) are widely used to induce degeneration of mDA neurons in rodents as an attempt to mimic PD and to study neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation as well as potential therapeutic approaches. In the present study, we addressed microglia and astroglia reactivity in the SN and the caudatoputamen (CPu) after 6-OHDA injections into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and further analyzed the temporal and spatial expression patterns of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in this mouse model of PD. We provide evidence that activated microglia as well as neurons in the lesioned SN and CPu express Transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfβ1), which overlaps with the downregulation of pro-inflammatory markers Tnfα, and iNos, and upregulation of anti-inflammatory markers Ym1 and Arg1. Taken together, the data presented in this study suggest an important role for Tgfβ1 as a lesion-associated factor that might be involved in regulating microglia activation states in the 6-OHDA mouse model of PD in order to prevent degeneration of uninjured neurons by microglia-mediated release of neurotoxic factors such as Tnfα and nitric oxide (NO). PMID:26869879

  9. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  10. Voluntary exercise reduces the neurotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine in maternally separated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa Vuyisile; Russell, Vivienne Ann

    2010-01-01

    Maternal separation has been associated with development of anxiety-like behaviour and learning impairments in adult rats. This has been linked to changes in brain morphology observed after exposure to high levels of circulating glucocorticoids during the stress-hyporesponsive period (P4 to P14). In the present study, adult rats that had been subjected to maternal separation (180 min/day for 14 days) during the stress-hyporesponsive period, received unilateral infusions of a small dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) into the medial forebrain bundle. The results showed that voluntary exercise had a neuroprotective effect in both non-stressed and maternally separated rats in that there was a decrease in forelimb akinesia (step test) and limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Maternal separation increased forelimb akinesia and forelimb use asymmetry and reduced the beneficial effect of exercise on forelimb akinesia. It also reduced exploratory behaviour, consistent with anxiety-like behaviour normally associated with maternal separation. Exercise appeared to reduce dopamine neuron destruction in the lesioned substantia nigra when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere. However, this appeared to be due to a compensatory decrease in completely stained tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in the contralateral, non-lesioned substantia nigra. In agreement with reports that maternal separation increases the 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopamine terminals in the striatum, there was a small increase in dopamine neuron destruction when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere but there was no difference in dopamine cell number, suggesting that exposure to maternal separation did not exacerbate dopamine cell loss. PMID:20206210

  11. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. PMID:27233809

  12. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine on visual deprivation in the kitten striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Daw, N W; Rader, R K; Robertson, T W; Ariel, M

    1983-05-01

    We tested the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on two forms of visual deprivation--monocular and directional deprivation. In normal kittens monocular deprivation leads to a change in the ocular dominance histogram recorded from the visual cortex, and directional deprivation leads to a change in the percentage of directionally sensitive cells responding to the appropriate direction of movement. 6-OHDA was infused into the occipital cortex prior to the peak of the critical period for the effects of visual deprivation. In agreement with the results of Kasamatsu et al. (Kasamatsu, T., and J. D. Pettigrew (1979) J. Comp. Neurol. 185: 139-162; Kasamatsu, T., J. D. Pettigrew, and M. Ary (1979) J. Comp. Neurol. 185: 163-182), suture of one eye (monocular deprivation) after the 6-OHDA treatment did not lead to a shift in ocular dominance in the area of striate cortex infused. Moreover, rearing kittens in an environment continually moving past them in one direction (directional deprivation) did not lead to a change in the percentage of cells preferring movement in that direction. In both rearing procedures the 6-OHDA did not make the cells in the cortex nonspecific, compared to cells recorded from the cortex of animals reared similarly but without infusion of 6-OHDA. Monocular and directional deprivation are forms of visual deprivation with different critical periods, probably involving different synapses. Therefore, the effect of 6-OHDA on visual deprivation is a general one, involving more than one kind of visual deprivation. In both cases 6-OHDA abolishes the plasticity of the visual cortex. PMID:6405018

  13. An assessment of the validity of densitometric measures of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers: relationship to apomorphine-induced rotations in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Cadet, J L; Kent, J D; Karanas, A L; Jackson-Lewis, V

    1990-10-01

    The power of immunohistochemical staining as a tool for the study of the neurochemical anatomy of the brain would be greatly enhanced if quantitative measures of staining were to be developed. We have here assessed the reliability and validity of two population measures of extent of fiber innervation: percent area occupied by staining, and average optical density (AOD) of staining. We have evaluated these measures for tyrosine hydroxylase-positive staining of the striatum in relation to apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. We have found that inter-operator reliability for the area measure is high (r = 0.98). Apomorphine-induced rotations were observed when the area measured was reduced to 2% or less of the control side, and when the density measure was reduced to 15% or less. These results are similar to those obtained previously for biochemical assay of TH activity, which showed rotations at reductions to 10% or less. We conclude that these density measures provide valid relative indices of extent of fiber innervation on the same section. The AOD measure appears to be more sensitive at lower levels of innervation. PMID:1980518

  14. An assessment of sympathetic function in isolated tissues from mice given nerve-growth-factor antiserum and 6-hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, I. E.; Kirk, Jennifer A.; Kneen, Barbara; Large, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. Experiments were done on isolated tissues from mice injected with 0·9% w/v NaCl solution (saline), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), nerve-growth-factor antiserum (NGF-As) or a combination of these agents (NGF-As+6-OHDA). 2. Fluorescence histochemistry of vasa deferentia showed clear differences between each of the treatments but no such distinction was possible in cardiac ventricle or intestine. 3. Compared with controls, the chronotropic responses of atria to field stimulation were reduced by all three treatments in the order NGF-As<6-OHDA6-OHDA. Supersensitivity to noradrenaline occurred in atria from all treated groups. 4. In contrast, vasa deferentia from NGF-As-treated mice responded almost identically with controls to both field stimulation and to exogenous noradrenaline. Considerable functional impairment and noradrenaline supersensitivity were obvious in both the 6-OHDA and the NGF-As+6-OHDA groups but no distinction could be made between them. 5. The relaxation of superfused ileum following nerve stimulation was reduced in the NGF-As group, whilst preparations from the two groups given 6-OHDA usually gave a motor response which was blocked by atropine. 6. None of the treatments employed in these experiments caused complete sympathectomy although 6-OHDA alone or in combination with NGF-As produced a more pronounced effect than NGF-As alone and the relative ineffectiveness of the latter is discussed. The implications of the motor response after 6-OHDA in ileum when the nerves were stimulated is considered in the light of the cholinergic link hypothesis. PMID:4723797

  15. Interactions of CaMKII with dopamine D2 receptors: roles in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, SuFang; Xie, ChengLong; Wang, Qiang; Liu, ZhenGuo

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a synapse-enriched kinase in mammalian brains. This kinase interacts with various synaptic proteins to regulate expression and function of interacting proteins and thereby modulates synaptic transmission. CaMKII and its interacting partners are also believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we found that CaMKIIα binds to dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vitro. A distal region in the D2R third intracellular loop harbors CaMKIIα binding. Endogenous CaMKIIα was also found to interact with native D2Rs in rat striatal neurons in which D2Rs are expressed at a high level. In addition, in a rat 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned model of PD, chronic levodopa administration induced characteristic dyskinesia. In parallel, levodopa induced an increase in CaMKIIα-D2R interactions in striatal neurons. Intrastriatal injection of a Tat-fusion and CaMKIIα-D2R interaction-dead peptide (Tat-D2Ri) reversed this increase in the interaction between two proteins. Tat-D2Ri also alleviated dyskinetic behaviors induced by levodopa. These results reveal a new interaction between CaMKIIα and D2Rs in striatal neurons which is sensitive to long-term administration of levodopa in PD rats. Prevention of the response of CaMKIIα-D2R interactions to levodopa can alleviate levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:25351365

  16. Counteraction by nitric oxide synthase inhibitor of neurochemical alterations of dopaminergic system in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats under L-DOPA treatment.

    PubMed

    Del-Bel, Elaine; Padovan-Neto, Fernando Eduardo; Szawka, Raphael Escorsim; da-Silva, Célia Aparecida; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Anselmo-Franci, Janete; Romano-Dutra, Angélica Caroline; Guimaraes, Francisco Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors reduce L-3, (Del-Bel et al., Cell Mol Neurobiol 25(2):371-392, 2005) 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced abnormal motor effects subsequent to depletion of dopaminergic neurons in rodents and non-human primates. The present study used quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography to analyze, for the first time, dopamine metabolism in striatum of rats in order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Adult male Wistar rats received unilateral microinjection of saline (sham) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned) in the medial forebrain bundle. Past 3 weeks, rats were treated during 21 days with L-DOPA/benserazide (30 mg/kg/7.5 mg/kg, respectively, daily). On the 22nd day rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either vehicle or 7-nitroindazole, a preferential neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor before L-DOPA. Abnormal involuntary movements and rotarod test were assessed as behavioral correlate of motor responses. Lesion intensity was evaluated through tyrosine hydroxylase immunohystochemical reaction. Dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and an extent of dopamine striatal tissue levels/dopamine metabolism were measured in the striatum. Lesion with 6-OHDA decreased dopamine, DOPAC, and DOPAC/dopamine ratio in the lesioned striatum. L-DOPA treatment induced abnormal involuntary movements and increased DOPAC/dopamine ratio (nearly five times) in the lesioned striatum. L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was mitigated by 7-nitroindazole, which also decreased dopamine turnover, dopamine and DOPAC levels. Our results revealed an almost two times increase in dopamine content in the non-lesioned striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Reduction of striatal DOPAC/dopamine ratio in dyskinetic rats may suggest an increase in the dopamine availability. Our data confirm contribution of nitrergic transmission in the pathogenesis of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia with potential

  17. Yokukansan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Enhances the L-DOPA-Induced Rotational Response in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rats: Possible Inhibition of COMT.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Tabuchi, Masahiro; Imamura, Sachiko; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Kase, Yoshio; Koganemaru, Go; Abe, Hiroshi; Ikarashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan (YKS) on the function of dopamine (DA) in the rat nigrostriatal system. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were produced in the rat nigrostriatal system. Despite a marked loss in the striatal immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase on the lesion side, striatal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity was not affected. Treatment using L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in conjunction with benserazide for 15 d induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) such as locomotive (rotational response), axial, forelimb, and orolingual movements in the lesioned rats. The L-DOPA-induced locomotive and axial, but not forelimb and orolingual, AIMs were significantly increased and prolonged by the pre-administration of YKS. We next investigated the effects of YKS on the production of DA from L-DOPA in 5-HT synthetic RIN 14B cells. RIN 14B cells produced DA and its metabolite, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), following L-DOPA treatment. YKS significantly augmented DA production and inhibited its metabolism to 3-MT in a manner similar to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor entacapone. YKS and some alkaloids (corynoxeine: CX, geissoschizine methyl ether: GM) in Uncaria hook, a constituent herb of YKS, also inhibited COMT activity, indicating that the augmenting effect of YKS on L-DOPA-induced DA production in 5-HT synthetic cells was due to the inhibition of COMT by CX and GM. Our results suggest that YKS facilitates the DA supplemental effect of L-DOPA, and that COMT inhibition by CX and GM contributes, at least in part, to the effects of YKS. PMID:26725433

  18. Two-step grafting significantly enhances the survival of foetal dopaminergic transplants and induces graft-derived vascularisation in a 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Büchele, Fabian; Döbrössy, Máté; Hackl, Christina; Jiang, Wei; Papazoglou, Anna; Nikkhah, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Following transplantation of foetal primary dopamine (DA)-rich tissue for neurorestaurative treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), only 5-10% of the functionally relevant DAergic cells survive both in experimental models and in clinical studies. The current work tested how a two-step grafting protocol could have a positive impact on graft survival. DAergic tissue is divided in two portions and grafted in two separate sessions into the same target area within a defined time interval. We hypothesized that the first graft creates a "DAergic" microenvironment or "nest" similar to the perinatal substantia nigra that stimulates and protects the second graft. 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were sequentially transplanted with wild-type (GFP-, first graft) and transgenic (GFP+, second graft) DAergic cells in time interims of 2, 5 or 9days. Each group was further divided into two sub-groups receiving either 200k (low cell number groups: 2dL, 5dL, 9dL) or 400k cells (high cell number groups: 2dH, 5dH, 9dH) as first graft. During the second transplantation, all groups received the same amount of 200k GFP+ cells. Controls received either low or high cell numbers in one single session (standard protocol). Drug-induced rotations, at 2 and 6weeks after grafting, showed significant improvement compared to the baseline lesion levels without significant differences between the groups. Rats were sacrificed 8weeks after transplantation for post-mortem histological assessment. Both two-step groups with the time interval of 2days (2dL and 2dH) showed a significantly higher survival of DAergic cells compared to their respective standard control group (2dL, +137%; 2dH, +47%). Interposing longer intervals of 5 or 9days resulted in the loss of statistical significance, neutralising the beneficial two-step grafting effect. Furthermore, the transplants in the 2dL and 2dH groups had higher graft volume and DA-fibre-density values compared to all other two-step groups. They also showed intense growth of

  19. Nitrosative and cognitive effects of chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA lesion.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-García, G; Palafox-Sánchez, V; Limón, I D

    2015-04-01

    Besides motor disturbances, other symptoms found in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) are deficits in both learning and memory. The nigro-striatal-cortical pathway is affected in this pathology, with this neuronal circuit involved in cognitive processes such as spatial working memory (SWM). However, cognitive dysfunction appears even when the patients are receiving L-DOPA treatment. There is evidence that the dopamine metabolism formed by L-DOPA generates free radicals such as nitric oxide, which may cause damage through the nitrosative stress (NS). The aim of this study was to evaluate both the effects of chronic L-DOPA administration on SWM and the production of NS in rats using an intra-nigral lesion caused by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Post-lesion, the animals were administered orally with L-DOPA/Carbidopa (100-mg/kg) for 20 days. An SWM task in a Morris water maze was conducted post-treatment. Nitrite levels and immunoreactivity of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) were evaluated in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the dorsal striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. Our results show that chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA-lesion caused significant increases in SWM deficit, nitrite levels and the immunoreactivity of 3-NT, iNOS and GFAP in the nigro-striatal-cortical pathway. These facts suggest that as L-DOPA can induce NS in rats with dopaminergic intra-nigral lesion, it could play a key role in the impairment of the SWM, and thus can be considered as a toxic mechanism that induces cognitive deficit in PD patients. PMID:25644418

  20. The 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease - Terminal striatal lesions provide a superior measure of neuronal loss and replacement than median forebrain bundle lesions.

    PubMed

    Bagga, V; Dunnett, S B; Fricker, R A

    2015-07-15

    Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway produce side-biased motor impairments that reflect the motor deficits seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). This toxin-induced model in the rat has been used widely, to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies, but has not been well established in mice. With the advancements in mouse stem cell research we believe the requirement for a mouse model is essential for the therapeutic potential of these and other mouse-derived cells to be efficiently assessed. This aim of this study focused on developing a mouse model of PD using the 129 P2/OLA Hsd mouse strain as this is widely used in the generation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Both unilateral 6-OHDA medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and striatal lesion protocols were compared, with mice analysed for appropriate drug-induced rotational bias. Results demonstrated that lesioned mice responded to d-amphetamine with peak rotation dose at 5mg/kg and 10mg/kg for MFB and striatal lesions respectively. Apomorphine stimulation produced no significant rotational responses, at any dose, in either the MFB or striatal 6-OHDA lesioned mice. Analysis of dopamine neuron loss revealed that the MFB lesion was unreliable with little correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Striatal lesions however were more reliable, with a strong correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Functional recovery of d-amphetamine-induced rotational bias was shown following transplantation of E13 mouse VM tissue into the lesioned striatum; confirming the validity of this mouse model. PMID:25841616

  1. PHARMACOLOGICAL REGULATION OF DIGESTION IN THE ANAUTOGENOUS FLESH FLY, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, BY SIMPLE INJECTION OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE.

    PubMed

    Bil, Magdalena; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Female anautogenous Sarcophaga flesh flies need a protein meal to start large-scale yolk polypeptides (YPs) production and oocyte maturation. Protein meal rapidly elicits a brain-dependent increase in midgut proteolytic activity. Trypsin and chymotrypsin together represent over 80% of protease activity in liver-fed flies. Abdominal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) dose-dependently prohibits this increase in proteolytic activity at translational level in a similar way as post liver feeding decapitation. Delayed injection of 6-OHDA later than 6 h post liver meal has no effect. In flesh flies, chemical decapitation by 6-OHDA, by interrupting the brain-gut dopaminergic signaling, can be used as tool for the controlled inhibition of midgut proteolytic activity and subsequent ovarial development. Inhibition of ovarial development is probably indirect due to a deficit in circulating amino acids needed for YPs synthesis. PMID:26728276

  2. Left and right 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially affect voluntary ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, D M; Crosley, K J; Keller, R W; Glick, S D; Carlson, J N

    1999-03-27

    Dopaminergic projections to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to examine how dopamine (DA) asymmetry in the mPFC influences voluntary ethanol consumption. Differences in nucleus accumbens (NAS) DA neurotransmission have been related to individual differences in locomotor activity and in the rewarding efficacy of ethanol. Therefore, differences in locomotor activity were used to further characterize the effects of unilateral mPFC 6-OHDA lesions on ethanol consumption. Male Long Evans rats were assessed for high versus low levels of spontaneous locomotor activity. DA terminals in the left or right mPFC were unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA, resulting in an average DA depletion of 54% and 50%, respectively. After a minimum seven-day recovery period, preference for a 10% ethanol solution vs. water was determined in a 24-h 2-bottle home-cage free-choice paradigm. Left mPFC 6-OHDA lesions increased and right lesions decreased ethanol consumption. These differential effects of left and right lesions were primarily attributable to rats exhibiting low locomotor activity prior to surgery. The present data suggest that right greater than left cortical DA asymmetry in combination with low endogenous NAS DA (predicted by low locomotor activity levels) may increase the vulnerability to abuse ethanol. PMID:10095012

  3. Rho kinase inhibition by fasudil in the striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tatenhorst, Lars; Tönges, Lars; Saal, Kim-Ann; Koch, Jan C; Szegő, Éva M; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Chronic degeneration of nigrostriatal projections, followed by nigral dopaminergic cell death, is a key feature of Parkinson disease (PD). This study examines the neuroprotective potential of the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model of PD in vivo. C57Bl/6 mice were lesioned by striatal stereotactic injections with 4 μg of 6-OHDA and treated with fasudil 30 or 100 mg/kg body weight via drinking water. Motor behavior was tested biweekly; histologic and biochemical analyses were performed at 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Motor behavior was severely impaired after 6-OHDA lesion and was not improved by fasudil treatment. Fasudil 100 mg/kg did not significantly increase the number of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra after 12 weeks versus lesion controls. Interestingly, however, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dopamine metabolites revealed that striatal levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were significantly increased after 12 weeks, suggesting a regenerative response. In contrast to recent findings in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin model, fasudil effects seem limited in this severe 6-OHDA model of PD. Nevertheless, high therapeutic concentrations of fasudil are suggestive of a proregenerative potential for dopaminergic neurons, making further evaluations of rho kinase inhibition as a proregenerative therapeutic strategy in PD promising. PMID:25003236

  4. Distinct Effects of Rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydroxydopamine on Cellular Bioenergetics and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Samantha; Lee, Jisun; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration and is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The bioenergetic susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to toxins which induce Parkinson’s like syndromes in animal models is then of particular interest. For example, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its active metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), have been shown to induce dopaminergic cell death in vivo and in vitro. Exposure of animals to these compounds induce a range of responses characteristics of Parkinson’s disease, including dopaminergic cell death, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production. Here we test the hypothesis that cellular bioenergetic dysfunction caused by these compounds correlates with induction of cell death in differentiated dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. At increasing doses, rotenone induced significant cell death accompanied with caspase 3 activation. At these concentrations, rotenone had an immediate inhibition of mitochondrial basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) concomitant with a decrease of ATP-linked OCR and reserve capacity, as well as a stimulation of glycolysis. MPP+ exhibited a different behavior with less pronounced cell death at doses that nearly eliminated basal and ATP-linked OCR. Interestingly, MPP+, unlike rotenone, stimulated bioenergetic reserve capacity. The effects of 6-OHDA on bioenergetic function was markedly less than the effects of rotenone or MPP+ at cytotoxic doses, suggesting a mechanism largely independent of bioenergetic dysfunction. These studies suggest that these dopaminergic neurotoxins induce cell death through distinct mechanisms and differential effects on cellular bioenergetics. PMID:22970265

  5. Intravenous 6-hydroxydopamine attenuates vasopressin and oxytocin secretion stimulated by hemorrhage and hypotension but not hyperosmolality in rats.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Wilson, Melinda E; Madden, Christopher J; Lone, Usman; Sved, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    The present study sought to determine whether chemical destruction of peripheral catecholaminergic fibers with 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) attenuates vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion stimulated by hemorrhage, hypotension, and hyperosmolality. Rats received 6OHDA (100 mg/kg iv) or vehicle (1 ml/kg iv) on days 1 and 7, and experiments were performed on day 8. Serial hemorrhage (4 samples of 2 ml per 300 g body wt at 10-min intervals) increased plasma VP and OT levels in both groups; however, the increase in plasma VP and OT levels was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated vs. control rats despite a significantly lower mean arterial blood pressure. Similarly, the increase in plasma VP and OT levels in response to hypotension produced by the selective arteriolar vasodilator diazoxide was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated rats. In marked contrast to hemorrhage and hypotension, hyperosmolality produced by an infusion of 1 M NaCl (2 ml/h iv) stimulated increases in plasma VP and OT levels that were not different between 6OHDA-treated and control rats. In a parallel set of experiments, intravenous 6OHDA treatment reduced dopamine--hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the posterior pituitary but had no substantial effect in the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. In each experiment, the pressor response to tyramine (250 microg/kg iv) was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated rats, thereby confirming that 6OHDA treatment destroyed sympathetic catecholaminergic fibers. Collectively, these findings suggest that catecholaminergic fibers located outside the blood-brain barrier contribute to VP and OT secretion during hemorrhage and arterial hypotension. PMID:16497814

  6. Minocycline protects SH-SY5Y cells from 6-hydroxydopamine by inhibiting both caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Lantto, Tiina A; Puttonen, Katja A; Tuominen, Raimo K; Raasmaja, Atso; Männistö, Pekka T

    2012-03-01

    Minocycline, a tetracyclic antibiotic, exerts both antiinflammation by acting on microglia and a direct protection on neurons by inhibiting the apoptotic machinery at various levels. However, we are not aware of any study investigating the effects of minocycline on caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. This study investigated these alternative pathways in SH-SY5Y cells, a human dopaminergic cell line, challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Minocycline exhibited neuroprotection and inhibition of the toxin-induced caspase-3-like activity, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation, hallmarks of apoptosis. Moreover, we revealed that 6-OHDA also activated caspase-independent PCDs (such as paraptosis), which required de novo protein synthesis. Additionally, by separately monitoring caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways, we showed that inhibition of apoptosis only partially explained the protective effect of minocycline. Moreover, we observed that minocycline reduced the protein content of cells but, unexpectedly, increased the protein synthesis. These findings suggest that minocycline may actually increase protein degradation, so it may also accelerate the clearance of aberrant proteins. In conclusion, we report for the first time evidence indicating that minocycline may inhibit PCD pathways that are additional to conventional apoptosis. PMID:22108958

  7. Monoaminergic PET imaging and histopathological correlation in unilateral and bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal in-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Gago, Belén; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Juri, Carlos; Collantes, María; Delgado, Mercedes; Prieto, Elena; Ecay, Margarita; Iglesias, Elena; Marín, Concepció; Peñuelas, Iván; Obeso, José A

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled dihydrotetrabenazine ((11)C-DTBZ) binds to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and has been used to assess nigro-striatal integrity in animal models and patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we applied (11)C-DTBZ positron emission tomography (PET) to obtain longitudinally in-vivo assessment of striatal dopaminergic loss in the classic unilateral and in a novel bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 sub-groups: 1. 6-OHDA-induced unilateral lesion in the medial forebrain bundle, 2. bilateral lesion by injection of 6-OHDA in the third ventricle, and 3. vehicle injection in either site. (11)C-DTBZ PET studies were investigated in the same animals successively at baseline, 1, 3 and 6weeks after lesion using an anatomically standardized volumes-of-interest approach. Additionally, 12 rats had PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to construct a new (11)C-DTBZ PET template. Behavior was characterized by rotational, catalepsy and limb-use asymmetry tests and dopaminergic striatal denervation was validated post-mortem by immunostaining of the dopamine transporter (DAT). (11)C-DTBZ PET showed a significant decrease of striatal binding (SB) values one week after the unilateral lesion. At this point, there was a 60% reduction in SB in the affected hemisphere compared with baseline values in 6-OHDA unilaterally lesioned animals. A 46% symmetric reduction over baseline SB values was found in bilaterally lesioned rats at the first week after lesion. SB values remained constant in unilaterally lesioned rats whereas animals with bilateral lesions showed a modest (22%) increase in binding values at the 3rd and 6th weeks post-lesion. The degree of striatal dopaminergic denervation was corroborated histologically by DAT immunostaining. Statistical analysis revealed a high correlation between (11)C-DTBZ PET SB and striatal DAT immunostaining values (r=0.95, p<0.001). The data presented here indicate

  8. Intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine results in an increased number of tyrosine hydroxylase immune-positive cells in the rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Wachter, B; Caradonna, S; Gittinger, K; Schläger, A; Küppers, E

    2014-11-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) results in increased proliferation and de-differentiation of rat cortical astrocytes into progenitor-like cells 4 days after lesion (Wachter et al., 2010). To find out if these cells express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthesis pathway, we performed immunohistochemistry in the rat cortex following intraventricular injection of 6-OHDA. Four days after injection we demonstrated a strong emergence of TH-positive (TH(+)) somata in the cortices of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. The number of TH(+) cells in the cortex of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals was 15 times higher than in sham-operated animals, where virtually no TH(+) somata occurred. Combining TH immunohistochemistry with classical Nissl stain yielded complete congruency, and ∼45% of the TH(+) cells co-expressed calretinin, which indicates an interneuron affiliation. There was no co-staining of TH with other interneuron markers or with glial markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or the neural stem/progenitor marker Nestin, nor could we find co-localization with the proliferation marker Ki67. However, we found a co-localization of TH with glial progenitor cell markers (Sox2 and S100β) and with polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), which has been shown to be expressed in immature, but not recently generated cortical neurons. Taken together, this study seems to confirm our previous findings with respect to a 6-OHDA-induced expression of neuronal precursor markers in cells of the rat cortex, although the TH(+) cells found in this study are not identical with the potentially de-differentiated astrocytes described recently (Wachter et al., 2010). The detection of cortical cells expressing the catecholaminergic key enzyme TH might indicate a possible compensatory role of these cells in a dopamine-(DA)-depleted system. Future studies are needed to determine

  9. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FST increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or l-threo-3

  10. Activation and blockade of serotonin7 receptors in the prelimbic cortex regulate depressive-like behaviors in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q J; Du, C X; Tan, H H; Zhang, L; Li, L B; Zhang, J; Niu, X L; Liu, J

    2015-12-17

    The role of serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors in the regulation of depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the prelimbic (PrL) sub-region of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involve in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. The lesion induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) increased sucrose consumption, and decreased immobility time in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, indicating the induction of antidepressant-like effects. Further, intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6 μg/rat) decreased sucrose consumption, and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of AS19 (2 μg/rat) increased dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the mPFC, habenula and ventral hippocampus (vHip) in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6 μg/rat) decreased 5-HT levels in the habenula and vHip, and the levels of NA in the mPFC, habenula and vHip in the two groups of rats. The results suggest that 5-HT7 receptors in the PrL play an important role in the regulation of these behaviors, which attribute to changes in monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions after activation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:26470809

  11. The effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on trace element and antioxidant levels in rats following 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal insult.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Moosa, Zulfiah; Daniels, Willie M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2014-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a metal toxin found commonly in the environment. Studies have shown severe neurotoxic effects of MeHg poisoning especially during pregnancy where it crosses the foetoplacental and the blood brain barrier of the foetus leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in the offspring. These deficits may predispose offspring to neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure (2.5 mg/L in drinking water from GND 1-GND 21) on the trace element status in the brain of adolescent offspring (PND 28). Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured in their blood plasma. In a separate group of animals that was also exposed prenatally to MeHg, 6-hydroydopamine (6-OHDA) was administered at PND 60 as a model of neuronal insult. Trace element and TAC levels were compared before and after 6-OHDA exposure. Prenatal MeHg treatment alone resulted in significantly higher concentrations of zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in the brain of offspring at PND 28 (p < 0.05), when compared to controls. In contrast, brain iron levels in MeHg-exposed adolescent offspring were significantly lower than their controls (p < 0.05). Following 6-OHDA exposure, the levels of iron, zinc, copper and manganese were increased compared to sham-lesioned offspring (p < 0.05). Prenatal MeHg exposure further increased these trace element levels thereby promoting toxicity (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity was not significantly different in MeHg and control groups prior to lesion. However, following 6-OHDA administration, MeHg-exposed animals had a significantly lower TAC than that of controls (p < 0.05). Brain TAC levels were higher in adult male rats than in female rats during adolescence however male rats that had been exposed to MeHg in utero failed to show this increase at PND 74. Prenatal MeHg exposure results in trace element dyshomeostasis in the brain of offspring and reduces total

  12. Neuroprotective effect of sulfated polysaccharide isolated from sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus on 6-OHDA-induced death in SH-SY5Y through inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chao; Cui, Ningshan; Wang, Peng; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Ji, Aiguo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect and molecular mechanism of the sulfated polysaccharide (SJP) isolated from the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The results showed that SJP could protect SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced cell injury. We found that SJP effectively improves cell viability, decreases LDH leakage, and reverses morphological damage. Moreover, SJP significantly increases SOD activity but decreases MDA levels and ROS generation. Effect of SJP on 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells is associated with an arrest in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle and inhibits the expression of Cyclin D3. 6-OHDA-induced intracellular generation of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunctions, release of cytochrome c, imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-9/caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3/caspase-3 ratio, and p-p53 activation were strikingly attenuated by SJP pretreatment. Meanwhile, SJP counteracted NF-κB activation, thereby preventing up-regulation of iNOS and intracellular NO release. The data provide the first evidence that SJP protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity possibly by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB and activating PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Thus, SJP is a candidate for further evaluation of its protective effects against neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:26773499

  13. Embryonic MGE Precursor Cells Grafted into Adult Rat Striatum Integrate and Ameliorate Motor Symptoms in 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Noctor, Stephen C.; Espinosa, Ana; Ariza, Jeanelle; Parker, Philip; Orasji, Samantha; Daadi, Marcel M.; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated a strategy to ameliorate the motor symptoms of rats that received 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions, a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease, through transplantation of embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells into the striatum. During brain development, embryonic MGE cells migrate into the striatum and neocortex where they mature into GABAergic interneurons and play a key role in establishing the balance between excitation and inhibition. Unlike most other embryonic neurons, MGE cells retain the capacity for migration and integration when transplanted into the postnatal and adult brain. We performed MGE cell transplantation into the basal ganglia of control and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Transplanted MGE cells survived, differentiated into GABA+ neurons, integrated into host circuitry, and modifed motor behavior in both lesioned and control rats. Our data suggest that MGE cell transplantation into the striatum is a promising approach to investigate the potential benefits of remodeling basal ganglia circuitry in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20207227

  14. Upregulation of β1-adrenoceptors is involved in the formation of gastric dysmotility in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin; Zheng, Lifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Feng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruifang; Sun, Lu; Hong, Feng; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jinxia

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Gastroparesis and upregulated β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) have been reported in rats with bilateral microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the substantia nigra, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The aim of the current study is to investigate the role of β-ARs in gastroparesis in 6-OHDA rats. Gastric motility was studied through strain gauge measurement. Immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed to examine the expression of β-ARs. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited gastric motility in a dose-dependent fashion in both control and 6-OHDA rats, but much stronger adrenergic reactivity was observed in the 6-OHDA rats. The inhibition of gastric motility by NE in both control and 6-OHDA rats was not affected by tetrodotoxin, a neural sodium channel blocker. Blocking β1-AR or β2-AR did not affect the inhibition of strip contraction by NE in control rats, but β1-AR blockage obviously enhanced the half maximal inhibitory concentration value of NE in 6-OHDA rats. Selective inhibition of β3-AR blocked the effect of NE significantly in both control and 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β1-AR, but not β2-AR and β3-AR in gastric muscularis externa was increased significantly in 6-OHDA rats. In conclusion, β3-AR involves the regulation of gastric motility in control rats, whereas the upregulation of β1-AR is responsible for enhanced NE reactivity in 6-OHDA rats and therefore is involved in the formation of gastroparesis. The effect of both β1-AR and β3-AR on gastric motility is independent of the enteric nervous system. PMID:24467967

  15. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of rat substantia nigra up-regulate dopamine-induced phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein in striatal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, D G; Kobierski, L A; Konradi, C; Hyman, S E

    1994-01-01

    Destruction of the substantia nigra produces striatal D1 dopamine receptor supersensitivity without increasing receptor number or affinity, thus implicating postreceptor mechanisms. The nature of these mechanisms is unknown. Increased striatal c-fos expression ipsilateral to a unilateral lesion of the substantia nigra in rats treated with appropriate dopamine agonists provides a cellular marker of D1 receptor supersensitivity. D1 receptors are positively linked to adenylate cyclase and therefore to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Because expression of the c-fos gene in response to cAMP- and Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated protein kinases depends on phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) at Ser-133, we examined CREB phosphorylation after dopaminergic stimulation in cultured striatal neurons and in the striatum of rats after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine ablation of the substantia nigra. Using an antiserum specific for CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133, we found that dopamine increases CREB phosphorylation in cultured striatal neurons. This effect was blocked by a D1 antagonist. L-Dopa produced marked CREB phosphorylation in striatal neurons in rats ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. This response was blocked by a D1 antagonist, but not a D2 antagonist, and was reproduced by a D1 agonist, but not a D2 agonist. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that D1 receptor supersensitivity is associated with upregulated activity of cAMP-dependent or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, or both, following dopamine denervation of striatal neurons. Images PMID:7937819

  16. Neurotoxic effects of berberine on long-term L-DOPA administration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Zhao, Ting Ting; Suh, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Ik Hyun; Choi, Soon Ok; Lee, Myung Koo

    2013-06-01

    The effects of berberine on long-term administration of L-DOPA in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) were investigated. Rat models of PD were prepared by 6-OHDA lesions in the ipsilateral sides, and then were treated with berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) and/or L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) once daily for 21 days. Treatments with either concentration of berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups decreased the numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned groups. In addition, dopaminergic neuronal cell death of the ipsilateral sides in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups was attenuated by L-DOPA administration. However, both concentrations of berberine in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups treated with L-DOPA aggravated the numbers of TH-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, DOPAC and HVA in the striatum as compared to rats not treated with berberine. These results suggest that berberine leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neuronal cells in the substantia nigra in the rat model of PD with chronic L-DOPA administration. Long-term L-DOPA therapy that may involve possibly neurotoxic isoquinoline agents including berberine should involve monitoring for adverse symptoms. PMID:23539311

  17. Selective blockade of mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors is protective against hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in 6-OHDA lesioned Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Vairetti, Mariapia; Ambrosi, Giulia; Rizzo, Vittoria; Richelmi, Plinio; Blandini, Fabio; Fuzzati-Armentero, Marie-Therese

    2015-06-01

    Non-motor symptoms including those involving the splanchnic district are present in Parkinson's disease (PD). The authors previously reported that PD-like rats, bearing a lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by the injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), have impaired hepatic mitochondrial function. Glutamate intervenes at multiple levels in PD and liver pathophysiologies. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is abundantly expressed in brain and liver and may represent a pharmacological target for PD therapy. This study investigated whether and how chronic treatment with 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a well-characterized mGluR5 antagonist, may influence hepatic function with regard to neuronal cell loss in PD-like rats. Chronic treatment with MPEP was started immediately (Early) or 4 weeks after (Delayed) intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA and lasted 4 weeks. Early MPEP treatment significantly prevented the decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production/content and counteracted increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in isolated hepatic mitochondria of PD-like animals. Early MPEP administration also reduced the toxin-induced neurodegenerative process; improved survival of nigral dopaminergic neurons correlated with enhanced mitochondrial ATP content and production. ATP content/production, in turn, negatively correlated with ROS formation suggesting that the MPEP-dependent improvement in hepatic function positively influenced neuronal cell survival. Delayed MPEP treatment had no effect on hepatic mitochondrial function and neuronal cell loss. Antagonizing mGluR5 may synergistically act against neuronal cell loss and PD-related hepatic mitochondrial alterations and may represent an interesting alternative to non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PD. PMID:25904005

  18. RGS4 is involved in the generation of abnormal involuntary movements in the unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wai Kin D; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure; Bezard, Erwan; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2014-10-01

    Regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS) proteins are implicated in striatal G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) sensitisation in the pathophysiology of l-DOPA-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), also known as dyskinesia (LID), in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated RGS protein subtype 4 in the expression of AIMs in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID. The effects of RGS4 antisense brain infusion on the behavioural and molecular correlates of l-DOPA priming in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were assessed. In situ hybridisation revealed that repeated l-DOPA/benserazide treatment caused an elevation of RGS4 mRNA levels in the striatum, predominantly in the lateral regions. The increased expression of RGS4 mRNA in the rostral striatum was found to positively correlate with the behavioural (AIM scores) and molecular (pre-proenkephalin B, PPE-B expression) markers of LID. We found that suppressing the elevation of RGS4 mRNA in the striatum by continuous infusion of RGS4 antisense oligonucleotides, via implanted osmotic mini-pumps, during l-DOPA priming, reduced the induction of AIMs. Moreover, ex vivo analyses of the rostral dorsolateral striatum showed that RGS4 antisense infusion attenuated l-DOPA-induced elevations of PPE-B mRNA and dopamine-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding, a marker used for measuring dopamine receptor super-sensitivity. Taken together, these data suggest that (i) RGS4 proteins play an important pathophysiological role in the development and expression of LID and (ii) suppressing the elevation of RGS4 mRNA levels in l-DOPA priming attenuates the associated pathological changes in LID, dampening its physiological expression. Thus, modulating RGS4 proteins could prove beneficial in the treatment of dyskinesia in PD. PMID:24969021

  19. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  20. The D1 receptor-mediated effects of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829 in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, M.; Sprah, L.; Sket, D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Previous experiments have suggested a potential atypical antipsychotic activity of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829. In vitro experiments showed a high affinity to 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 and D2 receptors (the ratio of pKi values 5-HT2/D2 = 1.11) and a moderate affinity to D1 receptors. In vivo experiments showed antagonism of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor-linked behaviours. 2. In the present study, the rats with unilateral dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum, induced by the lesion of the median forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), were used to determine the effects of LEK-8829 on turning behaviour and on striatal c-fos mRNA levels. 3. The administration of LEK-8829 induced a long lasting contralateral turning behaviour that was dose-dependent. It was found that the specific D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390 but not the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol or 5-HT1A antagonist pindolol, dose-dependently inhibited the turning behaviour induced by LEK-8829. 4. In an attempt to clarify the D1:D2 receptor interactions involved in the action of LEK-8829 in the 6OHDA model, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry to compare the effect of SCH-23390 pretreatment on striatal c-fos mRNA expression induced either by LEK-8829 or by the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. 5. LEK-8829 induced a bilateral striatal c-fos mRNA expression that was significantly higher in the denervated striatum as compared to the intact striatum and was completely blocked on both sides by pretreatment with SCH-23390. In contrast, haloperidol-induced striatal c-fos mRNA expression was limited to the innervated striatum and was not blocked by SCH-23390. 6. Our data demonstrate an intrinsic activity of LEK-8829 on D1 receptors that is potentiated in the dopamine-depleted striatum. We conclude, therefore, that the putative atypical antipsychotic LEK-8829 may prove useful as an experimental tool for the study of D1:D2 receptor interactions and could have beneficial

  1. LPA signaling is required for dopaminergic neuron development and is reduced through low expression of the LPA1 receptor in a 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Ethan Y; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Sun, Feng-Xiang; Han, Hai-Lin; Han, Hui-Rong; Lin, Zhi-Juan; Pan, Zhi-Fang; Qu, Mei-Hua; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that activates at least five known G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1-LPA5. The nervous system is a major locus for LPA1 expression. LPA has been shown to regulate neuronal proliferation, migration, and differentiation during central nervous system development as well as neuronal survival. Furthermore, deficient LPA signaling has been implicated in several neurological disorders including neuropathic pain and schizophrenia. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that results from the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The specific molecular pathways that lead to DA neuron degeneration, however, are poorly understood. The influence of LPA in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into DA neurons in vitro and LPA1 expression in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in vivo were examined in the present study. LPA induced neuronal differentiation in 80.2 % of the MSC population. These MSCs developed characteristic neuronal morphology and expressed the neuronal marker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), while expression of the glial marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was absent. Moreover, 27.6 % of differentiated MSCs were positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker for DA neurons. In the 6-OHDA PD rat model, LPA1 expression in the substantia nigra was significantly reduced compared to control. These results suggest LPA signaling via activation of LPA1 may be necessary for DA neuron development and survival. Furthermore, reduced LPA/LPA1 signaling may be involved in DA neuron degeneration thus contributing to the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:26169757

  2. Ontogenetic manganese exposure with perinatal 6-OHDA lesioning alters behavioral responses of rats to dopamine D₁ and D2 agonist treatments.

    PubMed

    Szkilnik, Ryszard; Brus, Ryszard; Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Damian; Waliczek, Martyna; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Nowak, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    The effect of neonatal manganese (Mn) exposure in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease was investigated. Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water with 10,000 ppm of Manganese (MnCl₂.4H₂O) from the time of conception until weaning on the 21st day after delivery. Control rats consumed tap water. Three days after the birth, other groups of neonatal rat pups were pretreated with desipramine (20 mg/kg ip 1h) prior to bilateral ICV administration of 6-OHDA or its vehicle, saline-ascorbic (0.1%) (control). Two months after the birth, striatal dopamine and homovanilic acid efflux measured by an in vivo microdialysis method were reduced in rats lesioned with 6-OHDA. Co-exposure to perinatal Mn did not modify neurotransmission alterations. However, there were prominent abnormalities in behavioral testing in rats perinatally exposed to Mn and treated neonatally with 6-OHDA. These findings demonstrate that although Mn did not further damage neurotransmitter activity in the neostriatum, ontogenetic exposure to Mn enhances the behavioral toxicity to 6-OHDA. PMID:24295730

  3. Reduced expression of choline acetyltransferase in vagal motoneurons and gastric motor dysfunction in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Xiao-feng; Song, Jin; Hong, Feng; Lian, Hui; Wang, Qian; Feng, Xiao-Yan; Tang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2011-10-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been characterized by dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra (SN) accompanied by pathology of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). PD patients have often experienced gastrointestinal dysfunctions, such as gastroparesis. However, the mechanism underlying these symptoms in PD patients is not clear. In the present study, we investigated alterations of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the DMV and gastric motor function in rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) bilaterally into the SN (referred to as 6-OHDA rats) and explored possible mechanisms. A strain gauge force transducer was used to record gastric motility in vivo. Expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Acetylcholine (Ach) content was measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) analysis. After treatment with 6-OHDA for 6weeks, 6-OHDA rats exhibited decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV and decreased Ach content in the gastric muscular layer. Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility in vivo were observed in 6-OHDA rats. The results of the present study indicated that decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV may be correlated with the development of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility, which may be partly due to the decreased Ach release from the vagus. PMID:21955729

  4. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on mechanical and thermal thresholds in 6OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lucy E; Chen, Nita; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Shin, Damian S; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain is a major complaint for up to 85% of Parkinson's disease patients; however, it often not identified as a symptom of Parkinson's disease. Adequate treatment of motor symptoms often provides analgesic effects in Parkinson's patients but how this occurs remains unclear. Studies have shown both Parkinson's patients and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats exhibit decreased sensory thresholds. In humans, some show improvements in these deficits after subthalamic deep brain stimulation, while others report no change. Differing methods of testing and response criteria may explain these varying results. We examined this effect in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally implanted with subthalamic stimulating electrodes in the lesioned right hemisphere and sensory thresholds were tested using von Frey, tail-flick and hot-plate tests. Tests were done during and off subthalamic stimulation at 50 and 150 Hz to assess its effects on sensory thresholds. The 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals exhibited lower mechanical (left paw, P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds than shams (hot plate, P < 0.05). Both 50 and 150 Hz increased mechanical (left paw; P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (hot-plate test: 150 Hz, P < 0.05, 50 Hz, P < 0.01). Interestingly, during von Frey testing, low-frequency stimulation provided a more robust improvement in some 6OHDA lesioned rats, while in others, the magnitude of improvement on high-frequency stimulation was greater. This study shows that subthalamic deep brain stimulation improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals at both high and low frequencies. Furthermore, we suggest considering using low-frequency stimulation when treating Parkinson's patients where pain remains the predominant complaint. PMID:26082992

  5. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  6. Behavioural effects of basal ganglia rho-kinase inhibition in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects more than six million people in the world. While current available pharmacological therapies for PD in the early stages of the disease usually improve motor symptoms, they cause side effects, such as fluctuations and dyskinesias in the later stages. In this later stage, high frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option which is most successful to treat drug resistant advanced PD. It has previously been demonstrated that activation of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway is involved in the dopaminergic cell degeneration which is one of the main characteristics of PD pathology. In addition, the involvement of this pathway has been suggested in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, up to date, to our knowledge there are no previous reports showing the beneficial effects of the potent Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the behavioural effects of basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections in this PD model. Our results indicated that basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections significantly decreased the number of contralateral rotations-induced by apomorphine, significantly increased line crossings in the open-field test, contralateral forelimb use in the limb-use asymmetry test and contralateral tape playing time in the somatosensory asymmetry test, which may suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antiparkinsonian agent. PMID:26996632

  7. Retigabine, a K(V)7 (KCNQ) potassium channel opener, attenuates L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Sander, S E; Lemm, C; Lange, N; Hamann, M; Richter, A

    2012-02-01

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID) represent a severe complication of long-time pharmacotherapy in Parkinson's disease that necessitates novel therapeutics. The acute and chronic effects of K(V)7.2-7.5 channel openers (retigabine, flupirtine) on the severity of LID and parkinsonian signs were examined in comparison to the glutamate receptor antagonist amantadine (positive control) in a rat model of LID. Acute treatment with retigabine (2.5, 5 mg/kg i.p.) and flupirtine (5, 10 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM) to a comparable extent as amantadine (20, 40 mg/kg s.c.), but flupirtine delayed the disappearance of AIM. Chronic treatment with retigabine (daily 5 mg/kg i.p. over 19 days combined with l-DOPA 10 mg i.p.) did not prevent or delay the development of LID, but reduced the severity of AIM, while antidyskinetic effects of amantadine (40 mg/kg i.p.) were restricted to the first day of treatment. Retigabine caused sedation and ataxia which declined during the chronic treatment, but did not reduce the antiparkinsonian effects of l-DOPA in these experiments. Acute co-injections of retigabine (5 mg) together with l-DOPA (10 mg/kg) neither reduced the motor performance in the rotarod test nor exerted negative effects on the antiparkinsonian efficacy of l-DOPA in the block and stepping test. Nevertheless, the sedative effects of retigabine may limit its therapeutic potential for the treatment of LID. The present data indicate that K(V)7 channels deserve attention in the research of the pathophysiology of dyskinesias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'. PMID:22079161

  8. Development of a Unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Sherri L.; Warre, Ruth; Nash, Joanne E.

    2012-01-01

    The unilaterally lesioned 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proved to be invaluable in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms, since it recapitulates the changes in basal ganglia circuitry and pharmacology observed in parkinsonian patients1-4. However, the precise cellular and molecular changes occurring at cortico-striatal synapses of the output pathways within the striatum, which is the major input region of the basal ganglia remain elusive, and this is believed to be site where pathological abnormalities underlying parkinsonian symptoms arise3,5. In PD, understanding the mechanisms underlying changes in basal ganglia circuitry following degeneration of the nigro-striatal pathway has been greatly advanced by the development of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mice over-expressing green fluorescent proteins driven by promoters specific for the two striatal output pathways (direct pathway: eGFP-D1; indirect pathway: eGFP-D2 and eGFP-A2a)8, allowing them to be studied in isolation. For example, recent studies have suggested that there are pathological changes in synaptic plasticity in parkinsonian mice9,10. However, these studies utilised juvenile mice and acute models of parkinsonism. It is unclear whether the changes described in adult rats with stable 6-OHDA lesions also occur in these models. Other groups have attempted to generate a stable unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA adult mouse model of PD by lesioning the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), unfortunately, the mortality rate in this study was extremely high, with only 14% surviving the surgery for 21 days or longer11. More recent studies have generated intra-nigral lesions with both a low mortality rate >80% loss of dopaminergic neurons, however expression of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia11,12,13,14 was variable in these studies. Another well established mouse model of PD is the MPTP-lesioned mouse15. Whilst this model has proven

  9. Striatal Injury with 6-OHDA Transiently Increases Cerebrospinal GFAP and S100B.

    PubMed

    Batassini, Cristiane; Broetto, Núbia; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Borsoi, Milene; Zanotto, Caroline; Galland, Fabiana; Souza, Tadeu Mello; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B have been used as markers of astroglial plasticity, particularly in brain injury; however, they do not necessarily change in the same time frame or direction. Herein, we induced a Parkinson's disease (PD) model via a 6-OHDA intrastriatal injection in rats and investigated the changes in GFAP and S100B using ELISA in the substantia nigra (SN), striatum, and cerebrospinal fluid on the 1st, 7th, and 21st days following the injection. The model was validated using measurements of rotational behaviour induced by methylphenidate and tyrosine hydroxylase in the dopaminergic pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of cerebrospinal fluid S100B and GFAP in the 6-OHDA model of PD. Gliosis (based on a GFAP increase) was identified in the striatum, but not in the SN. We identified a transitory increment of cerebrospinal fluid S100B and GFAP on the 1st and 7th days, respectively. This initial change in cerebrospinal fluid S100B was apparently related to the mechanical lesion. However, the 6-OHDA-induced S100B secretion was confirmed in astrocyte cultures. Current data reinforce the idea that glial changes precede neuronal damage in PD; however, these findings also indicate that caution is necessary regarding the interpretation of data in this PD model. PMID:26090233

  10. Striatal Injury with 6-OHDA Transiently Increases Cerebrospinal GFAP and S100B

    PubMed Central

    Batassini, Cristiane; Broetto, Núbia; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Borsoi, Milene; Zanotto, Caroline; Galland, Fabiana; Souza, Tadeu Mello; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B have been used as markers of astroglial plasticity, particularly in brain injury; however, they do not necessarily change in the same time frame or direction. Herein, we induced a Parkinson's disease (PD) model via a 6-OHDA intrastriatal injection in rats and investigated the changes in GFAP and S100B using ELISA in the substantia nigra (SN), striatum, and cerebrospinal fluid on the 1st, 7th, and 21st days following the injection. The model was validated using measurements of rotational behaviour induced by methylphenidate and tyrosine hydroxylase in the dopaminergic pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of cerebrospinal fluid S100B and GFAP in the 6-OHDA model of PD. Gliosis (based on a GFAP increase) was identified in the striatum, but not in the SN. We identified a transitory increment of cerebrospinal fluid S100B and GFAP on the 1st and 7th days, respectively. This initial change in cerebrospinal fluid S100B was apparently related to the mechanical lesion. However, the 6-OHDA-induced S100B secretion was confirmed in astrocyte cultures. Current data reinforce the idea that glial changes precede neuronal damage in PD; however, these findings also indicate that caution is necessary regarding the interpretation of data in this PD model. PMID:26090233

  11. Intraventricular administration of endoneuraminidase-N facilitates ectopic migration of subventricular zone-derived neural progenitor cells into 6-OHDA lesioned striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhang, Yong-Xin; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Chen, Sha-Sha; Hao, Qiang; Lu, Tao; Qu, Ting-Yu; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a carbohydrate polymer associated with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), plays an important role in the migration, differentiation and maturation of neuroblasts. Endoneuraminidase-N (Endo-N) can specifically cleave PSA from NCAM. The objective of the present study was to examine: the effect of Endo-N on characteristics of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro; whether intraventricular administration of Endo-N could increase ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, and whether migrated NPCs could differentiate into neuronal and glial cells. In in vitro study, Endo-N was found to inhibit the migration of NPCs, and to enhance the differentiation of NPCs. In in vivo study, mice sequentially received injections of 6-OHDA into the right striatum, Endo-N into the right lateral ventricle, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneally. The data showed that intraventricular injections of Endo-N disorganized the normal structure of the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and drastically increased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (IR) cells in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum. In addition, a number of BrdU-IR cells were double labeled for doublecortin (DCX), NeuN or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The results suggest that interruption of neuroblast chain pathway with Endo-N facilitates ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into the lesioned striatum, and migrated NPCs can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26724216

  12. Dopamine, 6-hydroxydopamine, iron, and dioxygen--their mutual interactions and possible implication in the development of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Linert, W; Herlinger, E; Jameson, R F; Kienzl, E; Jellinger, K; Youdim, M B

    1996-08-23

    The reactions of dopamine (1-amino-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethane, DA), 5-hydroxydopamine (5-OHDA), and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), with molecular oxygen-with and without the addition of catalytic amounts of iron(III) and other metal ions-have been studied and the implication of these results with respect to the chemistry involved in the progress of Parkinson's disease is discussed. In the presence of O2 DA reacts spontaneously without the necessity of metal-ion catalysis under the production of stoichiometric amounts of H2O2, to form initially pink dopaminochrome, which is not stable and reacts further (without the consumption of dioxygen) to form the insoluble polymeric material known as 'melanine'. DA reacts with iron(III) yielding an intermediate 1:1 complex, which decomposes releasing Fe(II) and the semiquinone, which reacts further under involvement of both Fe(III) and dioxygen. 6-OHDA reacts without showing the necessity of such an intermediate, and it is shown to be able to release iron as Fe(II) from ferritine. On the other hand, it is shown (in vitro) that Fe(II) reacts in a Fenton type reaction with DA and the present H2O2 producing 5-OHDA and especially 6-OHDA. Based on these mutual interacting reactions a mechanism for the initiation and progress of Parkinson's disease is suggested. The catalytic effects of some other transition-metal ions are presented and an explanation for the peculiarly toxic effects of manganese(II) is put forward. Finally, a possible reason for the effect that nicotine has in the mitigation of Parkinson's disease is discussed. PMID:8781534

  13. Protective effect of INI-0602, a gap junction inhibitor, on dopaminergic neurodegeneration of mice with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromi; Ono, Kenji; Sawada, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    INI-0602, a novel gap junction hemichannel inhibitor, was administered to hemi-Parkinsonism mice generated by striatal 6-hydroxydopamine injection. INI-0602 prevented the toxic activation of microglia, such as the increased number of the activated form, enlargement of cell bodies and induction of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and TNFα, in the ipsilateral striatum. On the other hand, INI-0602 induced the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NT-4/5, in the 6-hydroxydopamine-treated striatum. INI-0602 treatment blocked not only dopaminergic loss in both the striatum and substantia nigra, but also apomorphine-induced rotational behavior. PMID:24744047

  14. Differential degradation of motor deficits during gradual dopamine depletion with 6-hydroxydopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Willard, A M; Bouchard, R S; Gittis, A H

    2015-08-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder whose cardinal motor symptoms arise due to the progressive loss of dopamine. Although this dopamine loss typically progresses slowly over time, currently there are very few animal models that enable incremental dopamine depletion over time within the same animal. This type of gradual dopamine depletion model would be useful in studies aimed at the prodromal phase of PD, when dopamine levels are pathologically low but motor symptoms have not yet presented. Utilizing the highly characterized neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we have developed a paradigm to gradually deplete dopamine levels in the striatum over a user-defined time course - spanning weeks to months - in C57BL/6 mice. Dopamine depletions were achieved by administration of five low-dose injections (0.75μg) of 6-OHDA through an implanted intracranial bilateral cannula targeting the medial forebrain bundle. Levels of dopamine within the striatum declined linearly with successive injections, quantified using tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and high-performance liquid chromatography. Behavioral testing was carried out at each time point to study the onset and progression of motor impairments as a function of dopamine loss over time. We found that spontaneous locomotion, measured in an open field, was robust until ∼70% of striatal dopamine was lost. Beyond this point, additional dopamine loss caused a sharp decline in motor performance, reaching a final level comparable to that of acutely depleted mice. Similarly, although rearing behavior was more sensitive to dopamine loss and declined linearly as a function of dopamine levels, it eventually declined to levels similar to those seen in acutely depleted mice. In contrast, motor coordination, measured on a vertical pole task, was only moderately impaired in gradually depleted mice, despite severe impairments observed in acutely depleted mice. These results demonstrate the importance of the temporal

  15. Alterations in the motor cortical and striatal glutamatergic system and D-serine levels in the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    El Arfani, Anissa; Albertini, Giulia; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is hallmarked by progressive degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons and is associated with aberrant glutamatergic activity. However, studies on the glutamatergic system in the motor cortex and striatum, two motor loop-related areas, are lacking in the clinically relevant bilateral SNc 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model, and therefore led to the rationale behind the present investigations. Using Western blotting, the expression levels of the glial glutamate transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST, as well as xCT, the specific subunit of system xc(-), and the vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUT1 and 2 were investigated at two different time points (1 week and 2 weeks) post-lesion. In addition, the total content of glutamate was measured. Moreover, the total D-serine levels were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time in these two PD-related areas in the bilateral 6-OHDA rat model. In the motor cortex, no significant changes were observed in the different glutamate transporter expression levels in the bilaterally-lesioned rats. In the striatum, GLAST expression was significantly decreased at both time points whereas VGLUT1 and 2 expressions were significantly decreased 2 weeks after bilateral 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesion resulted in an enhancement of the total d-serine content in both motor cortex and striatum at 1 week post-lesion suggesting its possible involvement in the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates disturbed glutamate and D-serine regulation in the bilateral SNc-lesioned brain which could contribute to the behavioral impairments in PD. PMID:26172319

  16. Effects of L-Dopa on circadian rhythms of 6-OHDA striatal lesioned rats: a radiotelemetric study.

    PubMed

    Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas; Vidal, Johanna; Bruguerolle, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal variation in the motor function of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suggests the potential importance of a chronobiological and chronopharmacological approach in its clinical management. We previously documented the effects of striatal injection of 6-OHDA (as an animal model of PD) on the circadian rhythms of temperature (T), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (A). The present work assessed the possible influence of L-Dopa on these same rhythms in the 6-OHDA animal model of PD. The study began after a four-week recovery period following surgical implantation of telemetric devices to monitor the study variables and/or anaesthesia. The study was divided into an initial one-week control period (W1) for baseline measurement of T, HR, and A rhythms. Thereafter, stereotaxic 6-OHDA lesioning was done. and a second monitoring for two weeks followed (W2, W3). Rats were then randomly divided into two groups: eight control rats received, via a mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously, the excipient saline; the other eight rats received L-Dopa (100 mg/kg SC/day). After a seven-day period (W4), the pumps were removed and the T, HR, and A rhythms were monitored for two weeks (W5 and W6). To control for 6-OHDA striatal dopamine-induced depletion, 12 other rats were injected by identical methods (eight rats with 6-OHDA and four controls with saline) and sacrificed at W1, W3, and W5 for dopamine striatal content determination. To verify the delivery of levodopa from the osmotic pumps, plasma levels of levodopa and its main metabolites 3-OMD, DOPAC, and HVA were determined on separate group of rats receiving the drug under the same experimental conditions (osmotic pumps delivering continuously 10 microl/h for seven days, 100 mg/kg/subcutaneously). Our results agree with previously reported rhythmic changes induced by 6-OHDA--loss of circadian rhythmicity or changes in the main parameters of the registered rhythms. When circadian rhythmicity was abolished, L

  17. Early toxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in the rat striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; García, Esperanza; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-12-01

    The early effects of 6-OHDA as a Parkinsonian model in rodents are relevant since pharmacological and toxicological points of view, as they can explain the acute and chronic deleterious events occurring in the striatum. In this study, we focused our attention on the neurochemical and motor dysfunction produced after a pulse infusion of 6-OHDA, paying special attention to the capacity of this molecule to induce neurotransmitter release and behavioural alterations. Extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, glycine and GABA were all assessed in striatal dialysates in freely moving rats immediately after exposed to a single pulse of 6-OHDA in dorsal striatum, and major behavioural markers of motor alterations were simultaneously explored. Enhanced release of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine was found immediately after 6-OHDA pulse. Delayed glutamate and glycine release were detected and a biphasic effect on GABA was observed. Mostly serotonin and dopamine outflow, followed by glutamate, correlated with wet dog shakes and other behavioural qualitative alterations. Early dopamine release, accompanied by other neurotransmitters, can generate an excitatory environment affecting the striatal neurons with immediate consequences for behavioural performance. In turn, these changes might be accounting for later features of toxicity described in this model. PMID:20643160

  18. The effect of additional noradrenergic and serotonergic depletion on a lateralised choice reaction time task in rats with nigral 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Hanna S; Demirbugen, Merve; Bergqvist, Filip; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often suffer from visuospatial deficits, which have been considered a disruption of the representation of external space. The lateralised choice reaction time (CRT) task is an operant task for rodents in which similar deficits can be assessed. It has been demonstrated that specific parameters in this task is disrupted after unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which have been associated with the dopamine (DA) depletion that inevitably follows this type of lesion. However, studies have demonstrated that this type of lesion also affects the serotonergic (5HT) and noradrenergic (NA) systems. However, the impact of these systems on parameters in the CRT task had not yet been investigated. To this end, rats were pretrained on the CRT task before receiving selective lesions of the DAergic system, either alone or in combination with depletion of the NA or 5HT system. All rats with a 6-OHDA lesion displayed a gradual decline in the selection, initiation and execution of lateralised movements compared to sham-lesion controls on the side contralateral to the lesion. They also displayed a reduced number of useable trials as well as an increased number of procedural errors. Interestingly, the group with an additional noradrenergic lesion was significantly slower in reacting to lateralised stimuli throughout the testing period compared to the other two groups with a 6-OHDA lesion. There was however no difference between the three different lesion groups in the other parameters assessed in the task. These data confirm previous findings demonstrating that the majority of the parameters assessed in the lateralised CRT task are strongly dependent on DA. However, this study has also shown that the NAergic system may play an important role in contributing to the attentive performance influencing the capacity to react to the presented lateralised stimuli. PMID:24333808

  19. Pentoxifylline Neuroprotective Effects Are Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and TNF-Alpha Inhibitory Properties, in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Nobre, Hélio Vitoriano; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-TNF-alpha activity, associated with its anti-inflammatory action. Considering Parkinson's disease (PD) as a neuroinflammatory disorder, the objectives were to evaluate PTX neuroprotective properties, in a model of PD. Male Wistar rats, divided into sham-operated (SO), untreated 6-OHDA, and 6-OHDA treated with PTX (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) groups, received a unilateral 6-OHDA injection, except the SO group administered with saline. Treatments started 24 h after surgery and continued for 15 days when the animals were submitted to apomorphine-induced rotations, open field, and forced swimming tests. At the next day, they were euthanized and their striata processed for neurochemical (DA and DOPAC determinations), histological, and immunohistochemical (Fluoro-Jade, TH, DAT, OX-42, TNF-alpha, COX-2, and iNOS) studies. PTX reversed the behavioral changes observed in the untreated 6-OHDA animals. Furthermore, PTX partially reversed the decrease in DA contents and improved neuronal viability. In addition, decreases in immunostaining for TH and dopamine transporter (DAT) were reversed. The untreated 6-OHDA group showed intense OX-42, TNF-alpha, COX-2, and iNOS immunoreactivities, which were attenuated by PTX. In conclusion, we demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of PTX, possibly related to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions, indicating its potential as an adjunct treatment for PD. PMID:26491600

  20. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:26363150

  1. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26966009

  2. Chronic Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation Protects Against 6-hydroxydopamine Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amol P.; Fuentes, Romulo; Zhang, Hao; Vinholo, Thais; Wang, Chi-Han; Freire, Marco Aurelio M.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Although L-dopa continues to be the gold standard for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), it presents long-term complications. Deep brain stimulation is effective, but only a small percentage of idiopathic PD patients are eligible. Based on results in animal models and a handful of patients, dorsal column stimulation (DCS) has been proposed as a potential therapy for PD. To date, the long-term effects of DCS in animal models have not been quantified. Here, we report that DCS applied twice a week in rats treated with bilateral 6-OHDA striatal infusions led to a significant improvement in symptoms. DCS-treated rats exhibited a higher density of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and higher neuronal cell count in the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to a control group. These results suggest that DCS has a chronic therapeutical and neuroprotective effect, increasing its potential as a new clinical option for treating PD patients.

  3. Altered extracellular striatal in vivo biotransformation of the opioid neuropeptide dynorphin A(1-17) in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Klintenberg, Rebecka; Andrén, Per E

    2005-02-01

    The in vivo biotransformation of dynorphin A(1-17) (Dyn A) was studied in the striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats by using microdialysis in combination with nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probes were implanted into both hemispheres of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Dyn A (10 pmol microl(-1)) was infused through the probes at 0.4 microl min(-1) for 2 h. Samples were collected every 30 min and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The results showed for the first time that there was a difference in the Dyn A biotransformation when comparing the two corresponding sides of the brain. Dyn A metabolites 1-8, 1-16, 5-17, 10-17, 7-10 and 8-10 were detected in the dopamine-depleted striatum but not in the untreated striatum. Dyn A biotransformed fragments found in both hemispheres were N-terminal fragments 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-11, 1-12 and 1-13, C-terminal fragments 2-17, 3-17, 4-17, 7-17 and 8-17 and internal fragments 2-5, 2-10, 2-11, 2-12, and 8-15. The relative levels of these fragments were lower in the dopamine-depleted striatum. The results imply that the extracellular in vivo processing of the dynorphin system is being disturbed in the 6-OHDA-lesion animal model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:15706626

  4. Neuropathology and behavioral impairments in Wistar rats with a 6-OHDA lesion in the substantia nigra compacta and exposure to a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, Guilherme; Dutra Souza, Hugo Celso; de Araujo, João Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Studies have sought to assess various potential neuroprotective therapeutics in Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field stimulation 14 days after a 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) substantia nigra compacta (SNc) lesion on motor behavior, as assessed by the rotarod (RR) test and brain tissue morphology. Forty male Wistar rats were used and were divided into five groups: control group, sham group (SG), lesion group (LG), lesion north pole group (LNPG) and lesion south pole group (LSPG). In groups with magnetic stimulation, a 3200-gauss magnet was fixed to the skull. After the experiments, the animals were anesthetized for brain perfusion. Coronal sections of the SNc were stained with Nissl. The RR test showed a decrease in the time spent on the apparatus in the LG compared with all groups. The LNPG and LSPG had significant increases in the time spent when compared to the LG. A morphometric analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of neurons in the LG, LNPG and LSPG in relation to the SG. There were a higher number of neurons in the LNPG and LSPG than the LG, and a higher number of neurons in the LSPG than the LNPG. We observed that the LG, LNPG and LSPG showed a higher number of glial cells than the SG, and the LNPG and LSPG showed a lower number of glial cells than the LG. Our results demonstrate a potential therapeutic use of static magnetic fields for the preservation of motor behavior and brain morphology in the SNc after 14 days with 6-OHDA lesion. PMID:23631668

  5. Valproic Acid Neuroprotection in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease Is Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and HDAC Inhibitory Properties.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, José Christian Machado; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A M; do Carmo, Marta Regina Santos; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça; Cavalheiro, Ésper Abrão; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder where the main hallmark is the dopaminergic neuronal loss. Besides motor symptoms, PD also causes cognitive decline. Although current therapies focus on the restoration of dopamine levels in the striatum, prevention or disease-modifying therapies are urgently needed. Valproic acid (VA) is a wide spectrum antiepileptic drug, exerting many biochemical and physiological effects. It has been shown to inhibit histone deacetylase which seems to be associated with the drug neuroprotective action. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective properties of VA in a model of Parkinson's disease, consisting in the unilateral striatal injection of the neurotoxin 6-OHDA. For that, male Wistar rats (250 g) were divided into the groups: sham-operated (SO), untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned, and 6-OHDA-lesioned treated with VA (25 or 50 mg/kg). Oral treatments started 24 h after the stereotaxic surgery and continued daily for 2 weeks, when the animals were subjected to behavioral evaluations (apomorphine-induced rotations and open-field tests). Then, they were sacrificed and had their mesencephalon, striatum, and hippocampus dissected for neurochemical (DA and DOPAC determinations), histological (Fluoro-Jade staining), and immunohistochemistry evaluations (TH, OX-42, GFAP, TNF-alpha, and HDAC). The results showed that VA partly reversed behavioral and neurochemical alterations observed in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Besides, VA also decreased neuron degeneration in the striatum and reversed the TH depletion observed in the mesencephalon of the untreated 6-OHDA groups. This neurotoxin increased the OX-42 and GFAP immunoreactivities in the mesencephalon, indicating increased microglia and astrocyte reactivities, respectively, which were reversed by VA. In addition, the immunostainings for TNF-alpha and HDAC demonstrated in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were also decreased after VA treatments. These results were

  6. Valproic Acid Neuroprotection in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease Is Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and HDAC Inhibitory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, José Christian Machado; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; do Carmo, Marta Regina Santos; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça; Cavalheiro, Ésper Abrão; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder where the main hallmark is the dopaminergic neuronal loss. Besides motor symptoms, PD also causes cognitive decline. Although current therapies focus on the restoration of dopamine levels in the striatum, prevention or disease-modifying therapies are urgently needed. Valproic acid (VA) is a wide spectrum antiepileptic drug, exerting many biochemical and physiological effects. It has been shown to inhibit histone deacetylase which seems to be associated with the drug neuroprotective action. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective properties of VA in a model of Parkinson's disease, consisting in the unilateral striatal injection of the neurotoxin 6-OHDA. For that, male Wistar rats (250 g) were divided into the groups: sham-operated (SO), untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned, and 6-OHDA-lesioned treated with VA (25 or 50 mg/kg). Oral treatments started 24 h after the stereotaxic surgery and continued daily for 2 weeks, when the animals were subjected to behavioral evaluations (apomorphine-induced rotations and open-field tests). Then, they were sacrificed and had their mesencephalon, striatum, and hippocampus dissected for neurochemical (DA and DOPAC determinations), histological (Fluoro-Jade staining), and immunohistochemistry evaluations (TH, OX-42, GFAP, TNF-alpha, and HDAC). The results showed that VA partly reversed behavioral and neurochemical alterations observed in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Besides, VA also decreased neuron degeneration in the striatum and reversed the TH depletion observed in the mesencephalon of the untreated 6-OHDA groups. This neurotoxin increased the OX-42 and GFAP immunoreactivities in the mesencephalon, indicating increased microglia and astrocyte reactivities, respectively, which were reversed by VA. In addition, the immunostainings for TNF-alpha and HDAC demonstrated in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were also decreased after VA treatments. These results were

  7. Local Change in Urinary Bladder Contractility Following CNS Dopamine Denervation in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Reinika; Aronsson, Patrik; Winder, Michael; Tobin, Gunnar; Bergquist, Filip; Carlsson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urinary problems, including urinary frequency, urgency, and nocturia are some of the non-motor symptoms that correlate most with poor quality of life in Parkinson’s disease. However, the mechanism behind these symptoms is poorly understood, in particular regarding peripheral bladder pathophysiology following dopamine degeneration. Objective: In this study, we compared the contractile responsiveness of urinary bladder from the 6-OHDA unilateral rat model of Parkinson’s disease with that of normal untreated animals. Methods: The contractility of the urinary detrusor muscle was evaluated in bladder strip preparations using electrical field stimulation, and muscarinic and purinoceptor stimulations in an vitro organ bath setup. Results: Our data show that the overall contractile response following electrical field stimulation was significantly higher (43% at maximum contraction by 20–40 Hz stimulation) in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats as compared to control animals. This increase was associated with a significant increase in the cholinergic contractile response, where the muscarinic agonist methacholine produced a 44% (at 10 −4 M concentration) higher response in the 6-OHDA-treated rats as compared to controls with a significant left-shift of the dose response. This indicates an altered sensitivity of the muscarinic receptor system following the specific central 6-OHDA-induced dopamine depletion. In addition a 36% larger contraction of strips from the 6-OHDA animals was also observed with purinoceptor activation using the agonist ATP (5×10 −3 M) during atropine treatment. Conclusions: Our data shows that it is not only the central dopamine control of the micturition reflex that is altered in Parkinson’s disease, but also the local contractile function of the urinary bladder. The current study draws attention to a mechanism of urinary dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease that has previously not been described. PMID:25697958

  8. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have established that selective damage to the early-developing components of the mesostriatal dopamine system produces profound changes in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated behaviors, while decreasing D1 receptor density. In order to better understand the effects of early intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions, we studied the ontogenetic expression (postnatal days 7, 14, 35 and 90) of D1 and D2 receptors, and their corresponding messenger RNAs, in rats that had received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine or vehicle lesions on postnatal day 1. Using receptor autoradiography, significant (P < 0.05) decreases in [3H]SCH 23390 binding to D1 receptors in the rostral and caudal dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals were evident by postnatal day 7, and remained depressed at all future time points. A significant decrease in D1 receptor concentration occurred in the dorsolateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). [3H]Spiperone binding to D2 receptor sites was unchanged throughout the entire study. In situ hybridization for D1 and D2 messenger RNA expression showed contrasting results. 6-Hydroxydopamine induced significant decreases of D1 messenger RNA levels in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate by postnatal day 7. By postnatal day 14, messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of the 6-hydroxydopamine group, and remained elevated thereafter. D1 messenger RNA levels became elevated in the lateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). The opposing changes in D1 receptor concentrations and the messenger RNA encoding the protein did not occur as a consequence of increased transport of D1 receptors to striatonigral terminals. D2 messenger RNA levels in the dorsal caudate were significantly decreased on postnatal day 7, and became higher than controls at postnatal day 14, but were unchanged from controls at later time points

  9. The effect of chronic L-dopa treatment on the recovery of motor function in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats receiving ventral mesencephalic grafts.

    PubMed

    Blunt, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1991-01-01

    The effect of treatment for 5 weeks with L-DOPA (200 mg/kg/24 h) plus carbidopa (25 mg/kg/24 h) on the behavioral recovery produced by rat fetal ventral mesencephalon grafts implanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats was assessed. Animals with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway and a sham graft (Group A) showed persistent high rates of rotation in response to the administration of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) (contralateral rotation) or (+)-amphetamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) (ipsilateral rotation). Treatment of sham-grafted animals with L-DOPA plus carbidopa had no effect on the rate of rotation to apomorphine or (+)-amphetamine (Group B). The proportion of animals showing marked stereotypy following apomorphine administration was greater in sham-grafted animals receiving L-DOPA and carbidopa than in sham-grafted animals alone. Animals receiving unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions followed by a fetal graft (Group C) showed a reduction in apomorphine-induced contralateral rotation and a complete reversal of (+)-amphetamine-induced ipsilateral rotation when assessed 6 weeks later. The reductions in apomorphine- and (+)-amphetamine-induced rotational behaviour produced by the fetal graft in animals with a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion were not altered by treatment with L-DOPA plus carbidopa (Group D). The proportion of animals showing marked apomorphine-induced stereotypy did not change significantly in either group over time. In rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion receiving fetal dopamine grafts, treatment with high doses of L-DOPA and carbidopa for 5 weeks does not have a detrimental effect on the functional activity of the grafts as assessed by reduction of apomorphine- and (+)-amphetamine-induced motor asymmetry. The continuation of L-DOPA therapy may not adversely affect fetal graft survival and growth in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:1902916

  10. Dynamic of neurochemical alterations in striatum, hippocampus and cortex after the 6-OHDA mesostriatal lesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Gui, Xue-Hong; Xue, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Li-Ping; Fang, Ruo-Ming; Ke, Xue-Hong; Li, Ling; Fang, Yong-Qi

    2014-08-01

    Immediate neurochemical alterations produced by 6-OHDA could explain the general toxic pattern in the central nervous system. However, no evidences describe the effects of 6-OHDA on early changes of neurotransmitters in rats' striatum, cortex and hippocampus. In our study, unilateral 6-OHDA injection into medial forebrain bundle (MFB) was used in rats, then five neurotransmitters were analyzed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Results showed that 6-OHDA injection caused a sharp decline of striatal dopamine (DA) levels in the first 12h followed by a further reduction between 12 and 48 h. However, striatal levels of homovanillic acid (HVA) were stable in the first 12h and showed a marked reduction between 12 and 24h. Striatal levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) decreased linearly for 72 h, whereas levels of norepinephrine (NE) showed a slight reduction in the first 48 h, and returned back to normal afterwards. Striatal HVA/DA ratio increased significantly in the first 12h, but 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio showed a sharp increase between 12 and 72 h. Besides, neurochemical alterations were also found in hippocampus and cortex, and the correlations of neurotransmitters were analyzed. Our study indicated that NE system had little influence in the early phase of 6-OHDA injection, moreover, early neurochemical alterations were involved with striatum, hippocampus and cortex. PMID:24814667

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  12. Effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists and L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical, glutamate and dopamine in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-02-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists have been proposed as a new therapy of PD. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of the selective A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on hydroxyl radical generation, and glutamate (GLU) and dopamine (DA) extracellular level using a microdialysis in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. CSC (1 mg/kg) and ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) given repeatedly for 14 days decreased the production of hydroxyl radical and extracellular GLU level, both enhanced by prior 6-OHDA treatment in dialysates from the rat striatum. CSC and ZM 241385 did not affect DA and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) extracellular levels in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. L-DOPA (6 mg/kg) given twice daily for two weeks in the presence of benserazide (3 mg/kg) decreased striatal hydroxyl radical and glutamate extracellular level in 6-OHDA-treated rats. At the same time, L-DOPA slightly but significantly increased the extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA. A combined repeated administration of L-DOPA and CSC or ZM 241385 did not change the effect of L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical production and glutamate extracellular level in spite of an enhancement of extracellular DA level by CSC and elevation of extracellular level of DOPAC and HVA by ZM 241385. The data suggest that the 6-OHDA-induced damage of nigrostriatal DA-terminals is related to oxidative stress and excessive release of glutamate. Administration of L-DOPA in combination with CSC or ZM 241385, by restoring striatal DA-glutamate balance, suppressed 6-OHDA-induced overproduction of hydroxyl radical. PMID:21830163

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  14. Naringin treatment induces neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease in vivo, but not enough to restore the lesioned dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with naringin, a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, attenuated neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in vivo. In order to investigate whether its effects are universally applied to a different model of PD and whether its treatment induces restorative effects on the lesioned nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projection, we observed the effects of pre-treatment or post-treatment with naringin in a mouse model of PD. For neuroprotective effects, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was unilaterally injected into the striatum of mouse brains for a neurotoxin model of PD in the presence or absence of naringin by daily intraperitoneal injection. Our results showed that naringin protected the nigrostriatal DA projection from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, similar to the effects in rat brains, this treatment induced the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is well known as an important survival factor for DA neurons, and inhibited microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN) of mouse brains treated with 6-OHDA. However, there was no significant change of DA phenotypes in the SN and striatum post-treated with naringin compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned mice, despite the treatment being continued for 12 weeks. These results suggest that post-treatment with naringin alone may not be enough to restore the nigrostriatal DA projection in a mouse model of PD. However, our results apparently suggest that naringin is a beneficial natural product to prevent DA degeneration, which is involved in PD. PMID:26878791

  15. Motor impairments and neurochemical changes after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Apicella, P; Trouche, E; Nieoullon, A; Legallet, E; Dusticier, N

    1990-01-01

    Unilateral lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system were induced in five monkeys by intranigral injections of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. Following the lesion, all monkeys showed a transient reluctance in using the contralateral forelimb, accompanied, in two monkeys by semi-flexed posture of the disabled forelimb. Three of the monkeys that had been conditioned to perform a visually triggered goal-directed arm movement, showed an increase in latency and duration of contralateral arm movements. Task performance recovered spontaneously to preoperative levels within four months in two monkeys despite significant reductions of endogenous dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid contents in the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus ipsilateral to the neurotoxic nigral injection. The third monkey exhibited a persistent increase in movement latency associated with a near complete loss of dopamine in both the putamen and the caudate nucleus. In all cases, an increase the dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid to dopamine ratio was detected in the striatum and pallidum suggesting a compensatory increase in dopamine turnover in remaining intact dopaminergic nerve terminals. The level of serotonin was changed in all monkeys consisting of either a decrease or an increase, depending on the striatopallidal regions studied. Changes in choline acetyltransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities in the same regions were only seen in some cases. The present results show that 6-hydroxydopamine-induced partial unilateral lesion of nigral dopaminergic neurons produced predominantly contralateral hypokinesia, accompanied by reductions of dopamine content in the ipsilateral striatum and pallidum. The use of this locally applied neurotoxin appears to be a suitable method for investigating neurophysiological mechanisms underlying hypokinesia since deficits in both initiating and executing movements can be expressed independently of other behavioral symptoms. The results

  16. Naloxone reverses L-dopa induced overstimulation effects in a Parkinson's disease animal model analogue.

    PubMed

    Carey, R J

    1991-01-01

    Chronic L-DOPA treatment of Parkinson's disease frequently leads to the development of motoric overstimulation and hyperkinetic movements. To investigate this problem in the laboratory, rats surgically altered by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions (6-OHDA) were chronically treated with one L-DOPA (10 mg/kg i.p.) injection per day for 20 days. In this 6-OHDA rotation model, the unilateral dopamine denervation results in a profound contralateral sensory-motor neglect and the animals spontaneously rotate in a direction ipsilateral to the dopamine depleted hemisphere. Initially, the L-DOPA treatment did not alter the response bias but after several weeks, the response bias was reversed and the animals rotated in the formerly akinetic direction, contralaterally, at a significantly higher level. Using this overstimulation effect as an analogue of the clinically observed L-DOPA overstimulation, animals were given naloxone in conjunction with the L-DOPA treatment. Naloxone (0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg i.p.) produced a dose related decrease in the L-DOPA induced contralateral rotation. Consistent with an expected selective effect on the L-DOPA induced rotation, a dose related increase in ipsilateral rotation was observed. These results suggest that naloxone can attenuate the overstimulation effect of L-DOPA and that this effect is not attributable to non-specific response suppression effects. PMID:1900558

  17. Characterization of long-term motor deficits in the 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Santana, M; Palmér, T; Simplício, H; Fuentes, R; Petersson, P

    2015-09-01

    Research aimed at developing new therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) critically depend on valid animal models of the disease that allows for repeated testing of motor disabilities over extended time periods. We here present an extensive characterization of a wide range of motor symptoms in the 6-OHDA marmoset model of PD when tested over several months. The severity of motor deficits was quantified in two ways: (i) through manual scoring protocols appropriately adapted to include species specific motor behavior and (ii) using automated quantitative motion tracking based on image processing of the digital video recordings. We show that the automated methods allow for rapid and reliable characterization of motor dysfunctions, thus complementing the manual scoring procedures, and that robust motor symptoms lasting for several months could be induced when using a two-stage neurotoxic lesioning procedure involving one hemisphere at a time. This non-human primate model of PD should therefore be well suited for long-term evaluation of novel therapies for treatment of PD. PMID:25934488

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus reverses akinesia in bilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Koke, S J; Kiss, Z H; Bland, B H

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia motor circuitry is a highly effective treatment for the debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent findings have indicated promising potential for PD therapy with DBS in brain structures outside the basal ganglia. For example, high frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) can reverse haloperidol-induced akinesia in rats [Jackson J, Young CK, Hu B, Bland BH (2008) High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Exp Neurol 213:210-219]. In the current study, we used the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinsonian akinesia in male Long-Evans rats to further explore the efficacy of PH DBS. The application of PH DBS in lesioned animals reversed akinesia in an active avoidance paradigm with increased latency compared to pre-lesion performance. The dramatic reversal of akinesia in two models of rodent Parkinsonism by PH DBS warrants further exploration of its therapeutic potential. PMID:19401216

  19. Dramatic differences in susceptibility to l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia between mice that are aged before or after a nigrostriatal dopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Bez, Francesco; Francardo, Veronica; Cenci, M Angela

    2016-10-01

    Mice with striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions are widely used as a model to study the effects of neurorestorative, symptomatic, or antidyskinetic treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). The standard praxis is to utilize young adult mice with relatively acute 6-OHDA lesions. However, long post-lesion intervals may be required for longitudinal studies of treatment interventions, and the long-term stability of the model's behavioral and cellular phenotypes is currently unknown. In this study, C57Bl/6J mice sustained unilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions at approx. 2months of age, and were allowed to survive for 1, 10 or 22months. Another group of mice sustained the lesion at the age of 23months and survived for one month thereafter. Baseline and drug-induced motor behaviors were examined using a battery of tests (utilizing also a novel video-based methodology). The extent of nigral dopamine cell loss was stable across post-lesion intervals and ages. However, a prominent sprouting of both dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers was detected in the caudate-putamen in animals that survived until 10 and 22months post-lesion. This phenomenon was associated with a recovery of baseline motor deficits, and with a lack of dyskinetic responses upon treatment with either l-DOPA or apomorphine. By contrast, mice sustaining the lesion at 23months of age showed a striking susceptibility to the dyskinetic effects of both l-DOPA and apomorphine, which was associated with a pronounced drug-induced upregulation of ∆FosB in the ventrolateral striatum. The results reveal a remarkable compensatory capacity of a damaged nigrostriatal pathway in ageing mice, and how this impacts on the response to dopaminergic therapies for PD. PMID:27312773

  20. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  1. Antioxidant effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima in a neurotoxic model caused by 6-OHDA in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, J C; Palafox-Sánchez, Victoria; Mendieta, Liliana; García, E; Santamaría, A; Chamorro-Cevallos, G; Limón, I Daniel

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence to support that an impaired energy metabolism and the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to brain injury in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas diets enriched in foods with an antioxidant action may modulate its progression. Several studies have proved that the antioxidant components produced by Spirulina, a microscopic blue-green alga, might prevent cell death by decreasing free radicals, inhibiting lipoperoxidation and upregulating the antioxidant enzyme systems. In our study, we investigated the protective effect of the Spirulina maxima (S. maxima) against the 6-OHDA-caused toxicity in the rat striatum. The S. maxima (700 mg/kg/day, vo) was administered for 40 days before and 20 days after a single injection of 6-OHDA (16 μg/2 μL) into the dorsal striatum. At 20-day postsurgery, the brain was removed and the striatum was obtained to evaluate the indicators of toxicity, such as nitric oxide levels, ROS formation, lipoperoxidation, and mitochondrial activity. These variables were found significantly stimulated in 6-OHDA-treated rats and were accompanied by declines in dopamine levels and motor activity. In contrast, the animals that received the chronic treatment with S. maxima had a restored locomotor activity, which is associated with the decreased levels of nitric oxide, ROS, and lipoperoxidation in the striatum, although mitochondrial functions and dopamine levels remained preserved. These findings suggest that supplementation with antioxidant phytochemicals (such as contained in S. maxima) represents an effective neuroprotective strategy against 6-OHDA-caused neurotoxicity vía free radical production to preserve striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. PMID:23430275

  2. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  3. 6-Hydroxydopamine and radiofrequency lesions of the lateral entorhinal cortex facilitate an operant appetitive conditioning task in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1981-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex seems heterogeneous as dopaminergic terminals are present only in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex. In order to clarify the interaction of this cortex with the hippocampus in memory processes, the effects of either 6-hydroxydopamine or radiofrequency bilateral lesions were compared. Both lesions enhance the retention of a Skinner task with continuous reinforcement schedule. Involvement of dopamine in memory processes is discussed. PMID:7254716

  4. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System in Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Peng, Yi-Jen; Wang, Shih-Yu; Young, Ton-Ho; Salter, Donald M.; Lee, Herng-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is widely used as an animal model of hepatotoxicity and the mechanisms have been arduously studied, however, the contribution of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity remains controversial. It is also known that either CCl4 or SNS can affect systemic inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in a mouse model of CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammatory response. Mice exposed to CCl4 or vehicle were pretreated with 6-OHDA or saline. The serum levels of aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase in the CCl4-poisoning mice with sympathetic denervation were significantly lower than those without sympathetic denervation. With sympathetic denervation, hepatocellular necrosis and fat infiltration induced by CCl4 were greatly decreased. Sympathetic denervation significantly attenuated CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation in liver and serum. Acute CCl4 intoxication showed increased expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines [eotaxin-2/CCL24, Fas ligand, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)], as well as decreased expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The overexpressed levels of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, MCP-1/CCL2, and TNF-α were attenuated by sympathetic denervation. Pretreatment with dexamethasone significantly reduced CCl4-induced hepatic injury. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the SNS plays an important role in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammation and the effect may be connected with chemical- or drug-induced hepatotoxicity and circulating immune response. PMID:25799095

  5. TROPHIC CONTROL OF THE ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE/POLYAMINE SYSTEM IN NEONATAL RAT CEREBELLUM: REGIONALLY-SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF NEONATAL LESIONS CAUSED BY 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Norepinephrine has been hypothesized as a trophic factor influencing postnatal development of the cerebellum. n the current study, neonatal rats were given 6-hydroxydopanine (6-OHDA) to destroy noradrenergic projections and the effects on the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)/polyami...

  6. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  7. Nonuniform Cardiac Denervation Observed by 11C-meta-Hydroxyephedrine PET in 6-OHDA-Treated Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie; Seneczko, Kailie; Goecks, Nichole C.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Brunner, Kevin G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, R. Jerome; Holden, James E.; Emborg, Marina E.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease presents nonmotor complications such as autonomic dysfunction that do not respond to traditional anti-parkinsonian therapies. The lack of established preclinical monkey models of Parkinson's disease with cardiac dysfunction hampers development and testing of new treatments to alleviate or prevent this feature. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of developing a model of cardiac dysautonomia in nonhuman primates and preclinical evaluations tools. Five rhesus monkeys received intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (total dose: 50 mg/kg). The animals were evaluated before and after with a battery of tests, including positron emission tomography with the norepinephrine analog 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine. Imaging 1 week after neurotoxin treatment revealed nearly complete loss of specific radioligand uptake. Partial progressive recovery of cardiac uptake found between 1 and 10 weeks remained stable between 10 and 14 weeks. In all five animals, examination of the pattern of uptake (using Logan plot analysis to create distribution volume maps) revealed a persistent region-specific significant loss in the inferior wall of the left ventricle at 10 (P<0.001) and 14 weeks (P<0.01) relative to the anterior wall. Blood levels of dopamine, norepinephrine (P<0.05), epinephrine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (P<0.01) were notably decreased after 6-hydroxydopamine at all time points. These results demonstrate that systemic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine in nonhuman primates creates a nonuniform but reproducible pattern of cardiac denervation as well as a persistent loss of circulating catecholamines, supporting the use of this method to further develop a monkey model of cardiac dysautonomia. PMID:22539969

  8. Nonuniform cardiac denervation observed by 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine PET in 6-OHDA-treated monkeys.

    PubMed

    Joers, Valerie; Seneczko, Kailie; Goecks, Nichole C; Kamp, Timothy J; Hacker, Timothy A; Brunner, Kevin G; Engle, Jonathan W; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, R Jerome; Holden, James E; Emborg, Marina E

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease presents nonmotor complications such as autonomic dysfunction that do not respond to traditional anti-parkinsonian therapies. The lack of established preclinical monkey models of Parkinson's disease with cardiac dysfunction hampers development and testing of new treatments to alleviate or prevent this feature. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of developing a model of cardiac dysautonomia in nonhuman primates and preclinical evaluations tools. Five rhesus monkeys received intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (total dose: 50 mg/kg). The animals were evaluated before and after with a battery of tests, including positron emission tomography with the norepinephrine analog (11)C-meta-hydroxyephedrine. Imaging 1 week after neurotoxin treatment revealed nearly complete loss of specific radioligand uptake. Partial progressive recovery of cardiac uptake found between 1 and 10 weeks remained stable between 10 and 14 weeks. In all five animals, examination of the pattern of uptake (using Logan plot analysis to create distribution volume maps) revealed a persistent region-specific significant loss in the inferior wall of the left ventricle at 10 (P<0.001) and 14 weeks (P<0.01) relative to the anterior wall. Blood levels of dopamine, norepinephrine (P<0.05), epinephrine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (P<0.01) were notably decreased after 6-hydroxydopamine at all time points. These results demonstrate that systemic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine in nonhuman primates creates a nonuniform but reproducible pattern of cardiac denervation as well as a persistent loss of circulating catecholamines, supporting the use of this method to further develop a monkey model of cardiac dysautonomia. PMID:22539969

  9. Intrastriatal GDNF gene transfer by inducible lentivirus vectors protects dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha-Sha; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Li, Chen; Lu, Tao; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, substantial evidence has shown that a long-term overexpression of GDNF gene is often associated with side effects. We previously improved tetracycline (Tet)-On lentivirus system carrying human GDNF (hGDNF) gene, and demonstrated that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated and functional in vitro. Here we further examined the efficiency and neuroprotection of Tet-On lentivirus-mediated hGDNF gene regulation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and a rat model of parkinsonism. The results showed that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated in transduced NPCs. Doxycycline (Dox)-induced hGDNF protected DA neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity in vitro. Intrastriatal injections of Tet-On lentivirus vectors resulted in dramatically increased levels of hGDNF protein in the striatum of rats with Dox-drinking water, when compared to lentivirus-injected and saline-injected rats with normal drinking water, respectively. In addition, hGDNF protected nigral DA neurons and striatal DA fibers, and attenuated d-amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the 6-OHDA lesioned rats. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that hGDNF gene transfer by Tet-On lentivirus vectors is tightly regulated in rat brain, and Dox-induced hGDNF is functional in neuroprotection of nigral DA neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism. PMID:24997241

  10. Effect of serotonin transporter blockade on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, C; Ko, W K D; Tronci, E; Li, Q; Stancampiano, R; Chuan, Q; Bezard, E; Carta, M

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin transporter blockade with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was recently shown to counteract L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. However, this effect has never been described in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, despite that they often receive SSRIs for the treatment of depression. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of the SSRI citalopram against dyskinesia in two experimental models of PD, the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat and 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated macaque. First, we studied the acute and chronic effect of citalopram, given at different time points before L-DOPA, in L-DOPA-primed parkinsonian rats. Moreover, the acute effect of citalopram was also evaluated in dyskinetic MPTP-treated macaques. In L-DOPA-primed rats, a significant and long-lasting reduction of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) was observed only when citalopram was given 30 min before L-DOPA, suggesting that the time of injection relative to L-DOPA is a key factor for the efficacy of the treatment. Interestingly, an acute challenge with the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine, given at the end of the chronic study, was equally effective in reducing LID in rats previously chronically treated with L-DOPA or L-DOPA plus citalopram, suggesting that no auto-receptor desensitization was induced by chronic citalopram treatment. In MPTP-treated macaques, citalopram produced a striking suppression of LID but at the expense of L-DOPA therapeutic efficacy, which represents a concern for possible clinical application. PMID:25907446

  11. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype. PMID:25120226

  12. Blocking Sympathetic Nervous System Reverses Partially Stroke-Induced Immunosuppression but does not Aggravate Functional Outcome After Experimental Stroke in Rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi-Wen; Yang, Heng; Yan, Fu-Ling; Wang, Huan; Xing, Fang-Lan; Zuo, Lei; Zhang, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Stoke results in activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), inducing systemic immunosuppression. However, the potential mechanisms underlying stroke-induced immunosuppression remain unclear. Here, we determined the SNS effects on functional outcome and explored the interactions among SNS, β-arrestin2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) after experimental stroke in rats. In the current study, stroke was induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats, and SNS activity was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine HBr (6-OHDA). 7.0 T Micro-MRI and Longa score were employed to assess the functional outcome after stroke. Flow cytometry and ELISA assay were used to measure the expression of MHC class II, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Western blot was conducted to analyze β-arrestin2 and NF-κB protein expression levels after experimental stroke. We found significantly increased infarct volumes and functional impairment after MCAO at different post-surgery time points, which were not aggravated by 6-OHDA treatment. SNS blockade partially reversed the expression of MHC class II after stroke over time, as well as TNF-α and IFN-γ levels in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages in vitro. Treatment of MCAO rats with SNS-inhibitor significantly diminished NF-κB activation and enhanced β-arrestin2 expression after stroke. This study suggests that pharmacological SNS inhibition dose not aggravate functional outcome after stroke. Stroke-induced immunosuppression may be involved in the SNS-β-arrestin2-NF-κB pathway. PMID:27059792

  13. Suppressive effect of mitragynine on the 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced head-twitch response in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Takayama, H; Sakai, S; Aimi, N; Watanabe, H

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mitragynine, a major alkaloid isolated from the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth (Rubiaceae), on the 5-HT2A receptor-mediated head-twitch response in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of mitragynine (5-30 mg/kg), as well as intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin, inhibited the 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT: 16 mg/kg, IP)-induced head-twitch response in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, mitragynine affected neither head-weaving caused by 5-MeO-DMT, nor drug-free spontaneous motor activity. Pretreatment of mice with reserpine (5 mg/kg, IP), p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA, 300 mg/kg x 3 times, IP), or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 50 micrograms/mouse, ICV) plus nomifensine (5 mg/kg, IP) did not change the suppressant effect of mitragynine on the head-twitch response caused by 5-MeO-DMT. On the other hand, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine (0.5 mg/kg, IP), and idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg, IP), significantly attenuated the suppressant effect of mitragynine. Lesion of central noradrenergic systems by 6-OHDA plus nomifensine did not alter the effect of idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) on mitragynine-induced suppression of the head-twitch response. These results indicate that stimulation of postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor, blockade of 5-HT2A receptors, or both, are involved in suppression of 5-HT2A receptor-mediated head-twitch response by mitragynine. PMID:9164589

  14. Effect of benserazid and 6-hydroxydopamine on the development of the last larval instar of the house cricket, Acheta domestica L.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, K S; Chudakova, I V; Hiripi, L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of benserazid and 6-OHDA on the duration of the last larval instar and development of wings with intact corpora allata and following allatectomy on Acheta domestica L. was studied. 6-OHDA failed to alter the duration of the last larval instar in the nymphs with intact corpora allata but prolonged it in the allatectomized crickets. Introduction of 6-OHDA in the second phase of the last larval instar caused a deformation of the wings both in allatectomized and intact crickets. Injection of benserazid to the nymphs of the last larval instar prolonged the duration of this phase only in the presence of the corpora allata. The effect of benserazid can be connected to elimination of central inhibition of the corpora allata involving dopaminergic neurons of the brain. PMID:2869911

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB has neurorestorative effects and modulates the pericyte response in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Padel, Thomas; Özen, Ilknur; Boix, Jordi; Barbariga, Marco; Gaceb, Abderahim; Roth, Michaela; Paul, Gesine

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease where the degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway leads to specific motor deficits. There is an unmet medical need for regenerative treatments that stop or reverse disease progression. Several growth factors have been investigated in clinical trials to restore the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway damaged in PD. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a molecule that recruits pericytes to stabilize microvessels, was recently investigated in a phase-1 clinical trial, showing a dose-dependent increase in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen of PD patients. Interestingly, evidence is accumulating that PD is paralleled by microvascular changes, however, whether PDGF-BB modifies pericytes in PD is not known. Using a pericyte reporter mouse strain, we investigate the functional and restorative effect of PDGF-BB in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesion mouse model of PD, and whether this restorative effect is accompanied by changes in pericyte features. We demonstrate that a 2-week treatment with PDGF-BB leads to behavioural recovery using several behavioural tests, and partially restores the nigrostriatal pathway. Interestingly, we find that pericytes are activated in the striatum of PD lesioned mice and that these changes are reversed by PDGF-BB treatment. The modulation of brain pericytes may contribute to the PDGF-BB-induced neurorestorative effects, PDGF-BB allowing for vascular stabilization in PD. Pericytes might be a new cell target of interest for future regenerative therapies. PMID:27288154

  16. The Longitudinal Transcriptomic Response of the Substantia Nigra to Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Reveals Significant Upregulation of Regeneration-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Grabinski, Tessa; Mattingly, Zachary R.; Winn, Mary E.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Lipton, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the study of gene expression at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 16 weeks in the substantia nigra (SN) after intrastriatal 6-OHDA in the Sprague-Dawley rat (rattus norvegicus) would identify cellular responses during the degenerative process that could be axoprotective. Specifically, we hypothesized that genes expressed within the SN that followed a profile of being highly upregulated early after the lesion (during active axonal degeneration) and then progressively declined to baseline over 16 weeks as DA neurons died are indicative of potential protective responses to the striatal 6-OHDA insult. Utilizing a κ-means cluster analysis strategy, we demonstrated that one such cluster followed this hypothesized expression pattern over time, and that this cluster contained several interrelated transcripts that are classified as regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) including Atf3, Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Gpnmb, Sox11, Mmp19, Srgap1, Rab15,Lifr, Trib3, Tgfb1, and Sema3c. All exemplar transcripts tested from this cluster (Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Atf3 and Sox11) were validated by qPCR and a smaller subset (Sprr1a, Gadd45a and Sox11) were shown to be exclusively localized to SN DA neurons using a dual label approach with RNAScope in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of RAGs is typically associated with the response to axonal injury in the peripheral nerves and was not previously reported as part of the axodegenerative process for DA neurons of the SN. Interestingly, as part of this cluster, other transcripts were identified based on their expression pattern but without a RAG provenance in the literature. These "RAG-like" transcripts need further characterization to determine if they possess similar functions to or interact with known RAG transcripts. Ultimately, it is hoped that some of the newly identified axodegeneration-reactive transcripts could be exploited as axoprotective therapies in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25992874

  17. Separation of the motor consequences from other actions of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the nigrostriatal neurones of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Garcia-Munoz, M; Arbuthnott, G W

    1985-12-01

    Male rats showed a clear preference for one forepaw when they were trained to press a lever for food reward. The preference was then changed by training, by local anaesthetic injection into the preferred paw, by lesions in the striatal output pathways in the brain, or by neurotoxin injection into the striatum contralateral to the side of the preferred paw. The pressing rate was not changed in spite of the change in paw use in any of these operations. This result is in marked contrast to the effect of reducing the dopamine concentration on the side contralateral to the preferred paw; in this case a marked reduction in responding is seen as well as the change in paw use. Thus medial forebrain bundle 6-hydroxydopamine lesions are more debilitating than either striatal damage or peripheral paralysis at least in the short term. PMID:3907747

  18. Dopamine as a potent inducer of cellular glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in PC12 neuronal cells: a potential adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhu, Hong; Misra, Bhaba R; Li, Yunbo; Misra, Hara P

    2008-11-01

    Dopamine auto-oxidation and the consequent formation of reactive oxygen species and electrophilic quinone molecules have been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. We reported here that in PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations (50-150 muM) potently induced cellular glutathione (GSH) and the phase 2 enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two critical cellular defenses in detoxification of ROS and electrophilic quinone molecules. Incubation of PC12 cells with dopamine also led to a marked increase in the mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and NQO1. In addition, treatment of PC12 cells with dopamine resulted in a significant elevation of GSH content in the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether treatment with dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations, which upregulated the cellular defenses could protect the neuronal cells against subsequent lethal oxidative and electrophilic injury, PC12 cells were pretreated with dopamine (150 muM) for 24 h and then exposed to various cytotoxic concentrations of dopamine or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with dopamine at a noncytotoxic concentration led to a remarkable protection against cytotoxicity caused by dopamine or 6-OHDA at lethal concentrations, as detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay. In view of the critical roles of GSH and NQO1 in protecting against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, the above findings implicate that upregulation of both GSH and NQO1 by dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations may serve as an important adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection. PMID:18368484

  19. Effects of GDNF pretreatment on function and survival of transplanted fetal ventral mesencephalic cells in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Andereggen, Lukas; Meyer, Morten; Guzman, Raphael; Ducray, Angélique D; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2009-06-18

    Transplantation of fetal dopaminergic (DA) neurons offers an experimental therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The low availability and the poor survival and integration of transplanted cells in the host brain are major obstacles in this approach. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor with growth- and survival-promoting capabilities for developing DA neurons. In the present study, we examined whether pretreatment of ventral mesencephalic (VM) free-floating roller tube (FFRT) cultures with GDNF would improve graft survival and function. For that purpose organotypic cultures of E14 rat VM were grown for 2, 4 or 8 days in the absence (control) or presence of GDNF [10 ng/ml] and transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. While all groups of rats showed a significant reduction in d-amphetamine-induced rotations at 6 weeks posttransplantation a significantly improved graft function was observed only in the days in vitro (DIV) 4 GDNF pretreated group compared to the control group. In addition, no statistical significant differences between groups were found in the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons assessed at 9 weeks posttransplantation. However, a tendency for higher TH-ir fiber outgrowth from the transplants in the GDNF pretreated groups as compared to corresponding controls was observed. Furthermore, GDNF pretreatment showed a tendency for a higher number of GIRK2 positive neurons in the grafts. In sum, our findings demonstrate that GDNF pretreatment was not disadvantageous for transplants of embryonic rat VM with the FFRT culture technique but only marginally improved graft survival and function. PMID:19389387

  20. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reestablishes neuronal information transmission in the 6-OHDA rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological activity of basal ganglia neurons accompanies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. High-frequency (>90 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces parkinsonian symptoms, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that parkinsonism-associated electrophysiological changes constitute an increase in neuronal firing pattern disorder and a concomitant decrease in information transmission through the ventral basal ganglia, and that effective DBS alleviates symptoms by decreasing neuronal disorder while simultaneously increasing information transfer through the same regions. We tested these hypotheses in the freely behaving, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of hemiparkinsonism. Following the onset of parkinsonism, mean neuronal firing rates were unchanged, despite a significant increase in firing pattern disorder (i.e., neuronal entropy), in both the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase in neuronal entropy was reversed by symptom-alleviating DBS. Whereas increases in signal entropy are most commonly indicative of similar increases in information transmission, directed information through both regions was substantially reduced (>70%) following the onset of parkinsonism. Again, this decrease in information transmission was partially reversed by DBS. Together, these results suggest that the parkinsonian basal ganglia are rife with entropic activity and incapable of functional information transmission. Furthermore, they indicate that symptom-alleviating DBS works by lowering the entropic noise floor, enabling more information-rich signal propagation. In this view, the symptoms of parkinsonism may be more a default mode, normally overridden by healthy basal ganglia information. When that information is abolished by parkinsonian pathophysiology, hypokinetic symptoms emerge. PMID:24554786

  1. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reestablishes neuronal information transmission in the 6-OHDA rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Dorval, Alan D; Grill, Warren M

    2014-05-01

    Pathophysiological activity of basal ganglia neurons accompanies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. High-frequency (>90 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces parkinsonian symptoms, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that parkinsonism-associated electrophysiological changes constitute an increase in neuronal firing pattern disorder and a concomitant decrease in information transmission through the ventral basal ganglia, and that effective DBS alleviates symptoms by decreasing neuronal disorder while simultaneously increasing information transfer through the same regions. We tested these hypotheses in the freely behaving, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of hemiparkinsonism. Following the onset of parkinsonism, mean neuronal firing rates were unchanged, despite a significant increase in firing pattern disorder (i.e., neuronal entropy), in both the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase in neuronal entropy was reversed by symptom-alleviating DBS. Whereas increases in signal entropy are most commonly indicative of similar increases in information transmission, directed information through both regions was substantially reduced (>70%) following the onset of parkinsonism. Again, this decrease in information transmission was partially reversed by DBS. Together, these results suggest that the parkinsonian basal ganglia are rife with entropic activity and incapable of functional information transmission. Furthermore, they indicate that symptom-alleviating DBS works by lowering the entropic noise floor, enabling more information-rich signal propagation. In this view, the symptoms of parkinsonism may be more a default mode, normally overridden by healthy basal ganglia information. When that information is abolished by parkinsonian pathophysiology, hypokinetic symptoms emerge. PMID:24554786

  2. Chronic L-DOPA administration increases the firing rate but does not reverse enhanced slow frequency oscillatory activity and synchronization in substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Aristieta, A; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Miguelez, C; Morera-Herreras, T; Ugedo, L

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is associated with dysfunctional neuronal activity in several nuclei of the basal ganglia. Moreover, high levels of oscillatory activity and synchronization have also been described in both intra- and inter-basal ganglia nuclei and the cerebral cortex. However, the relevance of these alterations in the motor symptomatology related to Parkinsonism and LID is not fully understood. Recently, we have shown that subthalamic neuronal activity correlates with axial abnormal movements and that a subthalamic nucleus (STN) lesion partially reduces LID severity as well as the expression of some striatal molecular modifications. The aim of the present study was to assess, through single-unit extracellular recording techniques under urethane anaesthesia, neuronal activity of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and its relationship with LID and STN hyperactivity together with oscillatory and synchronization between these nuclei and the cerebral cortex in 6-OHDA-lesioned and dyskinetic rats. Twenty-four hours after the last injection of L-DOPA the firing rate and the inhibitory response to an acute challenge of L-DOPA of SNr neurons from dyskinetic animals were increased with respect to those found in intact and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the mean firing rate of SNr neurons and the severity of the abnormal movements (limb and orolingual subtypes). There was also a significant correlation between the firing activity of SNr and STN neurons recorded from dyskinetic rats. In addition, low frequency band oscillatory activity and synchronization both within the SNr or STN and with the cerebral cortex were enhanced in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals and not or slightly affected by chronic treatment with L-DOPA. Altogether, these results indicate that neuronal SNr firing activity is relevant in dyskinesia and may be driven by STN hyperactivity. Conversely

  3. Neuroprotective Potential of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Along with Exposure to Electromagnetic Field in 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Umarao, Preeti; Bose, Samrat; Bhattacharyya, Supti; Kumar, Anil; Jain, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting mainly the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra leading to various motor and non-motor deficits. We explored the neuroprotective potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) along with exposure to EMF in 6-OHDA rat model of PD. IONPs were implanted at the site of lesion and 24 h thereafter the rats were exposed to magnetic fields 2 h/day for one week. Bilateral lesions of the striatum were made with 6-OHDA. The rats in all the intervention groups improved progressively over the days and by post-surgery day 4 they were active and bright. We observed a significant beneficial effect of the IONPs implantation and MF exposure on feeding behavior, gait and postural stability. There was a significant enhancement of mitochondrial function and attenuation of lesion volume in all the intervention groups as compared to PD. The results demonstrate neuroprotective effect of iron oxide nanoparticle implantation and magnetic field exposure in an in vivo 6-OHDA rat model of PD. PMID:27398453

  4. Neuroprotective Properties of the Standardized Extract from Camellia sinensis (Green Tea) and Its Main Bioactive Components, Epicatechin and Epigallocatechin Gallate, in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bitu Pinto, Natália; da Silva Alexandre, Bruno; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Silva, Aline Holanda; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; Viana, Glauce S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Camellia sinensis (green tea) is largely consumed, mainly in Asia. It possesses several biological effects such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The objectives were to investigate the neuroprotective actions of the standardized extract (CS), epicatechin (EC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on a model of Parkinson's disease. Male Wistar rats were divided into SO (sham-operated controls), untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned and 6-OHDA-lesioned treated for 2 weeks with CS (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg), EC (10 mg/kg), or EGCG (10 mg/kg) groups. One hour after the last administration, animals were submitted to behavioral tests and euthanized and their striata and hippocampi were dissected for neurochemical (DA, DOPAC, and HVA) and antioxidant activity determinations, as well as immunohistochemistry evaluations (TH, COX-2, and iNOS). The results showed that CS and catechins reverted behavioral changes, indicating neuroprotection manifested as decreased rotational behavior, increased locomotor activity, antidepressive effects, and improvement of cognitive dysfunction, as compared to the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned group. Besides, CS, EP, and EGCG reversed the striatal oxidative stress and immunohistochemistry alterations. These results show that the neuroprotective effects of CS and its catechins are probably and in great part due to its powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, pointing out their potential for the prevention and treatment of PD. PMID:26167188

  5. Gray level co-occurrence matrix algorithm as pattern recognition biosensor for oxidopamine-induced changes in lymphocyte chromatin architecture.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Igor; Dimitrijevic, Draga; Nesic, Dejan; Petrovic, Danica

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that a proapoptotic chemical agent, oxidopamine, induces dose dependent changes in chromatin textural patterns which can be quantified using the Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method. Peripheral blood (heparin-pretreated) samples were treated with oxidopamine (6-OHDA, 6-hydroxydopamine) to achieve effective concentrations of 100, 200 and 300µM. The samples were smeared on microscope slides and fixated in methanol. The smears were stained using a modification of Feulgen method for DNA visualization. For each stained smear, a sample of 30 lymphocyte chromatin structures were visualized and analyzed. This way, textural parameters for a total of 120 nuclei micrographs were calculated. For each chromatin structure, five different GLCM features were calculated: angular second moment, GLCM entropy, inverse difference moment, GLCM correlation, and GLCM variance. Oxidopamine induced the rise of the values of GLCM entropy and variance, and the reduction of angular second moment, correlation, and inverse difference moment. The trends for GLCM parameter changes were found to be highly significant (p<0.001). These results indicate that GLCM mathematical algorithm might be successfully used in detection and evaluation of discrete early apoptotic structural changes in Feulgen-stained chromatin of peripheral blood lymphocytes that are not detectable using conventional microscopy/cell biology techniques. PMID:27424557

  6. The preferential nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole and the non-selective one N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester administered alone or jointly with L-DOPA differentially affect motor behavior and monoamine metabolism in sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna; Konieczny, Jolanta; Lenda, Tomasz; Lorenc-Koci, Elżbieta

    2015-11-01

    Reciprocal interactions between nitrergic and dopaminergic systems play a key role in the control of motor behavior. In the present study, we performed a comparative analysis of motor behavior (locomotor activity, catalepsy, rotational behavior) and monoamine metabolism in the striatum and substantia nigra of unilaterally sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats treated with the preferential neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) or the non-selective one N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), alone or in combination with L-DOPA. Each NOS inhibitor given alone (50mg/kg) induced a distinct catalepsy 30 min after injection but only 7-NI impaired spontaneous locomotion after 10 min. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, chronic L-DOPA (25mg/kg) induced 2.5-h long contralateral rotations. 7-NI (30 and 50mg/kg) markedly reduced the intensity of L-DOPA-induced contralateral rotations while extending their duration until 4.5h whereas L-NAME (50 and 100mg/kg) only tended to attenuate their intensity without affecting the duration. 7-NI but not L-NAME significantly increased endogenous tissue DA levels in the nigrostriatal system of both sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In L-DOPA-treated group, 7-NI significantly enhanced the L-DOPA-derived tissue DA content in this system and decreased the level of the intracellular DA metabolite DOPAC produced by monoamine oxidase (MAO). In contrast to 7-NI, L-NAME decreased markedly DA content and did not affect DOPAC level in the ipsilateral striatum. It means that the differences in 7-NI and L-NAME-mediated modulation of L-DOPA-induced behavioral and biochemical effects resulted not only from the inhibition of NOS activity but also from differences in their ability to inhibit MAO. PMID:26319690

  7. Disappearance of hoarding behavior after 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine neurons and its reinstatement with L-dopa.

    PubMed

    Kelley, A E; Stinus, L

    1985-06-01

    The consequences of 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine system on hoarding behavior were investigated in the rat. Specific lesions of this system, at the level of either the ventral tegmental area or the nucleus accumbens, resulted in abolition or severe reduction of hoarding activity. Similar lesions of the forebrain noradrenaline neurons did not affect hoarding. In further experiments, amphetamine and apomorphine locomotor responses, spontaneous motor behavior, food intake and eating patterns, and the existence of any regulatory deficits were examined. A subtle disorganization of eating patterns was found in animals with mesolimbic-dopamine lesions. It was determined that the hoarding deficit could not be due to motor, ingestive, or regulatory impairments. In a final experiment, it was demonstrated that hoarding behavior can be restored to control levels in dopamine-lesion rats by prior treatment with the catecholamine presursor L-dopa. These findings suggest that hoarding activity is mediated by mesolimbic dopamine neurons, and it is hypothesized that this system is necessary for the facilitation of certain types of foraging responses under a high level of arousal. PMID:3939664

  8. RNAi-mediated silencing of HLA A2 suppressed acute rejection against human fibroblast xenografts in the striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caixia; Xu, Yunzhi; Zheng, Deyu; Sun, Xiaohong; Xu, Qunyuan; Duan, Deyi

    2016-08-15

    Major histocompatibility complex class l (MHC I) molecules play a role in determining whether transplanted cells will be accepted or rejected, and masking of MHC I on donor cells has been found useful for immunoprotection of neural xenografts. In the present study, primary human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF), HELF treated with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA A2, MHC I in humans) (siHELF), and rat embryonic lung fibroblasts (RELF) were stereotaxically grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats to explore whether knockdown of HLA A2 could reduce host immune responses against xenografts. Before lentiviral infection, the cells were transduced with retroviruses harboring tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA. Knockdown of HLA A2 protein was examined by Western blotting. The immune responses (the number of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in the brain and peripheral blood), glial reaction, and survival of human fibroblasts were quantitatively evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry at 4d, 2w, and 6w post-graft. Animal behaviors were assessed by counting apomorphine-induced rotations pre- and post-grafts. It was shown that a lower level of HLA A2 was observed in siHELF grafts than in HELF grafts, and knockdown of HLA A2 decreased rat immune responses, as indicated by less remarkable increases in the number of CD8 and CD4 T-cells in the brain and the ratio of CD4:CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood in rats grafted with siHELF. Rats grafted with siHELF exhibited a significant improvement in motor asymmetry post-transplantation and a better survival of human fibroblasts at 2w. The increasing number of activated microglia and the decreasing number of astrocytes were found in three groups of rats post-implantation. These data suggested that RNAi-mediated knockdown of HLA A2 could suppress acute rejection against xenogeneic human cell transplants in the rat brain. PMID:27397073

  9. Molsidomine, a nitric oxide donor, modulates rotational behavior and monoamine metabolism in 6-OHDA lesioned rats treated chronically with L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Lorenc-Koci, Elżbieta; Czarnecka, Anna; Lenda, Tomasz; Kamińska, Kinga; Konieczny, Jolanta

    2013-12-01

    Some biochemical and histological studies of Parkinson's disease patients' brains and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats suggest that dopaminergic dennervation of the striatum leads to the nitrergic system hypofunction in this structure. Hence, recently the modulation of nitric oxide (NO)- soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling is considered to be a new target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The aim of our study was to examine the impact of chronic combined treatment with low doses of the NO donor molsidomine (2 and 4mg/kg) and L-DOPA (12.5 and 25mg/kg) on rotational behavior and monoamine metabolism in the striatum (STR) and substantia nigra (SN) of unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Chronic administration of molsidomine at a dose of 2mg/kg jointly with 25mg/kg of L-DOPA significantly decreased the number of contralateral rotations when compared to L-DOPA alone. Other combinations of the examined drug doses were less effective. The tissue DA levels in the ipsilateral STR and SN after the last chronic doses of molsidomine (2mg/kg) and L-DOPA (12.5 or 25mg/kg), were significantly higher than after L-DOPA alone. Chronic L-DOPA treatment alone or jointly with a lower dose of molsidomine decreased 5-HT levels and accelerated its catabolism in the examined structures. However, combination of a higher dose of molsidomine with L-DOPA (25mg/kg) did not reduce 5-HT content while its catabolism was less intensive. The obtained results show that low doses of molsidomine can modulate rotational behavior and tissue DA and 5-HT concentrations in the STR and SN of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats treated chronically with L-DOPA. PMID:24090640

  10. Selegiline normalizes, while l-DOPA sustains the increased number of dopamine neurons in the olfactory bulb in a 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Hua; Carlsson, Thomas; Depboylu, Candan; Höglinger, Günter U; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Ries, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Olfactory dysfunction, often preceding the cardinal motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor at rest and postural instability, is frequently reported in Parkinson's disease. This symptom appears to be related to an increased number of dopamine neurons in the periglomerular layer of the olfactory bulb. In animal models of Parkinson's disease, adult neural progenitor cells migrating from the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle to the olfactory bulb are evidently altered in their survival and progeny. The modulation of neural progenitor cells contributing to the number of dopamine neurons in the periglomerular layer, however, is still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the survival and neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells in the olfactory bulb, following treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA and the monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor selegiline in a unilateral, intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model in mice. Our data show that the number of neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone is decreased after an intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion, while there is no difference from control in lesioned mice with selegiline or l-DOPA treatment. Selegiline is able to normalize the number of dopamine neurons in the periglomerular layer, while l-DOPA treatment sustains the increased number observed in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned animals. We conclude that there is a distinct modulation of newly generated dopamine neurons of the olfactory bulb after l-DOPA and selegiline treatment. The differential effects of the two drugs might also play a role in olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:24291466

  11. Activation of spinal α2 adrenergic receptors induces hyperglycemia in mouse though activating sympathetic outflow.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-10-15

    The roles of α2-adrenergic receptors located in the spinal cord in the regulation of blood glucose levels were studied in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Mice were treated intrathecally (i.t.) with clonidine or yohimbine, and the blood glucose levels were measured at 0, 30, 60 and 120min after i.t. administration. The i.t. injection with clonidine caused a pronounced elevation of the blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner. Clonidine-induced hyperglycemic effect was dose-dependently attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with yohimbine. Furthermore, plasma insulin level was attenuated by clonidine, and yohimbine pretreatment reversed partially, but significantly, clonidine-induced down-regulation of the plasma insulin level. I.t. pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) almost abolished the hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine. PTX pretreatment reversed the induced down-regulation of the insulin level. In addition, i.t. pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with mifepristone, hexamethonium and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) attenuated the hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine. I.t. injected clonidine significantly increased plasma corticosterone level. The elevated blood glucose level induced by clonidine was significantly decreased in adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. Our results suggest that the α2-adrenergic receptors located in the spinal cord play important roles for the elevation of the blood glucose level. The hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine appears to be mediated by a reduction of the plasma insulin level. In addition, glucocortioid system appears to be involved in clonidine-induced hyperglycemic effect. Furthermore, the clonidine-induced hyperglycemia appears to be mediated via activating the spinal nerves or peripheral sympathetic nervous system. PMID:25179570

  12. Unprecedented Therapeutic Potential with a Combination of A2A/NR2B Receptor Antagonists as Observed in the 6-OHDA Lesioned Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Nicolas, Jean-Marie; Scheller, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, the long-term use of dopamine replacing agents is associated with the development of motor complications; therefore, there is a need for non-dopaminergic drugs. This study evaluated the potential therapeutic impact of six different NR2B and A2A receptor antagonists given either alone or in combination in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without (monotherapy) or with (add-on therapy) the co-administration of L-Dopa: Sch-58261+ Merck 22; Sch-58261+Co-101244; Preladenant + Merck 22; Preladenant + Radiprodil; Tozadenant + Radiprodil; Istradefylline + Co-101244. Animals given monotherapy were assessed on distance traveled and rearing, whereas those given add-on therapy were assessed on contralateral rotations. Three-way mixed ANOVA were conducted to assess the main effect of each drug separately and to determine whether any interaction between two drugs was additive or synergistic. Additional post hoc analyses were conducted to compare the effect of the combination with the effect of the drugs alone. Motor activity improved significantly and was sustained for longer when the drugs were given in combination than when administered separately at the same dose. Similarly, when tested as add-on treatment to L-Dopa, the combinations resulted in higher levels of contralateral rotation in comparison to the single drugs. Of special interest, the activity observed with some combinations could not be described by a simplistic additive effect and involved more subtle synergistic pharmacological interactions. The combined administration of A2A/NR2B-receptor antagonists improved motor behaviour in 6-OHDA rats. Given the proven translatability of this model such a combination may be expected to be effective in improving motor symptoms in patients. PMID:25513815

  13. COMPARISON OF THE D1-DOPAMINE AGONIST SKF-38393 AND A-68930 IN NEONATAL 6-OHDA-LESIONED RATS: BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS AND INDUCTION OF C-FOS-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies from this laboratory and others have found that neonatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit profound behavioral manifestations, and significant induction of striatal c-fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI), when administered the selective D1-dopamine agonist SKF-38393. ith t...

  14. IL-33-driven ILC2/eosinophil axis in fat is induced by sympathetic tone and suppressed by obesity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofeng; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Handong; Yang, Xin; Yang, Xuexian; Liu, Meilian

    2016-10-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in white adipose tissue (WAT) promote WAT browning and assist in preventing the development of obesity. However, how ILC2 in adipose tissue is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, our study shows that ILC2s are present in brown adipose tissue (BAT) as well as subcutaneous and epididymal WAT (sWAT and eWAT). The fractions of ILC2s, natural killer T (NKT) cells and eosinophils in sWAT, eWAT and BAT are significantly decreased by high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding and leptin deficiency-induced obesity. Consistent with this, the adipose expression and circulating levels of IL-33, a key inducing cytokine of ILC2, are significantly downregulated by obesity. Furthermore, administration of IL-33 markedly increases the fraction of ILC2 and eosinophil as well as the expression of UCP1 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, in adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice. On the other hand, cold exposure induces the expression levels of IL-33 and UCP1 and the population of ILC2 and eosinophil in sWAT, and these promoting effects of cold stress are reversed by neutralization of IL-33 signaling in vivo Moreover, the basal and cold-induced IL-33 and ILC2/eosinophil pathways are significantly suppressed by sympathetic denervation via local injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in sWAT. Taken together, our data suggest that the ILC2/eosinophil axis in adipose tissue is regulated by sympathetic nervous system and obesity in IL-33-dependent manner, and IL-33-driven ILC2/eosinophil axis is implicated in the development of obesity. PMID:27562191

  15. Glial activation is associated with l-DOPA induced dyskinesia and blocked by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bortolanza, Mariza; Cavalcanti-Kiwiatkoski, Roberta; Padovan-Neto, Fernando E; da-Silva, Célia Aparecida; Mitkovski, Miso; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    l-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease but can induce debilitating abnormal involuntary movements (dyskinesia). Here we show that the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the rat is accompanied by upregulation of an inflammatory cascade involving nitric oxide. Male Wistar rats sustained unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the medial forebrain bundle. After three weeks animals started to receive daily treatment with L-DOPA (30 mg/kg plus benserazide 7.5 mg/kg, for 21 days), combined with an inhibitor of neuronal NOS (7-nitroindazole, 7-NI, 30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (saline-PEG 50%). All animals treated with L-DOPA and vehicle developed abnormal involuntary movements, and this effect was prevented by 7-NI. L-DOPA-treated dyskinetic animals exhibited an increased striatal and pallidal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in reactive astrocytes, an increased number of CD11b-positive microglial cells with activated morphology, and the rise of cells positive for inducible nitric oxide-synthase immunoreactivity (iNOS). All these indexes of glial activation were prevented by 7-NI co-administration. These findings provide evidence that the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the rat is associated with activation of glial cells that promote inflammatory responses. The dramatic effect of 7-NI in preventing this glial response points to an involvement of nitric oxide. Moreover, the results suggest that the NOS inhibitor prevents dyskinesia at least in part via inhibition of glial cell activation and iNOS expression. Our observations indicate nitric oxide synthase inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy for preventing neuroinflammatory and glial components of dyskinesia pathogenesis in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25447229

  16. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  17. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  18. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  19. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-08-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  20. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-01-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  1. Alterations in Energy/Redox Metabolism Induced by Mitochondrial and Environmental Toxins: A Specific Role for Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Paraquat Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat “hijacks” the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations

  2. Increase in brain /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor binding following chronic haloperidol treatment, intracisternal 6-hydroxydopamine or ventral tegmental lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.S.L.; Lotti, V.J.; Martin, G.E.; Chen, T.B.

    1983-02-21

    Specific /sup 125/I-CCK receptor binding was significantly increased in brain tissue taken from guinea pig or mouse following chronic (2-3 week) daily administration of haloperidol (2-3 mg/kg/day). Scatchard analysis indicated the increase in CCK binding was due to an increased receptor number (B max) with no change in affinity (Kd). In guinea pigs, the increased CCK binding was observed in the mesolimbic regions and frontal cortex, but not in striatum, hippocampus nor posterior cortex. In mice, however, the increases occurred in both pooled cerebral cortical-hippocampal tissue, and in the remainder of the brain. Enhanced CCK receptor binding was also observed in membranes prepared from whole brain of mice one month following intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. Additionally, an increase in CCK binding was observed in mesolimbic regions and frontal cortex, but not striatum or hippocampus, of guinea pigs 3 weeks after an unilateral radiofrequency lesions of the ipsilateral ventral tegmentum. The present studies demonstrate that three different procedures which reduce dopaminergic function in the brain enhance CCK receptor binding. The data provide further support for a functional interrelationship between dopaminergic systems and CCK in some brain regions and raise the possibility that CCK may play a role in the antipsychotic action of neuroleptics.

  3. Transplantation of subventricular zone neural precursors induces an endogenous precursor cell response in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Paumier, Katrina L; Collier, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Realistically, future stem cell therapies for neurological conditions including Parkinson’s disease (PD) will most probably entail combination treatment strategies, involving both the stimulation of endogenous cells and transplantation. Therefore, this study investigates these two modes of neural precursor cell (NPC) therapy in concert in order to determine their interrelationships in a rat PD model. Human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPAP) labeled NPCs were transplanted unilaterally into host rats which were subsequently infused ipsilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The reaction of host NPCs to the transplantation and 6-OHDA was tracked by bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Two weeks after transplantation, in animals transplanted with NPCs, we found evidence of elevated host subventricular zone NPC proliferation, neurogenesis, and migration to the graft site. In these animals, we also observed a significant preservation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and substantia nigra TH cell number. We have seen no evidence that neuroprotection is a product of DA neuron replacement by NPC-derived cells. Rather, the NPCs expressed glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), sonic hedgehog (Shh) and stromal cell derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α) providing a molecular basis for the observed neuroprotection and endogenous NPC response to transplantation. In summary, our data suggests plausible synergy between exogenous and endogenous NPC actions, and that NPC implantation before the 6-OHDA insult can create a host microenvironment conducive to stimulation of endogenous NPCs, and protection of mature nigral neurons. PMID:19399899

  4. Both Creatine and Its Product Phosphocreatine Reduce Oxidative Stress and Afford Neuroprotection in an In Vitro Parkinson’s Model

    PubMed Central

    Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria D.; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier; Ludka, Fabiana K.; Tasca, Carla I.; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; López, Manuela G.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr). This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson’s model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine473) and GSK3β (Serine9). Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25424428

  5. HYPERACTIVITY AND HYPOACTIVITY PRODUCED BY LESIONS TO THE MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneous locomotor activity and the locomotor response to amphetamine and apomorphine were studied in rats subjected to either radiofrequency(RF), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) of both RF and 6-OHDA lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. Large 6-OHDA lesions of the ventr...

  6. Decreased forelimb ability in mice intracerebroventricularly injected with low dose 6-hydroxidopamine: A model on the dissociation of bradykinesia from hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renata Pietsch; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Colle, Dirleise; Naime, Aline Aita; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ghizoni, Heloisa; Hort, Mariana Appel; Godoi, Marcelo; Dias, Paulo Fernando; Braga, Antonio Luiz; Farina, Marcelo

    2016-05-15

    Bradykinesia and hypokinesia represent well-known motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). While bradykinesia (slow execution of movements) is present in less affected PD patients and aggravates as the disease severity increases, hypokinesia (reduction of movement) seems to emerge prominently only in the more affected patients. Here we developed a model based on the central infusion of low dose (40μg) 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in mice in an attempt to discriminate bradykinesia (accessed through forelimb inability) from hypokinesia (accessed through locomotor and exploratory activities). The potential beneficial effects of succinobucol against 6-OHDA-induced forelimb inability were also evaluated. One week after the beginning of treatment with succinobucol (i.p. injections, 10mg/kg/day), mice received a single i.c.v. infusion of 6-OHDA (40μg/site). One week after 6-OHDA infusion, general locomotor/exploratory activities (open field test), muscle strength (grid test), forelimb skill (single pellet task), as well as striatal biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress and cellular homeostasis (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and NADH dehydrogenases activities, lipid peroxidation and TH levels), were evaluated. 6-OHDA infusions did not change locomotor/exploratory activities and muscle strength, as well as the evaluated striatal biochemical parameters. However, 6-OHDA infusions caused significant reductions (50%) in the single pellet reaching task performance, which detects forelimb skill inability and can be used to experimentally identify bradykinesia. Succinobucol partially protected against 6-OHDA-induced forelimb inability. The decreased forelimb ability with no changes in locomotor/exploratory behavior indicates that our 6-OHDA-based protocol represents a useful tool to mechanistically study the dissociation of bradykinesia and hypokinesia in PD. PMID:26921691

  7. Evidence for a role for α6(∗) nAChRs in l-dopa-induced dyskinesias using Parkinsonian α6(∗) nAChR gain-of-function mice.

    PubMed

    Bordia, T; McGregor, M; McIntosh, J M; Drenan, R M; Quik, M

    2015-06-01

    l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) are a serious side effect of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms that underlie LIDs are currently unclear. However, preclinical studies indicate that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a role, suggesting that drugs targeting these receptors may be of therapeutic benefit. To further understand the involvement of α6β2(∗) nAChRs in LIDs, we used gain-of-function α6(∗) nAChR (α6L9S) mice that exhibit a 20-fold enhanced sensitivity to nAChR agonists. Wildtype (WT) and α6L9S mice were lesioned by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 3μg/ml) into the medial forebrain bundle. Three to 4wk later, they were administered l-dopa (3mg/kg) plus benserazide (15mg/kg) until stably dyskinetic. l-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) were similar in α6L9S and WT mice. WT mice were then given nicotine in the drinking water in gradually increasing doses to a final 300μg/ml, which resulted in a 40% decline AIMs. By contrast, there was no decrease in AIMs in α6L9S mice at a maximally tolerated nicotine dose of 20μg/ml. However, the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine (1mg/kg ip 30min before l-dopa) reduced l-dopa-induced AIMs in both α6L9S and WT mice. Thus, both a nAChR agonist and antagonist decreased AIMs in WT mice, but only the antagonist was effective in α6L9S mice. Since nicotine appears to reduce LIDs via desensitization, hypersensitive α6β2(∗) nAChRs may desensitize less readily. The present data show that α6β2(∗) nAChRs are key regulators of LIDs, and may be useful therapeutic targets for their management in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25813704

  8. Carbidopa-Based Modulation of the Functional Effect of the AAV2-hAADC Gene Therapy in 6-OHDA Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2015-01-01

    Progressively blunted response to L-DOPA in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a critical factor that complicates long-term pharmacotherapy in view of the central importance of this drug in management of the PD-related motor disturbance. This phenomenon is likely due to progressive loss of one of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for dopamine in the basal ganglia: aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). We have developed a gene therapy based on an adeno-associated virus encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC) infused into the Parkinsonian striatum. Although no adverse clinical effects of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy have been observed so far, the ability to more precisely regulate transgene expression or transgene product activity could be an important long-term safety feature. The present study was designed to define pharmacological regulation of the functional activity of AAV2-hAADC transgene product by manipulating L-DOPA and carbidopa (AADC inhibitor) administration in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Thirty days after unilateral striatal infusion of AAV2-hAADC, animals displayed circling behavior and acceleration of dopamine metabolism in the lesioned striatum after administration of a low dose of L-DOPA (5 mg/kg) co-administered with 1.25 mg/kg of carbidopa. This phenomenon was not observed in control AAV2-GFP-treated rats. Withdrawal of carbidopa from a daily L-DOPA regimen decreased the peripheral L-DOPA pool, resulting in almost total loss of L-DOPA-induced behavioral response in AAV2-hAADC rats and a significant decline in striatal dopamine turnover. The serum L-DOPA level correlated with the magnitude of circling behavior in AAV2-hAADC rats. Additionally, AADC activity in homogenates of lesioned striata transduced by AAV2-AADC was 10-fold higher when compared with AAV2-GFP-treated control striata, confirming functional transduction. Our data suggests that the pharmacological regulation of circulating L-DOPA might be effective in the controlling of

  9. Carbidopa-based modulation of the functional effect of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sharma, Nitasha; Beyer, Janine; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2015-01-01

    Progressively blunted response to L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a critical factor that complicates long-term pharmacotherapy in view of the central importance of this drug in management of the PD-related motor disturbance. This phenomenon is likely due to progressive loss of one of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for dopamine in the basal ganglia: aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). We have developed a gene therapy based on an adeno-associated virus encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC) infused into the Parkinsonian striatum. Although no adverse clinical effects of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy have been observed so far, the ability to more precisely regulate transgene expression or transgene product activity could be an important long-term safety feature. The present study was designed to define pharmacological regulation of the functional activity of AAV2-hAADC transgene product by manipulating L-DOPA and carbidopa (AADC inhibitor) administration in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Thirty days after unilateral striatal infusion of AAV2-hAADC, animals displayed circling behavior and acceleration of dopamine metabolism in the lesioned striatum after administration of a low dose of L-DOPA (5 mg/kg) co-administered with 1.25 mg/kg of carbidopa. This phenomenon was not observed in control AAV2-GFP-treated rats. Withdrawal of carbidopa from a daily L-DOPA regimen decreased the peripheral L-DOPA pool, resulting in almost total loss of L-DOPA-induced behavioral response in AAV2-hAADC rats and a significant decline in striatal dopamine turnover. The serum L-DOPA level correlated with the magnitude of circling behavior in AAV2-hAADC rats. Additionally, AADC activity in homogenates of lesioned striata transduced by AAV2-AADC was 10-fold higher when compared with AAV2-GFP-treated control striata, confirming functional transduction. Our data suggests that the pharmacological regulation of circulating L-DOPA might be effective in the controlling of

  10. Behavioural Assessment of the A2a/NR2B Combination in the Unilateral 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rat Model: A New Method to Examine the Therapeutic Potential of Non-Dopaminergic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Van Damme, Xavier; De Wolf, Catherine; Schwarting, Rainer; Scheller, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopaminergic therapies are often associated with the development of motor complications. Attention has therefore been focused on the use of non-dopaminergic drugs. This study developed a new behavioural method capable of demonstrating the added value of combining adenosinergic and glutamatergic receptor antagonists in unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Rats were dosed orally with Tozadenant, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, and three different doses of Radiprodil, an NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The drugs were given alone or in combination and rats were placed in an open-field for behavioural monitoring. Video recordings were automatically analysed. Five different behaviours were scored: distance traveled, ipsi- and contraversive turns, body position, and space occupancy. The results show that A2A or NR2B receptor antagonists given alone or in combination did not produce enhanced turning as observed with an active dose of L-Dopa/benserazide. Instead the treated rats maintained a straight body position, were able to shift from one direction to the other and occupied a significantly larger space in the arena. The highest "Tozadenant/Radiprodil" dose combination significantly increased all five behavioural parameters recorded compared to rats treated with vehicle or the same doses of the drugs alone. Our data suggest that the A2A/NR2B antagonist combination may be able to stimulate motor activity to a similar level as that achieved by L-Dopa but in the absence of the side-effects that are associated with dopaminergic hyperstimulation. If these results translate into the clinic, this combination could represent an alternative symptomatic treatment option for PD. PMID:26322641

  11. Effects of catecholaminergic nerve lesion on endometrial development during early pregnancy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yulan; Liu, Guanhui; Wang, Zixu; Li, Jing; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-04-01

    Maternal stress is common during pregnancy and the postnatal period. This stress typically activates the sympathetic nervous system which releases catecholamines. This study explored the influence of sympathectomy by using neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on embryo implantation, and investigated the influence mechanism of sympathectomy on reconstruction of endometrial structure during early pregnancy. In the 6-OHDA-treated mice, uterine glands in the endometrium developed poorly, and the gland epithelia were arranged irregularly during early pregnancy. Furthermore, vacuoles, karyopykosis and plasmarrhexis appeared in some gland epithelia. The percentage of uterine glands and the density of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positivity were dramatically decreased, and Fas ligand (FasL) expression was decreased in cells from pregnancy days 5-9 (E5-9) in the treated group. Antioxidant enzyme activity levels in uteri were lower but the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were higher in the 6-OHDA mice than those in the control mice at E5-9. Similarly, the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells was significantly increased during early pregnancy following treatment with 6-OHDA. Our results have indicated that peripheral catecholaminergic nerve lesions induced by 6-OHDA cause adverse pregnancy outcomes through disruption of endometrial gland development, which increases oxidative stress and iNOS expression in the endometrium. Thus, catecholaminergic nerves might favourably influence blastocyst implantation, foetal survival and development during early pregnancy by oxidative state regulation and endometrial gland reconstruction. PMID:26554516

  12. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  13. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. PMID:23018122

  14. Running wheel exercise enhances recovery from nigrostriatal dopamine injury without inducing neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S J; Gross, N B; Fricks, A N; Casiano, B D; Nguyen, T B; Marshall, J F

    2007-02-01

    Forced use of the forelimb contralateral to a unilateral injection of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine can promote recovery of motor function in that limb and can significantly decrease damage to dopamine terminals. The present study was conducted to determine (1) whether a form of voluntary exercise, wheel running, would improve motor performance in rats with such lesions, and (2) whether any beneficial effects of wheel running are attributable to ameliorating the dopaminergic damage. In experiment 1, rats were allowed to run in exercise wheels or kept in home cages for 2 1/2 weeks, then given stereotaxic infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left striatum. The rats were replaced into their original environments (wheels or home cages) for four additional weeks, and asymmetries in forelimb use were quantified at 3, 10, 17, and 24 days postoperatively. After killing, dopaminergic damage was assessed by both quantifying 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) binding to striatal dopamine transporters and counting tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Exercised 6-hydroxydopamine-infused rats showed improved motor outcomes relative to sedentary lesioned controls, effects that were most apparent at postoperative days 17 and 24. Despite this behavioral improvement, 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of striatal dopamine transporters and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells in exercised and sedentary groups did not differ. Since prior studies suggested that forced limb use improves motor performance by sparing nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine damage, experiment 2 used a combined regimen of forced plus voluntary wheel running. Again, we found that the motor performance of exercised rats improved more rapidly than that of sedentary controls, but that there were no differences between these groups in the damage produced by 6-hydroxydopamine. It appears that voluntary

  15. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Bhangale, Jitendra O.; Acharya, Sanjeev R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p < 0.001) found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.). 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion). 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:26884755

  16. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Bhangale, Jitendra O; Acharya, Sanjeev R

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p < 0.001) found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.). 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion). 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:26884755

  17. ALCAR Exerts Neuroprotective and Pro-Neurogenic Effects by Inhibition of Glial Activation and Oxidative Stress via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu; Mishra, Akanksha; Shukla, Shubha

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are known causative factors in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Neural stem cells (NSCs) contribute in maintaining brain plasticity; therefore, survival of NSCs and neuroblasts during neurodegenerative process becomes important in replenishing the pool of mature neuronal population. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), present in almost all body cells, increases endogenous antioxidants and regulates bioenergetics. Currently, no information is available about the putative mechanism and neuroprotective effects of ALCAR in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. Herein, we investigated the effect of ALCAR on death/survival of DAergic neurons, neuroblasts and NSCs and associates mechanism of neuroprotection in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. ALCAR (100 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) treatment started 3 days prior to 6-OHDA lesioning and continued for another 14 day post-lesioning. We found that ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats increased expression of neurogenic and the Wnt pathway genes in the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region. It suppressed the glial cell activation, improved antioxidant status, increased NSC/neuroblast population and rescued the DAergic neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats decreased GSK-3β activation and increased nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Functional deficits were restored following ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats as demonstrated by improved motor coordination and rotational behaviour, confirming protection of DAergic innervations in lesioned striatum. These results indicate that ALCAR exerts neuroprotective effects through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, suggesting its therapeutic use to treat neurodegenerative diseases by enhancing regenerative capacity. PMID:26223802

  18. The P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G attenuates contralateral rotations in a rat model of Parkinsonism through a combined control of synaptotoxicity, neurotoxicity and gliosis.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marta R S; Menezes, Ana Paula F; Nunes, Ana Carla L; Pliássova, Anna; Rolo, Anabela P; Palmeira, Carlos M; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Canas, Paula M; Andrade, Geanne M

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) involves an initial loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals evolving into a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), which can be modeled by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration. Since ATP is a danger signal acting through its P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), we now tested if a blood-brain barrier-permeable P2X7R antagonist, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), controlled the 6-OHDA-induced PD-like features in rats. BBG (45 mg/kg) attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced: 1) increase of contralateral rotations in the apomorphine test, an effect mimicked by another P2X7R antagonist A438079 applied intra-cerebroventricularly; 2) short-term memory impairment in the passive avoidance and cued version of the Morris Water maze; 3) reduction of dopamine content in the striatum and SN; 4) microgliosis and astrogliosis in the striatum. To grasp the mechanism of action of BBG, we used in vitro models exploring synaptotoxicity (striatal synaptosomes) and neurotoxicity (dopamine-differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells). P2X7R were present in striatal dopaminergic terminals, and BBG (100 nM) prevented the 6-OHDA-induced synaptosomal dysfunction. P2X7R were also co-localized with tyrosine hydroxylase in SH-SY5Y cells, where BBG (100 nM) attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. This suggests that P2X7R contribute to PD pathogenesis through a triple impact on synaptotoxicity, gliosis and neurotoxicity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of P2X7R antagonists in PD. PMID:24508709

  19. Hyperactivity and hypoactivity produced by lesions to the mesolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Koob, G F; Stinus, L; Le Moal, M

    1981-11-01

    Spontaneous locomotor activity and the locomotor response to amphetamine and apomorphine were studied in rats subjected to either radiofrequency (RF), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or both RF and 6-OHDA lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. Large 6-OHDA lesions of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or of the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.) produced hypo-activity in the open field, a complete blockade of the locomotor stimulating effects of D-amphetamine and a profound supersensitive response to apomorphine as measured by a significant increase in locomotor activity as compared to sham-operated animals. In contrast, smaller 6-OHDA lesions of the VTA produced significant increases in spontaneous daytime and nocturnal activity with the biggest effect occurring at the lowest dose. RF lesions to the VTA produced even greater hyperactivity which was blocked by the addition of a 6-OHDA lesion to the N.Acc. The rats with RF lesions to VTA alone that were spontaneously hyperactive remained hyperactive after injection of amphetamine, whereas apomorphine produced a significant decrease in this hyperactivity. In contrast, the rats with the combined RF lesion and N.Acc. 6-OHDA lesion showed a blockade of the locomotor stimulating effects of D-amphetamine and a potentiated response to apomorphine identical to that observed with a N.Acc. lesion alone. All lesion groups revealed massive depletion of DA in the N.Acc. and anterior striatum with significantly greater depletions in those groups showing hypoactivity and hypo-responsiveness to amphetamine. All groups except the N.Acc. 6-OHDA alone group showed significant depletions of DA in the posterior striatum. Thus, limited destruction of the mesolimbic DA system can produce hyperactivity, but more extensive destruction of this system in the region of the N.Acc. and anterior striatum can reverse this hyperactivity and produce a hypo-responsiveness to the locomotor stimulating effects of amphetamine. These results suggest an

  20. Modulation of Corpus Striatal Neurochemistry by Astrocytes and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Yelkenli, İbrahim Halil; Ulupinar, Emel; Korkmaz, Orhan Tansel; Şener, Erol; Kuş, Gökhan; Filiz, Zeynep; Tunçel, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In various neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes play direct, active, and critical roles in mediating neuronal survival and functions. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has neurotrophic actions and modulates a number of astrocytic activities. In this study, the effects of VIP on the striatal neurochemistry were investigated in parkinsonian rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operated, unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned, and lesioned + VIP-administered (25 ng/kg i.p.) groups. VIP was first injected 1 h after the intrastriatal 6-OHDA microinjection and then every 2 days throughout 15 days. Extracellular striatal concentration of glutathione (GSH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (GLU), and lactate were measured in microdialysates by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantification of GABA and activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-expressing cells were determined by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)/ADNP + glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that a 6-OHDA lesion significantly increased the density of astrocytes in the striatum and VIP treatment slightly reduced the gliosis. Extracellular concentration of GABA, GLU, and lactate levels did not change, but GSH level significantly increased in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. VIP treatment reduced GSH level comparable to sham-operated groups, but enhanced GABA and GLU levels. Our double labeling results showed that VIP primarily acts on neurons to increase ADNP and GAD expression for protection. These results suggest that, in the 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration model, astrocytes were possibly activated for forefront defensiveness by modulating striatal neurochemistry. PMID:27115671

  1. Daphnane Diterpenes from Daphne genkwa Activate Nurr1 and Have a Neuroprotective Effect in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Baek-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Yu Jin; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Kang, Young-Mi; Lee, Kyu-Suk; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Won-Gon

    2016-06-24

    Nurr1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that is essential for the differentiation and maintenance of dopaminergic neurons in the brain, and it is a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD). During the screening for Nurr1 activators from natural sources using cell-based assay systems, a methanol extract of the combined stems and roots of Daphne genkwa was found to activate the transcriptional function of Nurr1 at a concentration of 3 μg/mL. The active components were isolated and identified as genkwanine N (1) and yuanhuacin (2). Both compounds 1 and 2 significantly enhanced the function of Nurr1 at 0.3 μM. Nurr1-specific siRNA abolished the activity of 1 and 2, strongly suggesting that transcriptional activation by 1 and 2 occurred through the modulation of Nurr1 function. Additionally, treatment with 1 and 2 inhibited 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neuronal cell death and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. Moreover, in a 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD, intraperitoneal administration of 2 (0.5 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks significantly improved behavioral deficits and reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic neuron death induced by 6-OHDA injection and had a beneficial effect on the inflammatory response in the brain. Accordingly, compounds 1 and 2, the first reported Nurr1 activators of natural origin, are potential lead compounds for the treatment of PD. PMID:27228307

  2. Autoradiography of dopamine receptors and dopamine uptake sites in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kujirai, K.; Przedborski, S.; Kostic, V.; Jackson-Lewis, V.; Fahn, S.; Cadet, J.L. )

    1990-11-01

    We examined the status of dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors by using (3H)SCH 23390 and (3H)spiperone binding, respectively, and DA uptake sites by using (3H)mazindol binding in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. SHR showed significantly higher (3H)SCH 23390 and (3H)spiperone binding in the caudate-putamen (CPu), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the olfactory tubercle (OT) in comparison to the SD rats. There were no significant differences in (3H)mazindol-labeled DA uptake sites between the two strains. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection into the striatum resulted in more than 90% depletion of DA uptake sites in the CPu in both strains. 6-OHDA-induced DA depletion was associated with significant increases in striatal (3H)spiperone binding which were of similar magnitude in the SD rats (+64.1%) and SHR (+51.3%). There were only small decreases (-5.4%) in D1 receptor binding in the dorsolateral aspect of the CPu in the SHR, whereas there were no changes in striatal D1 receptors in the SD rats. These results indicate that, although the SHR have higher concentrations of both D1 and D2 receptors in the basal ganglia, these receptors are regulated in a fashion similar to DA receptors in SD rats after 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion.

  3. MicroRNA-124 loaded nanoparticles enhance brain repair in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, C; Paiva, J; Santos, T; Ferreira, L; Bernardino, L

    2016-08-10

    Modulation of the subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenic niche can enhance brain repair in several disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). Herein, we used biocompatible and traceable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) containing perfluoro-1,5-crown ether (PFCE) and coated with protamine sulfate to complex microRNA-124 (miR-124), a neuronal fate determinant. The ability of NPs to efficiently deliver miR-124 and prompt SVZ neurogenesis and brain repair in PD was evaluated. In vitro, miR-124 NPs were efficiently internalized by neural stem/progenitors cells and neuroblasts and promoted their neuronal commitment and maturation. The expression of Sox9 and Jagged1, two miR-124 targets and stemness-related genes, were also decreased upon miR-124 NP treatment. In vivo, the intracerebral administration of miR-124 NPs increased the number of migrating neuroblasts that reached the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb, both in healthy and in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model for PD. MiR-124 NPs were also able to induce migration of neurons into the lesioned striatum of 6-OHDA-treated mice. Most importantly, miR-124 NPs proved to ameliorate motor symptoms of 6-OHDA mice, monitored by the apomorphine-induced rotation test. Altogether, we provide clear evidences to support the use of miR-124 NPs as a new therapeutic approach to boost endogenous brain repair mechanisms in a setting of neurodegeneration. PMID:27269730

  4. Induction of Pi form of glutathione S-transferase by carnosic acid is mediated through PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway and protects against neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Jing-Hsien; Fu, Ru-Huei; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2014-11-17

    Carnosic acid (CA), a diterpene found in the rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), has been reported to have a neuroprotective effect. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) P (GSTP) is a phase II detoxifying enzyme that provides a neuroprotective effect. The aim of this study was to explore whether the neuroprotective effect of CA is via an upregulation of GSTP expression and the possible signaling pathways involved. SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with 1 μM CA followed by treatment with 100 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Both immunoblotting and enzyme activity results show that CA also induced protein expression and enzyme activity of GSTP. Moreover, CA significantly increased the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, the nuclear translocation of p65, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with LY294002 (a PI3K/Akt inhibitor) suppressed the CA-induced phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα, p65 nuclear translocation, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-DNA binding activity as well as GSTP protein expression. Furthermore, CA attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase 3 activation, and cell death was reversed by GSTP siRNA or LY294002 treatment. Additionally, male Wistar rats with lesions induced by 6-OHDA treatment in the right striatum responded to treatment with CA, which significantly reversed the reduction in GSTP protein expression that resulted from lesioning. We suggest that CA prevents 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis through an increase in GSTP expression via activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway. Therefore, CA may be a promising candidate for use in the prevention of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25271104

  5. Differential pattern of motor impairments in neurotoxic, environmental and inflammation-driven rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Carol; Moriarty, Niamh; Feehan, Jennifer; O'Toole, Daniel; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-01-01

    One of the reasons proposed for the paucity of drug discovery for Parkinson's disease is the lack of relevant animal models of the condition. Parkinson's disease has been modelled extensively using the selective neurotoxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). However, as this model bears little etiological resemblance to the human condition, there has been a drive to develop models with improved etiological validity. Two such models are those induced by the pesticide, rotenone, and the inflammagen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, to date, these models have been poorly characterised in terms of their motor profiles and have never been directly compared to the more established models. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterise the behavioural profile of the rotenone and LPS models, and to compare them with the 6-OHDA model. Animals underwent baseline testing on the Stepping, Whisker, Corridor and Cylinder Tests of motor function. They were then grouped for unilateral intra-striatal infusion of 6-OHDA, rotenone or LPS. Motor testing continued for ten weeks after which the rats were processed for immunohistochemical analysis of nigrostriatal integrity. We found that, although all neurotoxins induced a similar level of nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, neither the rotenone nor LPS models were associated with amphetamine-induced rotation, and they were associated with significantly less pronounced and stable impairments in the spontaneous tasks than the 6-OHDA model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates key differences in the pattern of motor dysfunction induced by Parkinsonian neurotoxins which should be taken into consideration when selecting the most appropriate model for Parkinson's disease preclinical studies. PMID:26393432

  6. Intracranial application of near-infrared light in a hemi-parkinsonian rat model: the impact on behavior and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Florian; Massri, Nabil El; Chabrol, Claude; Cretallaz, Celine; Johnstone, Daniel M; Torres, Napoleon; Darlot, Fannie; Costecalde, Thomas; Stone, Jonathan; Mitrofanis, John; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Moro, Cécile

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The authors of this study used a newly developed intracranial optical fiber device to deliver near-infrared light (NIr) to the midbrain of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, a model of Parkinson's disease. The authors explored whether NIr had any impact on apomorphine-induced turning behavior and whether it was neuroprotective. METHODS Two NIr powers (333 nW and 0.16 mW), modes of delivery (pulse and continuous), and total doses (634 mJ and 304 J) were tested, together with the feasibility of a midbrain implant site, one considered for later use in primates. Following a striatal 6-OHDA injection, the NIr optical fiber device was implanted surgically into the midline midbrain area of Wistar rats. Animals were tested for apomorphine-induced rotations, and then, 23 days later, their brains were aldehyde fixed for routine immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS The results showed that there was no evidence of tissue toxicity by NIr in the midbrain. After 6-OHDA lesion, regardless of mode of delivery or total dose, NIr reduced apomorphine-induced rotations at the stronger, but not at the weaker, power. The authors found that neuroprotection, as assessed by tyrosine hydroxylase expression in midbrain dopaminergic cells, could account for some, but not all, of the observed behavioral improvements; the groups that were associated with fewer rotations did not all necessarily have a greater number of surviving cells. There may have been other "symptomatic" elements contributing to behavioral improvements in these rats. CONCLUSIONS In summary, when delivered at the appropriate power, delivery mode, and dosage, NIr treatment provided both improved behavior and neuroprotection in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. PMID:26613166

  7. CX3CR1 Disruption Differentially Influences Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration in Parkinsonian Mice Depending on the Neurotoxin and Route of Administration.

    PubMed

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Lazzarini, Márcio; Martin, Sabine; Amar, Majid; Stühmer, Walter; Kirchhoff, Frank; Gomes, Lucas Araújo Caldi; Lanfumey, Laurance; Prediger, Rui D; Sepulveda, Julia E; Del-Bel, Elaine A; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons accompanied by an inflammatory reaction. The neuron-derived chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) is an exclusive ligand for the receptor CX3CR1 expressed on microglia. The CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling is important for sustaining microglial activity. Using a recently developed PD model, in which the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxin is delivered intranasally, we hypothesized that CX3CR1 could play a role in neurotoxicity and glial activation. For this, we used CX3CR1 knock-in mice and compared results with those obtained using the classical PD models through intraperitonal MPTP or intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The striatum from all genotypes (CX3CR1(+/+), CX3CR1(+/GFP) and CX3CR1-deficient mice) showed a significant dopaminergic depletion after intranasal MPTP inoculation. In contrast to that, we could not see differences in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of CX3CR1-deficient animals. Similarly, after 6-OHDA infusion, the CX3CR1 deletion decreased the amphetamine-induced turning behavior observed in CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice. After the 6-OHDA inoculation, a minor dopaminergic neuronal loss was observed in the substantia nigra from CX3CR1-deficient mice. Distinctly, a more extensive neuronal cell loss was observed in the substantia nigra after the intraperitoneal MPTP injection in CX3CR1 disrupted animals, corroborating previous results. Intranasal and intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation induced a similar microgliosis in CX3CR1-deficient mice but a dissimilar change in the astrocyte proliferation in the substantia nigra. Nigral astrocyte proliferation was observed only after intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation. In conclusion, intranasal MPTP and 6-OHDA lesion in CX3CR1-deficient mice yield no nigral dopaminergic neuron loss, linked to the absence of astroglial proliferation. PMID:26403659

  8. Novel Food Supplement "CP1" Improves Motor Deficit, Cognitive Function, and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2016-08-01

    Based on pivotal roles of oxidative stress, dopaminergic and cholinergic systems on the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), the searching for functional food for patients attacked with PD from Cyperus rotundus and Zingiber officinale, the substances possessing antioxidant activity, and the suppression effects on monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) have been considered. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of the combined extract of C. rotundus and Z. officinale (CP1) to improve motor and memory deficits, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in the animal model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine hydrochloride (6-OHDA). Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantia nigra by 6-OHDA and were orally given CP1 at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight for 14 days after 6-OHDA injection. The results showed that the 6-OHDA rats treated with CP1 increased spatial memory, but decreased neurodegeneration, malondialdehyde level, and AChE activity in hippocampus. The decreased motor disorder and neurodegeneration in substantia nigra together with the enhanced catalase activity, but decreased MAO-B activity in striatum, were also observed. The memory enhancing effect of CP1 might occur through the improved oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function, whereas the effect to improve motor disorder of CP1 might occur through the enhanced dopaminergic function in striatum by decreasing the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the suppression of MAO-B. Therefore, CP1 is the potential functional food against PD. However, further researches in clinical trial and drug interactions are essential. PMID:26414358

  9. Buspirone requires the intact nigrostriatal pathway to reduce the activity of the subthalamic nucleus via 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagarduy, A; Llorente, J; Miguelez, C; Morera-Herreras, T; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Ugedo, L

    2016-03-01

    The most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), l-DOPA, induces dyskinesia after prolonged use. We have previously shown that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by prolonged l-DOPA administration, lesion of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) reduces not only dyskinesias but also buspirone antidyskinetic effect. This study examined the effect of buspirone on STN neuron activity. Cell-attached recordings in parasagittal slices from naïve rats showed that whilst serotonin excited the majority of STN neurons, buspirone showed an inhibitory main effect but only in 27% of the studied cells which was prevented by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist WAY-100635. Conversely, single-unit extracellular recordings were performed in vivo on STN neurons from four different groups, i.e., control, chronically treated with l-DOPA, 6-OHDA lesioned and lesioned treated with l-DOPA (dyskinetic) rats. In control animals, systemic-buspirone administration decreased the firing rate in a dose-dependent manner in every cell studied. This effect, prevented by WAY-100635, was absent in 6-OHDA lesioned rats and was not modified by prolonged l-DOPA administration. Altogether, buspirone in vivo reduces consistently the firing rate of the STN neurons through 5-HT1A receptors whereas ex vivo buspirone seems to affect only a small population of STN neurons. Furthermore, the lack of effect of buspirone in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, suggests the requirement of not only the activation of 5-HT1A receptors but also an intact nigrostriatal pathway for buspirone to inhibit the STN activity. PMID:26687972

  10. The neurobehavioral effects of subchronic manganese exposure in the presence and absence of pre-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Witholt, R; Gwiazda, R H; Smith, D R

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated chronic elevated exposures to environmental agents, such as metals (e.g., manganese, Mn) and pesticides, as contributors to neurological disease. In particular, there is a concern that sensitive subpopulations such as the aged may be at increased risk for the onset of neurologic disorders because elevated exposures to Mn is associated with increased incidence of parkinsonism. Here, we utilized a rat model of pre-parkinsonism to investigate the effects of Mn exposure on neurotoxicity and the exacerbation of parkinsonism. A pre-parkinsonism state was induced using a unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), followed 4 weeks later by Mn exposure (4.8 mg Mn/kgx3 intraperitoneal injections/week) for 5 weeks. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=44) were divided among the following treatments: (A) control, saline/vehicle; (B) Mn only; (C) 6-OHDA only; and (D) 6-OHDA+Mn. Brain Mn levels were measured by ICP-MS. Neurobehavioral function was assessed following Mn exposure using a functional observational battery (FOB) consisting of 10 neurobehavioral tests. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions produced significant ipsilateral vs. contralateral striatal dopamine depletions (60-70%), but no measurable impairment of neurobehavioral function, thereby substantiating this pre-parkinsonism (i.e., subthreshold) model. In contrast, Mn exposure resulted in significant impairment of neurobehavioral function for eight of the 10 FOB tests. No effects of Mn exposure on striatal dopamine depletion were detected, despite the 3.4-fold increase in brain Mn levels over controls. Notably, Mn exposure in the presence of a pre-parkinsonism state significantly exacerbated the neurobehavioral impairment in the reactivity to handling (P<.049) and hopping contralateral rear limb (P<.033) FOB tests. While the persistence and Mn dose-response relationship of these neurobehavioral effects were not evaluated here, these results nonetheless suggest that chronic Mn

  11. Adult neurogenesis restores dopaminergic neuronal loss in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, Françoise; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; Moigneu, Carine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-22

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis continuously provides new GABA- and dopamine (DA)-containing interneurons for the olfactory bulb (OB) in most adult mammals. DAergic interneurons are located in the glomerular layer (GL) where they participate in the processing of sensory inputs. To examine whether adult neurogenesis might contribute to regeneration after circuit injury in mice, we induce DAergic neuronal loss by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal GL or in the right substantia nigra pars compacta. We found that a 6-OHDA treatment of the OB produces olfactory deficits and local inflammation and partially decreases the number of neurons expressing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) near the injected site. Blockade of inflammation by minocycline treatment immediately after the 6-OHDA administration rescued neither TH(+) interneuron number nor the olfactory deficits, suggesting that the olfactory impairments are most likely linked to TH(+) cell death and not to microglial activation. TH(+) interneuron number was restored 1 month later. This rescue resulted at least in part from enhanced recruitment of immature neurons targeting the lesioned GL area. Seven days after 6-OHDA lesion in the OB, we found that the integration of lentivirus-labeled adult-born neurons was biased: newly formed neurons were preferentially incorporated into glomerular circuits of the lesioned area. Behavioral rehabilitation occurs 2 months after lesion. This study establishes a new model into which loss of DAergic cells could be compensated by recruiting newly formed neurons. We propose that adult neurogenesis not only replenishes the population of DAergic bulbar neurons but that it also restores olfactory sensory processing. PMID:25339754

  12. Depletion of nucleus accumbens dopamine leads to impaired reward and aversion processing in mice: Relevance to motivation pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Giorgio; Sigrist, Hannes; Ferger, Boris; Singewald, Nicolas; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, particularly the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens (VTA-NAcc) projection, underlies reward and aversion processing, and deficient DA function could underlie motivational impairments in psychiatric disorders. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection is an established method for chronic DA depletion, principally applied in rat to study NAcc DA regulation of reward motivation. Given the increasing focus on studying environmental and genetic regulation of DA function in mouse models, it is important to establish the effects of 6-OHDA DA depletion in mice, in terms of reward and aversion processing. This mouse study investigated effects of 6-OHDA-induced NAcc DA depletion using the operant behavioural test battery of progressive ratio schedule (PRS), learned non-reward (LNR), learned helplessness (LH), treadmill, and in addition Pavlovian fear conditioning. 6-OHDA NAcc DA depletion, confirmed by ex vivo HPLC-ED, reduced operant responding: for gustatory reward under effortful conditions in the PRS test; to a stimulus recently associated with gustatory non-reward in the LNR test; to escape footshock recently experienced as uncontrollable in the LH test; and to avoid footshock by physical effort in the treadmill test. Evidence for specificity of effects to NAcc DA was provided by lack of effect of medial prefrontal cortex DA depletion in the LNR and LH tests. These findings add significantly to the evidence that NAcc DA is a major regulator of behavioural responding, particularly at the motivational level, to both reward and aversion. They demonstrate the suitability of mouse models for translational study of causation and reversal of pathophysiological DA function underlying motivation psychopathologies. PMID:27036890

  13. Low Concentrations of Methamphetamine Can Protect Dopaminergic Cells against a Larger Oxidative Stress Injury: Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    El Ayadi, Amina; Zigmond, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Mild stress can protect against a larger insult, a phenomenon termed preconditioning or tolerance. To determine if a low intensity stressor could also protect cells against intense oxidative stress in a model of dopamine deficiency associated with Parkinson disease, we used methamphetamine to provide a mild, preconditioning stress, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) as a source of potentially toxic oxidative stress, and MN9D cells as a model of dopamine neurons. We observed that prior exposure to subtoxic concentrations of methamphetamine protected these cells against 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas higher concentrations of methamphetamine exacerbated it. The protection by methamphetamine was accompanied by decreased uptake of both [3H] dopamine and 6-OHDA into the cells, which may have accounted for some of the apparent protection. However, a number of other effects of methamphetamine exposure suggest that the drug also affected basic cellular survival mechanisms. First, although methamphetamine preconditioning decreased basal pERK1/2 and pAkt levels, it enhanced the 6-OHDA-induced increase in these phosphokinases. Second, the apparent increase in pERK1/2 activity was accompanied by increased pMEK1/2 levels and decreased activity of protein phosphatase 2. Third, methamphetamine upregulated the pro-survival protein Bcl-2. Our results suggest that exposure to low concentrations of methamphetamine cause a number of changes in dopamine cells, some of which result in a decrease in their vulnerability to subsequent oxidative stress. These observations may provide insights into the development of new therapies for prevention or treatment of PD. PMID:22022363

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF SEROTONERGIC AND ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD: EFFECTS OF NEONATAL CHEMICAL LESIONS AND HYPERTHYROIDISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ontogeny of serotonergic receptors and alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in thoracolumbar spinal cord of rats given neurotoxins which destroy serotonergic (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or noradrenergic (6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)) nerve terminals was examined. Intraci...

  15. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Mee Ree

    2016-08-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  16. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung

    2016-01-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  17. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Roy, Partha Deb; Kannan, Elango; Antony, A. Shanish; Kumar, M. N. Satish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE) was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg). Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative control, positive control (levodopa 6 mg/kg) and two experimental groups (n = 6/group). Experimental groups received 200 and 400 mg/kg of TCEE once daily for 30 days by oral gavage. Biochemical parameters including dopamine level, oxidative stress, complex I activity and brain iron asymmetry ratio and locomotor activity including skeletal muscle co-ordination and degree of catatonia were assessed. Results: TCEE exhibited significant neuroprotection by increasing the dopamine levels (1.96 ± 0.20 and 2.45 ± 0.40 ng/mg of protein) and complex I activity (77.14 ± 0.89 and 78.50 ± 0.96 nmol/min/mg of protein) at 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively when compared with negative control group. Iron asymmetry ratio was also significantly attenuated by TCEE at 200 (1.57 ± 0.18) and 400 mg/kg (1.11 ± 0.15) when compared with negative control group. Neuroprotection by TCEE was further supported by reduced oxidative stress and restored locomotor activity in treatment groups. Conclusion: Results show that TCEE possess significant neuroprotection in 6-OHDA induced PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons and reducing the iron accumulation. PMID:24741189

  18. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound selectively antagonizes MPP⁺, but not rotenone, neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Wong, Ngok-Shun; Sze, Cho-Wing; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Wai; Tong, Yao; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2012-07-11

    Chrysotoxine is a naturally occurring bibenzyl compound found in medicinal Dendrobium species. We previously reported that chrysotoxine structure-specifically suppressed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced dopaminergic cell death. Whether chrysotoxine and other structurally similar bibenzyl compounds could also inhibit the neurotoxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+)) and rotenone has not been investigated. We showed herein that chrysotoxine inhibited MPP(+), but not rotenone, induced dopaminergic cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction as indexed by the decrease in membrane potential, increase in calcium concentration and NF-κB activation triggered by MPP(+) were blocked by chrysotoxine pretreatment. The imbalance between the pro-apoptotic signals (Bax, caspase-3, ERK and p38 MAPK) and the pro-survival signals (Akt/PI3K/GSK-3β) induced by MPP(+) was partially or totally rectified by chrysotoxine. The results indicated that ROS inhibition, mitochondria protection, NF-κB modulation and regulation of multiple signals determining cell survival and cell death were involved in the protective effects of chrysotoxine against MPP(+) toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Given the different toxic profiles of 6-OHDA and MPP(+) as compared to rotenone, our results also indicated that DAT inhibition may partially account for the neuroprotective effects of chrysotoxine. PMID:22659498

  19. Pramipexole- and methamphetamine-induced reward-mediated behavior in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease and controls.

    PubMed

    Riddle, J L; Rokosik, S L; Napier, T C

    2012-07-15

    Pramipexole (PPX) is a dopamine agonist that is FDA-approved for treatment of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and restless leg syndrome. In a subpopulation of treated patients, PPX can lead to impulsive-compulsive disorders including behavioral addictions and dopamine dysregulation syndrome, a phenomenon that mirrors drug addiction. Regardless of this clinical picture, the capacity of PPX to regulate reward-mediated behaviors remains unclear and has not been evaluated in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. To fill this gap, we examined the rewarding potential of PPX in parkinsonian-like rats using conditioned place preference (CPP) and also evaluated associated motor behaviors. Methamphetamine (meth) and saline served as positive and negative controls, respectively. To model Parkinson's disease, the neurotoxin 6-OHDA was injected bilaterally into the dorsolateral striatum. The resulting lesions were verified functionally using a forelimb adjusting step and post mortem immunohistochemical staining of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase. Three pairings of meth (1mg/kg, ip), paired with a unique context, induced CPP in both 6-OHDA-treated and sham-operated rats; saline pairings had no effect. Three pairings of (±)PPX at 2mg/kg ip (equal to 1mg/kg of the active racimer) induced CPP in 6-OHDA-treated rats, but a higher dose (4 mg/kg, ip (±)PPX) was needed to induce CPP in sham rats. In all rats, acute administration of 2mg/kg (±)PPX decreased locomotor activity; the behavior was normalized by the third (±)PPX administration. In summary, these findings reveal that (±)PPX has motor and rewarding effects and suggest the parkinsonian brain state may be more sensitive to the rewarding, but not motoric effects. PMID:22727039

  20. Heat shock protein 60 affects behavioral improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease grafted with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-derived dopaminergic-like neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Can; Li, Hui; Zhao, Xian-Jing; Liu, Zheng-Xia; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Ying; Feng, Mei-Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in mesencephalic substantia nigra (SN). Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages, including DAergic neurons. Thus, hUC-MSCs could be a promising alternative to compensate for the loss of DAergic neurons in PD. In the current study, hUC-MSCs and hUC-MSCs-derived DAergic-like neurons were transplanted into the striatum and SN of a rat model of PD that is induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We evaluated their therapeutic effects on improving rotation behavior in the rat and on modulating the level of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) expression in the brain. After transplantation, an amelioration of rotation behavior was observed in rats that underwent cell grafting, and hUC-MSCs-derived DAergic-like neurons were superior to hUC-MSCs at inducing behavioral improvement. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis indicated significantly elevated levels of Hsp60 in cell-grafted rats compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned (PD) rats. These results demonstrate that hUC-MSCs-based cell transplantation is potential therapeutic treatment for PD, and hUC-MSCs-derived DAergic-like neurons appear to be favorable candidates for cell replacement therapy in PD. Finally, Hsp60 could be involved in a mechanism of behavioral recovery. PMID:26758268

  1. Chronic Amitriptyline Treatment Attenuates Nigrostriatal Degeneration and Significantly Alters Trophic Support in a Rat Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Paumier, Katrina L; Sortwell, Caryl E; Madhavan, Lalitha; Terpstra, Brian; Celano, Stephanie L; Green, Joshua J; Imus, Nastassja M; Marckini, Nathan; Daley, Brian; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    In addition to alleviating depression, long-term adaptive changes induced by antidepressants may regulate neural plasticity in the diseased brain, providing symptomatic and disease-modifying effects in Parkinson's disease. The present study investigated whether chronic treatment with a frequently prescribed tricyclic antidepressant was neuroprotective in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of parkinsonism. In lesioned animals, chronic amitriptyline (AMI; 5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in a significant sparing of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) compared with saline treatment. Additionally, striatal fibers were preserved and functional motor deficits were attenuated. Although 6-OHDA lesions did not induce anhedonia in our model, the dose of AMI utilized had antidepressant activity as demonstrated by reduced immobility. Recent in vitro and in vivo data provide evidence that trophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) may be key mediators of the therapeutic response to antidepressants. Therefore, we investigated whether AMI mediates changes in these specific trophic factors in the intact and degenerating nigrostriatal system. Chronic AMI treatment mediates an increase in nigral BDNF both before and during ongoing degeneration, suggesting it may contribute to neuroprotection observed in vivo. However, over time, AMI reduced BDNF levels in the striatum, indicating tricyclic therapy differentially regulates trophic factors within the nigrostriatal system. Combined, these results suggest that AMI treatment attenuates dopamine neuron loss and elicits significant trophic changes relevant to dopamine neuron survival. PMID:25267343

  2. Reduced dopamine function within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens enhances latent inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, A.J.D.; Thur, K.E.; Horsley, R.R.; Spicer, C.; Marsden, C.A.; Cassaday, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a CS that has previously been presented without consequence. There is some evidence that LI can be potentiated by reduced mesoaccumbal dopamine (DA) function but the locus within the nucleus accumbens of this effect is as yet not firmly established. Experiment 1 tested whether 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of DA terminals within the core and medial shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) would enhance LI under conditions that normally disrupt LI in controls (weak pre-exposure). LI was measured in a thirst motivated conditioned emotional response procedure with 10 pre-exposures (to a noise CS) and 2 conditioning trials. The vehicle-injected and core-lesioned animals did not show LI and conditioned to the pre-exposed CS at comparable levels to the non-pre-exposed controls. 6-OHDA lesions to the medial shell, however, produced potentiation of LI, demonstrated across two extinction tests. In a subsequent experiment, haloperidol microinjected into the medial shell prior to conditioning similarly enhanced LI. These results underscore the dissociable roles of core and shell subregions of the NAc in mediating the expression of LI and indicate that reduced DA function within the medial shell leads to enhanced LI. PMID:21146557

  3. Transplants of neurosphere cell suspensions from aged mice are functional in the mouse model of Parkinson's.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Kelly K; Kirkham, David L; Doering, Laurie C

    2005-09-28

    Neural stem cell therapy has the potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For Parkinson's disease (PD), the goal is to enhance the dopamine system sufficiently to restore the control of movement and motor activities. In consideration of autologous stem cell therapy for PD, it will be necessary to propagate the cells in most cases from aged brain tissue. We isolated cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) in the brains of 1-year-old enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice and generated neurospheres in culture. Neurospheres yielding high numbers of neurons and astrocytes "de novo" were selected and cryopreserved before evaluating the efficacy of neurosphere cell suspensions transplanted to the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. In mice unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA, transplants of neurosphere cell suspensions to the striatum yielded astrocytes and tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons that reduced or reversed the drug-induced behavioral circling response to amphetamine and apomorphine. Control mice without the cell suspensions showed no change in the motor behavior. Our results indicate that the SVZ in the aged mouse brain contains cells that can be expanded in the form of neurospheres, cryopreserved, re-expanded and then transplanted into the damaged dopamine system to generate functional cell progeny that offset the motor disturbances in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:16140285

  4. Facile and rapid generation of 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels for high-throughput drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Obregón, Raquel; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-09-15

    We propose a novel application of dielectrophoresis (DEP) to make three-dimensional (3D) methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels with gradients of micro- and nanoparticles. DEP forces were able to manipulate micro- and nanoparticles of different sizes and materials (i.e., C2C12 myoblasts, polystyrene beads, gold microparticles, and carbon nanotubes) within GelMA hydrogels in a rapid and facile way and create 3D gradients of these particles in a microchamber. Immobilization of drugs, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), on gold microparticles allowed us to investigate the high-throughput release of these drugs from GelMA-gold microparticle gradient systems. The latter gradient constructs were incubated with C2C12 myoblasts for 24h to examine the cell viability through the release of 6-OHDA. The drug was released from the microparticles in a gradient manner, inducing a cell viability gradient. This novel approach to create 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels is scalable to any arbitrary length scale. It is useful for making anisotropic biomimetic materials and high-throughput platforms to investigate cell-microenvironment interactions in a rapid, simple, cost-effective, and reproducible manner. PMID:24727602

  5. Enhanced function in the good forelimb of hemi-parkinson rats: Compensatory adaptation for contralateral postural instability?

    PubMed Central

    Woodlee, Martin T.; Kane, Jacqueline R.; Chang, Jitsen; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present two new assays of rat motor behavior which can be used to assess function linked to postural stability in each forelimb independently. Postural instability is a major deficit in Parkinson's disease that is resistant to levodopa therapy and contributes to the risk of falling. We applied both tests, one forelimb at a time, to normal rats as well as rats extensively depleted of dopamine by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, given in the medial forebrain bundle) to produce a hemi-parkinsonian syndrome. The 6-OHDA rats showed severe postural instability in the impaired forelimb, but unexpectedly showed enhanced function in the non-impaired forelimb. The data suggest that the intact hemisphere may undergo rapid reorganization subsequent to unilateral dopamine depletion, which allows for compensatory function of the “intact” limb. Measurements of amphetamine-induced striatal c-fos expression, as well as behavior results gathered when animals were under the influence of apomorphine or haloperidol, indicate that this potential reorganization may require non-dopaminergic neural plasticity. The relevance of these findings for unilateral rat models of neurological disease is discussed. PMID:18417125

  6. Exposure to Mitochondrial Genotoxins and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bodhicharla, Rakesh K.; McKeever, Madeline G.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Margillo, Kathleen M.; Ryde, Ian T.; Cyr, Derek D.; Kosmaczewski, Sara G.; Hammarlund, Marc; Meyer, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration has been correlated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and exposure to environmental toxins, but causation is unclear. We investigated the ability of several known environmental genotoxins and neurotoxins to cause mtDNA damage, mtDNA depletion, and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that paraquat, cadmium chloride and aflatoxin B1 caused more mitochondrial than nuclear DNA damage, and paraquat and aflatoxin B1 also caused dopaminergic neurodegeneration. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) caused similar levels of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage. To further test whether the neurodegeneration could be attributed to the observed mtDNA damage, C. elegans were exposed to repeated low-dose ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) that resulted in persistent mtDNA damage; this exposure also resulted in dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Damage to GABAergic neurons and pharyngeal muscle cells was not detected. We also found that fasting at the first larval stage was protective in dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration. Finally, we found that dopaminergic neurons in C. elegans are capable of regeneration after laser surgery. Our findings are consistent with a causal role for mitochondrial DNA damage in neurodegeneration, but also support non mtDNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:25486066

  7. The Chemical Molecule B355252 is Neuroprotective in an In Vitro Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gliyazova, Nailya S; Ibeanu, Gordon C

    2016-10-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin frequently used to create in vitro and in vivo experimental models of Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder largely resulting from damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. No effective drugs or therapies have been developed for this devastating disorder, and current regimens of symptomatic therapeutics only alleviate symptoms temporarily. Therefore, effective treatments that reverse or cure this disorder are urgently needed. The aim of the study described in this report was to investigate the therapeutic impact of B355252, an aryl thiophene sulfonamide chemical entity, in the widely recognized in vitro model of PD, and to characterize the molecular signaling pathways. We show here that 6-OHDA-induced cell death in HT22, a murine neuronal cell model, through a pathway that involves the mitochondria by increasing the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), raising intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), enhancing the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and promoting activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signaling pathway. More importantly, we found that B355252 protected HT22 neurons against 6-OHDA toxin-induced neuronal cell death by significant attenuation of ROS production, blocking of mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of cytochrome c release, sequestration of [Ca(2+)]i, modulation of JNK cascade, and strong inhibition of caspase 3/7 cleavage. Overall, this study demonstrates that death of neurons under toxic conditions characteristic of PD can be efficiently halted by B355252 and suggests that further development of the molecule could be potentially beneficial as a therapeutic prevention or treatment option for PD. PMID:26649727

  8. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats. PMID:25825926

  9. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  10. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  11. Investigating the role of Sirt1-modulated oxidative stress in relation to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Lee, Yi-Yen; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2015-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most frequently encountered primary complaints in dizziness clinics. The incidence of BPPV has been proven to increase with age. The relationship between BPPV and another neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), has not been previously discussed. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of BPPV and PD with oxidative stress. A total of 30,811 subjects participated in our cohort study. The study cohort comprised 5057 BPPV patients and a comparison cohort of 25,754 nonBPPV patients. SIRT1 axis gene expression was investigated in BPPV patient blood samples and a PD cell model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PC-12 cells to elucidate the potential in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of degeneration in PD and BPPV. Our data suggest that BPPV patients with histories of head injuries show a significantly higher hazard to develop subsequent PD (hazard ratio, 3.942; confidence interval, 1.523-10.205, p = 0.005). We also observed that oxidative status is increased in blood samples from patients with BPPV. Our in vitro study suggests that SIRT1 function is inhibited by oxidative stress, which thereby promotes 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with an increased risk of PD. This finding may be attributed to oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of SIRT1 expression levels. PMID:26130063

  12. Investigation of the therapeutic potential of N-acetyl cysteine and the tools used to define nigrostriatal degeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nouraei, Negin; Zarger, Lauren; Weilnau, Justin N; Han, Jimin; Mason, Daniel M; Leak, Rehana K

    2016-04-01

    The glutathione precursor N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) is currently being tested on Parkinson's patients for its neuroprotective properties. Our studies have shown that NAC can elicit protection in glutathione-independent manners in vitro. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish an animal model of NAC-mediated protection in which to dissect the underlying mechanism. Mice were infused intrastriatally with the oxidative neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 4μg) and administered NAC intraperitoneally (100mg/kg). NAC-treated animals exhibited higher levels of the dopaminergic terminal marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum 10d after 6-OHDA. As TH expression is subject to stress-induced modulation, we infused the tracer FluoroGold into the striatum to retrogradely label nigrostriatal projection neurons. As expected, nigral FluoroGold staining and cell counts of FluoroGold(+) profiles were both more sensitive measures of nigrostriatal degeneration than measurements relying on TH alone. However, NAC failed to protect dopaminergic neurons 3weeks following 6-OHDA, an effect verified by four measures: striatal TH levels, nigral TH levels, nigral TH(+) cell counts, and nigral FluoroGold levels. Some degree of mild toxicity of FluoroGold and NAC was evident, suggesting that caution must be exercised when relying on FluoroGold as a neuron-counting tool and when designing experiments with long-term delivery of NAC-such as clinical trials on patients with chronic disorders. Finally, the strengths and limitations of the tools used to define nigrostriatal degeneration are discussed. PMID:26879220

  13. Neuroprotective effects of levetiracetam target xCT in astrocytes in parkinsonian mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Torigoe, Nao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Asanuma, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes but not neurons express cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), which takes up cystine, and consequently supplies the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. It is recognized that GSH synthesis in neurons is dependent on the expression of xCT in astrocytes. Previous studies reported that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti-epileptic drug, increased xCT expression in vivo. The purpose of this study was to examine neuroprotective effects of LEV in parkinsonian models and demonstrate xCT in astrocytes as a target of neuroprotection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We identified striatal astrocytes cultured with LEV showed significant increase in xCT expression and GSH levels. Preincubation of primary cultured mesencephalic dopamine neurons with conditioned media from LEV-treated astrocytes protected against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity. These protective effects were canceled by xCT inhibitor. Furthermore, reduction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in 6-OHDA-lesioned parkinsonian mice was significantly abrogated by repeated injections of LEV. Treatment with LEV significantly increased the expression of xCT in striatal astrocytes in the hemi-parkinsonian mice. In conclusion, LEV exerts neuroprotective effects against neurodegeneration via up-regulation of xCT and GSH in astrocytes. Thus, xCT in astrocytes could be a potential target in novel neuroprotective approaches to prevent degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione (GSH) is the most potent intrinsic antioxidant. Since extracellular cysteine is readily oxidized to form cystine, cystine transport mechanisms are essential to provide cells with cysteine. Cystine uptake is mediated by cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), expressed primarily on astrocytes, but not on neurons. Astrocytes take up cystine via xCT and reduce it to cysteine to supply cysteine, the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. This study demonstrated that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti

  14. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor reduces cell apoptosis via upregulating GRP78 in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Chen, Changyan; Gu, Hua; Li, Chen; Fu, Xing; Jiang, Ming; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jun; Fang, Jianmin; Jin, Lingjing

    2016-07-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) protects dopaminergic neurons from damage. In this study, we used MTT, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL staining to investigate the protective effect of MANF in SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein. Cleaved caspase-3 levels significantly increased in cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein. 6-OHDA or α-synuclein overexpression that induced cleaved caspase-3 levels to increase was reduced by MANF treatment. In addition, MANF treatment upregulated GRP78 expressions in cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein, and RNAi knockdown for GRP78 could block the MANF induced cell survival from 6-OHDA treatment. Furthermore, GRP78 overexpression inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that MANF inhibits apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA and overexpressed α-synuclein in SH-SY5Y cells via upregulating GRP78 in the transcriptional pattern. PMID:27145383

  15. The effects of dihydropyridine compounds in behavioural tests of dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bourson, A.; Gower, A. J.; Mir, A. K.; Moser, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker nifedipine and the activator Bay K 8644 were investigated in different behavioural tests involving dopaminergic systems. These were the discriminative stimulus induced by amphetamine, rotational behaviour in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions and apomorphine-induced yawning in rats. 2. The yawning induced by apomorphine (40 micrograms kg-1 s.c.) was significantly potentiated by nifedipine (5-10 mgkg-1 i.p.). Bay K 8644 (0.05-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited yawning induced by apomorphine (80 micrograms kg-1 s.c.) and, at 0.4 mgkg-1, inhibited the nifedipine potentiation of apomorphine-induced yawning. In contrast to their effects on apomorphine-induced yawning, nifedipine and Bay K 8644 had no effect on apomorphine-induced penile erection. 3. Bay K 8644 (0.06-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) and nifedipine (5-20 mgkg-1 i.p.) had no dose-related effect on the discrimination performance of rats trained to discriminate amphetamine from saline. However, nifedipine dose-dependently reduced the response rate of amphetamine-treated rats. Bay K 8644 had no effect on this measure except at high doses that also caused disruption. 4. Neither nifedipine (5-10 mgkg-1 i.p.) nor Bay K 8644 (0.06-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) affected the turning behaviour induced by amphetamine (1 mgkg-1 i.p.) in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the medial forebrain bundle, and did not induce turning themselves. 5. As the dihydropyridine compounds affected apomorphine-induced yawning but not penile erection, and did not affect amphetamine-induced rotation or drug discrimination, it seems unlikely that they are affecting dopamine release in vivo. PMID:2482105

  16. Murine model for Parkinson's disease: from 6-OH dopamine lesion to behavioral test.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Fabio S L; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Houzel, Jean-Christophe; Rehen, Stevens K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 6.5 million people worldwide, irrespective of gender, social, ethnic, economic, or geographic boundaries. Key symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity and bradikinesia, develop when about 3/4 of dopaminergic cells are lost in the substantia nigra, and fail to provide for the smooth, coordinated regulation of striatal motor circuits. Depression and hallucinations are common, and dementia eventually occurs in 20% of patients. At this time, there is no treatment to delay or stop the progression of PD. Rather, the medications currently available aim more towards the alleviation of these symptoms. New surgical strategies may reversibly switch on the functionally damaged circuits through the electrical stimulation of deep brain structures, but although deep brain stimulation is a major advance, it is not suitable for all patients. It remains therefore necessary to test new cell therapy approaches in preclinical models. Selective neurotoxic disruption of dopaminergic pathways can be reproduced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tertahydropyridine) whereas depleting drugs and oxidative-damaging chemicals may also reproduce specific features of PD in rodents. Unlike MPTP, 6-OHDA lesions cause massive irreversible neuronal loss, and can be uni- or bilateral. The 6-OHDA lesion model is reliable, leads to robust motor deficits, and is the most widely used after 40 years of research in rats. As interactions between grafted cells and host can now be studied more thoroughly in mice rather than in rats, the model has been transposed to mice, where it has been recently characterized. In this video, we demonstrate how to lesion the left nigro-striatal pathway of anesthetized mice by slowly delivering 2.0 microL of 6-OHDA through a stereotaxically inserted micro-syringe needle. The loss of dopaminergic input occurs within days, and the functional impairments can be monitored over post-operative weeks and

  17. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 4-positive allosteric modulator VU0364770 produces efficacy alone and in combination with L-DOPA or an adenosine 2A antagonist in preclinical rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carrie K; Bubser, Michael; Thompson, Analisa D; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Turle-Lorenzo, Nathalie; Amalric, Marianne; Blobaum, Anna L; Bridges, Thomas M; Morrison, Ryan D; Jadhav, Satyawan; Engers, Darren W; Italiano, Kimberly; Bode, Jacob; Daniels, J Scott; Lindsley, Craig W; Hopkins, Corey R; Conn, P Jeffrey; Niswender, Colleen M

    2012-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder associated with severe motor impairments caused by the loss of dopaminergic innervation of the striatum. Previous studies have demonstrated that positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu₄), including N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino) cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide, can produce antiparkinsonian-like effects in preclinical models of PD. However, these early mGlu₄ PAMsexhibited unsuitable physiochemical properties for systemic dosing, requiring intracerebroventricular administration and limiting their broader utility as in vivo tools to further understand the role of mGlu₄ in the modulation of basal ganglia function relevant to PD. In the present study, we describe the pharmacologic characterization of a systemically active mGlu₄ PAM, N-(3-chlorophenyl)picolinamide (VU0364770), in several rodent PD models. VU0364770 showed efficacy alone or when administered in combination with L-DOPA or an adenosine 2A (A2A) receptor antagonist currently in clinical development (preladenant). When administered alone, VU0364770 exhibited efficacy in reversing haloperidol-induced catalepsy, forelimb asymmetry-induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the median forebrain bundle, and attentional deficits induced by bilateral 6-OHDA nigrostriatal lesions in rats. In addition, VU0364770 enhanced the efficacy of preladenant to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy when given in combination. The effects of VU0364770 to reverse forelimb asymmetry were also potentiated when the compound was coadministered with an inactive dose of L-DOPA, suggesting that mGlu₄ PAMs may provide L-DOPA-sparing activity. The present findings provide exciting support for the potential role of selective mGlu₄ PAMs as a novel approach for the symptomatic treatment of PD and a possible augmentation strategy with either L-DOPA or A2A antagonists. PMID:22088953

  18. Sex-dependent changes in ADHD-like behaviors in juvenile rats following cortical dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Freund, Nadja; MacGillivilray, Heather T; Thompson, Britta S; Lukkes, Jodi L; Stanis, Jessica J; Brenhouse, Heather C; Andersen, Susan L

    2014-08-15

    Reduced cortical dopamine levels have been observed in individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Global dopamine depletions by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; with noradrenergic protection) in neonatal rats produces locomotor hyperactivity, with less known about how cortical depletion modulates risky behaviors. Here, we determined the effect of a medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) 6-OHDA depletions (30-60%) or sham microinjection at postnatal day 11 on behavior in male and female juvenile rats. Separate groups were studied for delay discounting (impulsive choice), novelty-preference, and preferences for cues and environments associated with cocaine (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg), their extinction, and reinstatement with place conditioning. Because PFC D1 receptors play a role in these behaviors, confocal microscopy was used to measure D1-immunoreactive projections to the nucleus accumbens core. Both 6-OHDA males and females increased delay discounting relative to sham controls, although only 6-OHDA females increased novelty preferences. Preferences for cocaine-associated environments, their extinction, and reinstatement with a priming dose of cocaine were reduced in 6-OHDA subjects overall. However, impulsive choice at 5s positively correlated with preferences for cocaine-associated environments in 6-OHDA subjects, but not sham controls. As possible compensation for low dopamine levels, D1-immunoreactivity on traced neurons increased in 6-OHDA females; dopamine levels did not remain low in adolescent 6-OHDA males and D1 did not change. We believe that these modest depletions restricted to the PFC demonstrate the role of dopamine, and not norepinephrine, in understanding these behaviors in other animal models where cortical dopamine is reduced during development. PMID:24861711

  19. Preventive effects of soy meal (+/- isoflavone) on spatial cognitive deficiency and body weight in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkaki, A; Badavi, M; Aligholi, H; Moghaddam, A Zand

    2009-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of 4 weeks soy meal (+/- isoflavone) on post-menopausal cognitive deficiency and body weight alteration in ovariectomized (OVX)-6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA)-induced animal model of Parkinson's Disease (PD) which mimics status in menopause women. Female Wistar rats (250-300 g, 5-6 months old) were divided into 2 main groups. (1) Control; (2) OVX; included 5 subgroups that were pre-treated with 10 or 20 g soy with isoflavone in 30 g daily diet (10 and 20 groups, respectively), 10 or 20 g soy without isoflavone in 30 g daily diet (-10 and -20 groups, respectively) and 0 g soy (sham treated group) during 4 weeks after OVX. To induce animal model ofPD in main second group (OVX rats) the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) was lesioned by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (8 microg kg(-1) 4 microL(-1) normal saline contains 0.1% ascorbate). All animals were trained in Morris water maze for evaluating the spatial learning and memory. The results indicated that pre-treatment of Parkinsonian rats with different doses of dietary soy meal (+/- isoflavone) improved the spatial learning and memory and prevents increasing the body weight after menopause significantly. Our data show that, long-duration dietary soy meal may have the potential neuroprotective effect against post-menopausal cognitive deficiency induced by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and constant body weight during post-menopausal life cycle. PMID:20128500

  20. Embryonic stem cells derived neuron transplantation recovery in models of parkinsonism in relation to severity of the disorder in rats.

    PubMed

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2015-04-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell-derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP(+) responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×10(5) differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  1. Embryonic Stem Cells Derived Neuron Transplantation Recovery in Models of Parkinsonism in Relation to Severity of the Disorder in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell–derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP+ responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×105 differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  2. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease. PMID:26571268

  3. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease. PMID:26571268

  4. Effects of GDF5 overexpression on embryonic rat dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, David B; Harrison, Patrick T; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2010-05-01

    Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurones has shown promise for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but this approach is limited by the poor survival of the transplanted cells. Exogenous dopaminergic neurotrophic factors such as growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) have been found to enhance the survival of transplanted dopaminergic neurones. However, this approach is limited by the rapid degradation of such factors in vivo; thus, methods for long-term delivery of these factors are under investigation. The present study shows, using optimised lipid-mediated transfection procedures, that overexpression of GDF5 significantly improves the survival of dopaminergic neurones in cultures of embryonic day (E) 13 rat ventral mesencephalon (VM) and protects them against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity. In another experiment, E13 VM cells were transfected with GDF5 after 1 day in vitro (DIV), then transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned adult rat striata after 2 DIV. The survival of these E13 VM dopaminergic neurones after transfection and transplantation was as least as high as that of freshly dissected E14 VM dopaminergic neurones, demonstrating that transfection was not detrimental to these cells. Furthermore, GDF5-overexpressing E13 VM transplants significantly reduced amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the lesioned rats. This study shows that lipid-mediated transfection in vitro prior to transplantation is a valid approach for the introduction of neurotrophic proteins such as GDF5, as well as lending further support to the potential use of GDF5 in neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:20349094

  5. Effect of glutamatergic systems on in vivo binding of [(125)I]beta-CIT in the brain of a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Shinya; Nakano, Takayuki; Inoue, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-10-01

    The effect of MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, on both in vivo and in vitro binding of [(125)I]beta-CIT (RTI-55) was investigated in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. The binding experiments were performed 2 weeks after unilateral intranigral microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In the in vitro binding study, no alterations in [(125)I]beta-CIT binding in rat brain sections were observed after addition of MK-801, 0.03 microM or 3 microM, to the incubation medium. However, in vivo [(125)I]beta-CIT binding to the dopamine transporter in both nonlesioned and 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum was significantly increased by pretreatment with MK-801. In vivo [(125)I]beta-CIT binding to the serotonin (5HT) transporter in nonlesioned cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and thalamus was also significantly increased by MK-801. However, the degree of change in the specific binding of [(125)I]beta-CIT induced by MK-801 was smaller in the lesioned cerebral cortex. Kinetic analysis, by a simplified three-compartment model with the cerebellum as the reference region, revealed that these alterations in the in vivo [(125)I]beta-CIT binding induced by MK-801 were mainly due to changes in the rate constants of in vivo binding, the input rate constant, k(3), and the output rate constant, k(4). These results indicate that the glutamatergic system significantly affects the function of dopamine transporters in the degenerated dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:12211097

  6. Functional recovery of supersensitive dopamine receptors after intrastriatal grafts of fetal substantia nigra

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, T.M.; Dawson, V.L.; Gage, F.H.; Fisher, L.J.; Hunt, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1991-03-01

    Interruption of the ascending dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway, by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion in rats, produced a significant loss of the dopamine transport complexes labeled with the phencyclidine derivative (3H)BTCP. This loss of dopamine innervation in the striatum was present at least 12 to 14 months after lesioning and was functionally manifested by ipsilateral rotation of the animals in response to amphetamine. In these same animals, in comparison to controls, there was a significant increase in the number (Bmax) of (3H)SCH 23390-labeled D-1 receptors in the striatum (36.7%) and the substantia nigra (35.1%) and a 54.4% increase in the number (Bmax) of (3H)sulpiride-labeled striatal D-2 receptors without an apparent change in affinity (Kd). Ten to twelve months after the transplantation of homologous fetal substantia nigra into the denervated striatum, there was a significant decrease in amphetamine-induced turning behavior. In these animals, there was an ingrowth of dopamine nerve terminals in the striatum as demonstrated by a return of (3H)BTCP binding. Accompanying this reinnervation was the normalization of D-1 and D-2 receptors to control values in the striatum as well as the return of D-1 receptors to prelesion densities in the substantia nigra. In a subgroup of transplanted rats, amphetamine continued to induce ipsilateral turning. In these animals both D-1 and D-2 receptors remained supersensitive. These results support the hypothesis that the functional recovery of transplanted animals is due, in part, to reinnervation of the striatum. In addition, long-term alterations in receptor density may be related to the behavioral deficits that are associated with the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat.

  7. IGF-1 protects dopamine neurons against oxidative stress: association with changes in phosphokinases.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Amina El; Zigmond, Michael J; Smith, Amanda D

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is an endogenous peptide transported across the blood brain barrier that is protective in several brain injury models, including an acute animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Motor deficits in PD are due largely to the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Thus, we examined the neuroprotective potential of IGF-1 in a progressive model of dopamine deficiency in which 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is infused into the striatum. Rats received intrastriatal IGF-1 (5 or 50 µg) 6 h prior to infusion of 4 µg 6-OHDA into the same site and were euthanized 1 or 4 weeks later. Both concentrations of IGF-1 protected tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive terminals in striatum at 4 weeks but not at 1 week, indicating that IGF-induced restoration of the dopaminergic phenotype occurred over several weeks. TH-immunoreactive cell loss was only attenuated with 50 µg IGF-1. We then examined the effect of striatal IGF-1 on the Ras/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways to ascertain whether their activation correlated with IGF-1-induced protection. Striatal and nigral levels of phospho-ERK1/2 were maximal 6 h after IGF-1 infusion and, with the exception of an increase in nigral pERK2 at 48 h, returned to basal levels by 7 days. Phospho-Akt (Ser473) was elevated 6-24 h post-IGF-1 infusion in both striatum and substantia nigra concomitant with inhibition of pro-death GSK-3β, a downstream target of Akt. These results suggest that IGF-1 can protect the nigrostriatal pathway in a progressive PD model and that this protection is preceded by activation of key pro-survival signaling cascades. PMID:26894890

  8. TROPHIC CONTROL OF LUNG DEVELOPMENT BY SYMPATHETIC NEURONS: EFFECTS OF NEONATAL SYMPATHECTOMY WITH 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The onset of peripheral sympathetic neuronal function is thought to provide trophic regulatory signals for development of adrenergic target tissues. n the current study, we examined the effects on lung development of neonatal sympathectomy with hydroxydopamine. he completeness of...

  9. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NTS noradrenergic A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n= 5; HPA study, n= 5], or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n= 6; HPA study, n= 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress. PMID:25765732

  10. Endogenous neural precursors influence grafted neural stem cells and contribute to neuroprotection in the Parkinsonian rat

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Sortwell, Caryl E; Collier, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective and neurorescue effects after neural stem/precursor cell (NPC) transplantation have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying such phenomena are not well understood. Our recent findings in a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model indicate that transplantation of NPCs before a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) insult can result in nigrostriatal protection which is associated with endogenous NPC proliferation, migration and neurogenesis. Here, we sought to determine whether the observed endogenous NPC response (1) contributes to transplanted NPC - mediated neuroprotection and/or (2) affects graft phenotype and function. Host Fischer 344 rats were administered the antimitotic agent cytosine-β-D-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C) to eliminate actively proliferating endogenous neural precursors before being transplanted with NPCs and treated with 6-OHDA to induce nigrostriatal degeneration. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrate that the neuroprotective response observed in NPC transplanted animals which had not received Ara-C was significantly attenuated in animals which did receive pre-transplant Ara-C. Also, while grafts in Ara-C treated animals showed no decrease in cell number, they exhibited significantly reduced expression of the neural stem cell regulators nestin and sonic hedgehog. In addition, inhibition of the endogenous NPC response resulted in an exaggerated host glial reaction. Overall, the study establishes for the first time that endogenous NPCs contribute to transplanted NPC-mediated therapeutic effects by affecting both grafted and mature host cells in unique ways. Thus, both endogenous and transplanted NPCs are important in creating an environment suitable for neural protection and rescue, and harnessing their synergistic interaction may lead to the optimization of cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:22417168

  11. Assessment of the Protection of Dopaminergic Neurons by an α7 Nicotinic Receptor Agonist, PHA 543613 Using [(18)F]LBT-999 in a Parkinson's Disease Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Sérrière, Sophie; Doméné, Aurélie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Mothes, Céline; Bodard, Sylvie; Rodrigues, Nuno; Guilloteau, Denis; Routier, Sylvain; Page, Guylène; Chalon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The inverse association between nicotine intake and Parkinson's disease (PD) is well established and suggests that this molecule could be neuroprotective through anti-inflammatory action mediated by nicotinic receptors, including the α7-subtype (α7R). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an agonist of α7R, PHA 543613, on striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. Adult male Wistar rats were lesioned in the right striatum and assigned to either the PHA group (n = 7) or the Sham group (n = 5). PHA 543613 hydrochloride at the concentration of 6 mg/kg (PHA group) or vehicle (Sham group) was intra-peritoneally injected 2 h before 6-OHDA lesioning and then at days 2, 4, and 6 post-lesion. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 7 days post-lesion using [(18)F]LBT-999 to quantify the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). After PET imaging, neuroinflammation was evaluated in same animals in vitro through the measurement of the microglial activation marker 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]PK-11195. The DAT density reflecting the integrity of dopaminergic neurons was significantly decreased while the intensity of neuroinflammation measured by TSPO density was significantly increased in the lesioned compared to intact striatum in both groups. However, these both modifications were partially reversed in the PHA group compared to Sham. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the degree of lesion and the intensity of neuroinflammation was evidenced. These findings indicate that PHA 543613 exerts neuroprotective effects on the striatal dopaminergic neurons associated with a reduction in microglial activation in this model of PD. This reinforces the hypothesis that an α7R agonist could provide beneficial effects for the treatment of PD. PMID:26389120

  12. Activation of 5-HT₁A receptors in the medial subdivision of the central nucleus of the amygdala produces anxiolytic effects in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Na; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yong; Han, Ling-Na; Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Liu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Although the medial subdivision of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeM) and serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors are involved in the regulation of anxiety, their roles in Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated anxiety are still unknown. Here we assessed the importance of CeM 5-HT1A receptors for anxiety in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The lesion induced anxiety-like behaviors, increased the firing rate and burst-firing pattern of CeM γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons, as well as decreased dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), amygdala and ventral part of hippocampus (vHip). Intra-CeM injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT produced anxiolytic effects in the lesioned rats, and decreased the firing rate of CeM GABAergic neurons in two groups of rats. Compared to sham-operated rats, the duration of the inhibitory effect on the firing rate of GABAergic neurons was shortened in the lesioned rats. The injection increased DA levels in the mPFC and amygdala in two groups of rats and the vHip in the lesioned rats, and increased 5-HT level in the lesioned rats, whereas it decreased NA levels in the mPFC in two groups of rats and the vHip in the lesioned rats. Moreover, the mean density of 5-HT1A receptor and GABA double-labeled neurons in the CeM was reduced after the lesioning. These results suggest that activation of CeM 5-HT1A receptor produces anxiolytic effects in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which involves decreased firing rate of the GABAergic neurons, and changed monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions. PMID:25797491

  13. The network of causal interactions for beta oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus, primary motor cortex, and subthalamic nucleus of walking parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Ming; Wen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Yong; Xiao, Hu; Xie, Zhengyuan; Li, Xing; Wang, Ning; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei; Chang, Jingyu; Zhang, Wangming

    2016-08-01

    Oscillatory activity has been well-studied in many structures within cortico-basal ganglia circuits, but it is not well understood within the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which was recently introduced as a potential target for the treatment of gait and postural impairments in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate oscillatory activity in the PPN and its relationship with oscillatory activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the PPN, primary motor cortex (M1), and subthalamic nucleus (STN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rats during resting and walking. After analysis of power spectral density, coherence, and partial Granger causality, three major findings emerged: 1) after 6-OHDA lesions, beta band oscillations were enhanced in all three regions during walking; 2) the direction of information flow for beta oscillations among the three structures was STN→M1, STN→PPN, and PPN→M1; 3) after the treatment of levodopa, beta activity in the three regions was reduced significantly and the flow of beta band was also abrogated. Our results suggest that beta activity in the PPN is transmitted from the basal ganglia and probably comes from the STN, and the STN plays a dominant role in the network of causal interactions for beta activity. Thus, the STN may be a potential source of aberrant beta band oscillations in PD. Levodopa can inhibit beta activity in the PPN of parkinsonian rats but cannot relieve parkinsonian patients' axial symptoms clinically. Therefore, beta oscillations may not be the major cause of axial symptoms. PMID:27163550

  14. In vivo L-DOPA production by genetically modified primary rat fibroblast or 9L gliosarcoma cell grafts via coexpression of GTPcyclohydrolase I with tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Leff, S E; Rendahl, K G; Spratt, S K; Kang, U J; Mandel, R J

    1998-06-01

    To investigate the biochemical requirements for in vivo L-DOPA production by cells genetically modified ex vivo in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD), rat syngeneic 9L gliosarcoma and primary Fischer dermal fibroblasts (FDFs) were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding the human tyrosine hydroxylase 2 (hTH2) and human GTP cyclohydrolase I (hGTPCHI) cDNAs. As GTPCHI is a rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of the essential TH cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), only hTH2 and GTPCHI cotransduced cultured cells produced L-DOPA in the absence of added BH4. As striatal BH4 levels in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats are minimal, the effects of cotransduction with hTH2 and hGTPCHI on L-DOPA synthesis by striatal grafts of either 9L cells or FDFs in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were tested. Microdialysis experiments showed that those subjects that received cells cotransduced with hTH2 and hGTPCHI produced significantly higher levels of L-DOPA than animals that received either hTH2 or untransduced cells. However, animals that received transduced FDF grafts showed a progressive loss of transgene expression until expression was undetectable 5 weeks after engraftment. In FDF-engrafted animals, no differential effect of hTH2 vs hTH2 + hGTPCHI transgene expression on apomorphine-induced rotation was observed. The differences in L-DOPA production found with cells transduced with hTH2 alone and those cotransduced with hTH2 and hGTPCHI show that BH4 is critical to the restoration of the capacity for L-DOPA production and that GTPCHI expression is an effective means of supplying BH4 in this rat model of PD. PMID:9628761

  15. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life. PMID:26498277

  16. Distinct temporal spike and local field potential activities in the thalamic parafascicular nucleus of parkinsonian rats during rest and limb movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Li, Min; Song, Zhimin; Chen, Feiyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Jinlu; Geng, Xiwen; Yang, Maoquan; Wang, Xiusong; Lei, Chengdong; Hou, Yabing

    2016-08-25

    Several studies have suggested that the thalamic centromedian-parafascicular (CM/PF or the PF in rodents) is implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, inconsistent changes in the neuronal firing rate and pattern have been reported in parkinsonian animals. To investigate the impact of a dopaminergic cell lesion on PF extracellular discharge in behaving rats, the PF neural activities in the spike and local field potential (LFP) were recorded in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA) lesioned and neurologically intact control rats during rest and limb movement. During rest, the two PF neuronal subtypes was less spontaneously active, with no difference in the spike firing rates between the control and lesioned rats; only the lesioned rats reshaped their spike firing pattern. Furthermore, the simultaneously recorded LFP in the lesioned rats exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35 and 35-70Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz. During the execution of a voluntary movement, two subtypes of PF neurons were identified by a rapid increase in the discharge activity in both the control and lesioned rats. However, dopamine lesioning was associated with a decrease in neuronal spiking fire rate and reshaping in the firing pattern in the PF. The simultaneously recorded LFP activity exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz compared with the control rats. These findings indicate that 6-OHDA induces modifications in PF spike and LFP activities in rats during rest and movement and suggest that PF dysfunction may be an important contributor to the pathophysiology of parkinsonian motor impairment. PMID:27238892

  17. The neuroprotective effect of Activin A and B: implication for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kupershmidt, Lana; Amit, Tamar; Bar-Am, Orit; Youdim, Moussa B H; Blumenfeld, Zeev

    2007-11-01

    Activin is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily which comprises a growing list of multifunctional proteins that function as modulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, hormone secretion and neuronal survival. This study examined the neuroprotective effect of both Activin A and B in serum withdrawal and oxidative stress apoptotic cellular models and investigated the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, which may account for the mechanism of Activin-induced neuroprotection. Here, we report that recombinant Activin A and B are neuroprotective against serum deprivation- and toxin- [either the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or the peroxynitrite donor, 3-(4-morpholinyl) sydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1)] induced neuronal death in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that transient transfection with Activin betaA or betaB significantly protect SH-SY5Y and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells against serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. This survival effect is mediated by the Bcl-2 family members and involves inhibition of caspase-3 activation; reduction of cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase and phosphorylated H2A.X protein levels and elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression. These results indicate that both Activin-A and -B share the potential to induce neuroprotective activity and thus may have positive impact on aging and neurodegenerative diseases to retard the accelerated rate of neuronal degeneration. PMID:17680997

  18. Dorsal striatal dopamine depletion impairs both allocentric and egocentric navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Graham, Devon L; Schaefer, Tori L; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Successful navigation requires interactions among multiple but overlapping neural pathways mediating distinct capabilities, including egocentric (self-oriented, route-based) and allocentric (spatial, map-based) learning. Route-based navigation has been shown to be impaired following acute exposure to the dopaminergic (DA) drugs (+)-methamphetamine and (+)-amphetamine, but not the serotoninergic (5-HT) drugs (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or (±)-fenfluramine. The dopaminergic-rich neostriatum is involved in both allocentric and egocentric navigation. This experiment tested whether dorsal striatal DA loss using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections impaired one or both types of navigation. Two weeks following 6-OHDA injections, rats began testing in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) followed by the Morris water maze (MWM) for route-based and spatial navigation, respectively. 6-OHDA treatment significantly increased latency and errors in the CWM and path length, latency, and cumulative distance in the MWM with no difference on cued MWM trials. Neostriatal DA levels were reduced by 80% at 2 and 7 weeks post-treatment. In addition, 6-OHDA increased DA turnover and decreased norepinephrine (NE) levels. 6-OHDA injections did not alter monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The data support that neostriatal DA modulates both types of navigation. PMID:22465436

  19. 7-(3-(4-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)piperazinyl)propoxy)-2 (1H)-quinolinone (OPC-4392), a presynaptic dopamine autoreceptor agonist and postsynaptic D2 receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Y.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Tsutsui, M.; Yamada, K.; Hiyama, T.

    1988-01-01

    The assertion that OPC-4392 acts as an agonist at presynaptic dopamine autoreceptors is supported by the following behavioral and biochemical observations: OPC-4392, 3-PPP and apomorphine inhibited the reserpine-induced increase in DOPA accumulation in the forebrain of mice and in the frontal cortex, limbic forebrain and striatum of rats. In addition, the gamma-butyrolactone (GBL)-induced increase in DOPA accumulation in the mouse forebrain was also inhibited by OPC-4392, 3-PPP and apomorphine. The inhibitory effect of OPC-4392 on GBL-induced DOPA accumulation lasted for at least 8 hours after oral administration to mice, while that of 3-PPP and apomorphine disappeared in 4 hours after subcutaneous injection. OPC-4392 failed to increase spontaneous motor activity in reserpinized mice, enhance spontaneous ipsilateral rotation in rats with unilateral striatal kainic acid (KA) lesions, induce contralateral rotation in rats with unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions and inhibit /sup 14/C-acetylcholine (Ach) release stimulated by 20 mM KCl in rat striatal slices.

  20. Meclizine-induced enhanced glycolysis is neuroprotective in Parkinson disease cell models

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chien Tai; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Meclizine is a well-tolerated drug routinely used as an anti-histamine agent in the management of disequilibrium. Recently, meclizine has been assessed for its neuroprotective properties in ischemic stroke and Huntington disease models. We found that meclizine protected against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis and cell death in both SH-SY5Y cells and rat primary cortical cultures. Meclizine increases the level of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), which activates phosphofructokinase, a rate-determining enzyme of glycolysis. This protection is therefore mediated by meclizine’s ability to enhance glycolysis and increase mitochondrial hyperpolarization. Meclizine represents an interesting candidate for further investigation to re-purpose for its potential to be neuroprotective in Parkinson disease. PMID:27145922

  1. Scoliosis in rats with experimentally-induced hemiparkinsonism: dependence upon striatal dopamine denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, M; Utsumi, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Rats suffering from experimental hemiparkinsonism induced by a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left area ventralis tegmenti showed a strong ipsilateral deviation and scoliosis-like skeletal deformity. The rats often showed single rotatory curves affecting the thoracic and lumbar regions, although cases with multiple curves were also found. The severity of the scoliosis was closely related to a decrease in extracellular striatal dopamine measured with microdialysis and to the development of postsynaptic dopamine receptor supersensitivity, functionally evaluated with rotational behaviour elicited with apomorphine. Indeed, rats with the strongest dopamine depletion (greater than 95%) and the strongest rotational responses showed the sharpest spinal deviation and skeletal deformity. These findings agree with the clinical observations that scoliosis occurs in patients with Parkinson's disease and its direction is correlated with the side of the major signs and symptoms of parkinsonism. Images PMID:2303830

  2. Meclizine-induced enhanced glycolysis is neuroprotective in Parkinson disease cell models.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien Tai; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-01-01

    Meclizine is a well-tolerated drug routinely used as an anti-histamine agent in the management of disequilibrium. Recently, meclizine has been assessed for its neuroprotective properties in ischemic stroke and Huntington disease models. We found that meclizine protected against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis and cell death in both SH-SY5Y cells and rat primary cortical cultures. Meclizine increases the level of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), which activates phosphofructokinase, a rate-determining enzyme of glycolysis. This protection is therefore mediated by meclizine's ability to enhance glycolysis and increase mitochondrial hyperpolarization. Meclizine represents an interesting candidate for further investigation to re-purpose for its potential to be neuroprotective in Parkinson disease. PMID:27145922

  3. Trib3 Is Elevated in Parkinson's Disease and Mediates Death in Parkinson's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaotian; Zareen, Neela; Rao, Apeksha; Berman, Zachary; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Bernd, Paulette; Crary, John F.; Levy, Oren A.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive loss of select neuronal populations, but the prodeath genes mediating the neurodegenerative processes remain to be fully elucidated. Trib3 (tribbles pseudokinase 3) is a stress-induced gene with proapoptotic activity that was previously described as highly activated at the transcriptional level in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) cellular model of PD. Here, we report that Trib3 immunostaining is elevated in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of human PD patients. Trib3 protein is also upregulated in cellular models of PD, including neuronal PC12 cells and rat dopaminergic ventral midbrain neurons treated with 6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), or α-synuclein fibrils (αSYN). In the toxin models, Trib3 induction is substantially mediated by the transcription factors CHOP and ATF4. Trib3 overexpression is sufficient to promote neuronal death; conversely, Trib3 knockdown protects neuronal PC12 cells as well as ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA, MPP+, or αSYN. Mechanism studies revealed that Trib3 physically interacts with Parkin, a prosurvival protein whose loss of function is associated with PD. Elevated Trib3 reduces Parkin expression in cultured cells; and in the SNpc of PD patients, Parkin levels are reduced in a subset of dopaminergic neurons expressing high levels of Trib3. Loss of Parkin at least partially mediates the prodeath actions of Trib3 in that Parkin knockdown in cellular PD models abolishes the protective effect of Trib3 downregulation. Together, these findings identify Trib3 and its regulatory pathways as potential targets to suppress the progression of neuron death and degeneration in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Current treatments ameliorate symptoms, but not the underlying neuronal death. Understanding the core neurodegenerative processes in PD is a

  4. From unilateral to bilateral parkinsonism: Effects of lateralization on dyskinesias and associated molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying lateralization and progression of motor symptoms from unilateral to bilateral in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. In addition, the molecular mechanisms involved in levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) depending on lateralization and disease progression from unilaterally to bilateral have not been described yet. We investigated motor symptoms, LIDs and associated striatal molecular markers expression after unilateral left or right, and after a sequential bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal lesions in rats. Sequentially bilateral lesioned animals showed a bilateral increase in striatal preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA without changes in pre-prodynorphin (PDyn) mRNA expression. The increase in dyskinesias when parkinsonism becomes bilateral was mostly due to an increase in orolingual dyskinesias associated to a increase in PDyn mRNA expression. Right lesion induces, or facilitates when first-done, a greater level of LIDs and an increase in striatal PPE and PDyn mRNAs in the second lesioned side. We describe a new striatal molecular pattern that appears when parkinsonism becomes bilateral and the relevance of the lateralization for the development of LIDs. PMID:26113400

  5. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate protects rat PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal independent of P13-Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Silvia; Reznichenko, Lydia; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2003-01-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) exerts neuroprotective/neurorescue effects against B-amyloid toxicity and protects neuronal cells from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridinium ion (MPP+) and 6-hydroxydopamine in vitro, or from N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine- (MPTP-) induced nigral dopaminergic neuronal loss in mice. In the present study, we report that EGCG (0.1 and 1 microM) significantly protects rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by serum support withdrawal, suggesting that EGCG may play a role in the growth of PC12 cells, where it stimulates survival-promoting pathways. PMID:14715445

  6. Neuroinflammation mediated by IL-1β increases susceptibility of dopamine neurons to degeneration in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Koprich, James B; Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Mithal, Prabhakar; Isacson, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive despite identification of several genetic mutations. It is more likely that multiple factors converge to give rise to PD than any single cause. Here we report that inflammation can trigger degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods We examined the effects of inflammation on the progressive 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease using immunohistochemistry, multiplex ELISA, and cell counting stereology. Results We show that a non-toxic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced secretion of cytokines and predisposed DA neurons to be more vulnerable to a subsequent low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine. Alterations in cytokines, prominently an increase in interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), were identified as being potential mediators of this effect that was associated with activation of microglia. Administration of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist resulted in significant reductions in tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ and attenuated the augmented loss of DA neurons caused by the LPS-induced sensitization to dopaminergic degeneration. Conclusion These data provide insight into the etiology of PD and support a role for inflammation as a risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:18304357

  7. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  8. Noradrenaline neuron degeneration contributes to motor impairments and development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eunju; Rogers, James T; Devoto, Paola; Björklund, Anders; Carta, Manolo

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, studies of post-mortem PD brains have shown that not only DA neurons but also the noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the locus coeruleus degenerate, and that the NA neurodegeneration may be as profound, and also precede degeneration of the midbrain DA neurons. Previous studies in animal models of PD have suggested that loss of forebrain NA will add to the development of motor symptoms in animals with lesions of the nigrostriatal DA neurons, but the results obtained in rodents have been inconclusive due to the shortcomings of the toxin, DSP-4, used to lesion the NA projections. Here, we have developed an alternative double-lesion paradigm using injections of 6-OHDA into striatum in combination with intraventricular injections of a powerful NA immunotoxin, anti-DBH-Saporin, to eliminate the NA neurons in the locus coeruleus, and associated pontine nuclei. Animals with combined DA and NA lesions were more prone to develop L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, even at low L-DOPA doses, and they performed significantly worse in tests of reflexive and skilled paw use, the stepping and staircase tests, compared to DA-only lesioned rats. Post-mortem analysis revealed that NA depletion did not affect the degree of DA depletion, or the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive innervation in the striatum. Cell loss in the substantia nigra was similar in both single and double lesioned animals, showing that the worsening effect was not due to increased loss of nigral DA neurons. The results show that damage to brainstem NA neurons, contributes to the development of motor impairments and the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, and provide support for the view that the development of motor symptoms and dyskinetic side effects in PD patients reflects the combined loss of midbrain DA neurons and NA neurons. PMID:24747357

  9. Dopamine in nucleus accumbens: salience modulation in latent inhibition and overshadowing

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, AJD; Thur, KE; Marsden, CA; Cassaday, HJ

    2011-01-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) is demonstrated when non-reinforced pre-exposure to a to-be-conditioned stimulus retards later learning. Learning is similarly retarded in overshadowing, in this case using the relative intensity of competing cues to manipulate associability. Electrolytic/excitotoxic lesions to shell accumbens (NAc) and systemic amphetamine both reliably abolish LI. Here a conditioned emotional response procedure was used to demonstrate LI and overshadowing and to examine the role of dopamine (DA) within NAc. Experiment 1 showed that LI but not overshadowing was abolished by systemic amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p.). In Experiment 2, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was used to lesion DA terminals within NAc: both shell- and core- (plus shell-)lesioned rats showed normal LI and overshadowing. Experiment 3 compared the effects of amphetamine microinjected at shell and core coordinates prior to conditioning: LI, but not overshadowing, was abolished by 10.0 but not 5.0 µg/side amphetamine injected in core but not shell NAc. These results suggest that the abolition of LI produced by NAc shell lesions is not readily reproduced by regionally restricted DA depletion within NAc; core rather than shell NAc mediates amphetamine-induced abolition of LI; overshadowing is modulated by different neural substrates. PMID:21262855

  10. Using Gelatin Nanoparticle Mediated Intranasal Delivery of Neuropeptide Substance P to Enhance Neuro-Recovery in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qi; Yu, Wen-Ze; Lin, Qian; Tian, Fu-Rong; Mao, Kai-Li; Lv, Chuan-Zhu; Wáng, Yi-Xiáng J.; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intranasal administration of phospholipid-based gelatin nanoparticles (GNP) was prepared to investigate the neuro-recovery effects of neuropeptide Substance P (SP) on hemiparkinsonian rats. Methods The SP-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNP) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method and possessed high stability, encapsulating efficiency and loading capacity. PC-12 cells were used to examine the growth enhancement of SP-GNP in vitro by MTT assays and flow cytometry (FCM). The therapeutic effects of SP-GNP on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced hemiparkinsonian rats were assessed by quantifying rotational behavior and the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated c-Jun protein (p-c-Jun) and Caspase-3 (Cas-3) expressed in substantia nigra (SN) region of hemiparkinsonian rats. Results PC-12 cells under SP-GNP treatment showed better cell viability and lower degree of apoptosis than those under SP solution treatment. Hemiparkinsonian rats under intranasal SP-GNP administration demonstrated better behavioral improvement, higher level of TH in SN along with much lower extent of p-c-Jun and Cas-3 than those under intranasal SP solution administration and intravenous SP-GNP administration. Conclusions With the advantages of GNP and nose-to-brain pathway, SP can be effectively delivered into the damaged SN region and exhibit its neuro-recovery function through the inhibition on JNK pathway and dopaminergic neuron apoptosis. PMID:26894626

  11. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  12. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model.

    PubMed

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE's ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  13. Neuroprotection and Functional Recovery Associated with Decreased Microglial Activation Following Selective Activation of mGluR2/3 Receptors in a Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hugh; Paur, Helen; Vernon, Anthony C.; Zabarsky, Virginia; Datla, Krishna P.; Croucher, Martin J.; Dexter, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated positive proof of efficacy of dual metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGluR2/3) agonists in both anxiety and schizophrenia. Importantly, evidence suggests that these drugs may also be neuroprotective against glutamate excitotoxicity, implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether this neuroprotection also translates into functional recovery is unclear. In the current study, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of the dual mGluR2/3 agonist, 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC), and whether this is accompanied by behavioral recovery in a rodent 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. We now report that delayed post lesion treatment with 2R,4R-APDC (10 nmol), results in robust neuroprotection of the nigrostriatal system, which translated into functional recovery as measured by improved forelimb use asymmetry and reduced (+)-amphetamine-induced rotation compared to vehicle treated animals. Interestingly, these beneficial effects were associated with a decrease in microglial markers in the SNc, which may suggest an antiinflammatory action of this drug. PMID:20948891

  14. Genetic deletion of Rhes or pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 prevent striato-nigral neurons activation in levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Brugnoli, Alberto; Napolitano, Francesco; Usiello, Alessandro; Morari, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes) is a small GTP-binding protein that modulates signal transduction at dopamine receptors, and also activates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Rhes binding to mTORC1 is hypothesized to play a role in motor disorders such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Here, we investigate the behavioral and in vivo neurocircuitry changes associated with genetic deletion of Rhes or inhibition of mTORC1 signaling in the mouse model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. 6-Hydroxydopamine-hemilesioned Rhes knockout mice and wild-type littermates were chronically treated with levodopa. In parallel, 6-hydroxydopamine-hemilesioned naïve mice were chronically treated with levodopa or levodopa plus rapamycin, to block mTORC1 pathway activation. Dyskinetic movements were monitored during levodopa treatment along with motor activity on the rotarod. Finally, dyskinetic mice underwent microdialysis probe implantation in the dopamine-depleted striatum and ipsilateral substantia nigra reticulata, and GABA and glutamate levels were monitored upon acute challenge with levodopa. Both Rhes knockouts and rapamycin-treated mice developed less dyskinesia than controls, although only rapamycin-treated mice fully preserved rotarod performance on levodopa. Levodopa elevated nigral GABA and glutamate in controls but not in Rhes knockouts or rapamycin-treated mice. Levodopa also stimulated striatal glutamate in controls and Rhes knockouts but not in rapamycin-treated mice. We conclude that both genetic deletion of Rhes and pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 significantly attenuate dyskinesia development by reducing the sensitization of striato-nigral medium-sized spiny neurons to levodopa. However, mTORC1 blockade seems to provide a more favorable behavioral outcome and a wider effect on neurochemical correlates of dyskinesia. PMID:26522958

  15. Preventative treatment in an animal model of ADHD: Behavioral and biochemical effects of methylphenidate and its interactions with ovarian hormones in female rats.

    PubMed

    Lukkes, Jodi L; Freund, Nadja; Thompson, Britta S; Meda, Shirisha; Andersen, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show that juvenile males that are exposed to methylphenidate (MPH) show reduced risk for substance use later in life. In contrast, little is known about whether females have the same enduring treatment response to stimulants and how gonadal hormones influence their behavior later in life. Females received either a sham or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) microinjection in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at postnatal day (P)10. Subjects were then treated with Vehicle or MPH (2mg/kg, p.o.) between P20-35 and tested during late adolescence/young adulthood (P60); half of these subjects underwent ovariectomy at P55 to determine hormonal influences. Females with 6-OHDA were depleted of PFC dopamine by 61% and demonstrated increased impulsive choice (delayed discounting) and preferences for cocaine-associated environments relative to control females. Both MPH and ovariectomy reduced impulsive choice and cocaine preferences in 6-OHDA females, but had no enduring effect in Sham females. Ovariectomy itself did not significantly affect impulsivity. Juvenile MPH interacted strongly with 6-OHDA to increase D4, D5, Alpha-1A, Alpha-2A, and 5-HT-1A mRNA receptor expression in the PFC. MPH alone effected D1 mRNA, while 6-OHDA increased BDNF; all markers were decreased by ovariectomy. Together, these data suggest that 6-OHDA changes in dopamine are not only relevant for ADHD-like behaviors, but their long-term modulation by treatment and the influence of cyclical differences in menstrual cycle. PMID:27397110

  16. A mouse model of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: focus on pharmacological interventions targeting affective dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Masini, Débora; Fisone, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, are increasingly recognized as a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). These ailments, which often appear in the early stage of the disease, affect a large number of patients and are only partly resolved by conventional antiparkinsonian medications, such as L-DOPA. Here, we investigated non-motor symptoms of PD in a mouse model based on bilateral injection of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal striatum. This model presented only subtle gait modifications, which did not affect horizontal motor activity in the open-field test. Bilateral 6-OHDA lesion also impaired olfactory discrimination, in line with the anosmia typically observed in early stage parkinsonism. The effect of 6-OHDA was then examined for mood-related dysfunctions. Lesioned mice showed increased immobility in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, two behavioral paradigms of depression. Moreover, the lesion exerted anxiogenic effects, as shown by reduced time spent in the open arms, in the elevated plus maze test, and by increased thigmotaxis in the open-field test. L-DOPA did not modify depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, which were instead counteracted by the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole. Reboxetine, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, was also able to revert the depressive and anxiogenic effects produced by the lesion with 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pre-treatment with desipramine prior to injection of 6-OHDA, which is commonly used to preserve noradrenaline neurons, did not modify the effect of the lesion on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, in the present model, mood-related conditions are independent of the reduction of noradrenaline caused by 6-OHDA. Based on these findings we propose that the anti-depressive and anxiolytic action of reboxetine is mediated by promoting dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine uptake from residual noradrenergic terminals. PMID

  17. Dopamine Depletion In Either The Dorsomedial Or Dorsolateral Striatum Impairs Egocentric Cincinnati Water Maze Performance While Sparing Allocentric Morris Water Maze Learning

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Amanda A.; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M.; Guetierez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Both egocentric route-based learning and spatial learning, as assessed by the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively, are impaired following an 80% dopamine (DA) loss in the neostriatum after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration in rats. The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) are implicated in different navigational learning types, namely the DLS is implicated in egocentric learning while the DMS is implicated in spatial learning. This experiment tested whether selective DA loss through 6-OHDA lesions in the DMS or DLS would impair one or both types of navigation. Both DLS and DMS DA loss significantly impaired route-based CWM learning, without affecting spatial or cued MWM performance. DLS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 75% DA loss in this region, with no changes in other monoamine levels in the DLS or DMS. DMS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 62% DA loss in this region, without affecting other monoamine levels in the DMS or DLS. The results indicate a role for DA in DLS and DMS regions in route-based egocentric but not spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning deficits may require more pervasive monoamine reductions within each region before deficits are exhibited. This is the first study to implicate DLS and DMS DA in route-based egocentric navigation. PMID:25451306

  18. Dopamine depletion in either the dorsomedial or dorsolateral striatum impairs egocentric Cincinnati water maze performance while sparing allocentric Morris water maze learning.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H; Seroogy, Kim B; Skelton, Matthew R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2015-02-01

    Both egocentric route-based learning and spatial learning, as assessed by the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively, are impaired following an 80% dopamine (DA) loss in the neostriatum after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration in rats. The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) are implicated in different navigational learning types, namely the DLS is implicated in egocentric learning while the DMS is implicated in spatial learning. This experiment tested whether selective DA loss through 6-OHDA lesions in the DMS or DLS would impair one or both types of navigation. Both DLS and DMS DA loss significantly impaired route-based CWM learning, without affecting spatial or cued MWM performance. DLS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 75% DA loss in this region, with no changes in other monoamine levels in the DLS or DMS. DMS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 62% DA loss in this region, without affecting other monoamine levels in the DMS or DLS. The results indicate a role for DA in DLS and DMS regions in route-based egocentric but not spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning deficits may require more pervasive monoamine reductions within each region before deficits are exhibited. This is the first study to implicate DLS and DMS DA in route-based egocentric navigation. PMID:25451306

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NOREPINEPHRINE AND ERYTHROPOIESIS: EVIDENCE FOR A CRITICAL THRESHOLD

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Angela; Mohr, Alicia M.; Shah, Salil G.; Sifri, Ziad C.; Kaiser, Vicki L.; Rameshwar, Pranela; Livingston, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic injury elicits a neuroendocrine response that activates the sympathetic nervous system. Our previous work suggests that norepinephrine (NE) influences the bone marrow (BM) erythropoietic response. However, the dose-response relationship between NE and erythropoiesis remains unclear. Materials and Methods Two days following chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or injection with saline vehicle (SHAM), male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused continuously with either saline (NS) or increasing doses of NE for 5 days via osmotic pumps. Erythropoiesis was assessed by growth of erythroid progenitor colonies (BFU-E and CFU-E for early and late progenitors, respectively). Results Following chemical sympathectomy with 6-OHDA, both BFU-E and CFU-E growth is inhibited (42%* and 43%* vs. 100% SHAM, *P < 0.05). SHAM rats with continuous infusion of exogenous NE show a clear dose-response inhibition of both BFU-E and CFU-E colony growth. In the 6-OHDA rats, continuous infusion of NE restored BFU-E and CFU-E growth at 10−8g/hr and 10−9g/hr, respectively. Conclusions Erythroid precursor colony growth is inhibited in sympathectomized rats. In addition, supraphysiologic doses of exogenous NE inhibit normal erythropoiesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Following chemical sympathectomy with 6-OHDA, exogenous NE restores erythropoiesis in a narrow window. Therefore, NE has a complex interaction within the BM and the elevation of NE following traumatic injury impacts BM erythropoietic function. PMID:20605580

  20. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  1. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Kang, X-y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-l; Li, Y-q; Gao, D-s

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  2. Intranasally applied L-DOPA alleviates parkinsonian symptoms in rats with unilateral nigro-striatal 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Chao, Owen Y; Mattern, Claudia; Silva, Angelica M De Souza; Wessler, Janet; Ruocco, Lucia A; Nikolaus, Susanne; Huston, Joseph P; Pum, Martin E

    2012-02-10

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the most effective drug for therapy of Parkinson's disease. However, the current clinical route of L-DOPA administration is variable and unreliable because of problems with drug absorption and first-pass metabolism. Administration of drugs via the nasal passage has been proven an effective alternate route for a number of medicinal substances. Here we examined the acute behavioral and neurochemical effects of intranasally (IN) applied L-DOPA in rats bearing unilateral lesions of the medial forebrain bundle, with severe depletion (97%) of striatal dopamine. Turning behavior in an open field, footslips on a horizontal grid and postural motor asymmetry in a cylinder were assessed following IN L-DOPA or vehicle administration with, or without, benserazide pre-treatment. IN L-DOPA without benserazide pre-treatment mildly decreased ipsilateral turnings and increased contralateral turnings 10-20 min after the treatment. IN L-DOPA with saline pre-treatment reduced contralateral forelimb-slips on the grid while no effects were evident in the cylinder test. These results support the hypothesis that L-DOPA can bypass the blood-brain barrier by the IN route and alleviate behavioral impairments in the hemiparkinsonian animal model. PMID:22108632

  3. Neuronal effects of 4-t-Butylcatechol: A model for catechol-containing antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Y.-C. Liu Yuxin; Lin, Y.-C.; Shih, Y.-T.; Liu, C.-M.; Burka, Leo T.

    2008-04-15

    Many herbal medicines and dietary supplements sold as aids to improve memory or treat neurodegenerative diseases or have other favorable effects on the CNS contain a catechol or similar 1,2-dihydroxy aromatic moiety in their structure. As an approach to isolate and examine the neuroprotective properties of catechols, a simple catechol 4-t-Butylcatechol (TBC) has been used as a model. In this study, we investigated the effects of TBC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglial-induced neurotoxicity by using the in vitro model of coculture murine microglial-like cell line HAPI with the neuronal-like human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We also examined the effects of TBC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. TBC at concentrations from 0.1-10 {mu}M had no toxic effect on HAPI cells and SH-SY5Y cells, and it inhibited LPS (100 ng/ml)-induced increases of superoxide, intracellular ROS, gp91{sup Phox}, iNOS and a decrease of HO-1 in HAPI cells. Under coculture condition, TBC significantly reduced LPS-activated microglia-induced dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells death. Moreover, TBC (0.1-10 {mu}M) inhibited 6-OHDA-induced increases of intracellular ROS, iNOS, nNOS, and a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential, and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurotoxic effects of TBC (100 {mu}M) on SH-SY5Y cells were also observed including the decrease in mitochondria membrane potential and the increase in COX-2 expression and cell death. TBC-induced SH-SY5Y cell death was attenuated by pretreatment with NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. In conclusion, this study suggests that TBC might possess protective effects on inflammation- and oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. However, the high concentration of TBC might be toxic, at least in part, for increasing COX-2 expression.

  4. PET Imaging of Serotonin Transporters With 4-[(18)F]-ADAM in a Parkinsonian Rat Model With Porcine Neural Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Li, I-Hsun; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chou, Ta-Kai; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. Apart from effective strategies to halt the underlying neuronal degeneration, cell replacement now offers novel prospects for PD therapy. Porcine embryonic neural tissue has been considered an alternative source to human fetal grafts in neurodegenerative disorders because its use avoids major practical and ethical issues. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of embryonic day 27 (E27) porcine mesencephalic tissue transplantation in a PD rat model using animal positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with 4-[(18)F]-ADAM, a serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent. The parkinsonian rat was induced by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the right nigrostriatal pathway. The apomorphine-induced rotation behavioral test and 4-[(18)F]-ADAM/animal PET scanning were carried out following 6-OHDA lesioning. At the second week following 6-OHDA lesioning, the parkinsonian rat rotates substantially on apomorphine-induced contralateral turning. In addition, the mean striatal-specific uptake ratio (SUR) of 4-[(18)F]-ADAM decreased by 44%. After transplantation, the number of drug-induced rotations decreased markedly, and the mean SUR of 4-[(18)F]-ADAM and the level of SERT immunoreactivity (SERT-ir) in striatum were partially restored. The mean SUR level was restored to 71% compared to that for the contralateral intact side, which together with the abundant survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons accounted for functional recovery at the fourth week postgraft. In regard to the extent of donor-derived cells, we found the neurons of the xenografts from E27 transgenic pigs harboring red fluorescent protein (RFP) localized with TH-ir cells and SERT-ir in the grafted area. Thus, transplanted E27 porcine mesencephalic tissue may restore dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in the parkinsonian rat

  5. Impact of grafted serotonin and dopamine neurons on development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats is determined by the extent of dopamine neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Thomas; Carta, Manolo; Muñoz, Ana; Mattsson, Bengt; Winkler, Christian; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that serotonin neurons play an important role in the induction and maintenance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in animals with lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Patients with Parkinson's disease that receive transplants of foetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, the graft cell preparation is likely to contain, in addition to dopamine neurons, serotonin neurons that will vary in number depending on the landmarks used for dissection. Here, we have studied the impact of grafted serotonin neurons--alone or mixed with dopamine neurons--on the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the host nigrostriatal projection. In these rats, which showed only low-level dyskinesia at the time of transplantation, serotonin grafts induced a worsening in the severity of dyskinesia that developed during continued L-DOPA treatment, while the dopamine-rich graft had the opposite, dampening effect. The detrimental effect seen in animals with serotonin neuron grafts was dramatically increased when the residual dopamine innervation in the striatum was removed by a second 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Interestingly, rats with grafts that contained a mixture of dopamine and serotonin neurons (in approximately 2:1) showed a marked reduction in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia over time, and the appearance of severe dyskinesia induced by the removal of the residual dopamine innervation, seen in the animals with transplants of serotonin neurons alone, was blocked. FosB expression in the striatal projection neurons, which is associated with dyskinesias, was also normalized by the dopamine-rich grafts, but not by the serotonin neuron grafts. These data indicate that as long as a sufficient portion, some 10-20%, of the dopamine innervation still remains, the increased host serotonin innervation generated by the grafted serotonin neurons will have limited effect on the development or severity of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. At

  6. Antidyskinetic Effect of 7-Nitroindazole and Sodium Nitroprusside Associated with Amantadine in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bortolanza, Mariza; Bariotto-Dos-Santos, Keila D; Dos-Santos-Pereira, Maurício; da-Silva, Célia Aparecida; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2016-07-01

    Amantadine is the noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate, receptor activated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. It is the only effective medication used to alleviate dyskinesia induced by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in Parkinson's disease patients. Unfortunately, adverse effects as abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia limit its clinical utility. Combined effective symptomatic treatment modalities may lessen the liability to undesirable events. Likewise drugs known to interfere with nitrergic system reduce AIMs in animal models of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to analyze an interaction between amantadine, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (7-nitroindazole, 7NI), and nitric oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) in 6-hydroxydopamine-(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats (microinjection in the medial forebrain bundle) presenting L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (20 mg/kg, gavage, during 21 days). We confirm that 7NI-30 mg/kg, SNP-2/4 mg/kg and amantadine-40 mg/kg, individually reduced AIMs. Our results revealed that co-administration of sub-effective dose of amantadine (10 mg/kg) plus sub-effective dose of 7NI (20 mg/kg) potentiates the effect of reducing AIMs scores when compared to the effect of the drugs individually. No superior benefit on L-DOPA-induced AIMs was observed with the combination of amantadine and SNP. The results revealed that combination of ineffective doses of amantadine and 7NI represents a new strategy to increase antidyskinetic effect in L-DOPA-induced AIMs. It may provide additional therapeutic benefits to Parkinson's disease patients from these disabling complications at lower and thus safer and more tolerable doses than required when either drug is used alone. To close, we discuss the paradox of both nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and/or donor produced AIMs reduction by targeting nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27053252

  7. CART modulates the effects of levodopa in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Manoj A; Shelkar, Gajanan P; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Kokare, Dadasaheb M

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related disorder characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra (SN). The neuropeptide cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is known to closely interact with the dopamine system and regulate psychomotor activity. We screened the effectiveness of CART in reversing the symptoms of PD in a rat model. PD like condition was induced by administering 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly in the SN of the right side. Fifteen days later, intraperitoneal (IP) treatment with apomorphine hydrochloride to these rats, resulted in contralateral rotations in the rotation test chamber suggesting induction of PD-like symptoms. This action of apomorphine was significantly attenuated by intracerebroventricular (ICV) treatment with CART and potentiated by CART antibody. IP treatment with levodopa also produced contralateral rotation in PD induced rats, and showed anti-Parkinson-like action. Prior treatment with CART via ICV route potentiated the anti-Parkinsonian effects of levodopa, while CART antibody produced opposite effects. CART treatment per se, to PD induced rats produced ipsilateral rotations, suggesting that the peptide may promote the endogenous release of dopamine from intact neurons. While CART-immunoreactivity in arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, striatum, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and locus coeruleus was reduced in the PD induced rats, levodopa treatment restored the expression of CART-immunoreactivity in these nuclei. These results suggest that endogenous CART might closely interact with the dopamine containing SN-striatal pathway which is known to profoundly influence the motor system. The study underscores the importance of CART as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of PD. PMID:26771081

  8. NANC transmitters in the female pig urethra–localization and modulation of release via α2-adrenoceptors and potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Werkström, Viktoria; Persson, Katarina; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    To investigate further the release, localization and identity of a non-nitrergic mediator of smooth muscle relaxation in the female pig urethra, we studied the effects of drugs acting at α2-adrenoceptors or K+ channels, the effects of capsaicin and chemical sympathectomy, and the actions of several transmitter candidates. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; frequencies above 12 Hz) of spontaneously contracted smooth muscle strips from the female pig urethra evoked long-lasting, frequency-dependent relaxations in the presence of prazosin, scopolamine, and NG-nitro-L-arginine. Treatment with the selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14 304 markedly reduced the relaxations evoked by EFS at all frequencies tested (16–30 Hz). The inhibitory effect of UK-14 304 was completely antagonized by the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine. The muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, or exogenously administered carbachol, did not have any effects on the electrically evoked relaxations. Inhibition of high conductance Ca2+ activated K+ channels by iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin significantly enhanced the relaxations evoked by EFS at all frequencies. However, inhibition of voltage-sensitive K+ channels with 4-aminopyridine or dendrotoxin-1, treatment with the ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, glibenclamide, or treatment with the high and low conductance Ca2+ activated K+ channel blockers, tetraethylammonium chloride and apamin, had no effect on the relaxations evoked by EFS. Electrically evoked relaxations were not affected by adrenergic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) at any frequency. However, treatment with 6-OHDA abolished prazosin-sensitive electrically induced contractions, and a long-lasting relaxation was revealed. Treatment with capsaicin, believed to damage selectively a subpopulation of primary afferent fibres, did not affect basal tone or relaxations evoked by EFS. Exogenously applied vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate

  9. Sympathetic Nervous System Control of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Oxidative Stress in Liver through α-Adrenergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Peng, Yi-Jen; Wang, Shih-Yu; Young, Ton-Ho; Salter, Donald M.; Lee, Herng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the primary organ involved in redox cycling, the liver is one of the most highly innervated tissues in mammals. The interaction between hepatocytes and sympathetic, parasympathetic, and peptidergic nerve fibers through a variety of neurotransmitters and signaling pathways is recognized as being important in the regulation of hepatocyte function, liver regeneration, and hepatic fibrosis. However, less is known regarding the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in modulating the hepatic response to oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the role of the SNS in healthy and oxidatively stressed liver parenchyma. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide were used to realize chemical sympathectomy. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injection was used to induce oxidative liver injury. Sympathectomized animals were protected from CCl4 induced hepatic lipid peroxidation-mediated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as assessed by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels, morphological features of cell damage, and DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, sympathectomy modulated hepatic inflammatory response induced by CCl4-mediated lipid peroxidation. CCl4 induced lipid peroxidation and hepatotoxicity were suppressed by administration of an α-adrenergic antagonist. We conclude that the SNS provides a permissive microenvironment for hepatic oxidative stress indicating the possibility that targeting the hepatic α-adrenergic signaling could be a viable strategy for improving outcomes in patients with acute hepatic injury. PMID:26798417

  10. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  11. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  12. Exercise exerts neuroprotective effects on Parkinson's disease model of rats.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Yasuhara, Takao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Kondo, Akihiko; Yuan, Wenji; Kadota, Tomohito; Wang, Feifei; Baba, Tanefumi; Tayra, Judith Thomas; Morimoto, Takamasa; Jing, Meng; Kikuchi, Yoichiro; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Agari, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Fujino, Hidemi; Obata, Futoshi; Takeda, Isao; Furuta, Tomohisa; Date, Isao

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that rehabilitation ameliorates physical and cognitive impairments of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and other neurological diseases and that rehabilitation also has potencies to modulate brain plasticity. Here we examined the effects of compulsive exercise on Parkinson's disease model of rats. Before 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 microg) lesion into the right striatum of female SD rats, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to label the proliferating cells. Subsequently, at 24 h after the lesion, the rats were forced to run on the treadmill (5 days/week, 30 min/day, 11 m/min). As behavioral evaluations, cylinder test was performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks and amphetamine-induced rotational test was performed at 2 and 4 weeks with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical investigations. The exercise group showed better behavioral recovery in cylinder test and significant decrease in the number of amphetamine-induced rotations, compared to the non-exercise group. Correspondingly, significant preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in the striatum and TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) was demonstrated, compared to the non-exercise group. Additionally, the number of migrated BrdU- and Doublecortin-positive cells toward the lesioned striatum was increased in the exercise group. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor increased in the striatum by exercise. The results suggest that exercise exerts neuroprotective effects or enhances the neuronal differentiation in Parkinson's disease model of rats with subsequent improvement in deteriorated motor function. PMID:19900418

  13. Enhanced histamine H2 excitation of striatal cholinergic interneurons in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sean Austin O; Xia, Rong; Ding, Yunmin; Won, Lisa; Ray, William J; Hitchcock, Stephen A; McGehee, Daniel S; Kang, Un Jung

    2015-04-01

    Levodopa is the most effective therapy for the motor deficits of Parkinson's disease (PD), but long term treatment leads to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Our previous studies indicate enhanced excitability of striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in mice expressing LID and reduction of LID when ChIs are selectively ablated. Recent gene expression analysis indicates that stimulatory H2 histamine receptors are preferentially expressed on ChIs at high levels in the striatum, and we tested whether a change in H2 receptor function might contribute to the elevated excitability in LID. Using two different mouse models of PD (6-hydroxydopamine lesion and Pitx3(ak/ak) mutation), we chronically treated the animals with either vehicle or l-DOPA to induce dyskinesia. Electrophysiological recordings indicate that histamine H2 receptor-mediated excitation of striatal ChIs is enhanced in mice expressing LID. Additionally, H2 receptor blockade by systemic administration of famotidine decreases behavioral LID expression in dyskinetic animals. These findings suggest that ChIs undergo a pathological change in LID with respect to histaminergic neurotransmission. The hypercholinergic striatum associated with LID may be dampened by inhibition of H2 histaminergic neurotransmission. This study also provides a proof of principle of utilizing selective gene expression data for cell-type-specific modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:25661301

  14. Untangling Cortico-Striatal Connectivity and Cross-Frequency Coupling in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Belić, Jovana J.; Halje, Pär; Richter, Ulrike; Petersson, Per; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    We simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs) in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analyzed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80-Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the control state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz) across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz. PMID:27065818

  15. Transplantation of melanocytes obtained from the skin ameliorates apomorphine-induced abnormal behavior in rodent hemi-parkinsonian models.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Higashi, Youichirou; Namba, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosinase, which catalyzes both the hydroxylation of tyrosine and consequent oxidation of L-DOPA to form melanin in melanocytes, is also expressed in the brain, and oxidizes L-DOPA and dopamine. Replacement of dopamine synthesis by tyrosinase was reported in tyrosine hydroxylase null mice. To examine the potential benefits of autograft cell transplantation for patients with Parkinson's disease, tyrosinase-producing cells including melanocytes, were transplanted into the striatum of hemi-parkinsonian model rats or mice lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine. Marked improvement in apomorphine-induced rotation was noted at day 40 after intrastriatal melanoma cell transplantation. Transplantation of tyrosinase cDNA-transfected hepatoma cells, which constitutively produce L-DOPA, resulted in marked amelioration of the asymmetric apomorphine-induced rotation in hemi-parkinsonian mice and the effect was present up to 2 months. Moreover, parkinsonian mice transplanted with melanocytes from the back skin of black newborn mice, but not from albino mice, showed marked improvement in the apomorphine-induced rotation behavior up to 3 months after the transplantation. Dopamine-positive signals were seen around the surviving transplants in these experiments. Taken together with previous studies showing dopamine synthesis and metabolism by tyrosinase, these results highlight therapeutic potential of intrastriatal autograft cell transplantation of melanocytes in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:23776585

  16. Mitochondrial ferritin suppresses MPTP-induced cell damage by regulating iron metabolism and attenuating oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    You, Lin-Hao; Li, Zhen; Duan, Xiang-Lin; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Shi, Zhen-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work showed that mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) played an important role in preventing neuronal damage in 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role of MtFt in a PD model induced by MPTP is not clear. Here, we found that methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetra-pyridine (MPTP) significantly upregulated MtFt in the mouse hippocampus, substantia nigra (SN) and striatum. To explore the effect of MtFt upregulation on the MPTP-mediated injury to neural cells, MtFt-/- mice and MtFt-overexpressing cells were used to construct models of PD induced by MPTP. Our results showed that MPTP dramatically downregulated expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and tyrosine hydroxylase and upregulated L-ferritin expression in the mouse striatum and SN. Interestingly, MPTP induced high levels of MtFt in these tissues, indicating that MtFt was involved in iron metabolism and influenced dopamine synthesis induced by MPTP. Meanwhile, the Bcl2/Bax ratio was decreased significantly by MPTP in the striatum and SN of MtFt knockout (MtFt-/-) mice compared with controls. Overexpression of MtFt increased TfR1 and decreased ferroportin 1 induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ions (MPP+). MtFt strongly inhibited mitochondrial damage through maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential and protecting the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane. It also suppressed the increase of the labile iron pool, decreased production of reactive oxygen species and dramatically rescued the apoptosis induced by MPP+. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MtFt plays an important role in preventing neuronal damage in the MPTP-induced parkinsonian phenotype by inhibiting cellular iron accumulation and subsequent oxidative stress. PMID:27017962

  17. Neuroprotective Activity of Peripherally Administered Liver Growth Factor in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio Sánchez; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Miranda, Cristina; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Bazán, Eulalia

    2013-01-01

    Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen purified some years ago that promotes proliferation of different cell types and the regeneration of damaged tissues, including brain tissue. Considering the possibility that LGF could be used as a therapeutic agent in Parkinson’s disease, we analyzed its potential neuroregenerative and/or neuroprotective activity when peripherally administered to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. For these studies, rats subjected to nigrostriatal lesions were treated intraperitoneally twice a week with LGF (5 microg/rat) for 3 weeks. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the last LGF treatment. The results show that LGF stimulates sprouting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive terminals and increases tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression, as well as dopamine levels in the denervated striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In this structure, LGF activates microglia and raises tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein levels, which have been reported to have a role in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection. Besides, LGF stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and CREB, and regulates the expression of proteins which are critical for cell survival such as Bcl2 and Akt. Because LGF partially protects dopamine neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra, and reduces motor deficits in these animals, we propose LGF as a novel factor that may be useful in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23861803

  18. Effect of exercise on dopamine neuron survival in prenatally stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Mabandla, Musa V; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Daniels, William M U; Russell, Vivienne A

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal stress has been associated with increased vulnerability to psychiatric disturbances including schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Elevated maternal circulating stress hormones alter development of neural circuits in the fetal brain and cause long-term changes in behaviour. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether mild prenatal stress increases the vulnerability of dopamine neurons in adulthood. A low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 microg/4 microl saline) was unilaterally infused into the medial forebrain bundle of nerve fibres in the rat brain in order to create a partial lesion of dopamine neurons which was sufficient to cause subtle behavioural deficits associated with early onset of Parkinson's disease without complete destruction of dopamine neurons. Voluntary exercise appeared to have a neuroprotective effect resulting in an improvement in motor control and decreased asymmetry in the use of left and right forelimbs to explore a novel environment as well as decreased asymmetry of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased dopamine cell loss in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Prenatal stress appeared to enhance the toxic effect of 6-OHDA possibly by reducing the compensatory adaptations to exercise. PMID:19844780

  19. Sympathetic innervation, norepinephrine content, and norepinephrine turnover in orthotopic and spontaneous models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Mercedes J; Belcher, Elizabeth K; Dawes, Ryan P; Madden, Kelley S

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drives breast cancer progression in preclinical breast cancer models, but it has yet to be established if neoplastic and stromal cells residing in the tumor are directly targeted by locally released norepinephrine (NE). In murine orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ sympathetic nerves were limited to the periphery of the tumor. No TH+ staining was detected deeper within these tumors, even in regions with a high density of blood vessels. NE concentration was much lower in tumors compared to the more densely innervated spleen, reflecting the relative paucity of tumor TH+ innervation. Tumor and spleen NE concentration decreased with increased tissue mass. In mice treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to selectively destroy sympathetic nerves, tumor NE concentration was reduced approximately 50%, suggesting that the majority of tumor NE is derived from local sympathetic nerves. To evaluate NE utilization, NE turnover in orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumors was compared to spleen under baseline and stress conditions. In non-stressed mice, NE turnover was equivalent between tumor and spleen. In mice exposed to a stressor, tumor NE turnover was increased compared to spleen NE turnover, and compared to non-stressed tumor NE turnover. Together, these results demonstrate that NE in mammary tumors is derived from local sympathetic nerves that synthesize and metabolize NE. However, differences between spleen and tumor NE turnover with stressor exposure suggest that sympathetic NE release is regulated differently within the tumor microenvironment compared to the spleen. Local mammary tumor sympathetic innervation, despite its limited distribution, is responsive to stressor exposure and therefore can contribute to stress-induced tumor progression. PMID:26718447

  20. A comparison of the cardiovascular and sedative actions of the α-adrenoceptor agonists, FLA-136 and clonidine, in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T.C.; Longman, Susan D.

    1982-01-01

    1 The cardiovascular and sedative effects of FLA-136 have been compared with those of clonidine after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration in the rat. The effects of both drugs on pre- and postsynaptic α-adrenoceptors in the periphery have been investigated after intravenous (i.v.) administration in the pithed rat. 2 In the anaesthetized rat, i.c.v. FLA-136 and clonidine produced dose-related hypotension, FLA-136 having three to 30 times less activity than clonidine; both drugs caused concomitant bradycardia. In the conscious rat i.c.v. FLA-136 had less sedative potential than clonidine, in terms of overt sedation assessed visually. 3 Yohimbine reduced the hypotension and bradycardia produced by i.c.v. FLA-136 and clonidine; prazosin and mianserin also antagonized the cardiovascular responses to clonidine, but not those to FLA-136. 4 Chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) markedly reduced the cardiovascular effects of FLA-136 but only slightly reduced those of clonidine. 5 Naloxone antagonized the cardiovascular responses to clonidine, but not FLA-136, suggesting a direct or indirect involvement of central opiate receptors in the responses induced by clonidine. 6 Metiamide attenuated the cardiovascular responses to FLA-136 and clonidine, implying a direct or indirect involvement of central histamine (H2)-receptors in such responses. 7 FLA-136, unlike clonidine, did not stimulate peripheral pre- or postsynaptic α-adrenoceptors in the pithed rat. 8 FLA-136 is a novel centrally-acting hypotensive compound which, unlike clonidine, selectively stimulates central α-autoreceptors (yohimbine-sensitive) in the rat; these autoreceptors may be different from peripheral pre- and postsynaptic α-adrenoceptors. The results suggest that clonidine lowers blood pressure by stimulation of two types of central postsynaptic α-adrenoceptors in the rat, one type being sensitive to yohimbine and the other to prazosin. PMID:6122478

  1. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation generates a concomitant synaptic excitation–inhibition in substantia nigra pars reticulata

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Clémentine; Degos, Bertrand; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Venance, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation is an efficient treatment for various neurological pathologies and a promising tool for neuropsychiatric disorders. This is particularly exemplified by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS), which has emerged as an efficient symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease. How STN-HFS works is still not fully elucidated. With dual patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices, we analysed the cellular responses of STN stimulation on SNr neurons by simultaneously recording synaptic currents and firing activity. We showed that STN-HFS caused an increase of the spontaneous spiking activity in half of SNr neurons while the remaining ones displayed a decrease. At the synaptic level, STN stimulation triggered inward current in 58% of whole-cell recorded neurons and outward current in the remaining ones. Using a pharmacological approach, we showed that STN-HFS-evoked responses were mediated in all neurons by a balance between AMPA/NMDA receptors and GABAA receptors, whose ratio promotes either a net excitation or a net inhibition. Interestingly, we observed a higher excitation occurrence in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats. In vivo injections of phaseolus revealed that GABAergic pallido-nigral fibres travel through the STN whereas striato-nigral fibres travel below it. Therefore, electrical stimulation of the STN does not only recruit glutamatergic axons from the STN, but also GABAergic passing fibres probably from the globus pallidus. For the first time, we showed that STN-HFS induces concomitant excitatory–inhibitory synaptic currents in SNr neurons by recruitment of efferences and passing fibres allowing a tight control on basal ganglia outflow. PMID:21690190

  2. Induction of activation of the antioxidant response element and stabilization of Nrf2 by 3-(3-pyridylmethylidene)-2-indolinone (PMID) confers protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jia-Wei; Liu, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Zhang, Shou-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Wei; Xu, Wang-Xiang; Tang, Liu-Jun; Ge, Chang-Hui; Wang, Lin; Li, Chang-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2012-03-01

    The antioxidant response elements (ARE) are a cis-acting enhancer sequence located in regulatory regions of antioxidant and detoxifying genes. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a member of the Cap ‘n’ Collar family of transcription factors that binds to the ARE and regulates the transcription of specific ARE-containing genes. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2/ARE induction is fundamental to defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and serves as a key factor in the protection against toxic xenobiotics. 3-(3-Pyridylmethylidene)-2-Indolinone (PMID) is a derivative of 2-indolinone compounds which act as protein kinase inhibitors and show anti-tumor activity. However, the role of PMID in the oxidative stress remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that PMID induced the activation of ARE-mediated transcription, increased the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2 and then up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes such as HO-1, SOD, and NQO1. The level of Nrf2 protein was increased in cells treated with PMID by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Under CHX treatment, the stability of Nrf2 protein was enhanced by PMID with decreased turnover rate. We showed that PMID reduced the ubiquitination of Nrf2 and disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. Furthermore, cells treated with PMID showed resistance to cytotoxicity by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6-OHDA. PMID also up-regulated the antioxidant level in BALB/c mice. Taken together, the compound PMID induces the ARE-mediated gene expression through stabilization of Nrf2 protein and activation of Nrf2/ARE pathway and protects against oxidative stress-mediated cell death. -- Highlights: ► PMID up-regulates ARE-mediated antioxidant gene expression in vitro and in vivo. ► PMID enhances the stabilization of Nrf2 protein, decreasing Nrf2 turnover rate. ► PMID disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. ► PMID protects against cell death induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6

  3. Differential Dopamine Receptor Occupancy Underlies L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Gurdal; Thompson, Lachlan H.; Lavisse, Sonia; Ozgur, Merve; Rbah-Vidal, Latifa; Dollé, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side effect of an otherwise effective L-DOPA treatment in Parkinson's patients. The prevailing view for the underlying presynaptic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) suggests that surges in dopamine (DA) via uncontrolled release from serotonergic terminals results in abnormally high level of extracellular striatal dopamine. Here we used high-sensitivity online microdialysis and PET imaging techniques to directly investigate DA release properties from serotonergic terminals both in the parkinsonian striatum and after neuronal transplantation in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Although L-DOPA administration resulted in a drift in extracellular DA levels, we found no evidence for abnormally high striatal DA release from serotonin neurons. The extracellular concentration of DA remained at or below levels detected in the intact striatum. Instead, our results showed that an inefficient release pool of DA associated with low D2 receptor binding remained unchanged. Taken together, these findings suggest that differential DA receptor activation rather than excessive release could be the underlying mechanism explaining LID seen in this model. Our data have important implications for development of drugs targeting the serotonergic system to reduce DA release to manage dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:24614598

  4. Dopamine Modulates Motor Control in a Specific Plane Related to Support.

    PubMed

    Herbin, Marc; Simonis, Caroline; Revéret, Lionel; Hackert, Rémi; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Eugène, Daniel; Diaz, Jorge; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    At the acute stage following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), rats, mice or guinea pigs exhibit a complex motor syndrome combining circling (HSCC lesion) and rolling (utricular lesion). At the chronic stage, they only display circling, because proprioceptive information related to the plane of support substitutes the missing utricular information to control posture in the frontal plane. Circling is also observed following unilateral lesion of the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by 6- hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA rats) and systemic injection of apomorphine (APO rats). The resemblance of behavior induced by unilateral vestibular and dopaminergic lesions at the chronic stage can be interpreted in two ways. One hypothesis is that the dopaminergic system exerts three-dimensional control over motricity, as the vestibular system does. If this hypothesis is correct, then a unilateral lesion of the nigro-striatal pathway should induce three-dimensional motor deficits, i.e., circling and at least some sort of barrel rolling at the acute stage of the lesion. Then, compensation could also take place very rapidly based on proprioception, which would explain the prevalence of circling. In addition, barrel rolling should reappear when the rodent is placed in water, as it occurs in UL vertebrates. Alternatively, the dopaminergic network, together with neurons processing the horizontal canal information, could control the homeostasis of posture and locomotion specifically in one and only one plane of space, i.e. the plane related to the basis of support. In that case, barrel rolling should never occur, whether at the acute or chronic stage on firm ground or in water. Moreover, circling should have the same characteristics following both types of lesions. Clearly, 6-OHDA and APO-rats never exhibited barrel rolling at the acute stage. They circled at the acute stage of the lesion and continued to do so three weeks later, including in water. In contrast, UL-rats, exhibited

  5. Dopamine Modulates Motor Control in a Specific Plane Related to Support

    PubMed Central

    Herbin, Marc; Simonis, Caroline; Revéret, Lionel; Hackert, Rémi; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Eugène, Daniel; Diaz, Jorge; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    At the acute stage following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), rats, mice or guinea pigs exhibit a complex motor syndrome combining circling (HSCC lesion) and rolling (utricular lesion). At the chronic stage, they only display circling, because proprioceptive information related to the plane of support substitutes the missing utricular information to control posture in the frontal plane. Circling is also observed following unilateral lesion of the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by 6- hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA rats) and systemic injection of apomorphine (APO rats). The resemblance of behavior induced by unilateral vestibular and dopaminergic lesions at the chronic stage can be interpreted in two ways. One hypothesis is that the dopaminergic system exerts three-dimensional control over motricity, as the vestibular system does. If this hypothesis is correct, then a unilateral lesion of the nigro-striatal pathway should induce three-dimensional motor deficits, i.e., circling and at least some sort of barrel rolling at the acute stage of the lesion. Then, compensation could also take place very rapidly based on proprioception, which would explain the prevalence of circling. In addition, barrel rolling should reappear when the rodent is placed in water, as it occurs in UL vertebrates. Alternatively, the dopaminergic network, together with neurons processing the horizontal canal information, could control the homeostasis of posture and locomotion specifically in one and only one plane of space, i.e. the plane related to the basis of support. In that case, barrel rolling should never occur, whether at the acute or chronic stage on firm ground or in water. Moreover, circling should have the same characteristics following both types of lesions. Clearly, 6-OHDA and APO-rats never exhibited barrel rolling at the acute stage. They circled at the acute stage of the lesion and continued to do so three weeks later, including in water. In contrast, UL-rats, exhibited

  6. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  7. Serotonin neuron transplants exacerbate L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Thomas; Carta, Manolo; Winkler, Christian; Björklund, Anders; Kirik, Deniz

    2007-07-25

    Clinical trials in patients with Parkinson's disease have shown that transplants of fetal mesencephalic dopamine neurons can form a new functional innervation of the host striatum, but the clinical benefits have been highly variable: some patients have shown substantial recovery in motor function, whereas others have shown no improvement and even a worsening in the 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinetic side effects. Differences in the composition of the grafted cell preparation may contribute to these discrepancies. In particular, the number of serotonin neurons contained in the graft can vary greatly depending on the dissection of the fetal tissue. Importantly, serotonin neurons have the ability to store and release dopamine, formed from exogenously administered L-DOPA. Here, we have evaluated the effect of transplants containing serotonin neurons, or a mixture of dopamine and serotonin neurons, on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals. As expected, dopamine neuron-rich grafts induced functional recovery, accompanied by a 60% reduction in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia that developed gradually over the first 10 weeks. Rats with serotonin-rich grafts with few dopamine neurons, in contrast, showed a progressive worsening of their L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias over time, and no functional improvement. The antidyskinetic effect of dopamine-rich grafts was independent of the number of serotonin neurons present. We conclude that serotonin neurons in the grafts are likely to have a detrimental effect on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in cases in which the grafts contain no or few dopamine neurons. PMID:17652591

  8. Acute L: -DOPA effect on hydroxyl radical- and DOPAC-levels in striatal microdialysates of parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemysław; Kostrzewa, Rose Anna; Skaba, Dariusz; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2010-04-01

    The object of the current study was to determine the effect of L: -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L: -DOPA) on the in vivo striatal microdialysate levels of the respective dopamine and serotonin metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenlalanine (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and hydroxyl radical level (HO(*); 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA) in adult rats made parkinsonian by treatment at 3 days after birth with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 66.7 microg, base form, on each side; desipramine pretreatment, 1 h). Using HPLC/ED we found that in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats the basal striatal extraneuronal level of DOPAC was dramatically reduced and constituted only approximately 4.5% of referenced value (intact rats). Conversely, the striatal microdialysate level of 5-HIAA was elevated 2-fold in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Acute L: -DOPA (60 mg/kg i.p.; S-carbidopa pretreatment, 12.5 mg/kg i.p., 30 min) produced a rapid rise in the extraneuronal DOPAC in both tested groups but to a much greater extent in intact rats (P < 0.05). Levels of HO(*) (spin-trap products of salicylate, 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA) were elevated 2-fold in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. However, L: -DOPA did not enhance HO(*) production; acute 6-OHDOPA treatment (60 mg/kg i.p.) also did not alter HO(*) production. In summary, L: -DOPA, an effective drug in ameliorating PD symptoms, did not acutely pose a risk for HO(*) generation in parkinsonian rats. We conclude that L: -DOPA is not likely to generate reactive oxygen species in humans nor is L: -DOPA likely to accelerate PD in humans. PMID:19760476

  9. Reduced vocal variability in a zebra finch model of dopamine depletion: implications for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie E; Hafzalla, George W; Burkett, Zachary D; Fox, Cynthia M; White, Stephanie A

    2015-11-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) modulates the activity of basal ganglia circuitry important for motor control in a variety of species. In songbirds, DA underlies motivational behavior including reproductive drive and is implicated as a gatekeeper for neural activity governing vocal variability. In the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, DA levels increase in Area X, a song-dedicated subregion of the basal ganglia, when a male bird sings his courtship song to a female (female-directed; FD). Levels remain stable when he sings a less stereotyped version that is not directed toward a conspecific (undirected; UD). Here, we used a mild dose of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to reduce presynaptic DA input to Area X and characterized the effects on FD and UD behaviors. Immunoblots were used to quantify levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as a biomarker for DA afferent loss in vehicle- and 6-OHDA-injected birds. Following 6-OHDA administration, TH signals were lower in Area X but not in an adjacent subregion, ventral striatal-pallidum (VSP). A postsynaptic marker of DA signaling was unchanged in both regions. These observations suggest that effects were specific to presynaptic afferents of vocal basal ganglia. Concurrently, vocal variability was reduced during UD but not FD song. Similar decreases in vocal variability are observed in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), but the link to DA loss is not well-understood. The 6-OHDA songbird model offers a unique opportunity to further examine how DA loss in cortico-basal ganglia pathways affects vocal control. PMID:26564062

  10. Reduced vocal variability in a zebra finch model of dopamine depletion: implications for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Julie E; Hafzalla, George W; Burkett, Zachary D; Fox, Cynthia M; White, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) modulates the activity of basal ganglia circuitry important for motor control in a variety of species. In songbirds, DA underlies motivational behavior including reproductive drive and is implicated as a gatekeeper for neural activity governing vocal variability. In the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, DA levels increase in Area X, a song-dedicated subregion of the basal ganglia, when a male bird sings his courtship song to a female (female-directed; FD). Levels remain stable when he sings a less stereotyped version that is not directed toward a conspecific (undirected; UD). Here, we used a mild dose of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to reduce presynaptic DA input to Area X and characterized the effects on FD and UD behaviors. Immunoblots were used to quantify levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as a biomarker for DA afferent loss in vehicle- and 6-OHDA-injected birds. Following 6-OHDA administration, TH signals were lower in Area X but not in an adjacent subregion, ventral striatal-pallidum (VSP). A postsynaptic marker of DA signaling was unchanged in both regions. These observations suggest that effects were specific to presynaptic afferents of vocal basal ganglia. Concurrently, vocal variability was reduced during UD but not FD song. Similar decreases in vocal variability are observed in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), but the link to DA loss is not well-understood. The 6-OHDA songbird model offers a unique opportunity to further examine how DA loss in cortico-basal ganglia pathways affects vocal control. PMID:26564062

  11. Relationship between dopamine deficit and the expression of depressive behavior resulted from alteration of serotonin system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Ryu, Young Hoon; Cho, Won Gil; Kang, Yeo Wool; Lee, Soo Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Kim, Chul Hoon; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Kyochul; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choi, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Depression frequently accompanies in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous research suggested that dopamine (DA) and serotonin systems are closely linked with depression in PD. However, comprehensive studies about the relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems are limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic destruction on the serotonin system. The interconnection between motor and depression was also examined. Two PET scans were performed in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned and sham operated rats: [(18) F]FP-CIT for DA transporters and [(18) F]Mefway for serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors. Here, 6-OHDA is a neurotoxin for dopaminergic neurons. Behavioral tests were used to evaluate the severity of symptoms: rotational number for motor impairment and immobility time, acquired from the forced swim test for depression. Region-of-interests were drawn in the striatum and cerebellum for the DA system and hippocampus and cerebellum for the 5-HT system. The cerebellum was chosen as a reference region. Nondisplaceable binding potential in the striatum and hippocampus were compared between 6-OHDA and sham groups. As a result, the degree of DA depletion was negatively correlated with rotational behavior (R(2)  = 0.79, P = 0.003). In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, binding values for 5-HT(1A) receptors was 22% lower than the sham operated group. This decrement of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was also correlated with the severity of depression (R(2)  = 0.81, P = 0.006). Taken together, this research demonstrated that the destruction of dopaminergic system causes the reduction of the serotonergic system resulting in the expression of depressive behavior. The degree of dopaminergic dysfunction was positively correlated with the impairment of the serotonin system. Severity of motor symptoms was also closely related to depressive behavior. PMID:26089169

  12. The importance of A9 dopaminergic neurons in mediating the functional benefits of fetal ventral mesencephalon transplants and levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Wei-Li; Lin, Rachel; Tyers, Pam; Barker, Roger A

    2007-03-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) tissue provides the potential to alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). However, the degree of recovery varies among individuals with an incidence of "off-phase", graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) in some patients. We hypothesised that this variability is due to the heterogeneous nature of dopaminergic neurons in the transplant. We therefore investigated this in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of PD. These animals were primed to develop LID and then transplanted with fetal VM into the caudal aspects of the striatum. No GID was observed but in a significant number of animals the transplants ameliorated LID. There was a correlation between the degree of behavioural and LID recovery with the number of A9 dopaminergic neurons in the transplant, based on their expression of a G-protein-coupled inward rectifying current potassium channel (Girk2). Furthermore, we showed that LID development is related to an abnormal expression profile of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the striatum and that intrastriatal VM transplants normalised both Cdk5 expression and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in animals exhibiting functional improvement. These results suggest that an A9 dopaminergic neuron-enriched transplant may be the key to an effective PD cell replacement therapy through normalisation of the altered striatal expression of Cdk5/DARPP-32. PMID:17188499

  13. Oleoylethanolamide reduces L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia via TRPV1 receptor in a mouse model of Parkinson´s disease.

    PubMed

    González-Aparicio, Ramiro; Moratalla, Rosario

    2014-02-01

    The long-term use of levodopa (L-DOPA) in Parkinson's disease (PD) results in the development of abnormal involuntary movements called L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. Increasing evidences suggest that the endocannabinoid system may play a role in the modulation of dyskinesias. In this work, we assessed the antidyskinetic effect of the endocannabinoid analog oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an agonist of PPARα and antagonist of TRPV1 receptors. We used a hemiparkinsonian model of PD in mice with 6-OHDA striatal lesion. The chronic L-DOPA treatment developed intense axial, forelimb and orolingual dyskinetic symptoms, as well as contralateral rotations. Treatment with OEA reduced all these symptoms without reducing motor activity or the therapeutic motor effects of L-DOPA. Moreover, the OEA-induced reduction in dyskinetic behavior correlated with a reduction in molecular correlates of dyskinesia. OEA reduced FosB striatal overexpression and phosphoacetylation of histone 3, both molecular markers of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. We found that OEA antidyskinetic properties were mediated by TRPV1 receptor, as pretreatment with capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, blocked OEA antidyskinetic actions, as well as the reduction in FosB- and pAcH3-overexpression induced by L-DOPA. This study supports the hypothesis that the endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the development and expression of dyskinesias and might be an effective target for the treatment of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. Importantly, there was no development of tolerance to OEA in any of the parameters we examined, which has important implications for the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting the endocannabinoid system. PMID:24140894

  14. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-03-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors.

  15. Natural toxins implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Experimental models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are of great importance for improving the design of future clinical trials. Various neurotoxic models are available, including 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), paraquat and rotenone. However, no model is considered perfect; each has its own limitations. Based on epidemiological data, a new trend of using environmental toxins in PD modeling seems attractive and has dominated public discussions of the disease etiology. A search for new environmental toxin-based models would improve our knowledge of the pathology of the condition. Here, we discuss some toxins of natural origin (e.g. cycad-derived toxins, epoxomicin, Nocardia asteroides bacteria, Streptomyces venezuelae bacteria, annonacin and DOPAL) that possibly represent a contributory environmental component to PD. PMID:22164190

  16. Protection of Primary Dopaminergic Midbrain Neurons by GPR139 Agonists Supports Different Mechanisms of MPP+ and Rotenone Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bayer Andersen, Kirsten; Leander Johansen, Jens; Hentzer, Morten; Smith, Garrick Paul; Dietz, Gunnar P. H.

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 139 (GPR139) is expressed specifically in the brain in areas of relevance for motor control. GPR139 function and signal transduction pathways are elusive, and results in the literature are even contradictory. Here, we examined the potential neuroprotective effect of GPR139 agonism in primary culture models of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal degeneration. We find that in vitro GPR139 agonists protected primary mesencephalic DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-mediated degeneration. Protection was concentration-dependent and could be blocked by a GPR139 antagonist. However, the protection of DA neurons was not found against rotenone or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mediated degeneration. Our results support differential mechanisms of toxicity for those substances commonly used in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models and potential for GPR139 agonists in neuroprotection. PMID:27445691

  17. Optogenetic activation of striatal cholinergic interneurons regulates L-dopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Bordia, Tanuja; Perez, Xiomara A; Heiss, Jaime E; Zhang, Danhui; Quik, Maryka

    2016-07-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) are a serious complication of L-dopa therapy for Parkinson's disease. Emerging evidence indicates that the nicotinic cholinergic system plays a role in LIDs, although the pathways and mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we used optogenetics to investigate the role of striatal cholinergic interneurons in LIDs. Mice expressing cre-recombinase under the control of the choline acetyltransferase promoter (ChAT-Cre) were lesioned by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. AAV5-ChR2-eYFP or AAV5-control-eYFP was injected into the dorsolateral striatum, and optical fibers implanted. After stable virus expression, mice were treated with L-dopa. They were then subjected to various stimulation protocols for 2h and LIDs rated. Continuous stimulation with a short duration optical pulse (1-5ms) enhanced LIDs. This effect was blocked by the general muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine indicating it was mAChR-mediated. By contrast, continuous stimulation with a longer duration optical pulse (20ms to 1s) reduced LIDs to a similar extent as nicotine treatment (~50%). The general nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine blocked the decline in LIDs with longer optical pulses showing it was nAChR-mediated. None of the stimulation regimens altered LIDs in control-eYFP mice. Lesion-induced motor impairment was not affected by optical stimulation indicating that cholinergic transmission selectively regulates LIDs. Longer pulse stimulation increased the number of c-Fos expressing ChAT neurons, suggesting that changes in this immediate early gene may be involved. These results demonstrate that striatal cholinergic interneurons play a critical role in LIDs and support the idea that nicotine treatment reduces LIDs via nAChR desensitization. PMID:26921469

  18. Amphetamine-induced abnormal movements occur independently of both transplant- and host-derived serotonin innervation following neural grafting in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Emma Louise; Brundin, Patrik; Cenci, M Angela

    2009-07-01

    Serotonin has been postulated to play a role in the transplant-induced involuntary movements that occur following intrastriatal grafts of ventral mesencephalic tissue in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Serotonin innervation of the striatum may be derived from either the donor graft tissue or the normal host projections from the midbrain. In two sets of experiments we study the impact of graft- versus host-derived serotonin innervation. All experiments were performed in l-DOPA treated rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. As expected, following intrastriatal transplantation of embryonic ventral mesencephalon all the transplanted rats exhibited pronounced contralateral rotation in response to amphetamine and some animals also showed severe abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). In the first set of experiments, all types of AIMs (axial, limb, orolingual and locomotor) were markedly reduced when amphetamine was co-administered with either the D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist raclopride or the D(1) receptor antagonist SCH23390. Cotreatment with the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT significantly attenuated the amphetamine-induced axial and limb dyskinesias, whilst locomotor scores remained unchanged. These data point to a major role for dopamine receptors, and to a modulatory role for 5-HT(1A) receptors, in post-grafting dyskinesias. In the second experiment, grafted rats exhibiting amphetamine-induced dyskinesia were subjected to 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine injections into the midbrain in order to destroy the host serotonin innervation. This intervention had no effect on either amphetamine-induced AIMs or contralateral rotation. Histological examination of all grafted rats showed similar numbers of dopaminergic neurons and a very low number of serotonin neurons within the transplants, regardless of AIMs expression. Our results suggest that amphetamine-induced AIMs in grafted animals primarily depend on an activation of dopamine receptors, and that serotonin

  19. Effect of tricyclic antidepressants on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and motor improvement in hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Conti, Melissa M; Goldenberg, Adam A A; Kuberka, Alexandra; Mohamed, Mohamed; Eissa, Satie; Lindenbach, David; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Although dopamine replacement therapy with L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease initially reduces motor symptoms, its chronic use often leads to the development of abnormal involuntary movements known as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Increasingly, research has indicated that non-dopaminergic neurons gain function in the parkinsonian brain, taking up and converting L-DOPA to dopamine and releasing it as a "false neurotransmitter". Although less explored, promiscuity between monoamine transporters may also modulate these processes. Therefore, in order to examine the differential roles of monoamine transporters in L-DOPA's behavioral effects, three tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) with graded affinity for serotonin (SERT) vs. norepinephrine (NET) transporters were tested in hemi-parkinsonian rats: clomipramine (SERT>NET), amitriptyline (SERT=NET), and desipramine (SERT6-hydroxydopamine lesions and were primed with L-DOPA (12mg/kg, s.c.) to develop stable dyskinesia (N=19 of 26). In a series of studies, rats were administered TCAs (0, 7.5, 15 or 30mg/kg, i.p.) followed by L-DOPA (6mg/kg, s.c.) and were measured for dyskinesia using the abnormal involuntary movements scale as well as motor performance and activity using the forepaw adjusting steps test and locomotor chambers, respectively. Clomipramine, the compound with the highest affinity for SERT was most effective in attenuating L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia without altering L-DOPA's stimulatory effects. In contrast, desipramine, the TCA with the highest NET affinity deferred L-DOPA's effects to later time points in testing. The current results indicate divergent roles for non-dopaminergic neuronal transporters in L-DOPA's mechanisms of action and point to novel targets for improving Parkinson's disease treatment. PMID:26791104

  20. Combination of acamprosate and baclofen as a promising therapeutic approach for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Rodolphe; Milet, Aude; Toulorge, Damien; Cholet, Nathalie; Laffaire, Julien; Foucquier, Julie; Robelet, Sandra; Mitry, Richard; Guedj, Mickael; Nabirotchkin, Serguei; Chumakov, Ilya; Cohen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by the loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons but which involves the loss of additional neurotransmitter pathways. Mono- or polytherapeutic interventions in PD patients have declining efficacy long-term and no influence on disease progression. The systematic analysis of available genetic and functional data as well as the substantial overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and PD features led us to repurpose and explore the effectiveness of a combination therapy (ABC) with two drugs – acamprosate and baclofen – that was already effective in AD animal models, for the treatment of PD. We showed in vitro that ABC strongly and synergistically protected neuronal cells from oxidative stress in the oxygen and glucose deprivation model, as well as dopaminergic neurons from cell death in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. Furthermore, we showed that ABC normalised altered motor symptoms in vivo in 6-OHDA-treated rats, acting by protecting dopaminergic cell bodies and their striatal terminals. Interestingly, ABC also restored a normal behaviour pattern in lesioned rats suggesting a symptomatic effect, and did not negatively interact with L-dopa. Our results demonstrate the potential value of combining repurposed drugs as a promising new strategy to treat this debilitating disease. PMID:26542636

  1. Altered neuronal activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus: An electrophysiological study in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiwen; Xie, Jinlu; Wang, Xuenan; Wang, Xiusong; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yabing; Lei, Chengdong; Li, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Han, Hongyu; Yao, Xiaomeng; Wang, Min

    2016-05-15

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a new deep brain stimulation target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). But the alterations of the PPN electrophysiological activities in PD are still debated. To investigate these potential alterations, extracellular single unit and local field potential (LFP) activities in the PPN were recorded in unilateral hemispheric 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats and in control rats, respectively. The spike activity results revealed two types of neurons (Type I and Type II) with distinct electrophysiological characteristics in the PPN. Both types of neurons had increased firing rate and changed firing pattern in lesioned rats when compared to control rats. Specifically, Type II neurons showed an increased firing rate when the rat state was switched from rest to locomotion. The LFP results demonstrated that lesioned rats had lower LFP power at 0.7-12Hz and higher power at 12-30Hz than did control animals in either resting or locomotor state. These findings provide a better understanding of the effects of 6-OHDA lesion on neuronal activities in the PPN and also provide a proof of the link between this structure and locomotion, which contributes to better understanding the mechanisms of the PPN functioning in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:26924016

  2. Lesions of dopamine neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex: effects on self-administration of amphetamine and dopamine synthesis in the brain of the rat.

    PubMed

    Leccese, A P; Lyness, W H

    1987-09-01

    It has been suggested that dopamine (DA)-containing neurons within the medial prefrontal cortex subserve a role in the positive reinforcing effects of psychomotor stimulants. Injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into this region, which destroyed a major portion of the DA innervation, but maintained the integrity of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons, failed to alter either the acquisition or maintenance of the intravenous self-administration of d-amphetamine in rats. Compared to vehicle-injected controls (sham lesions), the animals treated with 6-OHDA acquired the drug-abuse behaviour and maintained comparable, stable rates of self-injection. The lesions increased concentrations of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the nucleus accumbens septi but not in the striatum. The increased synthesis of DA in the nucleus accumbens septi [demonstrated by increased accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)] was abolished by the intravenous administration of d-amphetamine, in patterns mimicking those of animals trained in self-administration. PMID:3118232

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson’s disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  4. The uptake of tritiated delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol by the isolated vas deferens of the rat.

    PubMed

    Egan, S M; Graham, J D; Lewis, M J

    1976-04-01

    1 Weighed stripped vasa deferentia were incubated in Holman's solution containing (a) [14C]-sorbitol 0.014 mm, (b) [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) 12.31 nM, (c) [3H]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([3H]-delta1-THC) 1 mug/ml for 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes. 2 Tissues were washed, dissolved in Protosol, counted by standard scintillation counting technique and 'drug space' expressed as ct min-1 mg-1 tissue/ct min-l mul-1 bathing fluid. 3 Vasa incubated for 30 min with [14C]-sorbitol were washed for varying lengths of time; 82% clearance had taken place after 2 washes of 5 minutes. 4 The uptake of [3H]-NA was inhibited by the presence of desmethylimipramine (DMI) 10 nM in the bath or by pretreatment of rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). 5 The uptake of [3H]-delta 1-THC was not inhibited by the presence of DMI. It was reduced but not abolished by 6-OHDA pretreatment. PMID:1260220

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson's disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  6. Mesocortical dopamine depletion and anxiety-related behavior in the rat: sex and hemisphere differences.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R M; Dufresne, M M; Siontas, D; Chehab, S; Townsend, J; Laplante, F

    2014-10-01

    The mesocortical dopamine (DA) system of the rat plays an important role in prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation of stress and emotion and exhibits functional hemispheric asymmetry for such processing. Since few studies examine sex differences in this context, we compared the effects of left vs. right unilateral PFC DA depletion in males and females in several behavioral situations associated with anxiety or aversion. Adult rats received unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or vehicle in the ventromedial (vm) PFC. Behavioral tests included a predator odor burying test, elevated plus maze and sucrose consumption with simple taste aversion. Tissue analysis confirmed that vmPFCs injected with 6-OHDA were depleted of DA (75-85%) compared to controls. Burying behavior and sucrose consumption were affected only by left lesions, similarly in both sexes. However, risk assessment behaviors were affected by right lesions in opposite directions in males and females. Behaviors modified preferentially by the left cortex thus showed less evidence of sex differences than those modulated by the right. While mesocortical DA depletion effects are lateralized, the nature of these effects can vary with sex and specific behavior. Such findings may be clinically significant, given the large gender differences in the incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, which also show many lateralized prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:24819821

  7. Exposure to Early Life Stress Results in Epigenetic Changes in Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in a Parkinsonian Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Mpofana, Thabisile; Daniels, Willie M. U.; Mabandla, Musa V.

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity increases the risk of mental disorders later in life. Chronic early life stress may alter neurotrophic factor gene expression including those for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) that are important in neuronal growth, survival, and maintenance. Maternal separation was used in this study to model early life stress. Following unilateral injection of a mild dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we measured corticosterone (CORT) in the blood and striatum of stressed and nonstressed rats; we also measured DNA methylation and BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum using real time PCR. In the presence of stress, we found that there was increased corticosterone concentration in both blood and striatal tissue. Further to this, we found higher DNA methylation and decreased neurotrophic factor gene expression. 6-OHDA lesion increased neurotrophic factor gene expression in both stressed and nonstressed rats but this increase was higher in the nonstressed rats. Our results suggest that exposure to early postnatal stress increases corticosterone concentration which leads to increased DNA methylation. This effect results in decreased BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum leading to decreased protection against subsequent insults later in life. PMID:26881180

  8. l-DOPA reverses the impairment of Dentate Gyrus LTD in experimental parkinsonism via β-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Pendolino, Valentina; Bagetta, Vincenza; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Sgobio, Carmelo; Morelli, Emanuela; Poggini, Silvia; Branchi, Igor; Latagliata, Emanuele C; Pascucci, Tiziana; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Calabresi, Paolo; Picconi, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients exhibit motor and non-motor symptoms that severely affect quality of life. Cognitive alterations in PD subjects have been related to both structural and functional hippocampal changes. Here we investigated the effects of the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion in the Medial Forebrain Bundle (MFB) on the hippocampus focusing on the Dentate Gyrus (DG). In vivo microdialysis measurements revealed that the 6-OHDA injection disrupts both dopaminergic and noradrenergic transmission in rat DG. In vitro electrophysiological recordings showed that these neurochemical alterations were accompanied by impairment of long-term depression (LTD) at medial perforant path/DG synapses. Furthermore, this alteration was reversed by l-DOPA treatment. Notably, the therapeutic effect of l-DOPA on LTD was blocked by the antagonism of β-noradrenergic receptors, but not by dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. Thus, while the dopaminergic transmission does not seem to be implicated in this therapeutic effect of l-DOPA, the noradrenergic system plays a central role in the synaptic dysfunction of the DG in experimental PD. Our work provides new evidence on the role of catecholamines in DG synaptic plasticity and sheds light on the possible synaptic mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in PD. Furthermore, our results indicate that l-DOPA exerts a therapeutic effect on the parkinsonian brain through different, coexistent, mechanisms. PMID:25058044

  9. The restorative effect of intramuscular injection of tetanus toxin C-fragment in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Alejandra; Mendieta, Liliana; Palafox, Victoria; Candalija, Anna; Luna, Félix; Aguilera, José; Limón, Ilhuicamina Daniel

    2014-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin (Hc-TeTx) is a peptide that has a neuroprotective action against dopaminergic damage by MPP(+), both in vitro and in vivo. The trophic effects of Hc-TeTx have been related to its ability to activate the pathways of the tropomyosin receptor kinase, which are crucial for survival process. Our group had previously shown neuroprotective effect of intramuscular Hc-TeTx treatment on animals with a dopaminergic lesion; however, there is no evidence indicating its restorative effects on advanced dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The aim of our study was to examine the restorative effects of an intramuscular injection of the Hc-TeTx fragment on the nigrostriatal system of hemiparkinsonian rats. The animals were administered with a vehicle or Hc-TeTx (20μg/kg) in the gastrocnemius muscle for three consecutive days post-dopaminergic lesion, which was made using 6-hydroxydopamine. Post-Hc-TeTx treatment, the hemiparkinsonian rats showed constant motor asymmetry. Moreover, the ipsilateral striatum of the post-Hc-TeTx group had a lower number of argyrophilic structures and a major immunorreactivity to Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the striatum and the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to the 6-OHDA group. Our results show the restorative effect of the Hc-TeTx fragment during the dopaminergic neurodegeneration caused by 6-OHDA. PMID:24815514

  10. Regional, kinetic [18F]FDG PET imaging of a unilateral Parkinsonian animal model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Matthew D; Glaus, Charles; Hesterman, Jacob Y; Hoppin, Jack; Puppa, Geraldine Hill della; Kazules, Timothy; Orcutt, Kelly M; Germino, Mary; Immke, David; Miller, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the glucose analog 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F] FDG) has demonstrated clinical utility for the monitoring of brain glucose metabolism alteration in progressive neurodegenerative diseases. We examined dynamic [18F]FDG PET imaging and kinetic modeling of atlas-based regions to evaluate regional changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in the widely-used 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson’s disease. Following a bolus injection of 18.5 ± 1 MBq [18F]FDG and a 60-minute PET scan, image-derived input functions from the vena cava and left ventricle were used with three models, including Patlak graphical analysis, to estimate the influx constant and the metabolic rate in ten brain regions. We observed statistically significant changes in [18F]FDG uptake ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA injection in the basal ganglia, olfactory bulb, and amygdala regions; and these changes are of biological relevance to the disease. These experiments provide further validation for the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging in this model for drug discovery and development. PMID:23526185

  11. Kinetic Study of Aroxyl-Radical-Scavenging and α-Tocopherol-Regeneration Rates of Five Catecholamines in Solution: Synergistic Effect of α-Tocopherol and Catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Nagai, Kanae; Egawa, Yoshifumi; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi

    2016-07-28

    Detailed kinetic studies have been performed for reactions of aroxyl (ArO(•)) and α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radicals with five catecholamines (CAs) (dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EN), and 5- and 6-hydroxydopamine (5- and 6-OHDA)) and two catechins (epicatechin (EC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) to clarify the free-radical-scavenging activity of CAs. Second-order rate constants (ks and kr) for reactions of ArO(•) and α-Toc(•) radicals with the above antioxidants were measured in 2-propanol/water (5:1, v/v) solution at 25.0 °C, using single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometries, respectively. Both the rate constants (ks and kr) increased in the order NE < EN < DA < EC < 5-OHDA < EGCG < 6-OHDA. The ks and kr values of 6-OHDA are large and comparable to the corresponding values of ubiquinol-10 and sodium ascorbate, which show high free-radical-scavenging activity. The ultraviolet-visible absorption of α-Toc(•) (λmax = 428 nm), which was produced by the reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) with ArO(•), disappeared under the coexistence of CAs due to the α-TocH-regeneration reaction. The results suggest that the CAs may contribute to the protection from oxidative damage in nervous systems, by scavenging free radicals (such as lipid peroxyl radical) and regenerating α-TocH from the α-Toc(•) radical. PMID:27346174

  12. Neuroprotective potential of pleiotrophin overexpression in the striatonigral pathway compared with overexpression in both the striatonigral and nigrostriatal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gombash, SE; Manfredsson, FP; Mandel, RJ; Collier, TJ; Fischer, DL; Kemp, CJ; Kuhn, NM; Wohlgenant, SL; Fleming, SM; Sortwell, CE

    2015-01-01

    Intrastriatal injection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1) to overexpress the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) provides neuroprotection for tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), increases THir neurite density in the striatum (ST) and reverses functional deficits in forepaw use following 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxic insult. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene transfer studies suggest that optimal neuroprotection is dependent on the site of nigrostriatal overexpression. The present study was conducted to determine whether enhanced neuroprotection could be accomplished via simultaneous rAAV2/1 PTN injections into the ST and SN compared with ST injections alone. Rats were unilaterally injected in the ST alone or injected in both the ST and SN with rAAV2/1 expressing either PTN or control vector. Four weeks later, all rats received intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA. Rats were euthanized 6 or 16 weeks relative to 6-OHDA injection. A novel selective total enumeration method to estimate nigral THir neuron survival was validated to maintain the accuracy of stereological assessment. Long-term nigrostriatal neuroprotection and functional benefits were only observed in rats in which rAAV2/1 PTN was injected into the ST alone. Results suggest that superior preservation of the nigrostriatal system is provided by PTN overexpression delivered to the ST and restricted to the ST and SN pars reticulata and is not improved with overexpression of PTN within SNpc neurons. PMID:24807806

  13. Anti-parkinsonian effects of fluvoxamine maleate in maternally separated rats.

    PubMed

    Dallé, Ernest; Daniels, Willie M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to early life stress has been shown to result in anxiety-like symptoms and exacerbates degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). First line treatment for anxiety disorders includes the use of Fluvoxamine maleate (FM). In this study, we investigated whether treating anxiety-like symptoms with FM has an effect in alleviating the neurotoxic effects of 6-OHDA in a parkinsonian rat model. Early maternal separation was used to create a rat model that depicts anxiety-like symptoms. Maternally separated adult Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with FM prior to and following lesion with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The elevated plus-maze (EPM) and the forelimb akinesia tests were used to evaluate anxiety-like symptoms and motor impairment respectively. Blood plasma was used to measure corticosterone concentration, and striatal tissue was collected for dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) analysis. Our results show that animals exposed to early life stress displayed increased anxiety-like symptoms and elevated basal plasma corticosterone concentration which were attenuated by treatment with FM. A 6-OHDA lesion effect was evidenced by impairment in the forelimb akinesia test as well as decreased DA and 5-HT concentrations in the lesioned striatum. These effects were attenuated on DA neurons by FM treatment in the pre-lesion treated as opposed to the post-lesion treated rats. This study suggests that early treatment of anxiety-like behavior decreases the vulnerability of DA neurons to neurotoxic insults later in life thus slowing down DA degeneration in PD. PMID:27338206

  14. Decomposition of abnormal free locomotor behavior in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; von Nicolai, Constantin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K.; Moll, Christian K.

    2013-01-01

    Poverty of spontaneous movement, slowed execution and reduced amplitudes of movement (akinesia, brady- and hypokinesia) are cardinal motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease that can be modeled in experimental animals by brain lesions affecting midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Most behavioral investigations in experimental parkinsonism have employed short-term observation windows to assess motor impairments. We postulated that an analysis of longer-term free exploratory behavior could provide further insights into the complex fine structure of altered locomotor activity in parkinsonian animals. To this end, we video-monitored 23 h of free locomotor behavior and extracted several behavioral measures before and after the expression of a severe parkinsonian phenotype following bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the rat dopaminergic substantia nigra. Unbiased stereological cell counting verified the degree of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive cell loss in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. In line with previous reports, overall covered distance and maximal motion speed of lesioned animals were found to be significantly reduced compared to controls. Before lesion surgery, exploratory rat behavior exhibited a bimodal distribution of maximal speed values obtained for single movement episodes, corresponding to a “first” and “second gear” of motion. 6-OHDA injections significantly reduced the incidence of second gear motion episodes and also resulted in an abnormal prolongation of these fast motion events. Likewise, the spatial spread of such episodes was increased in 6-OHDA rats. The increase in curvature of motion tracks was increased in both lesioned and control animals. We conclude that the discrimination of distinct modes of motion by statistical decomposition of longer-term spontaneous locomotion provides useful insights into the fine structure of fluctuating motor functions in a rat analog of Parkinson's disease. PMID:24348346

  15. Aberrant Restoration of Spines and their Synapses in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: Involvement of Corticostriatal but Not Thalamostriatal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyue; Mendoza-Elias, Nasya; Rademacher, David J.; Tseng, Kuei Y.; Steece-Collier, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    We examined the structural plasticity of excitatory synapses from corticostriatal and thalamostriatal pathways and their postsynaptic targets in adult Sprague-Dawley rats to understand how these striatal circuits change in l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LIDs). We present here detailed electron and light microscopic analyses that provide new insight into the nature of the structural and synaptic remodeling of medium spiny neurons in response to LIDs. Numerous studies have implicated enhanced glutamate signaling and persistent long-term potentiation as central to the behavioral sensitization phenomenon of LIDs. Moreover, experience-dependent alterations in behavior are thought to involve structural modifications, specifically alterations in patterns of synaptic connectivity. Thus, we hypothesized that in the striatum of rats with LIDs, one of two major glutamatergic pathways would form new or altered contacts, especially onto the spines of medium spiny neuron (MSNs). Our data provide compelling evidence for a dramatic rewiring of the striatum of dyskinetic rats and that this rewiring involves corticostriatal but not thalamostriatal contacts onto MSNs. There is a dramatic increase in corticostriatal contacts onto spines and dendrites that appear to be directly linked to dyskinetic behaviors, since they were not seen in the striatum of animals that did not develop dyskinesia. There is also an aberrant increase in spines receiving more than one excitatory contact(i.e., multisynaptic spines) in the dyskinetic animals compared with the 6-hydroxydopamine-treated and control rats. Such alterations could substantially impair the ability of striatal neurons to gate cortically driven signals and contribute to the loss of bidirectional synaptic plasticity. PMID:23843533

  16. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with a deficient numerical downregulation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    Klietz, Martin; Keber, Ursula; Carlsson, Thomas; Chiu, Wei-Hua; Höglinger, Günter U; Weihe, Eberhard; Schäfer, Martin K-H; Depboylu, Candan

    2016-09-01

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) is the therapeutic gold standard in Parkinson's disease. However, most patients develop debilitating abnormal involuntary movements termed l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) as therapy-complicating side effects. The underlying mechanisms of LID pathogenesis are still not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests an involvement of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein-expressing neurons, as they are capable of endogenously producing l-DOPA and possibly dopamine. The aim of this study was to elucidate changes of TH transcription in the striatum and nucleus accumbens that occur under experimental conditions of LID. Mice with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of the medial forebrain bundle were treated daily with l-DOPA for 15days to provoke dyskinesia. In situ hybridization analysis revealed a significant numerical decrease of TH mRNA-positive neurons in the striatum and nucleus accumbens of mice not exhibiting LID, whereas dyskinetic animals failed to show this reduction of TH transcription. Interestingly, similar changes were observed in intact non-deafferentiated striata, demonstrating an l-DOPA-responsive transcriptional TH regulation independently from nigrostriatal lesion severity. Consolidation with our previous study on TH protein level (Keber et al., 2015) impressively highlights that LID is associated with both a deficient downregulation of TH transcription and an excessive translation of TH protein in intrastriatal neurons. As TH protein levels in comparison to mRNA levels showed a stronger correlation with development and severity of LID, antidyskinetic treatment strategies should focus on translational and posttranslational modulations of TH as a promising target. PMID:27320210

  17. The regulation of subcortical dopamine systems by the prefrontal cortex: interactions of central dopamine systems and the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Deutch, A Y

    1992-01-01

    A recent hypothesis of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia posits a developmentally-specific dysfunction of the dopaminergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC; Weinberger, 1987; Berman and Weinberger, 1990). It has been difficult to reconcile this hypothesis with the observation that all clinically effective antipsychotic drugs used for the treatment of schizophrenia block dopamine D2 receptors (see Deutch et al., 1991a). A resolution between the suggestion of functional dopamine (DA) "depletion" in the PFC and enhanced subcortical DA function was offered by studies of Carter, Pycock, and associates (Carter and Pycock, 1980; Pycock et al., 1980a, b). These investigators reported that depletion of DA in the rat PFC enhanced DA utilization in subcortical sites such as the nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) and striatum. Thus, a functional deficit in DA neurotransmission in the PFC would increase subcortical DA turnover, and the D2 receptor blockade induced by antipsychotic drugs would counteract the increase in dopaminergic tone in subcortical sites. This hypothesis has been particularly influential because it incorporates both an explanation for negative symptoms, which are thought to reflect cortical dysfunction (a derangement in DA transmission in the PFC), and the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of positive symptoms (arising from increases in subcortical DA tone). As attractive as this hypothesis has been, the physiological underpinnings that subserve such system interactions have remained elusive. Pycock, Carter, and colleagues (Carter and Pycock, 1980; Pycock et al., 1980a, b) reported that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the PFC increase DA levels and DA turnover in the striatum; certain aspects of their findings have been confirmed (Martin-Iversen et al., 1986; Leccese and Lyness, 1987; Haroutounian et al., 1988). However, other groups have been unable to confirm either the biochemical or behavioral findings of Pycock and associates

  18. L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease is associated with the fluctuational release of norepinephrine in the sensorimotor striatum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Hui Sheng; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen; Liu, Jian

    2014-12-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) is the most common complication of standard L-DOPA therapy for Parkinson's disease experienced by most parkinsonian patients. LID is associated with disruption of dopaminergic homeostasis in basal ganglia following L-DOPA administration. Norepinephrine (NE) is another important catecholaminergic neurotransmitter that is also believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of LID. This study compared NE release in the ipsilateral sensorimotor striatum of dyskinetic and nondyskinetic 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats treated chronically with L-DOPA. After L-DOPA injection, the time-course curves of NE levels in the sensorimotor striatum were significantly different between dyskinetic and nondyskinetic rats. Several metabolic kinetic parameters of NE levels were also differentially expressed between the two groups. In comparison with nondyskinetic rats, the ΔCmax of NE was significantly higher in dyskinetic rats, whereas Tmax and t1/2 of NE were significantly shorter. Intrastriatal perfusion of NE into the lesioned sensorimotor striatum revealed a moderate dyskinesia in dyskinetic rats, which was similar to the dyskinetic behavior after L-DOPA administration. The L-DOPA-related dyskinetic behavior was inhibited significantly by a further pretreatment of noradrenergic neurotoxin N-​(2-​chloroethyl)​-​N-​ethyl-​2-​bromobenzylamine or intrastriatal administration of the α2 -adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, accompanied by significant changes in metabolic kinetic parameters of NE in the sensorimotor striatum. The results provide evidence to support the correlation between abnormal NE neurotransmission and the induction of LID and suggest that the aberrant change of the quantitative and temporal releasing of NE in the sensorimotor striatum might play an important role in the pathogenesis of LID. PMID:24975553

  19. Potential application of induced pluripotent stem cells in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, L W; Kuang, F; Wei, L C; Ding, Y X; Yung, K K L; Chan, Y S

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common degenerative disease in humans, is known to result from loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and is characterized by severe motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, bradykinsia and postural instability. Although levodopa administration, surgical neural lesion, and deep brain stimulation have been shown to be effective in improving parkinsonian symptoms, cell replacement therapy such as transplantation of dopamine neurons or neural stem cells has shed new light on an alternative treatment strategy for PD. While the difficulty in securing donor dopamine neurons and the immuno-rejection of neural transplants largely hinder application of neural transplants in clinical treatment, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) derived from somatic cells may represent a powerful tool for studying the pathogenesis of PD and provide a source for replacement therapies in this neurodegenerative disease. Yamanaka et al. [2006, 2007] first succeeded in generating iPS cells by reprogramming fibroblasts with four transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc in both mouse and human. Animal studies have further shown that iPS cells from fibroblasts could be induced into dopamine neurons and transplantation of these cells within the central nervous system improved motor symptoms in the 6-OHDA model of PD. More interestingly, neural stem cells or fibroblasts from patients can be efficiently reprogrammed and subsequently differentiated into dopamine neurons. Derivation of patient-specific iPS cells and subsequent differentiation into dopamine neurons would provide a disease-specific in vitro model for disease pathology, drug screening and personalized stem cell therapy for PD. This review summarizes current methods and modifications in producing iPS cells from somatic cells as well as safety concerns of reprogramming procedures. Novel reprogramming strategies that deter abnormal permanent genetic and epigenetic alterations are essential for

  20. Differential involvement of Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2 in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Bido, Simone; Solari, Nicola; Indrigo, Marzia; D’Antoni, Angela; Brambilla, Riccardo; Morari, Michele; Fasano, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent findings have shown that pharmacogenetic manipulations of the Ras-ERK pathway provide a therapeutic means to tackle l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID). First, we investigated whether a prolonged l-DOPA treatment differentially affected ERK signaling in medium spiny neurons of the direct pathway (dMSNs) and in cholinergic aspiny interneurons (ChIs) and assessed the role of Ras-GRF1 in both subpopulations. Second, using viral-assisted technology, we probed Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2 as potential targets in this pathway. We investigated how selective blockade of striatal Ras-GRF1 or Ras-GRF2 expression impacted on LID (induction, maintenance, and reversion) and its neurochemical correlates. Methods We used both Ras-GRF1 knockout mice and lentiviral vectors (LVs) delivering short-hairpin RNA sequences (shRNAs) to obtain striatum-specific gene knockdown of Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2. The consequences of these genetic manipulations were evaluated in the 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. Escalating doses of l-DOPA were administered and then behavioral analysis with immunohistochemical assays and in vivo microdialysis were performed. Results Ras-GRF1 was found essential in controlling ERK signaling in dMSNs, but its ablation did not prevent ERK activation in ChIs. Moreover, striatal injection of LV-shRNA/Ras-GRF1 attenuated dyskinesia development and ERK-dependent signaling, whereas LV-shRNA/Ras-GRF2 was without effect, ruling out the involvement of Ras-GRF2 in LID expression. Accordingly, Ras-GRF1 but not Ras-GRF2 striatal gene-knockdown reduced l-DOPA-induced GABA and glutamate release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, a neurochemical correlate of dyskinesia. Finally, inactivation of Ras-GRF1 provided a prolonged anti-dyskinetic effect for up to 7 weeks and significantly attenuated symptoms in animals with established LID. Interpretation Our results suggest that Ras-GRF1 is a promising target for LID

  1. Intranigral administration of substance P receptor antagonist attenuated levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinxin; Zhao, Hui; Shi, Hongjuan; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shenyang; Zhang, Zunsheng; Zu, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Xia; Cui, Guiyun; Hua, Fang

    2015-09-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) remains the most effective drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) has hindered its use for PD patients. The mechanisms of LID are not fully understood. Substance P (SP) receptor antagonist has been shown to reduce parkinsonism in animal models of PD, and ameliorate LID in PD rats. But the concrete mechanism is not fully understood. To address this issue, we produced a rat model of PD using 6-hydroxydompamine (6-OHDA) injections, and valid PD rats were intranigrally administrated with different doses of SP receptor antagonist LY303870 (5 nmol/day, 10 nmol/day and 20 nmol/day) following L-dopa (6 mg/kg/day, i.p.) plus benserazide (12 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 23 days. We found that nigral SP levels were increased on days 3, 7 and 14 and decreased on day 21 after 6-hydroxydompamine lesions. But nigral SP levels kept increasing after repeated L-dopa administration in PD rats. Intranigral administration of low and moderate LY303870 reduced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) while improving motor deficits in PD rats treated with L-dopa plus benserazide. Microdialysis revealed that LY303870 (10 nmol/day) treatment attenuated the increase of striatal dopamine and the reduction of γ-aminobutyric acid in ventromedial thalamus of PD rats primed with L-dopa. Additionally, LY303870 (10 nmol/day) treatment prior to L-dopa administration reduced the phosphorylated levels of dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa at Thr 34 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 as well as the levels of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein and Penk in L-dopa-primed PD rats. Taken together, these data showed that low and moderate SP receptor antagonists LY303870 could ameliorate LID via neurokinin 1 receptor without affecting therapeutic effect of L-dopa. PMID:26001615

  2. Enkephalin and dynorphin neuropeptides are differently correlated with locomotor hypersensitivity and levodopa-induced dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Sgroi, Stefania; Capper-Loup, Christine; Paganetti, Paolo; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2016-06-01

    The opioidergic neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (ENK) and the D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors (D1R, D2R) are involved in the striatal control of motor and behavioral function. In Parkinson's disease, motor disturbances such as "on-off" motor fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesia) are severe complications that often arise after chronic l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) treatment. Changes in the striatal expression of preproENK (PPENK), proDYN (PDYN), D1R, and D2R mRNA have been observed in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA. Enhanced opioidergic transmission has been found in association with l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, but the connection of PPENK, PDYN, D1R, and D2R mRNA expression with locomotor activity remains unclear. In this study, we measured PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA levels by in situ hybridization in the striatum of 6-OHDA hemi-parkinsonian rats treated with l-DOPA (PD+l-DOPA group), along with two control groups (PD+saline and naive+l-DOPA). We found different levels of expression of PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA across the experimental groups and correlated the changes in mRNA expression with dyskinesia and locomotor variables assessed by open field test during several phases of l-DOPA treatment. Both PDYN and PPENK mRNA levels were correlated with the severity of dyskinesia, while PPENK mRNA levels were also correlated with the frequency of contralateral rotational movements and with locomotor variables. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between D1R mRNA expression and D2R mRNA expression in the PD+l-DOPA group. These findings suggest that, in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA, high levels of PPENK are a prerequisite for a locomotor sensitization to l-DOPA treatment, while PDYN overexpression is responsible only for the development of dyskinesia. PMID:27072528

  3. Neuroprotective bibenzyl glycosides of Stemona tuberosa roots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Yong; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2006-04-01

    Three new bibenzyl glycosides characterized as stilbostemin B 3'-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), stilbostemin H 3'-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and stilbostemin I 2"-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3) were isolated from the roots of Stemona tuberosa. All three bibenzyl glycosides significantly protected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells from 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:16643052

  4. Impact of partial dopamine depletion on cognitive flexibility in BDNF heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vinay; Naughton, Sean X.; Yegla, Brittney; Guzman, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Cognitive flexibility is a key component of executive function and is disrupted in major psychiatric disorders. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts neuromodulatory effects on synaptic transmission and cognitive/affective behaviors. However the causal mechanisms linking BDNF hypofunction with executive deficits are not well understood. Objectives Here, we assessed the consequences of BDNF hemizygosity on cognitive flexibility in mice performing an operant conditioning task. As dopaminergic-glutamatergic interaction in the striatum is important for cognitive processing, and BDNF heterozygous (BDNF+/−) mice display a higher dopamine tone in the dorsal striatum, we also assessed the effects of partial striatal dopamine depletion on task performance and glutamate release. Results BDNF+/− mice acquired discrimination learning as well as new rule learning during set-shifting as efficiently as wild-type mice. However, partial removal of striatal dopaminergic inputs with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) impaired these cognitive processes by impeding the maintenance of a new learning strategy in both genotypes. BDNF mutants exhibited performance impairments during reversal learning and these deficits were associated with increased perseveration to the previously acquired strategy. Partial dopamine depletion of the striatum reversed these cognitive impairments. Additionally, reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release noted in the dorsal striatum of BDNF+/− mice was not observed in 6-OHDA-infused BDNF mutants indicating normalization of glutamatergic transmission in these animals. Conclusions Our data illustrate that BDNF signaling regulates cognitive control processes presumably by maintaining striatal dopamine-glutamate balance. Moreover, aberrations in BDNF signaling may act as a common neurobiological substrate that accounts for executive dysfunction observed in multiple psychiatric conditions. PMID:26861892

  5. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the