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Sample records for 6-hydroxydopamine 6-ohda-induced toxicity

  1. Protective effects of quercetin glycosides, rutin, and isoquercetrin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    PubMed

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that free radicals induced oxidative stress is a major causative agent in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease. Quercetin glycosides, namely rutin and isoquercitrin, are flavonoid polyphenol compounds found ubiquitously in fruits and vegetables and have been known to possess antioxidant effects. This study was designed to compare the neuroprotective effects of quercetin glycosides rutin and isoquercitrin in 6-OHDA-induced rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells. The results showed that both rutin and isoquercitrin significantly increased antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione level that were attenuated by 6-OHDA in PC-12 cells. There was no significant difference in the activation of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase enzymes between rutin and isoquercitrin. These two glycosides were equally effective in suppressing lipid peroxidation in 6-OHDA-induced PC-12 cells as both compounds suppressed the malondialdehyde generation and prevented cell damage. In conclusion, quercetin glycosides rutin and isoquercetrin are having a significant neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA toxicity in PC-12 cells. PMID:26542606

  2. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  3. EGCG Protects against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurotoxicity in a Cell Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Reddy, Manju B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes severe brain dopamine depletion. Disruption of iron metabolism may be involved in the PD progression. Objective. To test the protective effect of (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) induced neurotoxicity by regulating iron metabolism in N27 cells. Methods. Protection by EGCG in N27 cells was assessed by SYTOX green assay, MTT, and caspase-3 activity. Iron regulatory gene and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Intracellular iron uptake was measured using 55Fe. The EGCG protection was further tested in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by immunocytochemistry. Results. EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced cell toxicity. 6-OHDA treatment significantly (p < 0.05) increased divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and hepcidin and decreased ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) level, whereas pretreatment with EGCG counteracted the effects. The increased 55Fe (by 96%, p < 0.01) cell uptake confirmed the iron burden by 6-OHDA and was reduced by EGCG by 27% (p < 0.05), supporting the DMT1 results. Pretreatment with EGCG and 6-OHDA significantly increased (p < 0.0001) TH+ cell count (~3-fold) and neurite length (~12-fold) compared to 6-OHDA alone in primary mesencephalic neurons. Conclusions. Pretreatment with EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by regulating genes and proteins involved in brain iron homeostasis, especially modulating hepcidin levels. PMID:26770869

  4. Extracellular toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine on PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, D; Torch, S; Nissou, M F; Benabid, A L; Verna, J M

    2000-04-14

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is usually thought to cross cell membrane through dopamine uptake transporters, to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species. In this study, we show that the anti-oxidants catalase, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine are able to reverse the toxic effects of 6-OHDA. These two latter compounds considerably slow down 6-OHDA oxidation in a cell free system suggesting a direct chemical interaction with the neurotoxin. Moreover, desipramine does not protect PC12 cells and 6-OHDA is also strongly toxic towards non-catecholaminergic C6 and NIH3T3 cells. These results thus suggest that 6-OHDA toxicity on PC12 cells mainly involves an extracellular process. PMID:10754220

  5. Olomoucine inhibits cathepsin L nuclear translocation, activates autophagy and attenuates toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xi-Feng; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Xiang, Bei; Li, Ling-Yun; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji; Liang, Zhong-Qin

    2009-04-01

    The finding of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and its ability to process the CDP/Cux transcription factor uncovers an important role of cathepsin L in control of cell cycle progression. As the expression of certain cell cycle regulators is associated with nigral neuronal death, the present study was sought to investigate if nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and expression of certain cyclins were induced in DA neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The neuroprotective effects of the cell cycle inhibitor olomoucine against 6-OHDA-induced death of nigral neurons were examined. Using immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR we demonstrated that cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were aberrantly expressed in some dopaminergic neurons after 6-OHDA infusion. The nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and up-regulation of LC3, a protein involved in autophagy, were observed in nigral DA neurons. Olomoucine, a cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, reduced contralateral rotations and the loss of TH-positive neurons in substantia nigra induced by lesion with 6-OHDA. Pretreatment of rats or primary DA neurons with olomoucine resulted in a partial blockade of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L. Olomoucine also increased the expression of punctate LC3 immunoreactivity, indicating activation of autophagy. These findings suggest that olomoucine may exert neuroprotective effects through inhibiting cathepsin L nuclear translocation and activating autophagy. PMID:19368812

  6. Early expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in a toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Serratos, Iris N; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Gómez, Isabel; Rangel-López, Edgar; Santamaria, Abel

    2016-04-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is commonly involved in different neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. The cellular signaling associated to RAGE activation may occur upon binding to different ligands. In this study we investigated whether the toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats comprises early noxious responses related to RAGE-mediated signaling cascades. In order to explore a possible interaction between 6-OHDA and RAGE, affinity parameters of RAGE with 6-OHDA were estimated by different means. The possible binding sites of 6-OHDA with the VC1 homodimer for both rat and human RAGE were also modeled. Our results show that the striatal infusion of 6-OHDA recruits RAGE upregulation, as evidenced by an early expression of the receptor. 6-OHDA was also found to bind the VC1 homodimer, although its affinity was moderate when compared to other ligands. This work contributes to the understanding of the role of RAGE activation for 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26902637

  7. Agmatine Protects Against 6-OHDA-Induced Apoptosis, and ERK and Akt/GSK Disruption in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmat; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Moosavi, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a metabolite of dopamine is known to induce dopaminergic cell toxicity which makes that a suitable agent inducing an experimental model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Agmatine has been shown to protect against some cellular and animal PD models. This study was aimed to assess whether agmatine prevents 6-OHDA-induced SH-SY5Y cell death and if yes, then how it affects Akt/glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signals. The cells were treated with different drugs, and their viability was examined via MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay and morphological observation. Western blot studies were done to assess cleaved caspase-3, Akt/GSK-3β, and ERK proteins. 6-OHDA-induced cell death and caspase-3 cleavage, while agmatine prevented those changes. 6-OHDA also decreased the amount of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt)/Akt while increased GSK-3β activity which was prevented by agmatine. Additionally, this toxin increased pERK/ERK ratio which was averted again by agmatine. The PI3/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, impeded the changes induced by agmatine, while ERK inhibitor (PD98059) did not disturb the effects of agmatine, and by itself, it preserved the cells against 6-OHDA toxicity. This study revealed that agmatine is protective in 6-OHDA model of PD and affects Akt/GSK-3β and ERK pathways. PMID:26346882

  8. Impairment of Atg5-Dependent Autophagic Flux Promotes Paraquat- and MPP+-Induced Apoptosis But Not Rotenone or 6-Hydroxydopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Controversial reports on the role of autophagy as a survival or cell death mechanism in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins exist. We investigated the alterations in autophagic flux and the role of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5)-dependent autophagy in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Dopaminergic cell death induced by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitors 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and rotenone, the pesticide paraquat, and the dopamine analog 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was paralleled by increased autophagosome accumulation. However, when compared with basal autophagy levels using chloroquine, autophagosome accumulation was a result of impaired autophagic flux. Only 6-OHDA induced an increase in autophagosome formation. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Atg5 increased paraquat- and MPP+-induced cell death. Stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent signaling protected against cell death induced by paraquat, whereas MPP+-induced toxicity was enhanced by wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase class III inhibitor, rapamycin, and trehalose, an mTOR-independent autophagy activator. Modulation of autophagy by either pharmacological or genetic approaches had no effect on rotenone or 6-OHDA toxicity. Cell death induced by parkinsonian neurotoxins was inhibited by the pan caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD), but only caspase-3 inhibition was able to decrease MPP+-induced cell death. Finally, inhibition of the lysosomal hydrolases, cathepsins, increased the toxicity by paraquat and MPP+, supporting a protective role of Atg5-dependent autophagy and lysosomes degradation pathways on dopaminegic cell death. These results demonstrate that in dopaminergic cells, Atg5-dependent autophagy acts as a protective mechanism during apoptotic cell death induced by paraquat and MPP+ but not during rotenone or 6-OHDA toxicity. PMID:23997112

  9. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound, inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells via mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Sze, Cho-Wing; Tong, Yao; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Some naturally occurring bibenzyl compounds have been reported as free radical scavengers. The present study tested our hypothesis that bibenzyl compounds may be neuroprotective against apoptosis induced by the neurotoxins. Five structurally similar bibenzyl derivatives were tested for their protective effect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced toxicity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. The results showed that one bibenzyl compound, namely chrysotoxine, significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced cell death. The subsequent mechanism study demonstrated that chrysotoxine significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis characterized by DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation in a dose-dependent manner. 6-OHDA-induced intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, and mitochondrial dysfunctions, including the decrease of membrane potential, increase of intracellular free Ca2+, release of cytochrome c, imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and activation of caspase-3 were strikingly attenuated by chrysotoxine pretreatment. Meanwhile, chrysotoxine counteracted NF-κB activation by blocking its translocation to the nucleus, thereby preventing up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and intracellular NO release. The data provide the first evidence that chrysotoxine protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity possibly through mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation. Chrysotoxine is thus a candidate for further evaluation of its protection against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20708055

  10. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Jin, Huajun; Reddy, Manju B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P < 0.0001) upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P < 0.05) and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P = 0.086) and increased cell viability by 22% (P < 0.05). In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P < 0.05) and intracellular iron by 28% (P < 0.01), indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1. PMID:27298749

  11. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Jin, Huajun; Reddy, Manju B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P < 0.0001) upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P < 0.05) and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P = 0.086) and increased cell viability by 22% (P < 0.05). In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P < 0.05) and intracellular iron by 28% (P < 0.01), indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1. PMID:27298749

  12. 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction are mediated by early modulation of intracellular signals and interaction of Nrf2 and NF-κB factors.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio C; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Macías-Silva, Marina; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2013-02-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin that generates an experimental model of Parkinson's disease in rodents and is commonly employed to induce a lesion in dopaminergic pathways. The characterization of those molecular mechanisms linked to 6-OHDA-induced early toxicity is needed to better understand the cellular events further leading to neurodegeneration. The present work explored how 6-OHDA triggers early downstream signaling pathways that activate neurotoxicity in the rat striatum. Mitochondrial function, caspases-dependent apoptosis, kinases signaling (Akt, ERK 1/2, SAP/JNK and p38) and crosstalk between nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated at early times post-lesion. We found that 6-OHDA initiates cell damage via mitochondrial complex I inhibition, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release, as well as activation of caspases 9 and 3 to induce apoptosis, kinase signaling modulation and NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses, accompanied by inhibition of antioxidant systems regulated by the Nrf2 pathway. Our results suggest that kinases SAP/JNK and p38 up-regulation may play a role in the early stages of 6-OHDA toxicity to trigger intrinsic pathways for apoptosis and enhanced NF-κB activation. In turn, these cellular events inhibit the activation of cytoprotective mechanisms, thereby leading to a condition of general damage. PMID:23274087

  13. Neurosteroid allopregnanolone attenuates cognitive dysfunctions in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nezhadi, Akram; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh; Shabani, Mohammad; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2016-05-15

    Cognitive deficits have an extensive influence on the quality of life of the Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Previous studies have shown that lack of steroid hormones have an important role in the development of PD. Therefore, in this study the effects of neurosteroid allopregnanolone (Allo) on the PD-induced cognitive disorders were assessed. To simulate PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was injected into the rat's substantia nigra. Allo (5 and 20mg/kg, orally) were administered on the day after the 6-OHDA injection and continued during the entire treatment period (two months). Cognitive behaviors were assessed by Moris water maze (MWM), novel object recognition (NOR) and object location tasks. The data indicated that Allo significantly improved the 6-OHDA-induced cognitive impairment which revealed by the reduction of time spent to find out platform (escape latency) and the increase of retention time in MWM test and also with increase in the exploration index in NOR and object location tasks. Present study strongly supports the pro-cognitive property of allopregnanolone in PD. PMID:26970579

  14. Neuroprotective effects of tenuigenin in a SH-SY5Y cell model with 6-OHDA-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhigang; Shi, Fang; Wang, Yong; Lu, Li; Zhang, Zhanjun; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiaomin

    2011-06-22

    Tenuigenin, an active component of Polygala tenuifolia root extracts, has been shown to provide antioxidative and anti-aging effects in Alzheimer's disease, as well as to promote proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells. However, the effects of tenuigenin on Parkinson's disease remain unclear. In the present study, SH-SY5Y cells were utilized to determine the effects of tenuigenin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced injury. Results showed that 1.0 × 10⁻¹-10 μM tenuigenin significantly promoted cell viability and reduced cell death. In addition, tenuigenin protected mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) against 6-OHDA damage and significantly increased glutathione and superoxide dismutase expression. At the mRNA level, tenuigenin resulted in down-regulation of caspase-3, but up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression in 6-OHDA damaged cells. These results suggested that tenuigenin provides neuroprotection to dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA-induced damage. The neuroprotective mechanisms might involve antioxidative effects, maintenance of mitochondrial function, and regulation of caspase-3 and tyrosine hydroxylase expression and activity. Tenuigenin could provide a novel antioxidative strategy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:21536104

  15. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the free radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value for

  16. Duration of drug action of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Oana, Fumiki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Ijiro, Tomoyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hiratochi, Masahiro

    2015-12-16

    Although 6-hydroxydopamine-induced (6-OHDA-induced) rats are a well-known Parkinson's disease model, the effects of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions are not completely understood. We produced mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions and measured their total locomotion counts following administration of several dopamine D2 agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole, cabergoline, rotigotine, apomorphine, talipexole, and quinelorane). Cabergoline showed the longest duration of drug action, which was in agreement with its long-lived anti-Parkinson effects in rats and humans. In contrast, pramipexole and ropinirole had notably short durations of drug action. We demonstrated that mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions accompanied with significant lesions in the striatum may be reasonable models to predict the action duration of anti-Parkinson drug candidates in humans. PMID:26559726

  17. Neuroprotective effects of dimerumic acid and deferricoprogen from Monascus purpureus NTU 568-fermented rice against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in differentiated pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Context Oxidative stress plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Rice fermented with Monascus purpureus Went (Monascaceae) NTU 568 (red mould rice) was found to contain antioxidants, including dimerumic acid (DMA) and deferricoprogen (DFC). Objective The effects of DMA and DFC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cytotoxicity and potential protective mechanisms in differentiated PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were investigated. Materials and methods DMA (0-60 μM) or DFC (0-10 μM) was co-treated with 6-OHDA (200 μM, 24 h exposure) in differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell viability and intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assays, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide staining by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of cell protein expression. Results DMA and DFC significantly increased cell viability to 72% and 81% in 6-OHDA-induced differentiated PC-12 cell cultures, respectively. Furthermore, DMA and DFC reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of extracellular and intercellular ROS by 25% and 20%, respectively, and decreased NADPH oxidase-2 expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and decreased activation of caspase-3 via regulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 protein expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. Conclusion DMA and DFC may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting ROS formation and apoptosis. These results showed that the metabolites from M. purpureus NTU 568 fermentation were potential therapeutic agents for PD induced by oxidative damage and should be encouraged for further research. PMID:26794209

  18. Short-Term Treatment with Silymarin Improved 6-OHDA-Induced Catalepsy and Motor Imbalance in Hemi-Parkisonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Rasool; Eyvari Brooshghalan, Shahla; Farajniya, Safar; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Sharifi, Hamdolah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by disabling motor abnormalities, which include tremor, muscle stiffness, paucity of voluntary movements, and postural instability. Silymarin (SM) or milk thistle extract, is known to own antioxidative, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of SM, on 6-OHDA-induced motor-impairments (catalepsy and imbalance) in the rats. Methods: Experimental model of PD was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 8 μg/2 μl/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Catalepsy and motor coordination were assessed by using of bar test and rotarod respectively. Results: The results showed a significant (p<0.001) increase in catalepsy of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats whereas; in SM (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p for 5 days) treated hemi-parkinsonian rats catalepsy was decreased markedly (p<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant (p<0.001) increase in motor-imbalance of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. SM improved motor coordination significantly (p<0.001) in a dose dependent manner and increased motor balance. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that short-term treatment with SM could improve 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy and motor imbalance in rats. We suggest that SM can be used as adjunctive therapy along with commonly used anti-parkinsonian drugs. However, further clinical trial studies should be carried out to prove this hypothesis. PMID:26819917

  19. Beneficial effects of sodium butyrate in 6-OHDA induced neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities: Modulation of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev; Singh, Sumel

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have investigated the involvement of epigenetic modifications in PD. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to be beneficial in cognitive and motor deficit states. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - induced experimental PD like symptoms in rats. To produce motor deficit, 6-OHDA was administered unilaterally in the right medial forebrain bundle. Three weeks after 6-OHDA administration, the rats were challenged with apomorphine. Following this, the animals were treated with sodium butyrate (150 and 300 mg/kg i.p.) once daily for 14 days. Movement abnormalities were assessed by battery of behavioral tests. Biochemically, oxidative stress markers, neuroinflammation and dopamine were measured in striatal brain homogenate. Further, to explore the molecular mechanism(s), we measured the level of global H3 histone acetylation and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). 6-OHDA administration results in significant motor deficit along with reduction in striatal dopamine level. 6-OHDA treated rats showed elevated oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. Treatment with sodium butyrate results in significant attenuation of motor deficits and increased striatal dopamine level. Moreover, sodium butyrate treatment attenuated the oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. These effects occur concurrently with increased global H3 histone acetylation and BDNF levels. Thus, the observed results of the present study are indicative for the therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in PD. PMID:26048426

  20. A novel therapeutic approach to 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease in rats via supplementation of PTD-conjugated tyrosine hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shaoping; Fu Ailing; Wang Yuxia; Yu Leiping; Jia Peiyuan; Li Qian; Jin Guozhang; Sun Manji . E-mail: Sunmj@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-07-21

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether the protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) fusion protein was effective on the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats. An expression vector pET-PTD-TH harbouring the PTD-TH gene was constructed and transformed to the Escherichia coli BL21 cells for expression. The expressed recombinant PTD-TH with a molecular weight of 61 kD was successfully transduced (1 {mu}M) into the dopaminergic SH-sy5y human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and visualized by immunohistochemical assay. An in vivo experiment in rats showed that the iv administered PTD-TH protein (8 mg/kg) permeated across the blood-brain barrier, penetrated into the striatum and midbrain, and peaked at 5-8 h after the injection. The behavioral effects of PTD-TH on the apomorphine-induced rotations in the PD model rats 8 weeks after the 6-OHDA lesion showed that a single bolus of PTD-TH (8 mg/kg) iv injection caused a decrement of 60% of the contralateral turns on day 1 and 40% on days 5-17. The results imply that iv delivery of PTD-TH is therapeutically effective on the 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats, the PTD-mediated human TH treatment opening a promising therapeutic direction in treatment of PD.

  1. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of bFGF in the 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Pingtao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Johnson, Noah R.; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Cao, Guodong; Xiao, Jian; Ye, Junming; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complicated pathophysiologic mechanisms. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress appears to play a critical role in the progression of PD. We demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), as a neurotropic factor, inhibited ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis and that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced ER stress was involved in the progression of PD in rats. bFGF administration improved motor function recovery, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuron survival, and upregulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. The 6-OHDA-induced ER stress response proteins were inhibited by bFGF treatment. Meanwhile, bFGF also increased expression of TH. The administration of bFGF activated the downstream signals PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways by specific inhibitors partially reduced the protective effect of bFGF. This study provides new insight towards bFGF translational drug development for PD involving the regulation of ER stress. PMID:27493838

  2. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of bFGF in the 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pingtao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Cao, Guodong; Xiao, Jian; Ye, Junming; Lin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complicated pathophysiologic mechanisms. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress appears to play a critical role in the progression of PD. We demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), as a neurotropic factor, inhibited ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis and that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced ER stress was involved in the progression of PD in rats. bFGF administration improved motor function recovery, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuron survival, and upregulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. The 6-OHDA-induced ER stress response proteins were inhibited by bFGF treatment. Meanwhile, bFGF also increased expression of TH. The administration of bFGF activated the downstream signals PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways by specific inhibitors partially reduced the protective effect of bFGF. This study provides new insight towards bFGF translational drug development for PD involving the regulation of ER stress. PMID:27493838

  3. 6-OHDA-Induced Changes in Parkinson's Disease-Related Gene Expression are not Affected by the Overexpression of PGAM5 in In Vitro Differentiated Embryonic Mesencephalic Cells.

    PubMed

    Stępkowski, Tomasz Maciej; Wasyk, Iwona; Grzelak, Agnieszka; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    LUHMES cells, a recently established line of immortalized embryonic mesencephalic cells, are the novel in vitro model for studying Parkinson's disease (PD) and dopaminergic neuron biology. Phosphoglyceromutase 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein involved in mitophagy, mitochondria dynamics, and other processes important for PD pathogenesis. We tested the impact of lentiviral overexpression of PGAM5 protein in LUHMES cells on their differentiation and expression of 84 PD-related genes. LUHMES cells were transduced with PGAM5 or mock and treated with 100 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a model PD neurotoxin. Real-Time PCR analysis revealed that the treatment with 6-OHDA-induced changes in expression of 44 PD-related genes. PGAM5 transduction alone did not cause alternations in PD-related genes expression, nor it affected changes in gene expression mediated by 6-OHDA. The 6-OHDA-induced PD-related gene expression profile of LUHMES cells is presented for the first time and widely discussed. PMID:25986246

  4. Activin A Protects Midbrain Neurons in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kong M.; Vissel, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and a subsequent loss of dopamine (DA) within the striatum. Despite advances in the development of pharmacological therapies that are effective at alleviating the symptoms of PD, the search for therapeutic treatments that halt or slow the underlying nigral degeneration remains a particular challenge. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in vitro, suggesting that activin A may offer similar neuroprotective effects in in vivo models of PD. Using robust stereological methods, we found that intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA results in a significant loss of both TH positive and NeuN positive populations in the SNpc at 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-lesioning in drug naïve mice. Exogenous application of activin A for 7 days, beginning the day prior to 6-OHDA administration, resulted in a significant survival of both dopaminergic and total neuron numbers in the SNpc against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. However, we found no corresponding protection of striatal DA or dopamine transporter (DAT) expression levels in animals receiving activin A compared to vehicle controls. These results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection in a mouse model of PD, however this neuroprotection may be localized to the midbrain. PMID:25902062

  5. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells and in animal model of Parkinson's disease by enhancing Nrf2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; Shi, H; Zhang, C; Ren, M; Han, M; Wei, X; Zhang, X; Lou, H

    2015-02-12

    Oxidative stress is central to the pathology of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), and therapeutics designed to enhance antioxidant potential could have clinical value. In this study, we investigated whether dimethyl fumarate (DMF) has therapeutic effects in cellular and animal model of PD, and explore the role of nuclear transcription factor related to NF-E2 (Nrf2) in this process. Treatment of animals and dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells with DMF resulted in increased nuclear levels of active Nrf2, with subsequent upregulation of antioxidant target genes. The cytotoxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was reduced by pre-treatment with DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The increase in the reactive oxygen species caused by 6-OHDA treatment was also attenuated by DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The neuroprotective effects of DMF against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity were dependent on Nrf2, since treatment with Nrf2 siRNA failed to block against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity and induce Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes in SH-SY5Y cells. In vivo, DMF oral administration was shown to upregulate mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective genes, attenuate 6-OHDA induced striatal oxidative stress and inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, DMF ameliorated dopaminergic neurotoxicity in 6-OHDA-induced PD animal models as evidenced by amelioration of locomotor dysfunction, loss in striatal dopamine, and reductions in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that DMF may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD. PMID:25449120

  6. Cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity via its antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by degeneration and loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Increasing evidence has indicated that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therapeutic options that target the antioxidant machinery may have potential in the treatment of PD. Cordycepin, a nucleoside isolated from Cordyceps species displayed potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity as well as underlying mechanisms is still unclear. In this present study, we investigated the protective effect of cordycepin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism. We observed that cordycepin effectively inhibited 6-OHDA-induced cell death, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cordycepin also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA as observed in the reduction of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial as well as the inhibition of caspase-3. In addition cordycepin markedly reduced cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Cordycepin also significantly increased the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in 6-OHDA-treated cells. The results obtained unambiguously demonstrated that cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity through its potent antioxidant activity. PMID:27261571

  7. An enteric nervous system progenitor cell implant promotes a behavioral and neurochemical improvement in rats with a 6-OHDA-induced lesion.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cid, Carmen; García-López, Julieta; García, Esperanza; Ibarra, Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of mammals is derived from neural crest (NC) cells during embryogenesis and at the beginning of postnatal life. However, neural progenitor cells from the ENS (or ENSPC) are also found in the adult intestine and can be used for neuronal regeneration in diseases that lead to a loss of cell population, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which there is a decrease of dopaminergic neurons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of ENSPC to restore damaged nervous tissue and to show that they are functional for a behavioral and neurochemical recovery. We found that animals with ENSPC implants exhibited a motor recovery of 35% vs. the lesion group. In addition, DA levels were partially restored in 34%, while Homovanillic acid (HVA) levels remained at 21% vs. the group with a 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion, suggesting that ENSPC represent a possible alternative in the study of cell transplants and the preservation of functional dopaminergic neurons in PD. PMID:24686028

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) mediates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Bower, Kimberly A; Ma, Cuiling; Fang, Shengyun; Thiele, Carol J; Luo, Jia

    2004-07-01

    The causes of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) are poorly understood. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a PD mimetic, is widely used to model this neurodegenerative disorder in vitro and in vivo; however, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. We demonstrate here that 6-OHDA evoked endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which was characterized by an up-regulation in the expression of GRP78 and GADD153 (Chop), cleavage of procaspase-12, and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 alpha in a human dopaminergic neuronal cell line (SH-SY5Y) and cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3beta) responds to ER stress, and its activity is regulated by phosphorylation. 6-OHDA significantly inhibited phosphorylation of GSK3beta at Ser9, whereas it induced hyperphosphorylation of Tyr216 with little effect on GSK3beta expression in SH-SY5Y cells and PC12 cells (a rat dopamine cell line), as well as CGNs. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the expression of cyclin D1, a substrate of GSK3beta, and dephosphorylated Akt, the upstream signaling component of GSK3beta. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an ER stress-responsive phosphatase, was involved in 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta dephosphorylation (Ser9). Blocking GSK3beta activity by selective inhibitors (lithium, TDZD-8, and L803-mts) prevented 6-OHDA-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), DNA fragmentations and cell death. With a tetracycline (Tet)-controlled TrkB inducible system, we demonstrated that activation of TrkB in SH-SY5Y cells alleviated 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta dephosphorylation (Ser9) and ameliorated 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. TrkB activation also protected CGNs against 6-OHDA-induced damage. Although antioxidants also offered neuroprotection, they had little effect on 6-OHDA-induced GSK3beta activation. These results suggest that GSK3beta is a critical intermediate in pro-apoptotic signaling cascades that are associated with

  9. Pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons through paraplegin against 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun Ki; Park, Hyeon Soo; Cho, Jea Hyeon; Kim, Gon Sup; Won, Chungkil

    2015-01-21

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates various physiological and psychological functions, such as movement, motivation, behavior, and learning. DA exerts its function through DA receptors and a series of studies have reported the role of DAergic receptors in preventing DAergic neuronal degeneration. Here, we studied the DA receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of the D2-like receptor agonists against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced DAergic neurodegeneration. D2-like receptor agonists were administered in the substantia nigra in vivo and to primary cultured neurons. Treatment of 6-OHDA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and paraplegin (mitochondrial regulation protein) immunoreactivity, whereas pretreatment with quinpirole (a full D2-like receptor agonist) preserved TH and paraplegin reactivity. This led us to test which DA receptors were necessary for the neuroprotective effect and whether paraplegin can be regulated by D2 or D3 receptor agonists. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor selective agonist, sumanirole, did not preserve TH and paraplegin reactivity from 6-OHDA. However, the D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole, protected TH reactivity and restored paraplegin expression to the control level in the presence of 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pretreatment with the D3 receptor antagonist GR103691 reduced TH and paraplegin expression levels. These results suggest that the D3 receptor agonist may protect DA neurons from the effect of 6-OHDA through the modulation of the mitochondrial regulation protein paraplegin. PMID:25514384

  10. Echinacoside Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Inflammatory Responses in PC12 Cells via Reducing ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hua; Xuan, Zhao-Hong; Tian, Shuo; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses are involved in the mechanism of cell damage in PD. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a dopamine analog, specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Echinacoside (ECH) is a phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the stems of Cistanche salsa, showing a variety of neuroprotective effects in previous studies. The present study was to investigate its effect against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity and possible mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced cell viability, decreased oxidation-reduction activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis compared with untreated PC12 cells. However, echinacoside treatment significantly attenuated these changes induced by 6-OHDA. In addition, echinacoside also could significantly alleviate the inflammatory responses induced by 6-OHDA. Further research showed that echinacoside could reduce 6-OHDA-induced ROS production in PC12 cells. These results suggest that the underlying mechanism of echinacoside against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity may be involve in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses by reducing ROS production. PMID:25788961

  11. Early toxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in the rat striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; García, Esperanza; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-12-01

    The early effects of 6-OHDA as a Parkinsonian model in rodents are relevant since pharmacological and toxicological points of view, as they can explain the acute and chronic deleterious events occurring in the striatum. In this study, we focused our attention on the neurochemical and motor dysfunction produced after a pulse infusion of 6-OHDA, paying special attention to the capacity of this molecule to induce neurotransmitter release and behavioural alterations. Extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, glycine and GABA were all assessed in striatal dialysates in freely moving rats immediately after exposed to a single pulse of 6-OHDA in dorsal striatum, and major behavioural markers of motor alterations were simultaneously explored. Enhanced release of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine was found immediately after 6-OHDA pulse. Delayed glutamate and glycine release were detected and a biphasic effect on GABA was observed. Mostly serotonin and dopamine outflow, followed by glutamate, correlated with wet dog shakes and other behavioural qualitative alterations. Early dopamine release, accompanied by other neurotransmitters, can generate an excitatory environment affecting the striatal neurons with immediate consequences for behavioural performance. In turn, these changes might be accounting for later features of toxicity described in this model. PMID:20643160

  12. Tetraspanin (TSP-17) Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Neda; Holmes, Alexander; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1) and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling. PMID:25474638

  13. Myricitrin Ameliorates 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the Substantia Nigra of Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, resulting from the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of DA neuronal loss in PD is still unclear; however, accumulating evidence suggests that treatment with certain flavonoids can induce neuroprotective properties, such as activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models of PD. The bioflavonoid myricitrin is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is unclear whether systemic treatment with myricitrin can protect neurons against neurotoxin-induced DA degeneration in vivo via the preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the induction of mTORC1 activation. Our results found no significant neuroprotective effect of 30 mg/kg myricitrin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. However, myricitrin treatment with 60 mg/kg protected DA neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, myricitrin treatment preserved TH enzyme activity and mTORC1 activation in nigral DA neurons in the SN of 6-OHDA-treated mice, and its treatment suppressed an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α expression in activated microglia. These results suggest that myricitrin may have neuroprotective properties linked to mTORC1 activation, preservation of TH enzyme activity, and anti-neuroinflammation for preventing DA neuronal degeneration in vivo. PMID:26991235

  14. Adafenoxate abolishes the amnesia induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Genkova-Papazova, M G; Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G; Lazarova-Bakarova, M B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment on learning and memory and on the levels of biogenic monoamines in some brain structures, as well as the influence of the nootropic drug adafenoxate on 6-OHDA effect was studied in shuttle box and step down trained rats. In mature rats injected with 6-OHDA postnatal, learning and retention were impaired and the noradrenaline (NA) level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was decreased. Adafenoxate abolished the amnestic effect of 6-OHDA and restored the NA level to normal in the above-mentioned brain structures. This finding suggests the important role of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system in 6-OHDA-induced amnesia and the favorable effect of adafenoxate on learning and memory impaired by 6-OHDA. PMID:8412411

  15. Gelatin nanoparticle-mediated intranasal delivery of substance P protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis: an in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Rong-Rong; Jiang, Yi-Na; Lin, Qian; Yu, Wen-Ze; Mao, Kai-Li; Tian, Fu-Rong; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of intranasally administered substance P-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNPs) against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and to provide a new strategy for treating brain pathology, such as Parkinson’s disease. Methods SP-GNPs were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method, and their stability, encapsulating efficiency, and loading capacity were evaluated. PC-12 cells were used to examine the enhancement of growth and inhibition of apoptosis by SP-GNPs in vitro using MTT assays. In the in vivo study, hemiparkinsonian rats were created by intracerebroventricular injection of 6-OHDA. The rats then received intranasal SP-GNPs daily for 2 weeks. Functional improvement was assessed by quantifying rotational behavior, and the degree of apoptosis was assessed by immunohistochemical staining for caspase-3 in the substantia nigra region. Results PC-12 cells with 6-OHDA-induced disease treated with SP-GNPs showed higher cell viability than their untreated counterparts, and cell viability increased as the concentration of substance P (SP) increased, indicating that SP could enhance cell growth and inhibit the cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA. Rats with 6-OHDA-induced hemiparkinsonism treated with SP-GNPs made fewer rotations and showed less staining for caspase-3 than their counterparts not treated with SP, indicating that SP protects rats with 6-OHDA-induced hemiparkinsonism from apoptosis and therefore demonstrates their functional improvement. Conclusion Intranasal delivery of SP-GNPs protects against 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25897205

  16. Protective effect of L-kynurenine and probenecid on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced striatal toxicity in rats: implications of modulating kynurenate as a protective strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; González-Herrera, Irma Gabriela; García, Esperanza; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The neuroactive metabolite at the kynunerine pathway, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a well-known competitive antagonist at the co-agonist glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), and also decreases the extracellular levels of glutamate by blocking α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAchr) located on glutamatergic terminals. KYNA has been often reported to be neuroprotective in different neurotoxic models. The systemic administration of L-kynurenine (L-KYN)--the precursor of KYNA--together with probenecid (PROB)--an inhibitor of organic acids transport--to rodents increases KYNA levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. The striatal infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to rodents is one of the common models used to simulate Parkinson's disease (PD). Different studies have linked PD alterations with excessive glutamatergic transmission in the striatum since NMDAr antagonists exert beneficial effects in PD models. In this work we investigated the effect that a systemic administration of L-KYN+PROB exerted on the toxic model induced by 6-OHDA in rats. PROB (50 mg/kg, i.p.) + L-KYN (75 mg/kg, i.p.) were given to rats for seven consecutive days. On day two of treatment, the animals were infused with a single injection of 6-OHDA (20 μg/2 μl) into the right striatum. Fourteen days post-lesion, rotation behavior was assessed as a marker of motor impairment. The total levels of dopamine (DA) were also estimated in striatal tissue samples of 6-OHDA-treated animals as a neurochemical marker of damage. In addition, twenty eight days post-lesion, the striatal damage was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohistochemistry against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the same animals. Neurodegeneration was also assessed by Fluoro Jade staining. 6-OHDA infusion increased rotation behavior, striatal reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration, while DA levels were decreased. For all markers evaluated, we observed protective

  17. A partial lesion model of Parkinson's disease in mice--characterization of a 6-OHDA-induced medial forebrain bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Padel, Thomas; Paul, Gesine

    2015-05-01

    The most frequently used animal models for Parkinson's disease (PD) utilize unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), which results in total denervation of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. However, neuroprotective interventions in PD require models resembling earlier stages of PD, where some dopaminergic cells and fibres remain. The aim of the present study was therefore to establish a MFB partial lesion model in mice. We tested four different 6-OHDA doses, and our results show a dose-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic cells and striatal fibres that correlated with behavioural impairment in several behavioural tests. Specifically, doses of 0.7 μg and 1 μg of 6-OHDA induced a partial denervation of the nigrostriatal pathway, associated with a mild but quantifiable behavioural impairment. We identified the amphetamine-induced rotation, stepping, corridor and cylinder test to be sensitive enough to select partial lesion animals. Based on our data, we proposed a range of cut-off values for these different behavioural tests to select partial lesion mice. Using a statistical prediction model we identified two behavioural tests (the stepping test and amphetamine-induced rotation test) that with a high sensitivity and specificity predict the extent of nigral dopaminergic cell loss and select mice with a partial nigrostriatal lesion prior to further interventions. This model can serve as an important tool to study neuroprotective therapies for PD in mouse models, especially when the treatment targets the substantia nigra and/or the striatum. PMID:25698603

  18. Neuroprotective effect of sulfated polysaccharide isolated from sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus on 6-OHDA-induced death in SH-SY5Y through inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chao; Cui, Ningshan; Wang, Peng; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Ji, Aiguo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect and molecular mechanism of the sulfated polysaccharide (SJP) isolated from the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The results showed that SJP could protect SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced cell injury. We found that SJP effectively improves cell viability, decreases LDH leakage, and reverses morphological damage. Moreover, SJP significantly increases SOD activity but decreases MDA levels and ROS generation. Effect of SJP on 6-OHDA-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells is associated with an arrest in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle and inhibits the expression of Cyclin D3. 6-OHDA-induced intracellular generation of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunctions, release of cytochrome c, imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-9/caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3/caspase-3 ratio, and p-p53 activation were strikingly attenuated by SJP pretreatment. Meanwhile, SJP counteracted NF-κB activation, thereby preventing up-regulation of iNOS and intracellular NO release. The data provide the first evidence that SJP protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity possibly by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB and activating PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Thus, SJP is a candidate for further evaluation of its protective effects against neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:26773499

  19. Inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by l-carnosine in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun-Mi; Jang, Eun-Hee; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Ju-Hee; Park, Chang-Shin; Han, Seung Baik; Kim, Jun Sig; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Pie, Jae-Eun; Shin, Dong Wun

    2009-07-31

    Conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum malfunction (ER stress) play a key role in the development of various human diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Carnosine is an endogenous peptide, present in excitable tissues such as brain and skeletal muscle. Although there are reports suggesting that carnosine has a biological role independent of its antioxidant activity, there have been no reports of the effects of carnosine on the ER stress response. We investigated the effects of carnosine on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death and ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells. After assessing control cell viability in serum-free conditions for 24h (100% viability), we found that 50 microM 6-OHDA reduced cell viability to 76.4% of control values, whereas addition of 10mM carnosine significantly reduced cell death to 96.1% viability in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with its cytoprotective action, carnosine markedly inhibited subsequent ER stress responses, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) and c-jun, expression of glucose regulatory protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein, and mRNA splicing of X-box protein 1. The measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by 6-OHDA showed that addition of 10mM carnosine slightly but obviously inhibits the 6-OHDA-induced ROS production. In conclusion, our results show that carnosine almost completely inhibits 6-OHDA-induced ER stress responses and cytotoxicity, and that slight antioxidant activity of carnosine against 6-OHDA is observed. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate clinical uses for carnosine. PMID:19394406

  20. Hydroxytyrosol induces phase II detoxifying enzyme expression and effectively protects dopaminergic cells against dopamine- and 6-hydroxydopamine induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Deng, Ajun; Tang, Wanbin; Ma, Junzhi; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common late-age onset neurodegenerative disease. Except for the symptomatic alleviating treatment, no disease modifying therapy is currently available. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective role of hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major phenolic compound present in olive oil, against dopaminergic cell death. We found that HT effectively protected dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells against dopamine (DA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced cell death, but had no apparent effect on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we have shown that HT efficiently induced the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Using an NQO1 inhibitor, we revealed that increased NQO1 expression contributed to the protective effect of HT against dopaminergic cell death. Together, our findings suggest that HT has a protective effect against DA- and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death, supporting the beneficial effect of olive oil in preventing DA-metabolism related dopaminergic neuron dysfunction. PMID:26970393

  1. Impairment of learning and memory in shuttle box-trained rats neonatally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S; Papazova, M; Alova, L; Lazarova-Bakarova, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) treatment on learning and retention and on the level of biogenic monoamines in some brain structures as well as the influence of the nootropic drugs--piracetam, aniracetam, meclofenoxate and fipexide on the 6-OHDA-induced effect was studied. Two- way active avoidance (shuttle box) was used. The levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the frontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus, hippocampus and pons were measured. In mature rats, injected with 6-OHDA (100 mg/kg s.c.) in the first 3 postnatal days learning and retention were impaired and the NA level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was decreased. Piracetam (600 mg/kg), aniracetam (50 mg/kg), meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) and fipexide (10 mg/kg) administered orally 5 days before and 5 days during training, abolished the amnestic effect of 6-OHDA and restored to control values the NA level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. This finding suggests the important role of the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system in the 6-OHDA-induced amnesia, as well as in the favorable effect of the nootropic drugs tested on 6-OHDA-impaired memory processes. PMID:8203277

  2. Effect of WR-1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced catalepsy and IL-6 level in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play a key role in pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger WR-1065 on catalepsy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of interleukin 6(IL-6) and striatum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental model of PD. Materials and Methods: Seventy two male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups and 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat) was infused unilaterally into substantia nigra pars copmacta (SNc) to induce PD. Catalepsy was measured by standard bar test, CSF level of IL-6 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and SOD activity measured by spectrophotometric method. In pre-treatment groups WR-1065 (20, 40 and 80 μg/2 μl/rat/day, for 3 days) was infused into the SNc before 6-OHDA administration and 21 days later, as a recovery period, behavioral and molecular assay tests were done. Results: Our results showed that pre-treatment with WR-1065 improved (P<0.001) 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in a dose dependent manner. In 6-OHDA-lesioned animals SOD activity in SNc and CSF level of IL-6 was decreased markedly (P<0.001) when compared with non-lesioned group, while pre-treatment with WR-1065(P<0.001) restored their levels up to the normal range. Conclusion: Our study indicated that pre-treatment with WR-1065 could modulate catalepsy and IL-6 level in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Also WR1065 could increase SOD activity up to normal range. It can be regarded as an anti-oxidative drug in prevention or adjunctive therapy of PD. PMID:27403255

  3. Enhanced cystatin C and lysosomal protease expression following 6-hydroxydopamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Close, Fran T; Goodman, Carl B; Jackson, Inneke M; Wight-Mason, Ceceile; Wells, Lateesha M; Womble, Tracy A; Palm, Donald E

    2006-03-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a selective neurotoxin used to induce apoptosis in catecholamine-containing neurons. Although biochemical products and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of 6-OHDA have been well documented, the activation of cellular pathways following exposure are not well understood. Apoptosis in PC12 (Pheochromocytoma) cells was induced by 6-OHDA in a dose (10-150 microM) and time-dependent (24-72 h) manner compared to experimental controls (no treatment). PC 12 cells exposed to 50 microM 6-OHDA demonstrated the involvement of caspase 3 and lysosomal protease alterations. Following 6-OHDA exposure, the caspase 3-like inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly decreased 6-OHDA induced cell death. In addition, alterations in expression of the lysosomal cysteine and aspartic proteases, cathepsin B (CB) and cathepsin D (CD) and the endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C were observed utilizing immunocytochemical analysis at 24, 48, and 72 h following 6-OHDA exposure. Furthermore, CB and CD and cystatin C immuno-like reactivity was more pronounced in TUNEL positive cells. Moreover, Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in protein expression for CB and CD at 72 h and a temporal and concentration dependent increase in cystatin C in response to 6-OHDA. Cells treated with pepstatin A, an inhibitor for CD, showed a significant decrease in cell death, however, CA-074ME, a specific inhibitor for CB, failed to protect cells from 6-OHDA induced cell death. Thus, these results suggest that apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA exposure is mediated in part through caspase 3 activation and lysosomal protease CD. PMID:16414118

  4. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine exposure on motor activity and biochemical expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Chen, Wu-Fu

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, current treatments for PD are mainly palliative. Recently, researchers discovered that neurotoxins can induce Parkinsonian-like symptoms in zebrafish. No study to date has investigated the characteristics of PD, such as neuroinflammation factors, oxidative stress, or ubiquitin dysfunction, in this model. Therefore, the current study was aimed at utilizing commonly used clinical drugs, minocycline, vitamin E, and Sinemet, to test the usefulness of this model. Previous studies had indicated that DA cell loss was greater with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) than with other neurotoxins. Thus, we first challenged zebrafish with 6-OHDA immersion and found a significant reduction in zebrafish locomotor activity; we then reversed the locomotor disruptions by treatment with vitamin E, Sinemet, or minocycline. The present study also analyzed the mRNA expression of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b, because the expression of these molecular targets has been shown to result in attenuation in mammalian models of PD. Vitamin E, Sinemet, and minocycline significantly reversed 6-OHDA-induced changes of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b mRNA expression in zebrafish. Moreover, we assessed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to confirm the therapeutic effects of vitamin E tested on this PD model and established that vitamin E reversed the 6-OHDA-induced damage on TH expression. Our results provide some support for the validity of this in vivo Parkinson's model, and we hope that this model will be more widely used in the future. PMID:24720843

  5. Effects of 6-Hydroxydopamine Exposure on Motor Activity and Biochemical Expression in Zebrafish (Danio Rerio) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, current treatments for PD are mainly palliative. Recently, researchers discovered that neurotoxins can induce Parkinsonian-like symptoms in zebrafish. No study to date has investigated the characteristics of PD, such as neuroinflammation factors, oxidative stress, or ubiquitin dysfunction, in this model. Therefore, the current study was aimed at utilizing commonly used clinical drugs, minocycline, vitamin E, and Sinemet, to test the usefulness of this model. Previous studies had indicated that DA cell loss was greater with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) than with other neurotoxins. Thus, we first challenged zebrafish with 6-OHDA immersion and found a significant reduction in zebrafish locomotor activity; we then reversed the locomotor disruptions by treatment with vitamin E, Sinemet, or minocycline. The present study also analyzed the mRNA expression of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b, because the expression of these molecular targets has been shown to result in attenuation in mammalian models of PD. Vitamin E, Sinemet, and minocycline significantly reversed 6-OHDA-induced changes of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b mRNA expression in zebrafish. Moreover, we assessed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to confirm the therapeutic effects of vitamin E tested on this PD model and established that vitamin E reversed the 6-OHDA-induced damage on TH expression. Our results provide some support for the validity of this in vivo Parkinson's model, and we hope that this model will be more widely used in the future. PMID:24720843

  6. Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) Phosphorylation Promotes Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival during 6-OHDA-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Asaithambi, Arunkumar; Ay, Muhammet; Jin, Huajun; Gosh, Anamitra; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathophysiological mediator of degenerative processes in many neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Aberrant cell signaling governed by protein phosphorylation has been linked to oxidative damage of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Although several studies have associated activation of certain protein kinases with apoptotic cell death in PD, very little is known about protein kinase regulation of cell survival and protection against oxidative damage and degeneration in dopaminergic neurons. Here, we characterized the PKD1-mediated protective pathway against oxidative damage in cell culture models of PD. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) was used to induce oxidative stress in the N27 dopaminergic cell model and in primary mesencephalic neurons. Our results indicated that 6-OHDA induced the PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/S748) phosphorylation during early stages of oxidative stress and that PKD1 activation preceded cell death. We also found that 6-OHDA rapidly increased phosphorylation of the C-terminal S916 in PKD1, which is required for PKD1 activation loop (PKD1S744/748) phosphorylation. Interestingly, negative modulation of PKD1 activation by RNAi knockdown or by the pharmacological inhibition of PKD1 by kbNB-14270 augmented 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, while positive modulation of PKD1 by the overexpression of full length PKD1 (PKD1WT) or constitutively active PKD1 (PKD1S744E/S748E) attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, suggesting an anti-apoptotic role for PKD1 during oxidative neuronal injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PKD1 signaling plays a cell survival role during early stages of oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons and therefore, positive modulation of the PKD1-mediated signal transduction pathway can provide a novel neuroprotective strategy against PD. PMID:24806360

  7. Neuroprotective effects of aqueous extracts of Uncaria tomentosa: Insights from 6-OHDA induced cell damage and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Lu, Zhongbing; Zhao, Yashuo; Wang, Yueqi; Zhao-Wilson, Xi; Guan, Peng; Duan, Xianglin; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Zhao, Baolu

    2013-06-01

    Previous pharmacological studies have indicated that AC11 (a standardized aqueous extract of Uncaria tomentosa) has beneficial effects on DNA repair and immune function. However, its benefits go beyond this. The present study utilized electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping technique, as well as the 6-OHDA-induced cell damage and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans models, towards exploring the antioxidant and neuroprotective ability of AC11. Our results showed that AC11 could scavenge several types of free radicals, especially hydroxyl radicals (60% of hydroxyl radicals were scavenged by 30 μg/ml of AC11). In SH-SY5Y cells, we found that AC11 could dose dependently protect 6-OHDA induced cell damage by increase cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential. AC11 pretreatment also significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in 6-OHDA treated cells. In NL5901 C. elegans, 10 μg/ml AC11 could reduce the aggregation of α-synuclein by 40%. These findings encourage further investigation on AC11 and its active constituent compounds, as possible therapeutic intervention against Parkinson's disease. PMID:23500604

  8. β-Asarone Inhibits IRE1/XBP1 Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Baile; Deng, Minzhen; Zhang, Qinxin; Wang, Nanbu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, with genetics and environment contributing to the disease onset. The limited pathological cognize of the disease restrained the approaches to improve the clinical treatment. Recently, studies showed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. There was a neuroprotective effect partly mediated by modulating ER stress. β-Asarone is the essential constituent of Acorus tatarinowii Schott volatile oil. Our team observed that β-asarone could improve the behavior of parkinsonian rats; increase the HVA, Dopacl, and 5-HIAA levels; and reduce α-synuclein levels. Here we assumed that the protective role of β-asarone on parkinsonian rats was mediated via ER stress pathway. To prove the hypothesis we investigated the mRNA levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP) in 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) induced parkinsonian rats after β-asarone treatment. Furthermore, the inositol-requiring enzyme 1/X-Box Binding Protein 1 (IRE1/XBP1) ER stress pathway was also studied. The results showed that β-asarone inhibited the mRNA levels of GRP78 and CHOP, accompanied with the delined expressions of phosphorylated IER1 (p-IRE1) and XBP1. We deduced that β-asarone might have a protective effect on the 6-OHDA induced parkinsonian rats via IRE1/XBP1 Pathway. Collectively, all data indicated that β-asarone might be a potential candidate of medicine for clinical therapy of PD. PMID:27097550

  9. Striatal Pleiotrophin Overexpression Provides Functional and Morphological Neuroprotection in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gombash, Sara E; Lipton, Jack W; Collier, Timothy J; Madhavan, Lalitha; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Terpstra, Brian T; Spieles-Engemann, Anne L; Daley, Brian F; Wohlgenant, Susan L; Thompson, Valerie B; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Mandel, Ronald J; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are integrally involved in the development of the nigrostriatal system and in combination with gene therapy, possess great therapeutic potential for Parkinson's disease (PD). Pleiotrophin (PTN) is involved in the development, maintenance, and repair of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The present study examined the ability of striatal PTN overexpression, delivered via psueudotyped recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2/1 (rAAV2/1), to provide neuroprotection and functional restoration from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Striatal PTN overexpression led to significant neuroprotection of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and THir neurite density in the striatum, with long-term PTN overexpression producing recovery from 6-OHDA-induced deficits in contralateral forelimb use. Transduced striatal PTN levels were increased threefold compared to adult striatal PTN expression and approximated peak endogenous developmental levels (P1). rAAV2/1 vector exclusively transduced neurons within the striatum and SNpc with approximately half the total striatal volume routinely transduced using our injection parameters. Our results indicate that striatal PTN overexpression can provide neuroprotection for the 6-OHDA lesioned nigrostriatal system based upon morphological and functional measures and that striatal PTN levels similar in magnitude to those expressed in the striatum during development are sufficient to provide neuroprotection from Parkinsonian insult. PMID:22008908

  10. Cortex Fraxini (Qingpi) Protects Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ya; Zhang, Huan; Lam, Kim-Hung; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder having close relationship with oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cortex Fraxini (QP) is a kind of traditional Chinese medicinal herb with antioxidant properties. It may be a potential candidate for preventing the development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the key objective of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of QP water extract on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. It was found that QP water extract possesses strong antioxidant property with SC50 = 0.15 mg/mL. Total phenolic content of QP water extract was found to be 200.78 ± 2.65 mg GAE/g. QP water extract's free radical scavenging capacity was demonstrated by reversing the increased level of intracellular ROS induced by 6-OHDA, using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Moreover, QP water extract (0.5 mg/mL) could remarkably increase the viability of PC12 cells treated with 6-OHDA. The protective effect of QP water extract was found to be via inhibiting MEK/ERK pathway and reversing PI3-K/Akt/GSK3β pathway. The current results suggest that QP might be a potential candidate for preventing the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD. PMID:26347850

  11. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Depressive-Like Symptoms and Modulates BDNF Signaling in 6-Hydroxydopamine Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min; Wang, Ke; Yu, Yan; Su, Wen-Ting; Jiang, Xin-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the beneficial effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on motor behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role and potential mechanisms of EA in PD-associated depression remain unclear. In the present study, a rat model of PD with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions in the medial forebrain bundle was treated using EA for 4 weeks. We found that 100 Hz EA improved several motor phenotypes. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical analysis showed that EA had a minimal impact on the TH-positive profiles of the ipsilateral ventral tegmental area. Compared with the 6-OHDA group, long-term EA stimulation significantly increased sucrose solution consumption and decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. EA treatment did not alter dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels in the striatum and hippocampus. Noticeably, EA treatment reversed the 6-OHDA-induced abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the midbrain and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that EA at 100-Hz possesses the ability to improve depressive-like symptoms in PD rats, which is, at least in part, due to the distinct effect of EA on the mesostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways. Moreover, BDNF seems to participate in the effect of EA in PD. PMID:27525025

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  13. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor. PMID:27431098

  14. Involvement of Mu Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Protective Effect of Opioid against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar-Vaghefi, Shahrzad; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Elyasi, Leila; Abbasnejad, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The neuroprotective role of opioid morphine against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death has been demonstrated. However, the exact mechanism(s) underlying such neuroprotection, especially the role of subtype receptors, has not yet been fully clarified. Methods: Here, we investigated the effects of different opioid agonists on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of Parkinson’s disease. Cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-OHDA and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblot technique was used to evaluate cytochrome-c and activated caspase-3 as biochemical markers of apoptosis induction. Results: The data showed that 6-OHDA caused significant cell damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium levels as well as activated caspase-3 and cytochrome-c release. Incubation of SH-SY5Y cells with μ-opioid agonists, morphine and DAMGO, but not with δ-opioid agonist, DADLE, elicited protective effect and reduced biochemical markers of cell damage and death. Discussion: The results suggest that μ-opioid receptors signaling participate in the opioid neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26904174

  15. Characterization of a new low-dose 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease in rat.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Anna-Maija; Suleymanova, Ilida; Albert, Katrina; Anttila, Jenni; Voutilainen, Merja H; Airavaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induces partial degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, mimicking the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Setting up the partial lesion model can be challenging because a number of experimental settings can be altered. This study compares seven experimental settings in a single study on d-amphetamine-induced rotations, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurites in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT)-positive neurites in the striatum, and TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in rats. Moreover, we validate a new algorithm for estimating the number of TH-positive cells. We show that the behavior and immunoreactivity vary greatly depending on the injection settings, and we categorize the lesions as progressive, stable, or regressive based on d-amphetamine-induced rotations. The rotation behavior correlated with the degree of the lesion, analyzed by immunohistochemistry; the largest lesions were in the progressive group, and the smallest lesions were in the regressive group. We establish a new low-dose partial 6-OHDA lesion model in which a total of 6 μg was distributed evenly to three sites in the striatum at a 10° angle. The administration of low-dose 6-OHDA produced stable and reliable rotation behavior and induced partial loss of striatal TH-positive and DAT-positive neurites and TH-positive cells in the SNpc. This model is highly suitable for neurorestoration studies in the search for new therapies for PD, and the new algorithm increases the efficacy for estimating the number of dopamine neurons. This study can be extremely useful for laboratories setting up the partial 6-OHDA model. PMID:26762168

  16. Voluntary exercise reduces the neurotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine in maternally separated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa Vuyisile; Russell, Vivienne Ann

    2010-01-01

    Maternal separation has been associated with development of anxiety-like behaviour and learning impairments in adult rats. This has been linked to changes in brain morphology observed after exposure to high levels of circulating glucocorticoids during the stress-hyporesponsive period (P4 to P14). In the present study, adult rats that had been subjected to maternal separation (180 min/day for 14 days) during the stress-hyporesponsive period, received unilateral infusions of a small dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) into the medial forebrain bundle. The results showed that voluntary exercise had a neuroprotective effect in both non-stressed and maternally separated rats in that there was a decrease in forelimb akinesia (step test) and limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Maternal separation increased forelimb akinesia and forelimb use asymmetry and reduced the beneficial effect of exercise on forelimb akinesia. It also reduced exploratory behaviour, consistent with anxiety-like behaviour normally associated with maternal separation. Exercise appeared to reduce dopamine neuron destruction in the lesioned substantia nigra when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere. However, this appeared to be due to a compensatory decrease in completely stained tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in the contralateral, non-lesioned substantia nigra. In agreement with reports that maternal separation increases the 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopamine terminals in the striatum, there was a small increase in dopamine neuron destruction when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere but there was no difference in dopamine cell number, suggesting that exposure to maternal separation did not exacerbate dopamine cell loss. PMID:20206210

  17. R-apomorphine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Liang, Li-Wu; Chen, Zheng-Jing; Ji, Hui-Ru; Wang, Mei-Kang; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Li, Cao; Xu, Jian-Yang

    2006-11-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was not only to assess the retrograde degenerative changes in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, but also to use this 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of R-apomorphine (R-APO). Methods The partial lesion was obtained by intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA. R-APO administration (10 mg/kg, s.c.) started 15 min prior to lesioning and continued daily for another 22 days post surgery. Testing was carried out 5 weeks after lesioning. We investigated the histology and associated behavior and neurochemical changes. Structural and functional deficits were quantified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) / Nissl-staining cell number counting, striatal dopamine (DA) content determination and amphetamine-induced rotation analysis. Results R-APO-treatment attenuated the amphetamine-induced ipsiversive rotation 5 weeks after the lesion induction. R-APO administration for 22 days significantly reduced the size of the lesion at the level of the SN from 50% (control group) to 69%. Moreover, the cell shape resembled that observed in the intact animals. R-APO treatment significantly increased the number of cells in both the lesion and the intact sides of VTA by 60%, suggesting selective neurotrophic effect of R-APO in this area. Finally, R-APO-treatment significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion and normalized dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios. Conclusion We conclude that R-APO has neuroprotective and possible neurotrophic effect on a striatal lesion with 6-OHDA, suggesting that this drug may have rescuing properties in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease. These effects are more pronounced in VTA and enhance with duration of treatment. PMID:17690718

  18. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-01

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. PMID:27222379

  19. Effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of Parkinson's disease rat models.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jin; Zhao, Ting Ting; Lee, Kyung Sook; Lee, Seung Ho; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Keun Hong; Choi, Hyun Sook; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity using PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In PC12 cells, treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM) reduced 6-OHDA (100 µM)-induced cell death and induced transient extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and Bad phosphorylation at Ser112 (BadSer112). In contrast, sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) phosphorylation, and cleaved-caspase-3 activity, all of which were induced by 6-OHDA (100 µM), were inhibited by treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM). Furthermore, co-treatment with (-)-sesamin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) once a day for 28 days significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive neuronal cells and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid in the substantia nigra-striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. These results suggest that (-)-sesamin protects 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity via the activation of transient ERK1/2-BadSer112 system and the inhibition of sustained ERK-p38MAPK-JNK1/2-caspase-3 system in PC12 cells. (-)-Sesamin also shows protective effects on long-term L-DOPA therapy in dopaminergic neuronal cells of PD rat models. (-)-Sesamin may serve as adjuvant therapeutics in PD. PMID:25747493

  20. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26730494

  1. β-asarone increases MEF2D and TH levels and reduces α-synuclein level in 6-OHDA-induced rats via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway: Chaperone-mediated autophagy activation, macroautophagy inhibition and HSP70 up-expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Liu, Shu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-10-15

    Inactive myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation will cause neuronal death. MEF2D or α-syn degradation is also associated with macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). We found that β-asarone had positive effects on treating 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rats, but mechanisms of β-asarone affecting on MEF2D and α-syn via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway remain unclear. Unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle was used to create PD rats, which were divided into four groups and administered for 30days: 6-OHDA model group, MEF2D inhibitor-treated group (SB203580, 0.5mg/kg, i.p.), MEF2D activator-treated group (LiCl, 100mg/kg, i.p.), β-asarone-treated group (15mg/kg, p.o.). Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α-syn, heat-shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A), MEF2D, HSP70, Beclin-1, light chain 3B (LC3B) and p62 in the mesencephalon were measured after 30-day administration. α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B levels were higher in the 6-OHDA model group, while TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A, p62 levels were lower compared to the sham-operated group. Our results also showed thatβ-asarone treatment reduced protein and mRNA levels of α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B, but increased HSP70, TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A and p62 levels compared to the 6-OHDA model group. Additionally, certain correlations among α-syn, TH, Beclin-1, LC3B, p62, HSP70, LAMP-2A and MEF2D were also discovered in this study. These findings suggested that β-asarone treatment could increase MEF2D and TH as well as reduce α-syn to protect against 6-OHDA induced damage in PD rat mesencephalon via modulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway. PMID:27444243

  2. Protective effect of INI-0602, a gap junction inhibitor, on dopaminergic neurodegeneration of mice with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromi; Ono, Kenji; Sawada, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    INI-0602, a novel gap junction hemichannel inhibitor, was administered to hemi-Parkinsonism mice generated by striatal 6-hydroxydopamine injection. INI-0602 prevented the toxic activation of microglia, such as the increased number of the activated form, enlargement of cell bodies and induction of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and TNFα, in the ipsilateral striatum. On the other hand, INI-0602 induced the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NT-4/5, in the 6-hydroxydopamine-treated striatum. INI-0602 treatment blocked not only dopaminergic loss in both the striatum and substantia nigra, but also apomorphine-induced rotational behavior. PMID:24744047

  3. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence. PMID:27034665

  4. 7-nitroindazole attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced spatial learning deficits and dopamine neuron loss in a presymptomatic animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haik, Kristi L; Shear, Deborah A; Hargrove, Chad; Patton, Jared; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Sandstrom, Michael I; Dunbar, Gary L

    2008-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons (>50%) in the substantia nigra (SN) precedes most of the overt motor symptoms, making early diagnosis and treatment interventions difficult. Because PD has been associated with free radicals generated by nitric oxide, this study tested whether treatments of 7-nitroindazole (7NI), a nitric-oxide-synthase inhibitor, could reduce cognitive deficits that often emerge before overt motor symptoms in a presymptomatic rat model of PD. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg 7NI (or vehicle) just before receiving bilateral, intrastriatal injections of the DA-toxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The rats were then given a battery of motor tasks, and their learning ability was assessed using a spatial reversal task in a water-T maze. Results indicate that 7NI treatments attenuate 6-OHDA-induced spatial learning deficits and protect against DA cell loss in the SN, suggesting that 7NI may have potential as an early, presymptomatic pharmacotherapy for PD. PMID:18489022

  5. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  6. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. PMID:27233809

  7. An In Vivo Microdialysis Study of FLZ Penetration through the Blood-Brain Barrier in Normal and 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Parkinson's Disease Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jinfeng; Liu, Qian; Li, Yingfei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jinlan

    2014-01-01

    FLZ (N-[2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(2,5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide) is a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative and a potential anti-Parkinson's disease (PD) agent. The objective of the present study was to investigate the penetration of free FLZ across the BBB and the effects of P-gp inhibition on FLZ transport in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced PD model rats. In vivo microdialysis was used to collect FLZ containing brain and blood dialysates following intravenous (i.v.) drug administration either with or without pretreatment with the specific P-gp inhibitor, zosuquidar trihydrochloride (zosuquidar·3HCl). A sensitive, rapid, and reliable ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) technique was developed and validated to quantitate free FLZ levels in the dialysates. No significant differences were observed in the brain/blood FLZ area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratio between normal and PD model rats. However, pretreatment with zosuquidar·3HCl markedly increased the AUC ratio in both rat models. In addition, FLZ penetration was similar in zosuquidar·3HCl-pretreated normal and PD rats. These results suggest that P-gp inhibition increases BBB permeability to FLZ, thereby supporting the hypothesis that P-gp normally restricts FLZ transfer to the brain. These findings could provide reference data for future clinical trials and may aid investigation of the BBB permeability of other CNS-active substances. PMID:25045708

  8. Carnosic acid protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro model of Parkinson's disease: involvement of antioxidative enzymes induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Rei; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Li-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), have been widely investigated in recent years, however, its protection in in vivo still unclear. In this study, we investigated the behavioral activity and neuroprotective effects of CA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Rats were treated with 20mg/kg body weight of CA for 3 weeks before 6-OHDA exposure. Results indicated that CA improved the locomotor activity and reduced the apomorphine-caused rotation in 6-OHDA-stimulated rats. Significant protection against lipid peroxidation and GSH reduction was observed in the 6-OHDA rats pretreated with CA. Pretreatment with CA increased the protein expression of γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase compared with 6-OHDA-stimulated rats and SH-SY5Y cells. Immunoblots showed that the reduction of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the induction of caspase 3 cleavage, and the induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage by 6-OHDA was reversed in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) in SH-SY5Y cells. Rats treated with CA reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38, the down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3/caspase 3 and cleaved PARP/PARP ratio, and the down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. However, BAM7, an activator of Bax, attenuated the effect of CA on apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that CA protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity is attributable to its anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative action. The present findings may help to clarify the possible mechanisms of rosemary in the neuroprotection of PD. PMID:25446857

  9. 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopamine Reductions in the Nucleus Accumbens, but not the Medial Prefrontal Cortex, Impair Cincinnati Water Maze Egocentric and Morris Water Maze Allocentric Navigation in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H; Seroogy, Kim B; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (Nacc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) receive dopaminergic innervation from the ventral tegmental area and are involved in learning. Male rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions in the Nacc or mPFC were tested for allocentric and egocentric learning to determine their role in these forms of neuroplasticity. mPFC dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions did not result in changes to either type of learning or memory. Nacc dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions resulted in allocentric learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze (MWM) on acquisition, reversal, and probe trials. MWM cued performance was also affected, but straight-channel swim times and swim speed during hidden platform trials in the MWM were not affected. Nacc dopaminergic and noradrenergic reductions also impaired egocentric learning in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). Nacc-lesioned animals tested in the CWM in an alternate path through the maze were not significantly affected. 6-OHDA injections in the Nacc resulted in 63 % dopamine and 62 % norepinephrine reductions in the Nacc and 23 % reductions in adjacent dorsal striatum. 6-OHDA injections in the mPFC resulted in 88 % reductions in dopamine and 59 % reductions in norepinephrine. Hence, Nacc dopamine and/or norepinephrine play a role in egocentric and allocentric learning and memory, while mPFC dopamine and norepinephrine do not. PMID:27003940

  10. Monoaminergic PET imaging and histopathological correlation in unilateral and bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal in-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Gago, Belén; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Juri, Carlos; Collantes, María; Delgado, Mercedes; Prieto, Elena; Ecay, Margarita; Iglesias, Elena; Marín, Concepció; Peñuelas, Iván; Obeso, José A

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled dihydrotetrabenazine ((11)C-DTBZ) binds to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and has been used to assess nigro-striatal integrity in animal models and patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we applied (11)C-DTBZ positron emission tomography (PET) to obtain longitudinally in-vivo assessment of striatal dopaminergic loss in the classic unilateral and in a novel bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 sub-groups: 1. 6-OHDA-induced unilateral lesion in the medial forebrain bundle, 2. bilateral lesion by injection of 6-OHDA in the third ventricle, and 3. vehicle injection in either site. (11)C-DTBZ PET studies were investigated in the same animals successively at baseline, 1, 3 and 6weeks after lesion using an anatomically standardized volumes-of-interest approach. Additionally, 12 rats had PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to construct a new (11)C-DTBZ PET template. Behavior was characterized by rotational, catalepsy and limb-use asymmetry tests and dopaminergic striatal denervation was validated post-mortem by immunostaining of the dopamine transporter (DAT). (11)C-DTBZ PET showed a significant decrease of striatal binding (SB) values one week after the unilateral lesion. At this point, there was a 60% reduction in SB in the affected hemisphere compared with baseline values in 6-OHDA unilaterally lesioned animals. A 46% symmetric reduction over baseline SB values was found in bilaterally lesioned rats at the first week after lesion. SB values remained constant in unilaterally lesioned rats whereas animals with bilateral lesions showed a modest (22%) increase in binding values at the 3rd and 6th weeks post-lesion. The degree of striatal dopaminergic denervation was corroborated histologically by DAT immunostaining. Statistical analysis revealed a high correlation between (11)C-DTBZ PET SB and striatal DAT immunostaining values (r=0.95, p<0.001). The data presented here indicate

  11. Intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine results in an increased number of tyrosine hydroxylase immune-positive cells in the rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Wachter, B; Caradonna, S; Gittinger, K; Schläger, A; Küppers, E

    2014-11-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) results in increased proliferation and de-differentiation of rat cortical astrocytes into progenitor-like cells 4 days after lesion (Wachter et al., 2010). To find out if these cells express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthesis pathway, we performed immunohistochemistry in the rat cortex following intraventricular injection of 6-OHDA. Four days after injection we demonstrated a strong emergence of TH-positive (TH(+)) somata in the cortices of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. The number of TH(+) cells in the cortex of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals was 15 times higher than in sham-operated animals, where virtually no TH(+) somata occurred. Combining TH immunohistochemistry with classical Nissl stain yielded complete congruency, and ∼45% of the TH(+) cells co-expressed calretinin, which indicates an interneuron affiliation. There was no co-staining of TH with other interneuron markers or with glial markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or the neural stem/progenitor marker Nestin, nor could we find co-localization with the proliferation marker Ki67. However, we found a co-localization of TH with glial progenitor cell markers (Sox2 and S100β) and with polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), which has been shown to be expressed in immature, but not recently generated cortical neurons. Taken together, this study seems to confirm our previous findings with respect to a 6-OHDA-induced expression of neuronal precursor markers in cells of the rat cortex, although the TH(+) cells found in this study are not identical with the potentially de-differentiated astrocytes described recently (Wachter et al., 2010). The detection of cortical cells expressing the catecholaminergic key enzyme TH might indicate a possible compensatory role of these cells in a dopamine-(DA)-depleted system. Future studies are needed to determine

  12. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment. PMID:26991136

  13. Eriocaulon buergerianum extract protects PC12 cells and neurons in zebrafish against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ericaulon buergerianum (Gujingcao) is an ophthalmic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial Chinese medicinal herb. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Ericaulon buergerianum ethanol extract (EBE) and to elucidate its underlying action mechanism. Methods The viability of dopaminergic (DA) neuron in zebrafish was examined by anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining. The locomotor activity of zebrafish was assessed with a digital video tracking system. The viability and cellular damage of the PC12 cells were determined by MTT and LDH assays respectively. The nuclear morphological changes in apoptotic cells were evaluated with DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 dye. Intracellular nitric oxide (NO) was quantified by DAF-FM diacetate staining. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was determined by Western blot. Results EBE inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced decrease in total distance of movement in zebrafish. Pretreatments of EBE (25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml) increased the viability of 6-OHDA-damaged PC12 cells in a dose dependent manner. Protection against 6-OHDA-induced nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of apoptotic bodies was also observed in EBE pretreated cells. Anti-oxidative (inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression in PC12 cells in vitro) activities of EBE are related to its neuroprotective effects in 6-OHDA-induced DA neuron damage. Conclusion EBE exhibited significant neuroprotective activities in zebrafish, including recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss caused by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in vivo, inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced decrease of total distance in movement in zebrafish. The iNOS-NO pathway may be involved. PMID:21527031

  14. AGE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE ON LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experiment examined the effects on locomotor activity of intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administered to developing and adult rats. 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to pargyline treatment at 3 and 6 days of age; or 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to desmethy...

  15. Hypericum Perforatum Hydroalcoholic Extract Mitigates Motor Dysfunction and is Neuroprotective in Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with selective and progressive decline of nigral dopaminergic neurons. Hypericum perforatum L. (H. perforatum, St. John's wort) has been traditionally used for management of different disorders, especially mild-to-moderate depression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of H. perforatum extract against unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity and to unmask some involved mechanisms. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were treated with H. perforatum hydroalcoholic extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day started 1 week pre-surgery for 1 week post-surgery. The extract attenuated apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task, lowered striatal level of malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and reduced glutathione content, normalized striatal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tumor necrosis factor α with no significant effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase, lowered nigral DNA fragmentation, and prevented damage of nigral dopaminergic neurons with a higher striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. These findings reveal the beneficial effect of H. perforatum via attenuation of DNA fragmentation, astrogliosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress. PMID:26119304

  16. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages. PMID:26700436

  17. Functionality of NGF-protected PC12 cells following exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Edel T.; Loughlin, John P.; Herbert, Kate Reed; Dockery, Peter; Samali, Afshin; Doyle, Karen M.; Gorman, Adrienne M. . E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie

    2006-12-29

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is often used in models of Parkinson's disease since it can selectively target and kill dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra. In this study, pre-treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibited apoptosis and necrosis by 6-OHDA, including caspase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release. Notably, cells exposed to 6-OHDA in the presence of NGF were subsequently capable of proliferation (when replated without NGF), or neurite outgrowth (with continued presence of NGF). Following 7 days growth in the presence of NGF, expression of {beta}III tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase and increased intracellular catecholamines was detectable in PC12 cells, features characteristic of functional dopaminergic neurons. NGF-pre-treated PC12 cells retained expression of {beta}III-tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase, but not catecholamine content following 6-OHDA exposure. These data indicate that NGF-protected cells maintained some aspects of functionality and were subsequently capable of proliferation or differentiation.

  18. Dopamine, 6-hydroxydopamine, iron, and dioxygen--their mutual interactions and possible implication in the development of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Linert, W; Herlinger, E; Jameson, R F; Kienzl, E; Jellinger, K; Youdim, M B

    1996-08-23

    The reactions of dopamine (1-amino-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethane, DA), 5-hydroxydopamine (5-OHDA), and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), with molecular oxygen-with and without the addition of catalytic amounts of iron(III) and other metal ions-have been studied and the implication of these results with respect to the chemistry involved in the progress of Parkinson's disease is discussed. In the presence of O2 DA reacts spontaneously without the necessity of metal-ion catalysis under the production of stoichiometric amounts of H2O2, to form initially pink dopaminochrome, which is not stable and reacts further (without the consumption of dioxygen) to form the insoluble polymeric material known as 'melanine'. DA reacts with iron(III) yielding an intermediate 1:1 complex, which decomposes releasing Fe(II) and the semiquinone, which reacts further under involvement of both Fe(III) and dioxygen. 6-OHDA reacts without showing the necessity of such an intermediate, and it is shown to be able to release iron as Fe(II) from ferritine. On the other hand, it is shown (in vitro) that Fe(II) reacts in a Fenton type reaction with DA and the present H2O2 producing 5-OHDA and especially 6-OHDA. Based on these mutual interacting reactions a mechanism for the initiation and progress of Parkinson's disease is suggested. The catalytic effects of some other transition-metal ions are presented and an explanation for the peculiarly toxic effects of manganese(II) is put forward. Finally, a possible reason for the effect that nicotine has in the mitigation of Parkinson's disease is discussed. PMID:8781534

  19. AMPHETAMINE-, SCOPOLAMINE-, AND CAFFEINE-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY FOLLOWING 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE LESIONS OF THE MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As previously reported, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions to the region of the nucleus accumbens blocked the locomotor activation induced by low doses of d-amphetamine, and produced a supersensitive locomotor response to the dopamine (DA) agonist, apomorphine. This same lesion, ...

  20. Time course study of microglial and behavioral alterations induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Pereira da; Poli, Anicleto; Hara, Daniela Balz; Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto

    2016-05-27

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial in the search for new therapeutic approaches. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the time course of behavioral, neurochemical, and microglial responses after a retrograde partial lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by bilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The results showed that 6-OHDA was able to produce both anhedonic and anxiety behaviors; however, an increase of microglial density in some brain areas (substantia nigra, hippocampus and striatum) and deficits in locomotor activity was observed only one week after the lesion. Striatal levels of dopamine (DA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were reduced by approximately 60% at all times tested. Conversely, increased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite were also noted in the striatum only at the first week. These data extend our previous findings and suggest that the retrograde and partial damage of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra can induce effects resembling premotor symptoms of PD, two and three weeks after injury. PMID:27113204

  1. Electroacupuncture Produces the Sustained Motor Improvement in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiahui; Sun, Min; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and research evidence has shown that electroacupuncture (EA) promotes recovery of motor function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the “efficacy span” of EA treatment, especially the long-term effect of EA that is thought to last after the cessation of EA treatment, has not been investigated. The present study thus investigated and compared the effect of EA during and after chronic EA application on motor activity and dopamine lesions in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD. Chronic EA treatment (30 min a day, 6 days a week for 2 or 4 weeks) significantly attenuated motor deficiency and reduced dopamine neuron degeneration. Remarkably, EA showed a long-lasting effect after the cessation of EA stimulation. At 2 and 4 weeks after the termination of EA, EA continued to improve motor function in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Consistent with sustained behavioral effects, EA induced an enduring increase in the dopamine turnover ratio in the striatum 2 weeks after the cessation of EA treatment. Here we demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of EA outlasted the duration of EA application. During a relatively long period of time after the completion of EA treatment, EA is able to continue to improve motor function and enhance dopamine availability in 6-OHDA-lesioned PD mice. PMID:26894437

  2. Subtle Cardiovascular Dysfunction in the Unilateral 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Slack, K.; Billing, R.; Matthews, S.; Allbutt, H. N.; Einstein, R.; Henderson, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson's disease produces autonomic deficits. Autonomic parameters were assessed by implanting a small radiofrequency telemetry device which measured heart rate variability (HRV), diurnal rhythms of heart rate (HR), core body temperature (cBT) and locomotor activity (LA). Rats then received 6-OHDA lesion or sham surgery. 6-OHDA lesioned rats exhibited head and body axis biases, defective sensorimotor function (“disengage” test), and prominent apomorphine rotation (all P < .05 versus controls). Diurnal rhythm of HR was lower for 6-OHDA lesioned rats (n = 8) versus controls (n = 6; P < .05). Whilst HR decreased similarly in both groups during the day, there was a greater decrease in HR for the 6-OHDA lesioned rats at night (by 38 b.p.m. relative to 17 b.p.m. for controls). LA and cBT did not differ between surgery groups. This study indicates the unilateral 6-OHDA model of PD shows subtle signs of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. PMID:20976085

  3. Intrathecal noradrenaline restores 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine induced antinociception abolished by intrathecal 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Minor, B G; Persson, M L; Post, C; Jonsson, G; Archer, T

    1988-01-01

    Intrathecal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) abolished the antinociceptive effects of acute administration of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) in the hot-plate, tail-flick and shock titration tests of nociception. The antinociceptive effects of 5-MeODMT, abolished by the prior intrathecal 6-OHDA treatment, were restored by intrathecal administration (2 or 1 microgram) of noradrenaline (NA), immediately prior to 5-MeODMT, in all three tests of nociception. Biochemical analysis confirmed severe NA depletions (95 percent loss) in the lumbar and thoracic regions of the spinal and much lesser dopamine depletions (25-35 percent loss). Intrathecal 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) attenuated 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the tail-flick test and combined NA + 5-MeODMT induced antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests. Intrathecal administration of 5,7-DHT caused a severe depletion of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the lumbar region of the spinal cord. The present findings demonstrate further the modulatory role of NA upon serotonergic systems in nociception and indicate the necessity of NA availability for induction of 5-MeODMT analgesia. PMID:3133452

  4. Left and right 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially affect voluntary ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, D M; Crosley, K J; Keller, R W; Glick, S D; Carlson, J N

    1999-03-27

    Dopaminergic projections to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to examine how dopamine (DA) asymmetry in the mPFC influences voluntary ethanol consumption. Differences in nucleus accumbens (NAS) DA neurotransmission have been related to individual differences in locomotor activity and in the rewarding efficacy of ethanol. Therefore, differences in locomotor activity were used to further characterize the effects of unilateral mPFC 6-OHDA lesions on ethanol consumption. Male Long Evans rats were assessed for high versus low levels of spontaneous locomotor activity. DA terminals in the left or right mPFC were unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA, resulting in an average DA depletion of 54% and 50%, respectively. After a minimum seven-day recovery period, preference for a 10% ethanol solution vs. water was determined in a 24-h 2-bottle home-cage free-choice paradigm. Left mPFC 6-OHDA lesions increased and right lesions decreased ethanol consumption. These differential effects of left and right lesions were primarily attributable to rats exhibiting low locomotor activity prior to surgery. The present data suggest that right greater than left cortical DA asymmetry in combination with low endogenous NAS DA (predicted by low locomotor activity levels) may increase the vulnerability to abuse ethanol. PMID:10095012

  5. Rho kinase inhibition by fasudil in the striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tatenhorst, Lars; Tönges, Lars; Saal, Kim-Ann; Koch, Jan C; Szegő, Éva M; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Chronic degeneration of nigrostriatal projections, followed by nigral dopaminergic cell death, is a key feature of Parkinson disease (PD). This study examines the neuroprotective potential of the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model of PD in vivo. C57Bl/6 mice were lesioned by striatal stereotactic injections with 4 μg of 6-OHDA and treated with fasudil 30 or 100 mg/kg body weight via drinking water. Motor behavior was tested biweekly; histologic and biochemical analyses were performed at 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Motor behavior was severely impaired after 6-OHDA lesion and was not improved by fasudil treatment. Fasudil 100 mg/kg did not significantly increase the number of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra after 12 weeks versus lesion controls. Interestingly, however, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dopamine metabolites revealed that striatal levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were significantly increased after 12 weeks, suggesting a regenerative response. In contrast to recent findings in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin model, fasudil effects seem limited in this severe 6-OHDA model of PD. Nevertheless, high therapeutic concentrations of fasudil are suggestive of a proregenerative potential for dopaminergic neurons, making further evaluations of rho kinase inhibition as a proregenerative therapeutic strategy in PD promising. PMID:25003236

  6. 6-Hydroxydopamine and radiofrequency lesions of the lateral entorhinal cortex facilitate an operant appetitive conditioning task in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1981-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex seems heterogeneous as dopaminergic terminals are present only in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex. In order to clarify the interaction of this cortex with the hippocampus in memory processes, the effects of either 6-hydroxydopamine or radiofrequency bilateral lesions were compared. Both lesions enhance the retention of a Skinner task with continuous reinforcement schedule. Involvement of dopamine in memory processes is discussed. PMID:7254716

  7. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  8. Acupuncture inhibits oxidative stress and rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Ju, Wei-Ping; Li, Zhen-Guang; Wang, Dao-Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Chen; Xie, An-Mu

    2010-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the beneficial effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease (PD). Although clinical evidence for the acupuncture anti-Parkinson's disease effect has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism still remains elusive. It has been suggested a relationship between PD and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can result in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant enzyme response, and the role of acupuncture stimulation at GB34 (Yanglingquan), LR3 (Taichong), ST36 (Zusanli) and SP10 (Xuehai) acupoints on regulating oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal system in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the left medial forebrain bundle (MFB), an apomorphine induced rotational behavior test was performed. The levels of enzymatic, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and nonenzymatic, viz., reduced glutathione (GSH), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the nigrostriatal system were measured to assess the oxidative stress status. Brain MDA levels significantly increased, while GSH levels were decreased in impaired groups with 6-OHDA injection only, accompanied by a marked reduction in the level of SOD and GSH-Px. The levels of oxidative stress related parameters except CAT, as well as the rotational asymmetry, were reversed by acupuncture stimulation. These results showed that acupuncture treatment displayed antioxidative and/or neuroprotective properties in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat and these protective properties might be mediated, at least in part, by involving regulation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:20399757

  9. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine on visual deprivation in the kitten striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Daw, N W; Rader, R K; Robertson, T W; Ariel, M

    1983-05-01

    We tested the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on two forms of visual deprivation--monocular and directional deprivation. In normal kittens monocular deprivation leads to a change in the ocular dominance histogram recorded from the visual cortex, and directional deprivation leads to a change in the percentage of directionally sensitive cells responding to the appropriate direction of movement. 6-OHDA was infused into the occipital cortex prior to the peak of the critical period for the effects of visual deprivation. In agreement with the results of Kasamatsu et al. (Kasamatsu, T., and J. D. Pettigrew (1979) J. Comp. Neurol. 185: 139-162; Kasamatsu, T., J. D. Pettigrew, and M. Ary (1979) J. Comp. Neurol. 185: 163-182), suture of one eye (monocular deprivation) after the 6-OHDA treatment did not lead to a shift in ocular dominance in the area of striate cortex infused. Moreover, rearing kittens in an environment continually moving past them in one direction (directional deprivation) did not lead to a change in the percentage of cells preferring movement in that direction. In both rearing procedures the 6-OHDA did not make the cells in the cortex nonspecific, compared to cells recorded from the cortex of animals reared similarly but without infusion of 6-OHDA. Monocular and directional deprivation are forms of visual deprivation with different critical periods, probably involving different synapses. Therefore, the effect of 6-OHDA on visual deprivation is a general one, involving more than one kind of visual deprivation. In both cases 6-OHDA abolishes the plasticity of the visual cortex. PMID:6405018

  10. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  11. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FST increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or l-threo-3

  12. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have established that selective damage to the early-developing components of the mesostriatal dopamine system produces profound changes in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated behaviors, while decreasing D1 receptor density. In order to better understand the effects of early intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions, we studied the ontogenetic expression (postnatal days 7, 14, 35 and 90) of D1 and D2 receptors, and their corresponding messenger RNAs, in rats that had received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine or vehicle lesions on postnatal day 1. Using receptor autoradiography, significant (P < 0.05) decreases in [3H]SCH 23390 binding to D1 receptors in the rostral and caudal dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals were evident by postnatal day 7, and remained depressed at all future time points. A significant decrease in D1 receptor concentration occurred in the dorsolateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). [3H]Spiperone binding to D2 receptor sites was unchanged throughout the entire study. In situ hybridization for D1 and D2 messenger RNA expression showed contrasting results. 6-Hydroxydopamine induced significant decreases of D1 messenger RNA levels in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate by postnatal day 7. By postnatal day 14, messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of the 6-hydroxydopamine group, and remained elevated thereafter. D1 messenger RNA levels became elevated in the lateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). The opposing changes in D1 receptor concentrations and the messenger RNA encoding the protein did not occur as a consequence of increased transport of D1 receptors to striatonigral terminals. D2 messenger RNA levels in the dorsal caudate were significantly decreased on postnatal day 7, and became higher than controls at postnatal day 14, but were unchanged from controls at later time points

  13. Differential degradation of motor deficits during gradual dopamine depletion with 6-hydroxydopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Willard, A M; Bouchard, R S; Gittis, A H

    2015-08-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder whose cardinal motor symptoms arise due to the progressive loss of dopamine. Although this dopamine loss typically progresses slowly over time, currently there are very few animal models that enable incremental dopamine depletion over time within the same animal. This type of gradual dopamine depletion model would be useful in studies aimed at the prodromal phase of PD, when dopamine levels are pathologically low but motor symptoms have not yet presented. Utilizing the highly characterized neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we have developed a paradigm to gradually deplete dopamine levels in the striatum over a user-defined time course - spanning weeks to months - in C57BL/6 mice. Dopamine depletions were achieved by administration of five low-dose injections (0.75μg) of 6-OHDA through an implanted intracranial bilateral cannula targeting the medial forebrain bundle. Levels of dopamine within the striatum declined linearly with successive injections, quantified using tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and high-performance liquid chromatography. Behavioral testing was carried out at each time point to study the onset and progression of motor impairments as a function of dopamine loss over time. We found that spontaneous locomotion, measured in an open field, was robust until ∼70% of striatal dopamine was lost. Beyond this point, additional dopamine loss caused a sharp decline in motor performance, reaching a final level comparable to that of acutely depleted mice. Similarly, although rearing behavior was more sensitive to dopamine loss and declined linearly as a function of dopamine levels, it eventually declined to levels similar to those seen in acutely depleted mice. In contrast, motor coordination, measured on a vertical pole task, was only moderately impaired in gradually depleted mice, despite severe impairments observed in acutely depleted mice. These results demonstrate the importance of the temporal

  14. In vivo extracellular recording of striatal neurons in the awake rat following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Morales, M; Woodward, D J; Hoffer, B J; Janak, P H

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the functional effects of dopaminergic input to the dorsal striatum and to compare the effects of dopaminergic lesions in awake and anesthetized animals. We examined the effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the ascending dopaminergic bundle on the firing properties of dorsal striatal neurons in the awake freely moving rat using chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays. We recorded extracellular activity of striatal neurons under baseline conditions and following the systemic injection of apomorphine in awake and anesthetized subjects. Firing rates were higher in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion compared to rates of neurons from the contralateral unlesioned hemisphere. Striatal firing rates from sham and no-surgery control rats were, in general, higher than those from the contralateral unlesioned striatum of experimental subjects. Apomorphine (0.05 mg/kg, sc) normalized the differences in firing rates in lesioned animals by increasing firing of neurons within the contralateral unlesioned side, while simultaneously decreasing firing of neurons within the ipsilateral lesioned side. Mean firing rates were substantially higher in awake animals than in subjects anesthetized with chloral hydrate, perhaps reflecting anesthesia-induced decreases in excitatory input to striatal neurons. Chloral hydrate anesthesia decreased firing rates of neurons in the lesioned, unlesioned, and control striata to a similar degree, although absolute firing rates of neurons from the 6-OHDA-lesioned striata remained elevated over all other groups. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions also altered the pattern of spike output in the awake animal as indicated by an increase in the number of bursts per minute following dopaminergic deafferentation. This and other burst parameters were altered by apomorphine. Our findings show that effects of dopaminergic deafferentation can be measured in the awake behaving

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 1attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity: an in vitro and in vivo investigation in experimental models of parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojie; He, Songbin; Wang, Zhouguang; Wu, Jiamin; Zhang, Jinjing; Cheng, Yi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Xinlong; Chen, Zaifeng; Ye, Junmin; Chen, Li; Lin, Li; Xiao, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and is characterized by motor system disorders resulting in loss of dopamine producing brain cells. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, also called FGF1, promotes the survival of neurons. The aims of the present study were to confirm FGF1 could protect neurons cultures from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated FGF1 administration improved the motor function recovery, increased the TH-positive neurons survival and up-regulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. Meanwhile, FGF1 prevents the death of DA neuron at least in part by reducing the levels of α-synuclein and ER stress. The administration of FGF1 activated downstream signals PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2. In conclusion, FGF1 diminished α-synuclein neurotoxicity by down regulating ER stress mediators and the level of apoptosis, and these effects may underlying the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signal pathway. PMID:25628778

  16. Neuroprotection of microglial conditioned medium on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death: role of transforming growth factor beta-2.

    PubMed

    Polazzi, Elisabetta; Altamira, Luis Emiliano Peña; Eleuteri, Simona; Barbaro, Raffaella; Casadio, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio; Monti, Barbara

    2009-07-01

    Microglia, the immune cells of the CNS, play essential roles in both physiological and pathological brain states. Here we have used an in vitro model to demonstrate neuroprotection of a 48 h-microglial conditioned medium (MCM) towards cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) challenged with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, which induces a Parkinson-like neurodegeneration, and to identify the protective factor(s). MCM nearly completely protects CGNs from 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity and at least some of the protective factor(s) are peptidic in nature. While the fraction of the medium containing molecules < 30 kDa completely protects CGNs, fractions containing molecules < 10 kDa or > 10 kDa are not neuroprotective. We further demonstrate that microglia release high amounts of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) and that its exogenous addition to the fraction of the medium not containing it (< 10 kDa) fully restores the neuroprotective action. Moreover, MCM neuroprotection is significantly counteracted by an inhibitor of TGF-beta2 transduction pathway. Our results identify TGF-beta2 as an essential neuroprotective factor released by microglia in its culture medium that requires to be fully effective the concomitant presence of other factor(s) of low molecular weight. PMID:19457129

  17. Intranigral grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue in adult 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats can induce behavioral recovery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R E; Becker, J B

    1997-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions can reduce and even reverse rotational behavior in response to direct and indirect dopamine agonists. These grafts can ameliorate deficits on simple spontaneous behaviors, but do not improve complex behaviors that require the skilled integration of the use of both paws. We report here that rats with grafts into the DA-depleted substantia nigra, that receive cyclosporine A, can experience recovery on spontaneous behaviors that mimic those observed in Parkinson's disease. Specific cyclosporine A treatment conditions can differentially affect whether intranigral grafts normalize paw use during initiation or termination of a movement sequence. These findings may have important implications for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:9171159

  18. Separation of the motor consequences from other actions of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the nigrostriatal neurones of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Garcia-Munoz, M; Arbuthnott, G W

    1985-12-01

    Male rats showed a clear preference for one forepaw when they were trained to press a lever for food reward. The preference was then changed by training, by local anaesthetic injection into the preferred paw, by lesions in the striatal output pathways in the brain, or by neurotoxin injection into the striatum contralateral to the side of the preferred paw. The pressing rate was not changed in spite of the change in paw use in any of these operations. This result is in marked contrast to the effect of reducing the dopamine concentration on the side contralateral to the preferred paw; in this case a marked reduction in responding is seen as well as the change in paw use. Thus medial forebrain bundle 6-hydroxydopamine lesions are more debilitating than either striatal damage or peripheral paralysis at least in the short term. PMID:3907747

  19. PHARMACOLOGICAL REGULATION OF DIGESTION IN THE ANAUTOGENOUS FLESH FLY, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, BY SIMPLE INJECTION OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE.

    PubMed

    Bil, Magdalena; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Female anautogenous Sarcophaga flesh flies need a protein meal to start large-scale yolk polypeptides (YPs) production and oocyte maturation. Protein meal rapidly elicits a brain-dependent increase in midgut proteolytic activity. Trypsin and chymotrypsin together represent over 80% of protease activity in liver-fed flies. Abdominal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) dose-dependently prohibits this increase in proteolytic activity at translational level in a similar way as post liver feeding decapitation. Delayed injection of 6-OHDA later than 6 h post liver meal has no effect. In flesh flies, chemical decapitation by 6-OHDA, by interrupting the brain-gut dopaminergic signaling, can be used as tool for the controlled inhibition of midgut proteolytic activity and subsequent ovarial development. Inhibition of ovarial development is probably indirect due to a deficit in circulating amino acids needed for YPs synthesis. PMID:26728276

  20. Motor impairments and neurochemical changes after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Apicella, P; Trouche, E; Nieoullon, A; Legallet, E; Dusticier, N

    1990-01-01

    Unilateral lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system were induced in five monkeys by intranigral injections of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. Following the lesion, all monkeys showed a transient reluctance in using the contralateral forelimb, accompanied, in two monkeys by semi-flexed posture of the disabled forelimb. Three of the monkeys that had been conditioned to perform a visually triggered goal-directed arm movement, showed an increase in latency and duration of contralateral arm movements. Task performance recovered spontaneously to preoperative levels within four months in two monkeys despite significant reductions of endogenous dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid contents in the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus ipsilateral to the neurotoxic nigral injection. The third monkey exhibited a persistent increase in movement latency associated with a near complete loss of dopamine in both the putamen and the caudate nucleus. In all cases, an increase the dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid to dopamine ratio was detected in the striatum and pallidum suggesting a compensatory increase in dopamine turnover in remaining intact dopaminergic nerve terminals. The level of serotonin was changed in all monkeys consisting of either a decrease or an increase, depending on the striatopallidal regions studied. Changes in choline acetyltransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities in the same regions were only seen in some cases. The present results show that 6-hydroxydopamine-induced partial unilateral lesion of nigral dopaminergic neurons produced predominantly contralateral hypokinesia, accompanied by reductions of dopamine content in the ipsilateral striatum and pallidum. The use of this locally applied neurotoxin appears to be a suitable method for investigating neurophysiological mechanisms underlying hypokinesia since deficits in both initiating and executing movements can be expressed independently of other behavioral symptoms. The results

  1. The effect of chronic L-dopa treatment on the recovery of motor function in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats receiving ventral mesencephalic grafts.

    PubMed

    Blunt, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1991-01-01

    The effect of treatment for 5 weeks with L-DOPA (200 mg/kg/24 h) plus carbidopa (25 mg/kg/24 h) on the behavioral recovery produced by rat fetal ventral mesencephalon grafts implanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats was assessed. Animals with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway and a sham graft (Group A) showed persistent high rates of rotation in response to the administration of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) (contralateral rotation) or (+)-amphetamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) (ipsilateral rotation). Treatment of sham-grafted animals with L-DOPA plus carbidopa had no effect on the rate of rotation to apomorphine or (+)-amphetamine (Group B). The proportion of animals showing marked stereotypy following apomorphine administration was greater in sham-grafted animals receiving L-DOPA and carbidopa than in sham-grafted animals alone. Animals receiving unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions followed by a fetal graft (Group C) showed a reduction in apomorphine-induced contralateral rotation and a complete reversal of (+)-amphetamine-induced ipsilateral rotation when assessed 6 weeks later. The reductions in apomorphine- and (+)-amphetamine-induced rotational behaviour produced by the fetal graft in animals with a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion were not altered by treatment with L-DOPA plus carbidopa (Group D). The proportion of animals showing marked apomorphine-induced stereotypy did not change significantly in either group over time. In rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion receiving fetal dopamine grafts, treatment with high doses of L-DOPA and carbidopa for 5 weeks does not have a detrimental effect on the functional activity of the grafts as assessed by reduction of apomorphine- and (+)-amphetamine-induced motor asymmetry. The continuation of L-DOPA therapy may not adversely affect fetal graft survival and growth in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:1902916

  2. Disappearance of hoarding behavior after 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine neurons and its reinstatement with L-dopa.

    PubMed

    Kelley, A E; Stinus, L

    1985-06-01

    The consequences of 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the mesolimbic dopamine system on hoarding behavior were investigated in the rat. Specific lesions of this system, at the level of either the ventral tegmental area or the nucleus accumbens, resulted in abolition or severe reduction of hoarding activity. Similar lesions of the forebrain noradrenaline neurons did not affect hoarding. In further experiments, amphetamine and apomorphine locomotor responses, spontaneous motor behavior, food intake and eating patterns, and the existence of any regulatory deficits were examined. A subtle disorganization of eating patterns was found in animals with mesolimbic-dopamine lesions. It was determined that the hoarding deficit could not be due to motor, ingestive, or regulatory impairments. In a final experiment, it was demonstrated that hoarding behavior can be restored to control levels in dopamine-lesion rats by prior treatment with the catecholamine presursor L-dopa. These findings suggest that hoarding activity is mediated by mesolimbic dopamine neurons, and it is hypothesized that this system is necessary for the facilitation of certain types of foraging responses under a high level of arousal. PMID:3939664

  3. Alteration of enteric monoamines with monoamine receptors and colonic dysmotility in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Yun; Liu, Chenzhe; Fan, Ruifang; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Lifei; Hong, Feng; Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Lisheng; Zhu, Jinxia

    2015-08-01

    Constipation is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), in which monoamines (dopamine [DA], norepinephrine [NE], and 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) play an important role. Rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral substantia nigra (SN) exhibit constipation, but the role of monoamines and their receptors is not clear. In the present study, colonic motility, monoamine content, and the expression of monoamine receptors were examined using strain gauge force transducers, ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. The 6-OHDA rats displayed a significant reduction in dopaminergic neurons in the SN and a decreased time on rota-rod test and a marked decrease in daily fecal production and fecal water content. The amplitude of colonic spontaneous contraction was obviously decreased in 6-OHDA rats. Blocking D1-like receptor and β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) significantly reduced the inhibition of DA and NE on the colonic motility, respectively, whereas the 5-HT and 5-HT4 receptor agonists promoted the colonic motility. Moreover, DA content was increased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β3-ARs was notably upregulated, but 5-HT4 receptors were significantly decreased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. We conclude that enhanced DA and β3-ARs and decreased 5-HT4 receptors may be contributed to the colonic dysmotility and constipation observed in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:25766133

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus reverses akinesia in bilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Koke, S J; Kiss, Z H; Bland, B H

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia motor circuitry is a highly effective treatment for the debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent findings have indicated promising potential for PD therapy with DBS in brain structures outside the basal ganglia. For example, high frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) can reverse haloperidol-induced akinesia in rats [Jackson J, Young CK, Hu B, Bland BH (2008) High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Exp Neurol 213:210-219]. In the current study, we used the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinsonian akinesia in male Long-Evans rats to further explore the efficacy of PH DBS. The application of PH DBS in lesioned animals reversed akinesia in an active avoidance paradigm with increased latency compared to pre-lesion performance. The dramatic reversal of akinesia in two models of rodent Parkinsonism by PH DBS warrants further exploration of its therapeutic potential. PMID:19401216

  5. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptor changes induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed

    Pan, H S; Penney, J B; Young, A B

    1985-11-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to ascertain alterations in [3H]muscimol, [3H]flunitrazepam (FLU), [3H]naloxone, [3H]D-alanine-D-leucine-enkephalin (DADL), and [3H]spiroperidol binding in basal ganglia 1 week, 4 weeks, and 5 months after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the rat. At 1 and 4 weeks following lesions, [3H]spiroperidol binding increased 33% in striatum. At 5 months, [3H]spiroperidol was only nonsignificantly increased above control. At 1 week, [3H]muscimol binding decreased 39% in ipsilateral globus pallidus (GP), but increased 41% and 11% in entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), respectively. At 4 weeks, [3H]muscimol binding was reduced 19% in striatum and 44% in GP and remained enhanced by 32% in both EPN and SNr. These changes in [3H]muscimol binding persisted at 5 months. [3H]FLU binding was altered in the same direction as [3H]muscimol binding; however, changes were slower in onset and became significant (and remained so) only at 4 weeks after lesions. Decreases in [3H]naloxone and [3H]DADL binding were seen in striatum, GP, EPN, and SNr. Scatchard analyses revealed that only receptor numbers were altered. This study provides biochemical evidence for differential regulation of striatal GABAergic output to GP and EPN/SNr. PMID:2995585

  6. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  7. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D. Luke; Collier, Timothy J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1) did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2) did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3) did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation. PMID:26222442

  8. [COMPARISON OF CYTOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF HEMANTANE AND AMANTADINE UNDER CONDITIONS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE NEUROTOXIN ACTION ON CULTURED HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS].

    PubMed

    Logvinov, I O; Antipova, T A; Nepoklonov, A V; Valdman, E A

    2016-01-01

    Potential neuroprotective activity of the novel antiparkinsonian drug hemantane (hydrochloride N-2-(adamantyl)-hexamethylenimine) in comparison to amantadine has been studied in various regimes of administration on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line injury induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which is used as in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease. Two regimes of hemantane and amantadine administration in a range of final concentrations 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M were used either prior to or immediately after 6-OHDA introduction. MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the viability of test cells. Significant decrease in viability of SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA was observed. The addition of hemantane to cell medium produced cytoprotective effects in both regimes of administration--before and after 6-OHDA--at concentrations 10⁻⁷ M and 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M, respectively. Amantadine in con- centrations 10⁻⁷-10⁻⁸ M was effective to increase cell survival only when administered after 6-OHDA. These results show that hemantane has a greater neu-roprotective potential in comparison to amantadine. PMID:27159951

  9. A novel synthetic activator of Nurr1 induces dopaminergic gene expression and protects against 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Sean L; Safe, Stephen; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2015-10-21

    Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with decreased expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 (NR4A2), which is critical for both homeostasis and development of dopamine (DA) neurons. The synthetic, phytochemical-based compound, 1,1-bis (3'-indolyl)-1-(p-chlorophenyl) methane (C-DIM12) activates Nurr1 in cancer cells and prevents loss of dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD in mice. In the present study, we examined the capacity of C-DIM12 to induce expression of Nurr1-regulated genes in two dopaminergic neuronal cell lines (N2A, N27) and to protect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxicity. C-DIM12 induced expression of Nurr1-regulated genes that was abolished by Nurr1 knockdown. C-DIM12 increased expression of transfected human Nurr1, induced Nurr1 protein expression in primary dopaminergic neurons and enhanced neuronal survival from exposure to 6-OHDA. These data indicate that C-DIM12 stimulates neuroprotective expression Nurr1-regulated genes in DA neurons. PMID:26383113

  10. Neuroprotection by 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate in a 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Morroni, Fabiana; Sita, Giulia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-11-17

    A number of pathogenic factors have been implicated in the progression of Parkinson׳s disease (PD), including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, excitotoxicity, and signals mediating apoptosis cascade. 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) is a major component in wasabi, a very popular spice in Japan and a member of the Brassica family of vegetables. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of 6-MSITC in a PD mouse model. Mice were treated with 6-MSITC (5mg/kg twice a week) for four weeks after the unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). On the 28th day, 6-OHDA-injected mice showed behavioral impairments, a significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, lesioned mice showed reduced glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities. Notably, 6-MSITC demonstrated neuroprotective effects in our experimental model strongly related to the preservation of functional nigral dopaminergic neurons, which contributed to the reduction of motor dysfunction induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that the beneficial effects of 6-MSITC could be attributed to the decrease of apoptotic cell death and to the activation of glutathione-dependent antioxidant systems. These findings may render 6-MSITC as a promising molecule for further pharmacological studies on the investigation for disease-modifying treatment in PD. PMID:25257035

  11. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson’s Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson’s disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  12. Protective efficacy of P7C3-S243 in the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Miller, Adam D; Britt, Jeremiah K; DeMarco, Anthony J; De Jesús-Cortés, Mayralis; Stuebing, Emily; Naidoo, Jacinth; Vázquez-Rosa, Edwin; Morlock, Lorraine; Williams, Noelle S; Ready, Joseph M; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are currently no therapeutic options for patients with Parkinson’s disease that prevent or slow the death of dopaminergic neurons. We have recently identified the novel P7C3 class of neuroprotective molecules that blocks neuron cell death. AIMS The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with highly active members of the P7C3 series blocks dopaminergic neuron cell death and associated behavioral and neurochemical deficits in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson’s disease. METHODS After unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle, rats were assessed for behavioral function in the open field, cylinder test, and amphetamine-induced circling test. Thereafter, their brains were subjected to neurochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of dopaminergic neuron survival. Analysis was conducted as a function of treatment with P7C3 compounds, with administration initiated either before or after 6-OHDA exposure. RESULTS Animals administered P7C3-A20 or P7C3-S243, two of the most advanced agents in the P7C3 series of neuroprotective compounds, both before and after 6-OHDA exposure showed evidence of protective efficacy in all measures. When P7C3-S243 administration was initiated after 6-OHDA exposure, rats also showed protective efficacy in all measures, which included blocking dopaminergic neuron cell death in ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta, preservation of dopamine and its metabolites in ipsilateral striatum, and preservation of normal motor behavior. CONCLUSIONS The P7C3 series of compounds may form the basis for developing new therapeutic agents for slowing or preventing progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27158662

  13. An assessment of sympathetic function in isolated tissues from mice given nerve-growth-factor antiserum and 6-hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, I. E.; Kirk, Jennifer A.; Kneen, Barbara; Large, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. Experiments were done on isolated tissues from mice injected with 0·9% w/v NaCl solution (saline), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), nerve-growth-factor antiserum (NGF-As) or a combination of these agents (NGF-As+6-OHDA). 2. Fluorescence histochemistry of vasa deferentia showed clear differences between each of the treatments but no such distinction was possible in cardiac ventricle or intestine. 3. Compared with controls, the chronotropic responses of atria to field stimulation were reduced by all three treatments in the order NGF-As<6-OHDA

  14. Behavioural effects of basal ganglia rho-kinase inhibition in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects more than six million people in the world. While current available pharmacological therapies for PD in the early stages of the disease usually improve motor symptoms, they cause side effects, such as fluctuations and dyskinesias in the later stages. In this later stage, high frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option which is most successful to treat drug resistant advanced PD. It has previously been demonstrated that activation of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway is involved in the dopaminergic cell degeneration which is one of the main characteristics of PD pathology. In addition, the involvement of this pathway has been suggested in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, up to date, to our knowledge there are no previous reports showing the beneficial effects of the potent Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the behavioural effects of basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections in this PD model. Our results indicated that basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections significantly decreased the number of contralateral rotations-induced by apomorphine, significantly increased line crossings in the open-field test, contralateral forelimb use in the limb-use asymmetry test and contralateral tape playing time in the somatosensory asymmetry test, which may suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antiparkinsonian agent. PMID:26996632

  15. Expression of Tgfβ1 and Inflammatory Markers in the 6-hydroxydopamine Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stefan Jean-Pierre; Zhou, Xiaolai; Machado, Venissa; Wree, Andreas; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been described as a common hallmark of PD and is believed to further trigger the progression of neurodegenerative events. Injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) are widely used to induce degeneration of mDA neurons in rodents as an attempt to mimic PD and to study neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation as well as potential therapeutic approaches. In the present study, we addressed microglia and astroglia reactivity in the SN and the caudatoputamen (CPu) after 6-OHDA injections into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and further analyzed the temporal and spatial expression patterns of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in this mouse model of PD. We provide evidence that activated microglia as well as neurons in the lesioned SN and CPu express Transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfβ1), which overlaps with the downregulation of pro-inflammatory markers Tnfα, and iNos, and upregulation of anti-inflammatory markers Ym1 and Arg1. Taken together, the data presented in this study suggest an important role for Tgfβ1 as a lesion-associated factor that might be involved in regulating microglia activation states in the 6-OHDA mouse model of PD in order to prevent degeneration of uninjured neurons by microglia-mediated release of neurotoxic factors such as Tnfα and nitric oxide (NO). PMID:26869879

  16. NAMPT protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells through modulating SIRT1 activity.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Shao-Qing; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Wei-Lang

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate‑limiting step in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthetic pathway in mammals, is a substrate for NAD+‑dependent enzymes, such as sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and contributes to cell fate decisions. However, the role of NAMPT in PD has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, PC12 cells were treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6‑OHDA) to establish an in vitro model of PD, following which an obvious inhibitory effect on the levels of NAMPT and NAD+ as well as the NAD+/NADH ratio was detected. In addition, pre‑incubation with FK866, a highly specific NAMPT inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of 6‑OHDA on the viability of PC12, while pre‑incubation with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), am enzymatic product of NAMPT, had the opposite effect. Furthermore, it was revealed that NMN markedly attenuated 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels, as well as 6‑OHDA‑induced increases in malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase in PC12 cells. Furthermore, 6‑OHDA significantly reduced SIRT1 activity in PC12 cells, which was inhibited by NMN. The pharmacological activator resveratrol also significantly inhibited 6‑OHDA‑mediated decreases in PC12 cell viability while reversing 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in SIRT1 levels. The results of the present study suggested that NMT protected against 6‑OHDA‑induced decreases in PC12 cell viability, and that SIRT1 activation had a role in this process. Treatment with NMN to activate SIRT1 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating PD. PMID:27035562

  17. Neuroprotection by scorpion venom heat resistant peptide in 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng-Ming; Zhao, Dan; Yu, De-Qin; Li, Sheng-Long; An, Dong; Peng, Yan; Xu, Hong; Sun, Yi-Ping; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Wan-Qin

    2014-12-25

    Neuroprotective effect of scorpion venom on Parkinson's disease (PD) has already been reported. The present study was aimed to investigate whether scorpion venom heat resistant peptide (SVHRP) could attenuate ultrastructural abnormalities in mitochondria and oxidative stress in midbrain neurons of early-stage PD model. The early-stage PD model was established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (20 μg/3 μL normal saline with 0.1% ascorbic acid) into the striatum of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats unilaterally. The rats were intraperitoneally administered with SVHRP (0.05 mg/kg per day) or vehicle (saline) for 1 week. Two weeks after 6-OHDA treatment, the rats received behavior tests for validation of model. Three weeks after 6-OHDA injection, the immunoreactivity of dopaminergic neurons were detected by immunohistochemistry staining, and the ultrastructure of neuronal mitochondria in midbrain was observed by electron microscope. In the meantime, the activities of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the mitochondria of the midbrain neurons, as well as the inhibitory ability of hydroxyl free radical and the antioxidant ability in the serum, were measured by corresponding kits. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced the optical density of dopaminergic neurons, induced damage of mitochondrial ultrastructure of midbrain neurons, decreased SOD activity, increased MAO-B activity and MDA content, and reduced the antioxidant ability of the serum. SVHRP significantly reversed the previous harmful effects of 6-OHDA in early-stage PD model. These findings indicate that SVHRP may contribute to neuroprotection by preventing biochemical and ultrastructure damage changes which occur during early-stage PD. PMID:25516514

  18. Diphenyl diselenide reduces mechanical and thermal nociceptive behavioral responses after unilateral intrastriatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Juliana Trevisan; Pinton, Simone; Gai, Bibiana Mozzaquatro; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, in addition to motor dysfunction, also present alterations in pain sensation. The present study characterized the antinociceptive effects of diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2) in a model of nociception induced by unilateral, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection in rats. Male adult Wistar rats received 20 μg/3 μl of 6-OHDA (in saline solution containing 0.02 % of ascorbic acid) or 3 μl of vehicle into the right striatum (1.0 mm anterior, 3.0 mm lateral, and 5.0 mm ventral-with respect to the bregma). Thirty days after injection, rats received (PhSe)2 intragastrically at a dose of 10 mg/kg 1 h before behavioral tests (von Frey hairs, hot plate, tail immersion, formalin, and open field). Our results demonstrated that 6-OHDA injection to rats augmented the response frequency of von Frey hairs (VHF) stimulation, besides reducing the thermal withdrawal latency in the hot plate test. Importantly, the (PhSe)2 treatment decreased the mechanical allodynia measured by the response frequency of VHF stimulation and diminished the thermal nociception in the hot plate test in 6-OHDA-injected rats. In conclusion, these results revealed that a single oral administration of (PhSe)2 1 h prior to the accomplishment of the behavioral tests was effective to attenuate the increased mechanical and thermal nociception caused by a single intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection to rats. Furthermore, other clarifying studies are warranted to improve the evidence bases for future clinical use of (PhSe)2 as a new alternative therapy for the treatment of painful symptoms associated to PD. PMID:23821314

  19. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  20. Intravenous 6-hydroxydopamine attenuates vasopressin and oxytocin secretion stimulated by hemorrhage and hypotension but not hyperosmolality in rats.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Wilson, Melinda E; Madden, Christopher J; Lone, Usman; Sved, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    The present study sought to determine whether chemical destruction of peripheral catecholaminergic fibers with 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) attenuates vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion stimulated by hemorrhage, hypotension, and hyperosmolality. Rats received 6OHDA (100 mg/kg iv) or vehicle (1 ml/kg iv) on days 1 and 7, and experiments were performed on day 8. Serial hemorrhage (4 samples of 2 ml per 300 g body wt at 10-min intervals) increased plasma VP and OT levels in both groups; however, the increase in plasma VP and OT levels was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated vs. control rats despite a significantly lower mean arterial blood pressure. Similarly, the increase in plasma VP and OT levels in response to hypotension produced by the selective arteriolar vasodilator diazoxide was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated rats. In marked contrast to hemorrhage and hypotension, hyperosmolality produced by an infusion of 1 M NaCl (2 ml/h iv) stimulated increases in plasma VP and OT levels that were not different between 6OHDA-treated and control rats. In a parallel set of experiments, intravenous 6OHDA treatment reduced dopamine--hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the posterior pituitary but had no substantial effect in the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. In each experiment, the pressor response to tyramine (250 microg/kg iv) was significantly attenuated in 6OHDA-treated rats, thereby confirming that 6OHDA treatment destroyed sympathetic catecholaminergic fibers. Collectively, these findings suggest that catecholaminergic fibers located outside the blood-brain barrier contribute to VP and OT secretion during hemorrhage and arterial hypotension. PMID:16497814

  1. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  2. Distinct Effects of Rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydroxydopamine on Cellular Bioenergetics and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Samantha; Lee, Jisun; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration and is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The bioenergetic susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to toxins which induce Parkinson’s like syndromes in animal models is then of particular interest. For example, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its active metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), have been shown to induce dopaminergic cell death in vivo and in vitro. Exposure of animals to these compounds induce a range of responses characteristics of Parkinson’s disease, including dopaminergic cell death, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production. Here we test the hypothesis that cellular bioenergetic dysfunction caused by these compounds correlates with induction of cell death in differentiated dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. At increasing doses, rotenone induced significant cell death accompanied with caspase 3 activation. At these concentrations, rotenone had an immediate inhibition of mitochondrial basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) concomitant with a decrease of ATP-linked OCR and reserve capacity, as well as a stimulation of glycolysis. MPP+ exhibited a different behavior with less pronounced cell death at doses that nearly eliminated basal and ATP-linked OCR. Interestingly, MPP+, unlike rotenone, stimulated bioenergetic reserve capacity. The effects of 6-OHDA on bioenergetic function was markedly less than the effects of rotenone or MPP+ at cytotoxic doses, suggesting a mechanism largely independent of bioenergetic dysfunction. These studies suggest that these dopaminergic neurotoxins induce cell death through distinct mechanisms and differential effects on cellular bioenergetics. PMID:22970265

  3. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine-induced hypo/hyperactivity: blockade by dopamine reuptake inhibitors and effect of acute D-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Palomo, Tomas; Fredriksson, Anders

    2002-05-01

    Five experiments were performed to assess the changes in motor activity resulting from neonatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on Days 1 or 2 postnatal, at doses of either 75 or 100 micro g in a volume of 10 micro l vehicle, following pretreatment with either GBR 12909 (40 mg/kg, s.c.) or amphonelic acid (4.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline. Motor activity was measured either over 60-min test periods on five consecutive days of testing or at 12-min intervals within a single 60-min test session. The initial extent of locomotor hyperactivity was dependent upon the neonatal dose of 6-OHDA: the 100 micro g, but not 75 micro g, dose induced marked hyperactivity from test day 1 onwards whereas the 75 micro g dose did so from test day 3 onwards. The initial hypoactivity for rearing behaviour was observed for both doses of 6-OHDA: this hypoactivity was altered over successive test days so that by test day 5 an hyperactivity by the 75 micro g, but not 100 micro g, was observed. Pretreatment with either GBR 12909 or amphonelic acid abolished the effects of both doses of 6-OHDA. In the within-60-min test session procedure, 6-OHDA treated rats (both 75 and 100 micro g) showed initial hyperactivity for locomotion that intensified, in relation to the other groups, over each 12-min interval and initial hypoactivity for rearing that developed into hyperactivity over each 12-min interval. Pretreatment with either GBR 12909 or amphonelic acid again abolished the effects of both doses of 6-OHDA. Habituation quotients derived in each case for both procedures indicated severe habituation deficits by 6-OHDA (75 and 100 micro g) rats, compared to the control groups in all four experiments. In Experiment V, a low dose of D-amphetamine abolished the hyperactivity of 6-OHDA (75 micro g) treated rats whereas a higher dose did so only transiently. Pretreatment with GBR 12909 abolished these effects. These findings underline the neuropharmacological utility of the neonatal 6-OHDA

  4. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the medial prefrontal cortex on social interactions in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Rong; Huang, Guang-Biao; Sui, Zhi Yan; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Chung, Young-Chul

    2010-07-30

    Bilateral depletion of dopamine (DA) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) following local infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was reported to affect mesolimbic DA neurotransmission and augment spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotion. However, the effects of 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC of adolescent rats have never been investigated. Given that dopaminergic neurons reach the peak of maturation during adolescence, we hypothesized that 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC during adolescence would have greater impact on subsequent behavioral parameters than would such lesioning during adulthood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-OHDA lesioning of the mPFC on the open-field activities and novel investigative and socially interactive behaviors of adolescent and adult rats. Using a stereotaxic apparatus, 6-OHDA (8.0 microg) was injected bilaterally into the mPFC of adolescent and adult rats. After a 1-week recovery period, rats were placed in an open-field chamber, and spontaneous locomotion and other behaviors were monitored. Next, a novel toy was place in the center and behavioral responses were observed. One day later, socially interactive behaviors were measured by placing the lesioned rats into a cage with four unfamiliar rats matched for age. The tests of locomotor activity and novel investigative behaviors revealed no significant differences between the lesioned and sham groups of adolescent or adult rats. Grooming and socially interactive behaviors were significantly lower in the adolescent and adult lesioned groups than in each sham group. Interestingly, we observed more extensive impairment in socially interactive behaviors among the adolescent lesioned rats compared to the adult lesioned rats. The present study indicates that DA depletion in the mPFC causes significantly reduced grooming and socially interactive behaviors; this phenomenon may be comparable to the negative symptoms observed in schizophrenia. Further research is

  5. The D1 receptor-mediated effects of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829 in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, M.; Sprah, L.; Sket, D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Previous experiments have suggested a potential atypical antipsychotic activity of the ergoline derivative LEK-8829. In vitro experiments showed a high affinity to 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 and D2 receptors (the ratio of pKi values 5-HT2/D2 = 1.11) and a moderate affinity to D1 receptors. In vivo experiments showed antagonism of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor-linked behaviours. 2. In the present study, the rats with unilateral dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum, induced by the lesion of the median forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), were used to determine the effects of LEK-8829 on turning behaviour and on striatal c-fos mRNA levels. 3. The administration of LEK-8829 induced a long lasting contralateral turning behaviour that was dose-dependent. It was found that the specific D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390 but not the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol or 5-HT1A antagonist pindolol, dose-dependently inhibited the turning behaviour induced by LEK-8829. 4. In an attempt to clarify the D1:D2 receptor interactions involved in the action of LEK-8829 in the 6OHDA model, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry to compare the effect of SCH-23390 pretreatment on striatal c-fos mRNA expression induced either by LEK-8829 or by the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. 5. LEK-8829 induced a bilateral striatal c-fos mRNA expression that was significantly higher in the denervated striatum as compared to the intact striatum and was completely blocked on both sides by pretreatment with SCH-23390. In contrast, haloperidol-induced striatal c-fos mRNA expression was limited to the innervated striatum and was not blocked by SCH-23390. 6. Our data demonstrate an intrinsic activity of LEK-8829 on D1 receptors that is potentiated in the dopamine-depleted striatum. We conclude, therefore, that the putative atypical antipsychotic LEK-8829 may prove useful as an experimental tool for the study of D1:D2 receptor interactions and could have beneficial

  6. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of rat substantia nigra up-regulate dopamine-induced phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein in striatal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, D G; Kobierski, L A; Konradi, C; Hyman, S E

    1994-01-01

    Destruction of the substantia nigra produces striatal D1 dopamine receptor supersensitivity without increasing receptor number or affinity, thus implicating postreceptor mechanisms. The nature of these mechanisms is unknown. Increased striatal c-fos expression ipsilateral to a unilateral lesion of the substantia nigra in rats treated with appropriate dopamine agonists provides a cellular marker of D1 receptor supersensitivity. D1 receptors are positively linked to adenylate cyclase and therefore to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Because expression of the c-fos gene in response to cAMP- and Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated protein kinases depends on phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) at Ser-133, we examined CREB phosphorylation after dopaminergic stimulation in cultured striatal neurons and in the striatum of rats after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine ablation of the substantia nigra. Using an antiserum specific for CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133, we found that dopamine increases CREB phosphorylation in cultured striatal neurons. This effect was blocked by a D1 antagonist. L-Dopa produced marked CREB phosphorylation in striatal neurons in rats ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. This response was blocked by a D1 antagonist, but not a D2 antagonist, and was reproduced by a D1 agonist, but not a D2 agonist. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that D1 receptor supersensitivity is associated with upregulated activity of cAMP-dependent or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, or both, following dopamine denervation of striatal neurons. Images PMID:7937819

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB has neurorestorative effects and modulates the pericyte response in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Padel, Thomas; Özen, Ilknur; Boix, Jordi; Barbariga, Marco; Gaceb, Abderahim; Roth, Michaela; Paul, Gesine

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease where the degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway leads to specific motor deficits. There is an unmet medical need for regenerative treatments that stop or reverse disease progression. Several growth factors have been investigated in clinical trials to restore the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway damaged in PD. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a molecule that recruits pericytes to stabilize microvessels, was recently investigated in a phase-1 clinical trial, showing a dose-dependent increase in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen of PD patients. Interestingly, evidence is accumulating that PD is paralleled by microvascular changes, however, whether PDGF-BB modifies pericytes in PD is not known. Using a pericyte reporter mouse strain, we investigate the functional and restorative effect of PDGF-BB in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesion mouse model of PD, and whether this restorative effect is accompanied by changes in pericyte features. We demonstrate that a 2-week treatment with PDGF-BB leads to behavioural recovery using several behavioural tests, and partially restores the nigrostriatal pathway. Interestingly, we find that pericytes are activated in the striatum of PD lesioned mice and that these changes are reversed by PDGF-BB treatment. The modulation of brain pericytes may contribute to the PDGF-BB-induced neurorestorative effects, PDGF-BB allowing for vascular stabilization in PD. Pericytes might be a new cell target of interest for future regenerative therapies. PMID:27288154

  8. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  9. An assessment of the validity of densitometric measures of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers: relationship to apomorphine-induced rotations in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Cadet, J L; Kent, J D; Karanas, A L; Jackson-Lewis, V

    1990-10-01

    The power of immunohistochemical staining as a tool for the study of the neurochemical anatomy of the brain would be greatly enhanced if quantitative measures of staining were to be developed. We have here assessed the reliability and validity of two population measures of extent of fiber innervation: percent area occupied by staining, and average optical density (AOD) of staining. We have evaluated these measures for tyrosine hydroxylase-positive staining of the striatum in relation to apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. We have found that inter-operator reliability for the area measure is high (r = 0.98). Apomorphine-induced rotations were observed when the area measured was reduced to 2% or less of the control side, and when the density measure was reduced to 15% or less. These results are similar to those obtained previously for biochemical assay of TH activity, which showed rotations at reductions to 10% or less. We conclude that these density measures provide valid relative indices of extent of fiber innervation on the same section. The AOD measure appears to be more sensitive at lower levels of innervation. PMID:1980518

  10. Neurotoxic effects of berberine on long-term L-DOPA administration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Zhao, Ting Ting; Suh, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Ik Hyun; Choi, Soon Ok; Lee, Myung Koo

    2013-06-01

    The effects of berberine on long-term administration of L-DOPA in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) were investigated. Rat models of PD were prepared by 6-OHDA lesions in the ipsilateral sides, and then were treated with berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) and/or L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) once daily for 21 days. Treatments with either concentration of berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups decreased the numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned groups. In addition, dopaminergic neuronal cell death of the ipsilateral sides in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups was attenuated by L-DOPA administration. However, both concentrations of berberine in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups treated with L-DOPA aggravated the numbers of TH-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, DOPAC and HVA in the striatum as compared to rats not treated with berberine. These results suggest that berberine leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neuronal cells in the substantia nigra in the rat model of PD with chronic L-DOPA administration. Long-term L-DOPA therapy that may involve possibly neurotoxic isoquinoline agents including berberine should involve monitoring for adverse symptoms. PMID:23539311

  11. Minocycline protects SH-SY5Y cells from 6-hydroxydopamine by inhibiting both caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Lantto, Tiina A; Puttonen, Katja A; Tuominen, Raimo K; Raasmaja, Atso; Männistö, Pekka T

    2012-03-01

    Minocycline, a tetracyclic antibiotic, exerts both antiinflammation by acting on microglia and a direct protection on neurons by inhibiting the apoptotic machinery at various levels. However, we are not aware of any study investigating the effects of minocycline on caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. This study investigated these alternative pathways in SH-SY5Y cells, a human dopaminergic cell line, challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Minocycline exhibited neuroprotection and inhibition of the toxin-induced caspase-3-like activity, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation, hallmarks of apoptosis. Moreover, we revealed that 6-OHDA also activated caspase-independent PCDs (such as paraptosis), which required de novo protein synthesis. Additionally, by separately monitoring caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways, we showed that inhibition of apoptosis only partially explained the protective effect of minocycline. Moreover, we observed that minocycline reduced the protein content of cells but, unexpectedly, increased the protein synthesis. These findings suggest that minocycline may actually increase protein degradation, so it may also accelerate the clearance of aberrant proteins. In conclusion, we report for the first time evidence indicating that minocycline may inhibit PCD pathways that are additional to conventional apoptosis. PMID:22108958

  12. Increase in brain /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor binding following chronic haloperidol treatment, intracisternal 6-hydroxydopamine or ventral tegmental lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.S.L.; Lotti, V.J.; Martin, G.E.; Chen, T.B.

    1983-02-21

    Specific /sup 125/I-CCK receptor binding was significantly increased in brain tissue taken from guinea pig or mouse following chronic (2-3 week) daily administration of haloperidol (2-3 mg/kg/day). Scatchard analysis indicated the increase in CCK binding was due to an increased receptor number (B max) with no change in affinity (Kd). In guinea pigs, the increased CCK binding was observed in the mesolimbic regions and frontal cortex, but not in striatum, hippocampus nor posterior cortex. In mice, however, the increases occurred in both pooled cerebral cortical-hippocampal tissue, and in the remainder of the brain. Enhanced CCK receptor binding was also observed in membranes prepared from whole brain of mice one month following intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. Additionally, an increase in CCK binding was observed in mesolimbic regions and frontal cortex, but not striatum or hippocampus, of guinea pigs 3 weeks after an unilateral radiofrequency lesions of the ipsilateral ventral tegmentum. The present studies demonstrate that three different procedures which reduce dopaminergic function in the brain enhance CCK receptor binding. The data provide further support for a functional interrelationship between dopaminergic systems and CCK in some brain regions and raise the possibility that CCK may play a role in the antipsychotic action of neuroleptics.

  13. Ether-à-go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel expression in dopaminergic neurons of basal ganglia is modulated by 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N R; Mitkovski, M; Stühmer, W; Pardo, L A; Del Bel, E A

    2012-04-01

    The ether à go-go (Eag) gene encodes the voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) ion channel Kv10.1, whose function still remains unknown. As dopamine may directly affect K(+) channels, we evaluated whether a nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion induced by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) would alter Eag1-K(+) channel expression in the rat basal ganglia and related brain regions. Male Wistar rats received a microinjection of either saline or 6-OHDA (unilaterally) into the medial forebrain bundle. The extent of the dopaminergic lesion induced by 6-OHDA was evaluated by apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. The 6-OHDA microinjection caused a partial or complete lesion of dopaminergic cells, as well as a reduction of Eag1+ cells in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. In addition, we observed a decrease in TH immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral striatum. In conclusion, the expression of the Eag1-K(+)-channel throughout the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain, its co-localization with dopaminergic cells and its reduction mirroring the extent of the lesion highlight a physiological circuitry where the functional role of this channel can be investigated. The Eag1-K(+) channel expression in dopaminergic cells suggests that these channels are part of the diversified group of ion channels that generate and maintain the electrophysiological activity pattern of dopaminergic midbrain neurons. PMID:22048886

  14. Alterations in the motor cortical and striatal glutamatergic system and D-serine levels in the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    El Arfani, Anissa; Albertini, Giulia; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is hallmarked by progressive degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons and is associated with aberrant glutamatergic activity. However, studies on the glutamatergic system in the motor cortex and striatum, two motor loop-related areas, are lacking in the clinically relevant bilateral SNc 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model, and therefore led to the rationale behind the present investigations. Using Western blotting, the expression levels of the glial glutamate transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST, as well as xCT, the specific subunit of system xc(-), and the vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUT1 and 2 were investigated at two different time points (1 week and 2 weeks) post-lesion. In addition, the total content of glutamate was measured. Moreover, the total D-serine levels were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time in these two PD-related areas in the bilateral 6-OHDA rat model. In the motor cortex, no significant changes were observed in the different glutamate transporter expression levels in the bilaterally-lesioned rats. In the striatum, GLAST expression was significantly decreased at both time points whereas VGLUT1 and 2 expressions were significantly decreased 2 weeks after bilateral 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesion resulted in an enhancement of the total d-serine content in both motor cortex and striatum at 1 week post-lesion suggesting its possible involvement in the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates disturbed glutamate and D-serine regulation in the bilateral SNc-lesioned brain which could contribute to the behavioral impairments in PD. PMID:26172319

  15. Yokukansan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Enhances the L-DOPA-Induced Rotational Response in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rats: Possible Inhibition of COMT.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Tabuchi, Masahiro; Imamura, Sachiko; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Kase, Yoshio; Koganemaru, Go; Abe, Hiroshi; Ikarashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan (YKS) on the function of dopamine (DA) in the rat nigrostriatal system. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were produced in the rat nigrostriatal system. Despite a marked loss in the striatal immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase on the lesion side, striatal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity was not affected. Treatment using L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in conjunction with benserazide for 15 d induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) such as locomotive (rotational response), axial, forelimb, and orolingual movements in the lesioned rats. The L-DOPA-induced locomotive and axial, but not forelimb and orolingual, AIMs were significantly increased and prolonged by the pre-administration of YKS. We next investigated the effects of YKS on the production of DA from L-DOPA in 5-HT synthetic RIN 14B cells. RIN 14B cells produced DA and its metabolite, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), following L-DOPA treatment. YKS significantly augmented DA production and inhibited its metabolism to 3-MT in a manner similar to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor entacapone. YKS and some alkaloids (corynoxeine: CX, geissoschizine methyl ether: GM) in Uncaria hook, a constituent herb of YKS, also inhibited COMT activity, indicating that the augmenting effect of YKS on L-DOPA-induced DA production in 5-HT synthetic cells was due to the inhibition of COMT by CX and GM. Our results suggest that YKS facilitates the DA supplemental effect of L-DOPA, and that COMT inhibition by CX and GM contributes, at least in part, to the effects of YKS. PMID:26725433

  16. New ghrelin agonist, HM01 alleviates constipation and L-dopa-delayed gastric emptying in 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, H.; Pietra, C.; Giuliano, C.; Garcia-Rubio, S.; Xu, X.; Yakabi, S.; Taché, Y.; Wang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation and L-dopa-induced gastric dysmotility are common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We investigate the novel ghrelin agonist, HM01 influence on GI motor dysfunctions in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rats. Methods HM01 pharmacological profiles were determined in vitro and in vivo in rats. We assessed changes in fecal output and water content, and gastric emptying (GE) in 6-OHDA rats treated or not with orogastric (og) HM01 and L-dopa/carbidopa (LD/CD, 20/2 mg kg−1). Fos immunoreactivity (ir) cells in specific brain and lumbosacral spinal cord were quantified. Key results HM01 displayed a high binding affinity to ghrelin receptor (Ki: 1.42 ± 0.36 nM), 4.3±1.0 h half-life and high brain/plasma ratio. 6-OHDA rats had reduced daily fecal output (22%) and water intake (23%) compared to controls. HM01 (3 and 10 mg kg−1) similarly reversed the decreased 4-h fecal weight and water content in 6-OHDA rats. Basal GE was not modified in 6-OHDA rats, however, LD/CD (once or daily for 8 days) delayed GE in 6-OHDA and control rats that was prevented by HM01 (3 mg kg−1 acute or daily before LD/CD). HM01 increased Fos-ir cell number in the area postrema, arcuate nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius and lumbosacral intermediolateral column of 6-OHDA rats where 6-OHDA had a lowering effect compared to controls. Conclusions & Inferences 6-OHDA rats display constipation- and adipsia-like features of PD and L-dopa-inhibited GE. The new orally active ghrelin agonist, HM01 crosses the blood brain barrier and alleviates these alterations suggesting a potential benefit for PD with GI disorders. PMID:25327342

  17. Adaptive down-regulation of the serotonin transporter in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease and after chronic pramipexole treatment.

    PubMed

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, K; Wardas, J; Kosmowska, B; Domin, H; Śmiałowska, M; Głowacka, U; Ossowska, K

    2016-02-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion induced by bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections into the ventrolateral region of the caudate-putamen (CP) in rats, modeling preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease, induces a "depressive-like" behavior which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole (PRA). The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of the above lesion and chronic PRA treatment on binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT) in different brain regions. As before, 6-OHDA (15 μg/2.5 μl) was administered bilaterally into the CP. PRA (1mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously twice a day for 2 weeks. Serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons of the dorsal raphe (DR) were immunostained for tryptophan hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively, and were counted stereologically. Binding of [(3)H]GBR 12,935 to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and [(3)H]citalopram to SERT was analyzed autoradiographically. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA injections decreased the number of dopaminergic, but not serotonergic neurons in the DR. 6-OHDA reduced the DAT binding in the CP, and SERT binding in the nigrostriatal system (CP, substantia nigra (SN)), limbic system (ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAC), amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFCX), habenula, hippocampus) and DR. A significant positive correlation was found between DAT and SERT binding in the CP. Chronic PRA did not influence DAT binding but reduced SERT binding in the above structures, and deepened the lesion-induced losses in the core region of the NAC, SN, VTA and PFCX. The present study indicates that both the lesion of dopaminergic neurons and chronic PRA administration induce adaptive down-regulation of SERT binding. Moreover, although involvement of stimulation of dopaminergic transmission by chronic PRA in its "antidepressant" effect seems to be prevalent, additional contribution of SERT inhibition cannot be excluded. PMID:26628402

  18. Upregulation of β1-adrenoceptors is involved in the formation of gastric dysmotility in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin; Zheng, Lifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Feng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruifang; Sun, Lu; Hong, Feng; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jinxia

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Gastroparesis and upregulated β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) have been reported in rats with bilateral microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the substantia nigra, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The aim of the current study is to investigate the role of β-ARs in gastroparesis in 6-OHDA rats. Gastric motility was studied through strain gauge measurement. Immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed to examine the expression of β-ARs. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited gastric motility in a dose-dependent fashion in both control and 6-OHDA rats, but much stronger adrenergic reactivity was observed in the 6-OHDA rats. The inhibition of gastric motility by NE in both control and 6-OHDA rats was not affected by tetrodotoxin, a neural sodium channel blocker. Blocking β1-AR or β2-AR did not affect the inhibition of strip contraction by NE in control rats, but β1-AR blockage obviously enhanced the half maximal inhibitory concentration value of NE in 6-OHDA rats. Selective inhibition of β3-AR blocked the effect of NE significantly in both control and 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β1-AR, but not β2-AR and β3-AR in gastric muscularis externa was increased significantly in 6-OHDA rats. In conclusion, β3-AR involves the regulation of gastric motility in control rats, whereas the upregulation of β1-AR is responsible for enhanced NE reactivity in 6-OHDA rats and therefore is involved in the formation of gastroparesis. The effect of both β1-AR and β3-AR on gastric motility is independent of the enteric nervous system. PMID:24467967

  19. Interactions of CaMKII with dopamine D2 receptors: roles in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, SuFang; Xie, ChengLong; Wang, Qiang; Liu, ZhenGuo

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a synapse-enriched kinase in mammalian brains. This kinase interacts with various synaptic proteins to regulate expression and function of interacting proteins and thereby modulates synaptic transmission. CaMKII and its interacting partners are also believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we found that CaMKIIα binds to dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vitro. A distal region in the D2R third intracellular loop harbors CaMKIIα binding. Endogenous CaMKIIα was also found to interact with native D2Rs in rat striatal neurons in which D2Rs are expressed at a high level. In addition, in a rat 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned model of PD, chronic levodopa administration induced characteristic dyskinesia. In parallel, levodopa induced an increase in CaMKIIα-D2R interactions in striatal neurons. Intrastriatal injection of a Tat-fusion and CaMKIIα-D2R interaction-dead peptide (Tat-D2Ri) reversed this increase in the interaction between two proteins. Tat-D2Ri also alleviated dyskinetic behaviors induced by levodopa. These results reveal a new interaction between CaMKIIα and D2Rs in striatal neurons which is sensitive to long-term administration of levodopa in PD rats. Prevention of the response of CaMKIIα-D2R interactions to levodopa can alleviate levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:25351365

  20. Activation and blockade of serotonin7 receptors in the prelimbic cortex regulate depressive-like behaviors in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q J; Du, C X; Tan, H H; Zhang, L; Li, L B; Zhang, J; Niu, X L; Liu, J

    2015-12-17

    The role of serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors in the regulation of depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the prelimbic (PrL) sub-region of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involve in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. The lesion induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) increased sucrose consumption, and decreased immobility time in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, indicating the induction of antidepressant-like effects. Further, intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6 μg/rat) decreased sucrose consumption, and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of AS19 (2 μg/rat) increased dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the mPFC, habenula and ventral hippocampus (vHip) in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6 μg/rat) decreased 5-HT levels in the habenula and vHip, and the levels of NA in the mPFC, habenula and vHip in the two groups of rats. The results suggest that 5-HT7 receptors in the PrL play an important role in the regulation of these behaviors, which attribute to changes in monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions after activation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:26470809

  1. Behavioral differences between neonatal and adult 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats to dopamine agonists: relevance to neurological symptoms in clinical syndromes with reduced brain dopamine.

    PubMed

    Breese, G R; Baumeister, A A; McCown, T J; Emerick, S G; Frye, G D; Crotty, K; Mueller, R A

    1984-11-01

    Administration of L-dopa or apomorphine to neonatal and adult 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats resulted in different behavioral responses depending on the age at which dopaminergic fibers were destroyed. When neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats were tested as adults, they exhibited marked stereotypies, self-biting and self-mutilation behavior (SMB) when given these dopamine agonists. Self-biting as well as the incidence of SMB in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats showed dose-related changes between 10 and 100 mg/kg of L-dopa. This SMB and self-biting after L-dopa was observed as early as 22 to 24 days of age. Adult 6-OHDA-treated rats did not exhibit SMB or self-biting to L-dopa (100 mg/kg) or apomorphine (10 mg/kg), but did display paw treading and head nodding--behaviors not observed in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. In addition, the locomotor response to apomorphine (1 mg/kg) was significantly greater in adult 6-OHDA-treated rats than in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. Brain dopamine was reduced markedly in striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercles in both 6-OHDA treatment groups with the reduction being slightly greater in rats treated with 6-OHDA neonatally. Serotonin content was elevated in striatum of rats treated neonatally with 6-OHDA, but not in adult 6-OHDA-treated rats. SMB and behaviors observed after L-dopa in rats treated neonatally with 6-OHDA were not apparent after L-dopa in rats with brain serotonin or norepinephrine reduced. Rats with brain dopaminergic fibers destroyed neonatally exhibited self-biting and SMB after L-dopa, suggesting that neonatal reduction of this amine is responsible for the SMB and self-biting in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats. 5-Hydroxytryptophan administration to neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats did not induce SMB, indicating that release of serotonin by L-dopa is not responsible for this behavior. Because inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase did not alter the SMB response to L-dopa observed in neonatal 6-OHDA-treated rats

  2. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  3. Both Creatine and Its Product Phosphocreatine Reduce Oxidative Stress and Afford Neuroprotection in an In Vitro Parkinson’s Model

    PubMed Central

    Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria D.; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier; Ludka, Fabiana K.; Tasca, Carla I.; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; López, Manuela G.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr). This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson’s model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine473) and GSK3β (Serine9). Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25424428

  4. S-allyl cysteine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in the rat striatum: involvement of Nrf2 transcription factor activation and modulation of signaling kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Macías-Silva, Marina; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Maldonado, Perla D; González-Trujano, María Eva; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacological activation at the basal ganglia of the transcription factor Nrf2, guardian of redox homeostasis, holds a strong promise for the slow progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a potent Nrf2 activator in the brain still must be found. In this study, we have investigated the potential use of the antioxidant compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC) in the activation of Nrf2 in 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA)-intoxicated rats. In the rat striatum, SAC by itself promoted the Nrf2 dissociation of Keap-1, its nuclear translocation, the subsequent association with small MafK protein, and further binding of the Nrf2/MafK complex to ARE sequence, as well as the up-regulation of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes HO-1, NQO-1, GR, and SOD-1. In vivo and in vitro experiments to identify signaling pathways activated by SAC pointed to Akt as the most likely kinase participating in Nrf2 activation by SAC. In PC12 cells, SAC stimulated the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and inhibited JNK1/2/3 activation. In the rat striatum, the SAC-induced activation of Nrf2 is likely to contribute to inhibit the toxic effects of 6-OHDA evidenced by phase 2 antioxidant enzymes up-regulation, glutathione recovery, and attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and lipid peroxides formation. These early protective effects correlated with the long-term preservation of the cellular redox status, the striatal dopamine (DA) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and the improvement of motor skills. Therefore, this study indicates that, in addition to direct scavenging actions, the activation of Nrf2 by SAC might confer neuroprotective responses through the modulation of kinase signaling pathways in rodent models of PD, and suggests that this antioxidant molecule may have a therapeutic value in this human pathology. PMID:22781654

  5. The effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on trace element and antioxidant levels in rats following 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal insult.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Moosa, Zulfiah; Daniels, Willie M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2014-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a metal toxin found commonly in the environment. Studies have shown severe neurotoxic effects of MeHg poisoning especially during pregnancy where it crosses the foetoplacental and the blood brain barrier of the foetus leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in the offspring. These deficits may predispose offspring to neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure (2.5 mg/L in drinking water from GND 1-GND 21) on the trace element status in the brain of adolescent offspring (PND 28). Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured in their blood plasma. In a separate group of animals that was also exposed prenatally to MeHg, 6-hydroydopamine (6-OHDA) was administered at PND 60 as a model of neuronal insult. Trace element and TAC levels were compared before and after 6-OHDA exposure. Prenatal MeHg treatment alone resulted in significantly higher concentrations of zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in the brain of offspring at PND 28 (p < 0.05), when compared to controls. In contrast, brain iron levels in MeHg-exposed adolescent offspring were significantly lower than their controls (p < 0.05). Following 6-OHDA exposure, the levels of iron, zinc, copper and manganese were increased compared to sham-lesioned offspring (p < 0.05). Prenatal MeHg exposure further increased these trace element levels thereby promoting toxicity (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity was not significantly different in MeHg and control groups prior to lesion. However, following 6-OHDA administration, MeHg-exposed animals had a significantly lower TAC than that of controls (p < 0.05). Brain TAC levels were higher in adult male rats than in female rats during adolescence however male rats that had been exposed to MeHg in utero failed to show this increase at PND 74. Prenatal MeHg exposure results in trace element dyshomeostasis in the brain of offspring and reduces total

  6. Subthalamic 6-OHDA-induced lesion attenuates levodopa-induced dyskinesias in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J A

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives direct dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra pars compacta that degenerates in Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of dopaminergic denervation of STN in the origin of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats were distributed in four groups which were concomitantly lesioned with 6-OHDA or vehicle (sham) in the STN and in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as follows: a) MFB-sham plus STN-sham, b) MFB-sham plus STN-lesion, c) MFB-lesion plus STN-sham, and d) MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion. Four weeks after lesions, animals were treated with levodopa (6mg/kg with 15mg/kg benserazide i.p.) twice daily for 22 consecutive days. Abnormal involuntary movements were measured. In situ hybridization was performed measuring the expression of striatal preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, STN cytochrome oxidase (CO) and nigral GAD67 mRNAs. STN 6-OHDA denervation did not induce dyskinesias in levodopa-treated MFB-sham animals but attenuated axial (p<0.05), limb (p<0.05) and orolingual (p<0.01) dyskinesias in rats with a concomitant lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The attenuation of dyskinesias was associated with a decrease in the ipsilateral STN CO mRNA levels (p<0.05). No significant differences between MFB-lesion plus STN-sham and MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion groups in the extent of STN dopaminergic denervation were observed. Moreover, intrasubthalamic microinfusion of dopamine in the MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion group triggered orolingual (p<0.01), but not axial or limb, dyskinesias. These results suggest that dopaminergic STN innervation influences the expression of levodopa-induced dyskinesias but also the existence of non dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms. STN noradrenergic depletion induced by 6-OHDA in the STN needs to be taken in account as a possible mechanism explaining the attenuation of dyskinesias in the combined lesion group. PMID:24140562

  7. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats. PMID:25825926

  8. Minocycline enhances MPTP toxicity to dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichuan; Sugama, Shuei; Chirichigno, Jason W; Gregorio, Jason; Lorenzl, Stefan; Shin, Dong H; Browne, Susan E; Shimizu, Yoshinori; Joh, Tong H; Beal, M Flint; Albers, David S

    2003-10-15

    Minocycline has been shown previously to have beneficial effects against ischemia in rats as well as neuroprotective properties against excitotoxic damage in vitro, nigral cell loss via 6-hydroxydopamine, and to prolong the life-span of transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated whether minocycline would protect against toxic effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a toxin that selectively destroys nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons and produces a clinical state similar to Parkinson's disease (PD) in rodents and primates. We found that although minocycline inhibited microglial activation, it significantly exacerbated MPTP-induced damage to DA neurons. We present evidence suggesting that this effect may be due to inhibition of DA and 1-methyl-4-phenylpridium (MPP+) uptake into striatal vesicles. PMID:14515357

  9. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound selectively antagonizes MPP⁺, but not rotenone, neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Wong, Ngok-Shun; Sze, Cho-Wing; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Wai; Tong, Yao; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2012-07-11

    Chrysotoxine is a naturally occurring bibenzyl compound found in medicinal Dendrobium species. We previously reported that chrysotoxine structure-specifically suppressed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced dopaminergic cell death. Whether chrysotoxine and other structurally similar bibenzyl compounds could also inhibit the neurotoxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+)) and rotenone has not been investigated. We showed herein that chrysotoxine inhibited MPP(+), but not rotenone, induced dopaminergic cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction as indexed by the decrease in membrane potential, increase in calcium concentration and NF-κB activation triggered by MPP(+) were blocked by chrysotoxine pretreatment. The imbalance between the pro-apoptotic signals (Bax, caspase-3, ERK and p38 MAPK) and the pro-survival signals (Akt/PI3K/GSK-3β) induced by MPP(+) was partially or totally rectified by chrysotoxine. The results indicated that ROS inhibition, mitochondria protection, NF-κB modulation and regulation of multiple signals determining cell survival and cell death were involved in the protective effects of chrysotoxine against MPP(+) toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Given the different toxic profiles of 6-OHDA and MPP(+) as compared to rotenone, our results also indicated that DAT inhibition may partially account for the neuroprotective effects of chrysotoxine. PMID:22659498

  10. Chronic Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation Protects Against 6-hydroxydopamine Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amol P.; Fuentes, Romulo; Zhang, Hao; Vinholo, Thais; Wang, Chi-Han; Freire, Marco Aurelio M.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Although L-dopa continues to be the gold standard for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), it presents long-term complications. Deep brain stimulation is effective, but only a small percentage of idiopathic PD patients are eligible. Based on results in animal models and a handful of patients, dorsal column stimulation (DCS) has been proposed as a potential therapy for PD. To date, the long-term effects of DCS in animal models have not been quantified. Here, we report that DCS applied twice a week in rats treated with bilateral 6-OHDA striatal infusions led to a significant improvement in symptoms. DCS-treated rats exhibited a higher density of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and higher neuronal cell count in the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to a control group. These results suggest that DCS has a chronic therapeutical and neuroprotective effect, increasing its potential as a new clinical option for treating PD patients.

  11. Neuronal effects of 4-t-Butylcatechol: A model for catechol-containing antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Y.-C. Liu Yuxin; Lin, Y.-C.; Shih, Y.-T.; Liu, C.-M.; Burka, Leo T.

    2008-04-15

    Many herbal medicines and dietary supplements sold as aids to improve memory or treat neurodegenerative diseases or have other favorable effects on the CNS contain a catechol or similar 1,2-dihydroxy aromatic moiety in their structure. As an approach to isolate and examine the neuroprotective properties of catechols, a simple catechol 4-t-Butylcatechol (TBC) has been used as a model. In this study, we investigated the effects of TBC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglial-induced neurotoxicity by using the in vitro model of coculture murine microglial-like cell line HAPI with the neuronal-like human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We also examined the effects of TBC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. TBC at concentrations from 0.1-10 {mu}M had no toxic effect on HAPI cells and SH-SY5Y cells, and it inhibited LPS (100 ng/ml)-induced increases of superoxide, intracellular ROS, gp91{sup Phox}, iNOS and a decrease of HO-1 in HAPI cells. Under coculture condition, TBC significantly reduced LPS-activated microglia-induced dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells death. Moreover, TBC (0.1-10 {mu}M) inhibited 6-OHDA-induced increases of intracellular ROS, iNOS, nNOS, and a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential, and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurotoxic effects of TBC (100 {mu}M) on SH-SY5Y cells were also observed including the decrease in mitochondria membrane potential and the increase in COX-2 expression and cell death. TBC-induced SH-SY5Y cell death was attenuated by pretreatment with NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. In conclusion, this study suggests that TBC might possess protective effects on inflammation- and oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. However, the high concentration of TBC might be toxic, at least in part, for increasing COX-2 expression.

  12. The P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G attenuates contralateral rotations in a rat model of Parkinsonism through a combined control of synaptotoxicity, neurotoxicity and gliosis.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marta R S; Menezes, Ana Paula F; Nunes, Ana Carla L; Pliássova, Anna; Rolo, Anabela P; Palmeira, Carlos M; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Canas, Paula M; Andrade, Geanne M

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) involves an initial loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals evolving into a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), which can be modeled by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration. Since ATP is a danger signal acting through its P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), we now tested if a blood-brain barrier-permeable P2X7R antagonist, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), controlled the 6-OHDA-induced PD-like features in rats. BBG (45 mg/kg) attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced: 1) increase of contralateral rotations in the apomorphine test, an effect mimicked by another P2X7R antagonist A438079 applied intra-cerebroventricularly; 2) short-term memory impairment in the passive avoidance and cued version of the Morris Water maze; 3) reduction of dopamine content in the striatum and SN; 4) microgliosis and astrogliosis in the striatum. To grasp the mechanism of action of BBG, we used in vitro models exploring synaptotoxicity (striatal synaptosomes) and neurotoxicity (dopamine-differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells). P2X7R were present in striatal dopaminergic terminals, and BBG (100 nM) prevented the 6-OHDA-induced synaptosomal dysfunction. P2X7R were also co-localized with tyrosine hydroxylase in SH-SY5Y cells, where BBG (100 nM) attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. This suggests that P2X7R contribute to PD pathogenesis through a triple impact on synaptotoxicity, gliosis and neurotoxicity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of P2X7R antagonists in PD. PMID:24508709

  13. Low Concentrations of Methamphetamine Can Protect Dopaminergic Cells against a Larger Oxidative Stress Injury: Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    El Ayadi, Amina; Zigmond, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Mild stress can protect against a larger insult, a phenomenon termed preconditioning or tolerance. To determine if a low intensity stressor could also protect cells against intense oxidative stress in a model of dopamine deficiency associated with Parkinson disease, we used methamphetamine to provide a mild, preconditioning stress, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) as a source of potentially toxic oxidative stress, and MN9D cells as a model of dopamine neurons. We observed that prior exposure to subtoxic concentrations of methamphetamine protected these cells against 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas higher concentrations of methamphetamine exacerbated it. The protection by methamphetamine was accompanied by decreased uptake of both [3H] dopamine and 6-OHDA into the cells, which may have accounted for some of the apparent protection. However, a number of other effects of methamphetamine exposure suggest that the drug also affected basic cellular survival mechanisms. First, although methamphetamine preconditioning decreased basal pERK1/2 and pAkt levels, it enhanced the 6-OHDA-induced increase in these phosphokinases. Second, the apparent increase in pERK1/2 activity was accompanied by increased pMEK1/2 levels and decreased activity of protein phosphatase 2. Third, methamphetamine upregulated the pro-survival protein Bcl-2. Our results suggest that exposure to low concentrations of methamphetamine cause a number of changes in dopamine cells, some of which result in a decrease in their vulnerability to subsequent oxidative stress. These observations may provide insights into the development of new therapies for prevention or treatment of PD. PMID:22022363

  14. Protection of Primary Dopaminergic Midbrain Neurons by GPR139 Agonists Supports Different Mechanisms of MPP+ and Rotenone Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bayer Andersen, Kirsten; Leander Johansen, Jens; Hentzer, Morten; Smith, Garrick Paul; Dietz, Gunnar P. H.

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 139 (GPR139) is expressed specifically in the brain in areas of relevance for motor control. GPR139 function and signal transduction pathways are elusive, and results in the literature are even contradictory. Here, we examined the potential neuroprotective effect of GPR139 agonism in primary culture models of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal degeneration. We find that in vitro GPR139 agonists protected primary mesencephalic DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-mediated degeneration. Protection was concentration-dependent and could be blocked by a GPR139 antagonist. However, the protection of DA neurons was not found against rotenone or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mediated degeneration. Our results support differential mechanisms of toxicity for those substances commonly used in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models and potential for GPR139 agonists in neuroprotection. PMID:27445691

  15. Effects of GDF5 overexpression on embryonic rat dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, David B; Harrison, Patrick T; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2010-05-01

    Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurones has shown promise for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but this approach is limited by the poor survival of the transplanted cells. Exogenous dopaminergic neurotrophic factors such as growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) have been found to enhance the survival of transplanted dopaminergic neurones. However, this approach is limited by the rapid degradation of such factors in vivo; thus, methods for long-term delivery of these factors are under investigation. The present study shows, using optimised lipid-mediated transfection procedures, that overexpression of GDF5 significantly improves the survival of dopaminergic neurones in cultures of embryonic day (E) 13 rat ventral mesencephalon (VM) and protects them against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity. In another experiment, E13 VM cells were transfected with GDF5 after 1 day in vitro (DIV), then transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned adult rat striata after 2 DIV. The survival of these E13 VM dopaminergic neurones after transfection and transplantation was as least as high as that of freshly dissected E14 VM dopaminergic neurones, demonstrating that transfection was not detrimental to these cells. Furthermore, GDF5-overexpressing E13 VM transplants significantly reduced amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the lesioned rats. This study shows that lipid-mediated transfection in vitro prior to transplantation is a valid approach for the introduction of neurotrophic proteins such as GDF5, as well as lending further support to the potential use of GDF5 in neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:20349094

  16. Intrastriatal GDNF gene transfer by inducible lentivirus vectors protects dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha-Sha; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Li, Chen; Lu, Tao; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, substantial evidence has shown that a long-term overexpression of GDNF gene is often associated with side effects. We previously improved tetracycline (Tet)-On lentivirus system carrying human GDNF (hGDNF) gene, and demonstrated that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated and functional in vitro. Here we further examined the efficiency and neuroprotection of Tet-On lentivirus-mediated hGDNF gene regulation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and a rat model of parkinsonism. The results showed that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated in transduced NPCs. Doxycycline (Dox)-induced hGDNF protected DA neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity in vitro. Intrastriatal injections of Tet-On lentivirus vectors resulted in dramatically increased levels of hGDNF protein in the striatum of rats with Dox-drinking water, when compared to lentivirus-injected and saline-injected rats with normal drinking water, respectively. In addition, hGDNF protected nigral DA neurons and striatal DA fibers, and attenuated d-amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the 6-OHDA lesioned rats. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that hGDNF gene transfer by Tet-On lentivirus vectors is tightly regulated in rat brain, and Dox-induced hGDNF is functional in neuroprotection of nigral DA neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism. PMID:24997241

  17. The Chemical Molecule B355252 is Neuroprotective in an In Vitro Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gliyazova, Nailya S; Ibeanu, Gordon C

    2016-10-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin frequently used to create in vitro and in vivo experimental models of Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder largely resulting from damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. No effective drugs or therapies have been developed for this devastating disorder, and current regimens of symptomatic therapeutics only alleviate symptoms temporarily. Therefore, effective treatments that reverse or cure this disorder are urgently needed. The aim of the study described in this report was to investigate the therapeutic impact of B355252, an aryl thiophene sulfonamide chemical entity, in the widely recognized in vitro model of PD, and to characterize the molecular signaling pathways. We show here that 6-OHDA-induced cell death in HT22, a murine neuronal cell model, through a pathway that involves the mitochondria by increasing the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), raising intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), enhancing the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and promoting activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signaling pathway. More importantly, we found that B355252 protected HT22 neurons against 6-OHDA toxin-induced neuronal cell death by significant attenuation of ROS production, blocking of mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of cytochrome c release, sequestration of [Ca(2+)]i, modulation of JNK cascade, and strong inhibition of caspase 3/7 cleavage. Overall, this study demonstrates that death of neurons under toxic conditions characteristic of PD can be efficiently halted by B355252 and suggests that further development of the molecule could be potentially beneficial as a therapeutic prevention or treatment option for PD. PMID:26649727

  18. A C. elegans p38 MAP kinase pathway mutant protects from dopamine, methamphetamine, and MDMA toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Matthew A.; McIntire, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amine systems are damaged by amphetamine abuse and in Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms mediating this damage are of high importance because of the public health impact of these problems. Here we have taken advantage of the C. elegans nematode model system to investigate genetic modifiers of biogenic amine toxicity. In a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutant resistant to the toxic effects of dopamine. This mutant was also resistant to toxic doses of methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In addition, this mutation conferred resistance to 6-hydroxydopamine damage to dopaminergic neurons in a Parkinson's disease model. Resistance was due to a mutation in the nsy-1 gene, orthologous to the mammalian ASK-1 MAPKKK. NSY-1 is in the highly conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, which plays a crucial role in C. elegans innate immunity, suggesting that this pathway may play a role in biogenic amine toxicity system damage due to amphetamines and in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease in higher organisms. PMID:21565252

  19. Autoradiography of dopamine receptors and dopamine uptake sites in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kujirai, K.; Przedborski, S.; Kostic, V.; Jackson-Lewis, V.; Fahn, S.; Cadet, J.L. )

    1990-11-01

    We examined the status of dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors by using (3H)SCH 23390 and (3H)spiperone binding, respectively, and DA uptake sites by using (3H)mazindol binding in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. SHR showed significantly higher (3H)SCH 23390 and (3H)spiperone binding in the caudate-putamen (CPu), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the olfactory tubercle (OT) in comparison to the SD rats. There were no significant differences in (3H)mazindol-labeled DA uptake sites between the two strains. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection into the striatum resulted in more than 90% depletion of DA uptake sites in the CPu in both strains. 6-OHDA-induced DA depletion was associated with significant increases in striatal (3H)spiperone binding which were of similar magnitude in the SD rats (+64.1%) and SHR (+51.3%). There were only small decreases (-5.4%) in D1 receptor binding in the dorsolateral aspect of the CPu in the SHR, whereas there were no changes in striatal D1 receptors in the SD rats. These results indicate that, although the SHR have higher concentrations of both D1 and D2 receptors in the basal ganglia, these receptors are regulated in a fashion similar to DA receptors in SD rats after 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion.

  20. Antagonism of quercetin against tremor induced by unilateral striatal lesion of 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xin; Yuan, Xia; Du, Li-Da; He, Guo-Rong; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in many plants, is reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tremor effects of quercetin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. In rats, quercetin had no effect on apomorphine-induced rotations, but it could significantly attenuate muscle tremor of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Interestingly, quercetin could decrease the burst frequency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that quercetin may have a protective effect on models to mimic muscle tremors of Parkinson's disease. This effect of quercetin may be associated with serotonergic system, but further study is needed. PMID:26217978

  1. Cardiac Dysregulation and Myocardial Injury in a 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Rat Model of Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-long; Ma, Du-Fang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Su, Wen-ge; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac sympathetic denervation is found in various cardiac pathologies; however, its relationship with myocardial injury has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods Twenty-four rats were assigned to the normal control group (NC), sympathectomy control group (SC), and a sympathectomy plus mecobalamin group (SM). Sympathectomy was induced by injection of 6-OHDA, after which, the destruction and distribution of sympathetic and vagal nerve in the left ventricle (LV) myocardial tissue were determined by immunofluorescence and ELISA. Heart rate variability (HRV), ECG and echocardiography, and assays for myocardial enzymes in serum before and after sympathectomy were examined. Morphologic changes in the LV by HE staining and transmission electron microscope were used to estimate levels of myocardial injury and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were used to reflect the inflammatory reaction. Results Injection of 6-OHDA decreased NE (933.1 ± 179 ng/L for SC vs. 3418.1± 443.6 ng/L for NC, P < 0.01) and increased NGF (479.4± 56.5 ng/mL for SC vs. 315.85 ± 28.6 ng/mL for NC, P < 0.01) concentrations. TH expression was reduced, while ChAT expression showed no change. Sympathectomy caused decreased HRV and abnormal ECG and echocardiography results, and histopathologic examinations showed myocardial injury and increased collagen deposition as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in the cardiac tissue of rats in the SC and SM groups. However, all pathologic changes in the SM group were less severe compared to those in the SC group. Conclusions Chemical sympathectomy with administration of 6-OHDA caused dysregulation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and myocardial injuries. Mecobalamin alleviated inflammatory and myocardial damage by protecting myocardial sympathetic nerves. PMID:26230083

  2. TROPHIC CONTROL OF LUNG DEVELOPMENT BY SYMPATHETIC NEURONS: EFFECTS OF NEONATAL SYMPATHECTOMY WITH 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The onset of peripheral sympathetic neuronal function is thought to provide trophic regulatory signals for development of adrenergic target tissues. n the current study, we examined the effects on lung development of neonatal sympathectomy with hydroxydopamine. he completeness of...

  3. Multifunctional D2/D3 agonist D-520 with high in vivo efficacy: modulator of toxicity of alpha-synuclein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Modi, Gyan; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Gogoi, Sanjib; Shah, Mrudang; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E A; Dutta, Aloke K

    2014-08-20

    We have developed a series of dihydroxy compounds and related analogues based on our hybrid D2/D3 agonist molecular template to develop multifunctional drugs for symptomatic and neuroprotective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). The lead compound (-)-24b (D-520) exhibited high agonist potency at D2/D3 receptors and produced efficacious activity in the animal models for PD. The data from thioflavin T (ThT) assay and from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis demonstrate that D-520 is able to modulate aggregation of alpha-synuclein (αSN). Additionally, coincubation of D-520 with αSN is able to reduce toxicity of preformed aggregates of αSN compared to control αSN alone. Finally, in a neuroprotection study with dopaminergic MN9D cells, D-520 clearly demonstrated the effect of neuroprotection from toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine. Thus, compound D-520 possesses properties characteristic of multifunctionality conducive to symptomatic and neuroprotective treatment of PD. PMID:24960209

  4. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  5. Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity studies in the animal models are done to determine the dose level recommended for the treatment of disease as drug. This guideline enables the characterization of adverse effects following repeated daily inhalation exposure to a test. This chapter includes oral and dermal toxicity studies which are discussed as per OECD guidelines. Both acute and subacute toxicity studies are given special emphasis. PMID:26939270

  6. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    Some six or so physiological systems, essential to normal mammalian life, are involved in poisoning; an intoxication that causes severe injury to any one of them could be life threatening. Reversible chemical reactions showing Scatchard-type binding are exemplified by CO, CN- and cyclodiene neurotoxin insecticide intoxications, and by antigen-antibody complex formation. Haemoglobin (Hb) molecular biology accounts for the allosteric co-operativity and other characteristics of CO poisoning, CN- acts as a powerful cytochrome oxidase inhibitor, and antigen binding in a deep antibody cleft between two domains equipped with epitopes for antigen-binding groups explains hapten-specific immune reactions. Covalent chemical reactions with second-order (SN2) kinetics characterize Hg and Cd poisonings, the reactions of organophosphates and phosphonates with acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase and the reaction sequence whereby Paraquat accepts electrons and generates superoxide under aerobic conditions. Indirect carcinogens require cytochrome P450 activation to form DNA adducts in target-organ DNA and cause cancer, but a battery of detoxifying enzymes clustered with the P450 system must be overcome. Thus, S-metabolism competes ineffectively with target DNA for reactive vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites, epoxide hydrolase is important to the metabolism and carcinogenicity of alfatoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, etc.), and the non-toxic 2-naphthylhydroxylamine N-glucuronide acts as a transport form in 2-naphthylamine bladder cancer. VC liver-cancer pathogenesis is explicable in terms of the presence of the glutathione S-transferase detoxifying system in hepatocytes and its absence from the fibroblastic elements, and of the VC concentrations reaching the liver by different administrative routes. In VC carcinogenicity, chemical reactions give imidazo-cyclization products with nucleoside residues of target DNA, and in benzene leukaemia, Z

  7. Decreased forelimb ability in mice intracerebroventricularly injected with low dose 6-hydroxidopamine: A model on the dissociation of bradykinesia from hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renata Pietsch; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Colle, Dirleise; Naime, Aline Aita; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ghizoni, Heloisa; Hort, Mariana Appel; Godoi, Marcelo; Dias, Paulo Fernando; Braga, Antonio Luiz; Farina, Marcelo

    2016-05-15

    Bradykinesia and hypokinesia represent well-known motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). While bradykinesia (slow execution of movements) is present in less affected PD patients and aggravates as the disease severity increases, hypokinesia (reduction of movement) seems to emerge prominently only in the more affected patients. Here we developed a model based on the central infusion of low dose (40μg) 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in mice in an attempt to discriminate bradykinesia (accessed through forelimb inability) from hypokinesia (accessed through locomotor and exploratory activities). The potential beneficial effects of succinobucol against 6-OHDA-induced forelimb inability were also evaluated. One week after the beginning of treatment with succinobucol (i.p. injections, 10mg/kg/day), mice received a single i.c.v. infusion of 6-OHDA (40μg/site). One week after 6-OHDA infusion, general locomotor/exploratory activities (open field test), muscle strength (grid test), forelimb skill (single pellet task), as well as striatal biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress and cellular homeostasis (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and NADH dehydrogenases activities, lipid peroxidation and TH levels), were evaluated. 6-OHDA infusions did not change locomotor/exploratory activities and muscle strength, as well as the evaluated striatal biochemical parameters. However, 6-OHDA infusions caused significant reductions (50%) in the single pellet reaching task performance, which detects forelimb skill inability and can be used to experimentally identify bradykinesia. Succinobucol partially protected against 6-OHDA-induced forelimb inability. The decreased forelimb ability with no changes in locomotor/exploratory behavior indicates that our 6-OHDA-based protocol represents a useful tool to mechanistically study the dissociation of bradykinesia and hypokinesia in PD. PMID:26921691

  8. Induction of Pi form of glutathione S-transferase by carnosic acid is mediated through PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway and protects against neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Jing-Hsien; Fu, Ru-Huei; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2014-11-17

    Carnosic acid (CA), a diterpene found in the rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), has been reported to have a neuroprotective effect. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) P (GSTP) is a phase II detoxifying enzyme that provides a neuroprotective effect. The aim of this study was to explore whether the neuroprotective effect of CA is via an upregulation of GSTP expression and the possible signaling pathways involved. SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with 1 μM CA followed by treatment with 100 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Both immunoblotting and enzyme activity results show that CA also induced protein expression and enzyme activity of GSTP. Moreover, CA significantly increased the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, the nuclear translocation of p65, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with LY294002 (a PI3K/Akt inhibitor) suppressed the CA-induced phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα, p65 nuclear translocation, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-DNA binding activity as well as GSTP protein expression. Furthermore, CA attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase 3 activation, and cell death was reversed by GSTP siRNA or LY294002 treatment. Additionally, male Wistar rats with lesions induced by 6-OHDA treatment in the right striatum responded to treatment with CA, which significantly reversed the reduction in GSTP protein expression that resulted from lesioning. We suggest that CA prevents 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis through an increase in GSTP expression via activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway. Therefore, CA may be a promising candidate for use in the prevention of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25271104

  9. ALCAR Exerts Neuroprotective and Pro-Neurogenic Effects by Inhibition of Glial Activation and Oxidative Stress via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu; Mishra, Akanksha; Shukla, Shubha

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are known causative factors in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Neural stem cells (NSCs) contribute in maintaining brain plasticity; therefore, survival of NSCs and neuroblasts during neurodegenerative process becomes important in replenishing the pool of mature neuronal population. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), present in almost all body cells, increases endogenous antioxidants and regulates bioenergetics. Currently, no information is available about the putative mechanism and neuroprotective effects of ALCAR in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. Herein, we investigated the effect of ALCAR on death/survival of DAergic neurons, neuroblasts and NSCs and associates mechanism of neuroprotection in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. ALCAR (100 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) treatment started 3 days prior to 6-OHDA lesioning and continued for another 14 day post-lesioning. We found that ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats increased expression of neurogenic and the Wnt pathway genes in the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region. It suppressed the glial cell activation, improved antioxidant status, increased NSC/neuroblast population and rescued the DAergic neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats decreased GSK-3β activation and increased nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Functional deficits were restored following ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats as demonstrated by improved motor coordination and rotational behaviour, confirming protection of DAergic innervations in lesioned striatum. These results indicate that ALCAR exerts neuroprotective effects through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, suggesting its therapeutic use to treat neurodegenerative diseases by enhancing regenerative capacity. PMID:26223802

  10. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  11. [Toxic polyneuropathies].

    PubMed

    Neundörfer, B

    1992-08-01

    Toxic factors may have damaging effects on the peripheral nerves at different sites: on the axon, on the myelin sheath, on the cell bodies and on the vasa nervorum. The toxic neuropathies can be divided up into polyneuropathies induced by drugs, by industrial, environmental and stimulant poisons. Mostly symmetrical sensory symptoms and signs are the first disturbances, often followed by symmetrical motor pareses. Some polyneuropathies induced by amiodarone, benzene, lead, cimetidine, chloroquine, dapsone, gentamycin, gold, imipramine, hexacarbons, nialamide, penicillin, triorthocresylphosphate and vincristine are primarily dominated by motory losses. Polyneuropathies induced by amitriptyline, ethylene, oxide, lead, chlorprothixene, heroin, hydralazine, methaqualone, nialamide and penicillin show an asymmetrical distribution pattern of the neural losses. In some types of toxic polyneuropathies the cranial nerves and the autonomic nerves are particularly involved. The clinical symptomatology of the most important types of toxic neuropathies are described shortly. The best therapy is, of course, termination of exposure to the toxic substance concerned. PMID:1509644

  12. Ellagic Acid Protects the Brain Against 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neuroinflammation in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farbood, Yaghoob; Sarkaki, Alireza; Dolatshahi, Mojtaba; Taqhi Mansouri, Seyed Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Neuroinflammation may play as an important risk factor in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic cells. Antioxidants have protective effects against free radicals-induced neural damage in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we examined the effects of ellagic acid (EA) on locomotion and neuroinflammatory biomarkers in a rat model of PD induced by 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA). Methods: 6-OHDA (16 μg/2 μl) was injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in MFB-lesioned rat’s brain. Sham group received vehicle instead of 6-OHDA. PD-model was confirmed by rotational test using apomorphine injection. EA (50 mg/kg/2 ml, by gavages) was administered in PD+EA group. One group of MFB-lesioned rats received pramipexole (PPX; 2 mg/kg/2 ml, by gavages) as positive control group (PD+PPX group). Motor activity was assessed by stride length and cylinder tests. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in both striatum and hippocampus tissues. Results: MFB lesion caused significant reduction of stride-length (P<0.001) and also increased the contralateral rotations (P<0.001) and score of the cylinder test (P<0.001). Use of 6-OHDA to induce the PD significantly increased the levels of TNF-α (P<0.001) and IL-1β (P<0.001) in MFB-lesioned rats. EA significantly restored all of the above parameters. Discussion: EA can improve the motor impairments in the MFB-lesioned rats via reducing the neuroinflammatory biomarkers and protect the brain against free radicals-induced neural damage. The results suggest that EA can be helpful in management of PD treatment. PMID:27307952

  13. The Longitudinal Transcriptomic Response of the Substantia Nigra to Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Reveals Significant Upregulation of Regeneration-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Grabinski, Tessa; Mattingly, Zachary R.; Winn, Mary E.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Lipton, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the study of gene expression at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 16 weeks in the substantia nigra (SN) after intrastriatal 6-OHDA in the Sprague-Dawley rat (rattus norvegicus) would identify cellular responses during the degenerative process that could be axoprotective. Specifically, we hypothesized that genes expressed within the SN that followed a profile of being highly upregulated early after the lesion (during active axonal degeneration) and then progressively declined to baseline over 16 weeks as DA neurons died are indicative of potential protective responses to the striatal 6-OHDA insult. Utilizing a κ-means cluster analysis strategy, we demonstrated that one such cluster followed this hypothesized expression pattern over time, and that this cluster contained several interrelated transcripts that are classified as regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) including Atf3, Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Gpnmb, Sox11, Mmp19, Srgap1, Rab15,Lifr, Trib3, Tgfb1, and Sema3c. All exemplar transcripts tested from this cluster (Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Atf3 and Sox11) were validated by qPCR and a smaller subset (Sprr1a, Gadd45a and Sox11) were shown to be exclusively localized to SN DA neurons using a dual label approach with RNAScope in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of RAGs is typically associated with the response to axonal injury in the peripheral nerves and was not previously reported as part of the axodegenerative process for DA neurons of the SN. Interestingly, as part of this cluster, other transcripts were identified based on their expression pattern but without a RAG provenance in the literature. These "RAG-like" transcripts need further characterization to determine if they possess similar functions to or interact with known RAG transcripts. Ultimately, it is hoped that some of the newly identified axodegeneration-reactive transcripts could be exploited as axoprotective therapies in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25992874

  14. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  15. Digitalis toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    These are symptoms of digitalis toxicity: Confusion Irregular pulse Loss of appetite Nausea , vomiting , diarrhea Fast heartbeat Vision changes (unusual), including blind spots, blurred vision, changes in how colors look, or ...

  16. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  17. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  18. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  19. Alterations in Energy/Redox Metabolism Induced by Mitochondrial and Environmental Toxins: A Specific Role for Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase and the Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Paraquat Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology including genetic risk factors, environmental exposures, and aging. While energy failure and oxidative stress have largely been associated with the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD and the toxicity induced by mitochondrial/environmental toxins, very little is known regarding the alterations in energy metabolism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and their causative role in cell death progression. In this study, we investigated the alterations in the energy/redox-metabolome in dopaminergic cells exposed to environmental/mitochondrial toxins (paraquat, rotenone, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium [MPP+], and 6-hydroxydopamine [6-OHDA]) in order to identify common and/or different mechanisms of toxicity. A combined metabolomics approach using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and direct-infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS) was used to identify unique metabolic profile changes in response to these neurotoxins. Paraquat exposure induced the most profound alterations in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolome. 13C-glucose flux analysis corroborated that PPP metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucono-1,5-lactone, and erythrose-4-phosphate were increased by paraquat treatment, which was paralleled by inhibition of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Proteomic analysis also found an increase in the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which supplies reducing equivalents by regenerating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels. Overexpression of G6PD selectively increased paraquat toxicity, while its inhibition with 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death. These results suggest that paraquat “hijacks” the PPP to increase NADPH reducing equivalents and stimulate paraquat redox cycling, oxidative stress, and cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates that alterations

  20. Beyond toxicity

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide’s role in signaling. PMID:24398435

  1. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  2. Thallium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Galván-Arzate, S; Santamaría, A

    1998-09-30

    Thallium (T1+) is a toxic heavy metal which was accidentally discovered by Sir William Crookes in 1861 by burning the dust from a sulfuric acid industrial plant. He observed a bright green spectral band that quickly disappeared. Crookes named the new element 'Thallium' (after thallos meaning young shoot). In 1862, Lamy described the same spectral line and studied both the physical and chemical properties of this new element (Prick, J.J.G., 1979. Thallium poisoning. In: Vinkrn, P.J., Bruyn, G.W. (Eds.), Intoxication of the Nervous System, Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 36. North-Holland, New York. pp. 239-278). PMID:9801025

  3. Toxic chemicals and toxic laws

    SciTech Connect

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1991-08-30

    Recently there was consternation when it was discovered that a program intended to help minorities and the underprivileged in Detroit might have to be canceled. The reason was that some of the land on which new buildings were built was thought to contain toxic chemicals and therefore fell under the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (or Superfund). This collision of two valuable programs illustrates how a program originally heralded to carry out a worthwhile goal can become flawed. Since 1980, when the Superfund Act was passed by an overwhelming majority in Congress, only 34 of 1,245 identified priority sites have been cleaned up while approximately 40% of the money has been spent in trial litigation and administrative oversight. Critics, many of them within the EPA, point out that if the chemical danger level had been scientifically determined, approximately 90% of the truly important sites could have been cleaned up by now and the money wisely spent. However, the program was designed so that Congress initially did not have to raise much money or raise taxes and instead could argue that the program would not cost the taxpayer anything because it soaked the corporations. What needs to be done First, priority decisions should be taken out of the hands of nonscientists and lawyers and placed in those of scientists who are knowledgeable about toxic agents, who can identify effective targets objectively and who can establish workable priorities for removal of toxic waste. Second, a significant fraction of the money should be dedicated to research and to new programs that are more cost-effective. The purpose is to get chemical manufacturers thinking about reducing pollutants and the cost of cleanup when they plan to manufacture a chemical.

  4. Toxic terror

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence to either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  6. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  7. Reduced dopamine function within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens enhances latent inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, A.J.D.; Thur, K.E.; Horsley, R.R.; Spicer, C.; Marsden, C.A.; Cassaday, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a CS that has previously been presented without consequence. There is some evidence that LI can be potentiated by reduced mesoaccumbal dopamine (DA) function but the locus within the nucleus accumbens of this effect is as yet not firmly established. Experiment 1 tested whether 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of DA terminals within the core and medial shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) would enhance LI under conditions that normally disrupt LI in controls (weak pre-exposure). LI was measured in a thirst motivated conditioned emotional response procedure with 10 pre-exposures (to a noise CS) and 2 conditioning trials. The vehicle-injected and core-lesioned animals did not show LI and conditioned to the pre-exposed CS at comparable levels to the non-pre-exposed controls. 6-OHDA lesions to the medial shell, however, produced potentiation of LI, demonstrated across two extinction tests. In a subsequent experiment, haloperidol microinjected into the medial shell prior to conditioning similarly enhanced LI. These results underscore the dissociable roles of core and shell subregions of the NAc in mediating the expression of LI and indicate that reduced DA function within the medial shell leads to enhanced LI. PMID:21146557

  8. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Bhangale, Jitendra O.; Acharya, Sanjeev R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p < 0.001) found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.). 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion). 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:26884755

  9. Using Gelatin Nanoparticle Mediated Intranasal Delivery of Neuropeptide Substance P to Enhance Neuro-Recovery in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qi; Yu, Wen-Ze; Lin, Qian; Tian, Fu-Rong; Mao, Kai-Li; Lv, Chuan-Zhu; Wáng, Yi-Xiáng J.; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intranasal administration of phospholipid-based gelatin nanoparticles (GNP) was prepared to investigate the neuro-recovery effects of neuropeptide Substance P (SP) on hemiparkinsonian rats. Methods The SP-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNP) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method and possessed high stability, encapsulating efficiency and loading capacity. PC-12 cells were used to examine the growth enhancement of SP-GNP in vitro by MTT assays and flow cytometry (FCM). The therapeutic effects of SP-GNP on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced hemiparkinsonian rats were assessed by quantifying rotational behavior and the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated c-Jun protein (p-c-Jun) and Caspase-3 (Cas-3) expressed in substantia nigra (SN) region of hemiparkinsonian rats. Results PC-12 cells under SP-GNP treatment showed better cell viability and lower degree of apoptosis than those under SP solution treatment. Hemiparkinsonian rats under intranasal SP-GNP administration demonstrated better behavioral improvement, higher level of TH in SN along with much lower extent of p-c-Jun and Cas-3 than those under intranasal SP solution administration and intravenous SP-GNP administration. Conclusions With the advantages of GNP and nose-to-brain pathway, SP can be effectively delivered into the damaged SN region and exhibit its neuro-recovery function through the inhibition on JNK pathway and dopaminergic neuron apoptosis. PMID:26894626

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  11. From unilateral to bilateral parkinsonism: Effects of lateralization on dyskinesias and associated molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying lateralization and progression of motor symptoms from unilateral to bilateral in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. In addition, the molecular mechanisms involved in levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) depending on lateralization and disease progression from unilaterally to bilateral have not been described yet. We investigated motor symptoms, LIDs and associated striatal molecular markers expression after unilateral left or right, and after a sequential bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal lesions in rats. Sequentially bilateral lesioned animals showed a bilateral increase in striatal preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA without changes in pre-prodynorphin (PDyn) mRNA expression. The increase in dyskinesias when parkinsonism becomes bilateral was mostly due to an increase in orolingual dyskinesias associated to a increase in PDyn mRNA expression. Right lesion induces, or facilitates when first-done, a greater level of LIDs and an increase in striatal PPE and PDyn mRNAs in the second lesioned side. We describe a new striatal molecular pattern that appears when parkinsonism becomes bilateral and the relevance of the lateralization for the development of LIDs. PMID:26113400

  12. Daphnane Diterpenes from Daphne genkwa Activate Nurr1 and Have a Neuroprotective Effect in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Baek-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Yu Jin; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Kang, Young-Mi; Lee, Kyu-Suk; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Won-Gon

    2016-06-24

    Nurr1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that is essential for the differentiation and maintenance of dopaminergic neurons in the brain, and it is a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD). During the screening for Nurr1 activators from natural sources using cell-based assay systems, a methanol extract of the combined stems and roots of Daphne genkwa was found to activate the transcriptional function of Nurr1 at a concentration of 3 μg/mL. The active components were isolated and identified as genkwanine N (1) and yuanhuacin (2). Both compounds 1 and 2 significantly enhanced the function of Nurr1 at 0.3 μM. Nurr1-specific siRNA abolished the activity of 1 and 2, strongly suggesting that transcriptional activation by 1 and 2 occurred through the modulation of Nurr1 function. Additionally, treatment with 1 and 2 inhibited 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neuronal cell death and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. Moreover, in a 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD, intraperitoneal administration of 2 (0.5 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks significantly improved behavioral deficits and reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic neuron death induced by 6-OHDA injection and had a beneficial effect on the inflammatory response in the brain. Accordingly, compounds 1 and 2, the first reported Nurr1 activators of natural origin, are potential lead compounds for the treatment of PD. PMID:27228307

  13. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Bhangale, Jitendra O; Acharya, Sanjeev R

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p < 0.001) found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.). 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion). 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:26884755

  14. Exposure to Mitochondrial Genotoxins and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bodhicharla, Rakesh K.; McKeever, Madeline G.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Margillo, Kathleen M.; Ryde, Ian T.; Cyr, Derek D.; Kosmaczewski, Sara G.; Hammarlund, Marc; Meyer, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration has been correlated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and exposure to environmental toxins, but causation is unclear. We investigated the ability of several known environmental genotoxins and neurotoxins to cause mtDNA damage, mtDNA depletion, and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that paraquat, cadmium chloride and aflatoxin B1 caused more mitochondrial than nuclear DNA damage, and paraquat and aflatoxin B1 also caused dopaminergic neurodegeneration. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) caused similar levels of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage. To further test whether the neurodegeneration could be attributed to the observed mtDNA damage, C. elegans were exposed to repeated low-dose ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) that resulted in persistent mtDNA damage; this exposure also resulted in dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Damage to GABAergic neurons and pharyngeal muscle cells was not detected. We also found that fasting at the first larval stage was protective in dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration. Finally, we found that dopaminergic neurons in C. elegans are capable of regeneration after laser surgery. Our findings are consistent with a causal role for mitochondrial DNA damage in neurodegeneration, but also support non mtDNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:25486066

  15. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  16. Thermal stress and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Aydin, Cenk

    2014-07-01

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at sub-thermoneutral temperatures of ~22∘C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress can nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable task attributed in part to the interspecies differences in thermoregulatory response to the toxicants and to thermal stress. PMID:24944028

  17. TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

  18. Toxic substances handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  19. How Toxic Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relative danger from toxicity of some typical chemicals. Notes that some materials in solutions have low toxicity, but in dust form have high toxicity. Suggests that more chemical compounds should be treated as the dangerous compounds they are. Lists common compounds found in the lab. (MVL)

  20. Dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells from human deciduous teeth and their therapeutic benefits for Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiromi; Matsubara, Kohki; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and the depletion of striatal dopamine. Here we show that DAergic-neuron-like cells could be efficiently induced from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), and that these induced cells had therapeutic benefits in a 6-OHDA-induced Parkinsonian rat model. In our protocol, EGF and bFGF signaling activated the SHED's expression of proneural genes, Ngn2 and Mash1, and subsequent treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoted their maturation into DAergic neuron-like SHEDs (dSHEDs). A hypoxic DAergic differentiation protocol improved cell viability and enhanced the expression of multiple neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and HGF. Engrafted dSHEDs survived in the striatum of Parkinsonian rats, improved the DA level more efficiently than engrafted undifferentiated SHEDs, and promoted the recovery from neurological deficits. Our findings further suggested that paracrine effects of dSHEDs contributed to neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration and to nigrostriatal tract restoration. In addition, we found that the conditioned medium derived from dSHEDs protected primary neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity and accelerated neurite outgrowth in vitro. Thus, our data suggest that stem cells derived from dental pulp may have therapeutic benefits for PD. PMID:25863132

  1. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  2. Effect of benserazid and 6-hydroxydopamine on the development of the last larval instar of the house cricket, Acheta domestica L.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, K S; Chudakova, I V; Hiripi, L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of benserazid and 6-OHDA on the duration of the last larval instar and development of wings with intact corpora allata and following allatectomy on Acheta domestica L. was studied. 6-OHDA failed to alter the duration of the last larval instar in the nymphs with intact corpora allata but prolonged it in the allatectomized crickets. Introduction of 6-OHDA in the second phase of the last larval instar caused a deformation of the wings both in allatectomized and intact crickets. Injection of benserazid to the nymphs of the last larval instar prolonged the duration of this phase only in the presence of the corpora allata. The effect of benserazid can be connected to elimination of central inhibition of the corpora allata involving dopaminergic neurons of the brain. PMID:2869911

  3. TROPHIC CONTROL OF THE ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE/POLYAMINE SYSTEM IN NEONATAL RAT CEREBELLUM: REGIONALLY-SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF NEONATAL LESIONS CAUSED BY 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Norepinephrine has been hypothesized as a trophic factor influencing postnatal development of the cerebellum. n the current study, neonatal rats were given 6-hydroxydopanine (6-OHDA) to destroy noradrenergic projections and the effects on the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)/polyami...

  4. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  5. Smoke toxicity methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilley, J. V.; Martin, S. B.; Mckee, R.; Pryor, G.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity of pyrolysis products for aircraft interior materials must be within some reasonable limit. The toxicity of pyrolysis products from five candidate aircraft materials is evaluated. The most important part of this study was to demonstrate that pyrolysis of materials could be controlled and biological endpoints are reproducible.

  6. Mechanisms of phosphine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nisa S; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G; Schlipalius, David I; Ebert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH(3)), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH(3) and AsH(3). The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity. PMID:21776261

  7. Management of digoxin toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Summary Digoxin toxicity can emerge during long-term therapy as well as after an overdose. It can occur even when the serum digoxin concentration is within the therapeutic range. Toxicity causes anorexia, nausea, vomiting and neurological symptoms. It can also trigger fatal arrhythmias. There is a range of indications for using digoxin-specific antibody fragments. The amount ingested and serum digoxin concentration help to determine the dose required, but are not essential. Digoxin-specific antibody fragments are safe and effective in severe toxicity. Monitoring should continue after treatment because of the small risk of rebound toxicity. Restarting therapy should take into account the indication for digoxin and any reasons why the concentration became toxic. PMID:27041802

  8. Ammonia and sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, R.S.; Hansen, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia toxicity to aquatic organisms has received considerable study, with most of these studies focusing on water column organisms. However, with the development and implementation of sediment (and pore water) toxicity tests, the toxicity of ammonia to benthic infauna and other sediment toxicity test organisms has become important, especially since sediment/porewater ammonia occurs at higher concentrations than in the water column. Unfortunately, there has been very little of this type information, especially for marine/estuarine organisms. This laboratory determined the toxicity of ammonia to three key marine/estuarine test organisms: the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius, the bivalve Mytilus edulis, and the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Because sediment/porewater pH can differ substantially from typical seawater pH, the toxicity evaluations covered a range of pH levels (6, 7, 8, and 9). Eohaustorius results indicate that while Total Ammonia increased in toxicity (measured as EC50) as pH increased (from 460 mg/L at pH 6, to 13 mg/L at pH 9), unionized ammonia toxicity decreased from 0.13 mg/L at pH 6 to 2.8 mg/L at pH 9. The amphipod was much less sensitive to ammonia than were the bivalve and echinoderm, with an unionized ammonia EC50 at pH 8 of 2.14 mg/L relative to 0.43 mg/L for the mussel and 0.13 mg/L for the purple urchin. These results are discussed with respect to design and interpretation of sediment toxicity test results, including an interpretation approach based on partitioning of Toxic Units (TU).

  9. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  10. BIOMARKERS OF REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and verification of anatomical, endocrine, cellular and molecular biomarkers is crucial for successful clinical diagnosis and treatment of toxicity and disease, as well as basic toxicological, epidemiological and other research. Various in situ biomarkers of repro...

  11. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like ... men. Risk factors include: Recent childbirth Infection with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ), commonly called a Staph infection Foreign ...

  12. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  13. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  14. Toxic inhalational exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tze-Ming Benson; Malli, Harjoth; Maslove, David M; Wang, Helena; Kuschner, Ware G

    2013-01-01

    Respirable toxicants are a spectrum of irritant and nonirritant gases, vapors, fumes, and airborne particles that can be entrained into the body through the respiratory tract, resulting in exposures that cause pulmonary injury and/or systemic disease. Sources of respirable toxicants include structural fires, industrial accidents, domestic mishaps, and intentional releases of injurious agents on the battleground (warfare) or in civilian settings (acts of terrorism). Acute toxic inhalational exposures may result in respiratory failure, multisystem organ dysfunction, and death. Management of victims includes assessment and protection of the airway, monitoring and treatment of systemic toxicity, and delivery of exposure-specific and nonspecific therapies that improve outcomes. Treatments may include antidotes, hyperbaric oxygen, and other nonspecific life-supporting interventions. PMID:22232204

  15. Cadmium Toxicity and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bernhoft, Robin A.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable toxicity with destructive impact on most organ systems. It is widely distributed in humans, the chief sources of contamination being cigarette smoke, welding, and contaminated food and beverages. Toxic impacts are discussed and appear to be proportional to body burden of cadmium. Detoxification of cadmium with EDTA and other chelators is possible and has been shown to be therapeutically beneficial in humans and animals when done using established protocols. PMID:23844395

  16. Cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Cryoprotectant toxicity is a fundamental limiting factor for the successful cryopreservation of living systems by both freezing and vitrification, and the ability to negate it would be attractive. Past attempts to demonstrate "cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization" (CTN) have had many ups and downs. First convincingly introduced by Baxter and Lathe in 1971, the concept that certain amides can block toxic effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) was contradicted by direct experiments in 1990. But in 1995, the opposite mode of CTN, in which Me(2)SO blocked the damaging effects of formamide, was robustly demonstrated. Recent experiments have verified the original 1995 results and extended them to urea and acetamide, but no CTN was detected for N-methylamides (N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, and N-methylacetamide). On the theory that the latter amides and acetamide might serve as low-toxicity structural analogs of formamide, urea, or Me(2)SO, competition experiments were carried out between them and formamide or urea, but CTN was not observed for these amide-amide systems. The idea that the N-methylamides might have non-specific rather than specific toxicity was supported by the fact that the concentrations of these amides that cause toxicity are similar to the concentrations that denature model proteins. Clear examples of neutralization of the toxicity of glycerol, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, or Me(2)SO are presently lacking, but effects of the latter that depend on sulfhydryl oxidation have been reversed with reducing agents. In summary, CTN is a useful phenomenon with significant theoretical and practical implications. PMID:19501081

  17. What Renders TAU Toxic

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Xia, Di; Leinenga, Gerhard; Chew, Yee Lian; Nicholas, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    TAU is a microtubule-associated protein that under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) forms insoluble, filamentous aggregates. When 20 years after TAU’s discovery the first TAU transgenic mouse models were established, one declared goal that was achieved was the modeling of authentic TAU aggregate formation in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. However, as we review here, it has become increasingly clear that TAU causes damage much before these filamentous aggregates develop. In fact, because TAU is a scaffolding protein, increased levels and an altered subcellular localization (due to an increased insolubility and impaired clearance) result in the interaction of TAU with cellular proteins with which it would otherwise either not interact or do so to a lesser degree, thereby impairing their physiological functions. We specifically discuss the non-axonal localization of TAU, the role phosphorylation has in TAU toxicity and how TAU impairs mitochondrial functions. A major emphasis is on what we have learned from the four available TAU knock-out models in mice, and the knock-out of the TAU/MAP2 homolog PTL-1 in worms. It has been proposed that in human pathological conditions such as AD, a rare toxic TAU species exists which needs to be specifically removed to abrogate TAU’s toxicity and restore neuronal functions. However, what is toxic in one context may not be in another, and simply reducing, but not fully abolishing TAU levels may be sufficient to abrogate TAU toxicity. PMID:23772223

  18. Lead toxicity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body are devastating. There is almost no function in the human body which is not affected by lead toxicity. Though in countries like US and Canada the use of lead has been controlled up to a certain extent, it is still used vehemently in the developing countries. This is primarily because lead bears unique physical and chemical properties that make it suitable for a large number of applications for which humans have exploited its benefits from historical times and thus it has become a common environmental pollutant. Lead is highly persistent in the environment and because of its continuous use its levels rise in almost every country, posing serious threats. This article reviews the works listed in the literature with recent updates regarding the toxicity of lead. Focus is also on toxic effects of lead on the renal, reproductive and nervous system. Finally the techniques available for treating lead toxicity are presented with some recent updates. PMID:27486361

  19. Toxicity of lunar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, Dag; Carpenter, James; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L.; Loftus, David J.; Prisk, G. Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M.; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust properties will be required to provide ground truth for ground-based studies quantifying the toxicity of dust exposure and the associated health risks during future manned lunar missions.

  20. Preventive effects of soy meal (+/- isoflavone) on spatial cognitive deficiency and body weight in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkaki, A; Badavi, M; Aligholi, H; Moghaddam, A Zand

    2009-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of 4 weeks soy meal (+/- isoflavone) on post-menopausal cognitive deficiency and body weight alteration in ovariectomized (OVX)-6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA)-induced animal model of Parkinson's Disease (PD) which mimics status in menopause women. Female Wistar rats (250-300 g, 5-6 months old) were divided into 2 main groups. (1) Control; (2) OVX; included 5 subgroups that were pre-treated with 10 or 20 g soy with isoflavone in 30 g daily diet (10 and 20 groups, respectively), 10 or 20 g soy without isoflavone in 30 g daily diet (-10 and -20 groups, respectively) and 0 g soy (sham treated group) during 4 weeks after OVX. To induce animal model ofPD in main second group (OVX rats) the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) was lesioned by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (8 microg kg(-1) 4 microL(-1) normal saline contains 0.1% ascorbate). All animals were trained in Morris water maze for evaluating the spatial learning and memory. The results indicated that pre-treatment of Parkinsonian rats with different doses of dietary soy meal (+/- isoflavone) improved the spatial learning and memory and prevents increasing the body weight after menopause significantly. Our data show that, long-duration dietary soy meal may have the potential neuroprotective effect against post-menopausal cognitive deficiency induced by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and constant body weight during post-menopausal life cycle. PMID:20128500

  1. Modulation of Corpus Striatal Neurochemistry by Astrocytes and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Yelkenli, İbrahim Halil; Ulupinar, Emel; Korkmaz, Orhan Tansel; Şener, Erol; Kuş, Gökhan; Filiz, Zeynep; Tunçel, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In various neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes play direct, active, and critical roles in mediating neuronal survival and functions. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has neurotrophic actions and modulates a number of astrocytic activities. In this study, the effects of VIP on the striatal neurochemistry were investigated in parkinsonian rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operated, unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned, and lesioned + VIP-administered (25 ng/kg i.p.) groups. VIP was first injected 1 h after the intrastriatal 6-OHDA microinjection and then every 2 days throughout 15 days. Extracellular striatal concentration of glutathione (GSH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (GLU), and lactate were measured in microdialysates by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantification of GABA and activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-expressing cells were determined by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)/ADNP + glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that a 6-OHDA lesion significantly increased the density of astrocytes in the striatum and VIP treatment slightly reduced the gliosis. Extracellular concentration of GABA, GLU, and lactate levels did not change, but GSH level significantly increased in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. VIP treatment reduced GSH level comparable to sham-operated groups, but enhanced GABA and GLU levels. Our double labeling results showed that VIP primarily acts on neurons to increase ADNP and GAD expression for protection. These results suggest that, in the 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration model, astrocytes were possibly activated for forefront defensiveness by modulating striatal neurochemistry. PMID:27115671

  2. Temporal Dissociation of Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex Uncouples Anhedonia and Defense Behaviors Relevant to Depression in 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-08-01

    The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) processes motor and non-motor functions and undergoes extensive dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). The nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration also affects other brain areas including the pre-frontal cortex (PFC), which has been associated with the appearance of anhedonia and depression at pre-motor phases of PD. Using behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological approaches, we investigated the temporal dissociation between the role of the DLS and PFC in the appearance of anhedonia and defense behaviors relevant to depression in rats submitted to bilateral DLS lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 10 μg/hemisphere). 6-OHDA induced partial dopaminergic nigrostriatal damage with no gross motor impairments. Anhedonic-like behaviors were observed in the splash and sucrose consumption tests only 7 days after 6-OHDA lesion. By contrast, defense behaviors relevant to depression evaluated in the forced swimming test and social withdrawal only emerged 21 days after 6-OHDA lesion when anhedonia was no longer present. These temporally dissociated behavioral alterations were coupled to temporal- and structure-dependent alterations in dopaminergic markers such as dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and dopamine transporter, leading to altered dopamine sensitivity in DLS and PFC circuits, evaluated electrophysiologically. These results provide the first demonstration of a dissociated involvement of the DLS and PFC in anhedonic-like and defense behaviors relevant to depression in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which was linked with temporal fluctuations in dopaminergic receptor density, leading to altered dopaminergic system sensitivity in these two brain structures. This sheds new light to the duality between depressive and anhedonic symptoms in PD. PMID:26164273

  3. Depletion of nucleus accumbens dopamine leads to impaired reward and aversion processing in mice: Relevance to motivation pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Giorgio; Sigrist, Hannes; Ferger, Boris; Singewald, Nicolas; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, particularly the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens (VTA-NAcc) projection, underlies reward and aversion processing, and deficient DA function could underlie motivational impairments in psychiatric disorders. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection is an established method for chronic DA depletion, principally applied in rat to study NAcc DA regulation of reward motivation. Given the increasing focus on studying environmental and genetic regulation of DA function in mouse models, it is important to establish the effects of 6-OHDA DA depletion in mice, in terms of reward and aversion processing. This mouse study investigated effects of 6-OHDA-induced NAcc DA depletion using the operant behavioural test battery of progressive ratio schedule (PRS), learned non-reward (LNR), learned helplessness (LH), treadmill, and in addition Pavlovian fear conditioning. 6-OHDA NAcc DA depletion, confirmed by ex vivo HPLC-ED, reduced operant responding: for gustatory reward under effortful conditions in the PRS test; to a stimulus recently associated with gustatory non-reward in the LNR test; to escape footshock recently experienced as uncontrollable in the LH test; and to avoid footshock by physical effort in the treadmill test. Evidence for specificity of effects to NAcc DA was provided by lack of effect of medial prefrontal cortex DA depletion in the LNR and LH tests. These findings add significantly to the evidence that NAcc DA is a major regulator of behavioural responding, particularly at the motivational level, to both reward and aversion. They demonstrate the suitability of mouse models for translational study of causation and reversal of pathophysiological DA function underlying motivation psychopathologies. PMID:27036890

  4. The network of causal interactions for beta oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus, primary motor cortex, and subthalamic nucleus of walking parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Ming; Wen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Yong; Xiao, Hu; Xie, Zhengyuan; Li, Xing; Wang, Ning; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei; Chang, Jingyu; Zhang, Wangming

    2016-08-01

    Oscillatory activity has been well-studied in many structures within cortico-basal ganglia circuits, but it is not well understood within the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which was recently introduced as a potential target for the treatment of gait and postural impairments in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate oscillatory activity in the PPN and its relationship with oscillatory activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the PPN, primary motor cortex (M1), and subthalamic nucleus (STN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rats during resting and walking. After analysis of power spectral density, coherence, and partial Granger causality, three major findings emerged: 1) after 6-OHDA lesions, beta band oscillations were enhanced in all three regions during walking; 2) the direction of information flow for beta oscillations among the three structures was STN→M1, STN→PPN, and PPN→M1; 3) after the treatment of levodopa, beta activity in the three regions was reduced significantly and the flow of beta band was also abrogated. Our results suggest that beta activity in the PPN is transmitted from the basal ganglia and probably comes from the STN, and the STN plays a dominant role in the network of causal interactions for beta activity. Thus, the STN may be a potential source of aberrant beta band oscillations in PD. Levodopa can inhibit beta activity in the PPN of parkinsonian rats but cannot relieve parkinsonian patients' axial symptoms clinically. Therefore, beta oscillations may not be the major cause of axial symptoms. PMID:27163550

  5. Distinct temporal spike and local field potential activities in the thalamic parafascicular nucleus of parkinsonian rats during rest and limb movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Li, Min; Song, Zhimin; Chen, Feiyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Jinlu; Geng, Xiwen; Yang, Maoquan; Wang, Xiusong; Lei, Chengdong; Hou, Yabing

    2016-08-25

    Several studies have suggested that the thalamic centromedian-parafascicular (CM/PF or the PF in rodents) is implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, inconsistent changes in the neuronal firing rate and pattern have been reported in parkinsonian animals. To investigate the impact of a dopaminergic cell lesion on PF extracellular discharge in behaving rats, the PF neural activities in the spike and local field potential (LFP) were recorded in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA) lesioned and neurologically intact control rats during rest and limb movement. During rest, the two PF neuronal subtypes was less spontaneously active, with no difference in the spike firing rates between the control and lesioned rats; only the lesioned rats reshaped their spike firing pattern. Furthermore, the simultaneously recorded LFP in the lesioned rats exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35 and 35-70Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz. During the execution of a voluntary movement, two subtypes of PF neurons were identified by a rapid increase in the discharge activity in both the control and lesioned rats. However, dopamine lesioning was associated with a decrease in neuronal spiking fire rate and reshaping in the firing pattern in the PF. The simultaneously recorded LFP activity exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz compared with the control rats. These findings indicate that 6-OHDA induces modifications in PF spike and LFP activities in rats during rest and movement and suggest that PF dysfunction may be an important contributor to the pathophysiology of parkinsonian motor impairment. PMID:27238892

  6. Naringin treatment induces neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease in vivo, but not enough to restore the lesioned dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with naringin, a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, attenuated neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in vivo. In order to investigate whether its effects are universally applied to a different model of PD and whether its treatment induces restorative effects on the lesioned nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projection, we observed the effects of pre-treatment or post-treatment with naringin in a mouse model of PD. For neuroprotective effects, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was unilaterally injected into the striatum of mouse brains for a neurotoxin model of PD in the presence or absence of naringin by daily intraperitoneal injection. Our results showed that naringin protected the nigrostriatal DA projection from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, similar to the effects in rat brains, this treatment induced the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is well known as an important survival factor for DA neurons, and inhibited microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN) of mouse brains treated with 6-OHDA. However, there was no significant change of DA phenotypes in the SN and striatum post-treated with naringin compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned mice, despite the treatment being continued for 12 weeks. These results suggest that post-treatment with naringin alone may not be enough to restore the nigrostriatal DA projection in a mouse model of PD. However, our results apparently suggest that naringin is a beneficial natural product to prevent DA degeneration, which is involved in PD. PMID:26878791

  7. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  8. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  9. Ocular toxicity of fludarabine

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Herzlich, Alexandra A; Bishop, Rachel; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    The purine analogs, fludarabine and cladribine represent an important class of chemotherapy agents used to treat a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies. Their toxicity profiles include dose-limiting myelosuppression, immunosuppression, opportunistic infection and severe neurotoxicity. This review summarizes the neurotoxicity of high- and standard-dose fludarabine, focusing on the clinical and pathological manifestations in the eye. The mechanisms of ocular toxicity are probably multifactorial. With increasing clinical use, an awareness of the neurological and ocular vulnerability, particularly to fludarabine, is important owing to the potential for life- and sight-threatening consequences. PMID:18461151

  10. The toxicity of refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents toxicity data and exposure limits for refrigerants. The data address both acute (short-term, single exposure) and chronic (long-term, repeated exposure) effects, with emphasis on the former. The refrigerants covered include those in common use for the last decade, those used as components in alternatives, and selected candidates for future replacements. The paper also reviews the toxicity indicators used in both safety standards and building, mechanical, and fire codes. It then outlines current classification methods for refrigerant safety and relates them to standard and code usage.

  11. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  12. Toxicity of azaarenes.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, Eric A J; Wiegman, Saskia; de Voogt, Pim; Kraak, Michiel; Leslie, Heather A; de Haas, Elske; Admiraal, Wim

    2002-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds by far outnumber the homocyclic PAHs. In addition, they are often more soluble in water, which may imply a greater biological significance of these heterocycles. Yet, most research focuses on the homocyclics, based on the implicit assumption that the mostly higher concentration of the homocyclics rank these compounds as priority compounds. This review critically examines the available evidence and poses questions on the biological activity and environmental risk of one small group of heterocyclics, the azaarenes, which contain one nitrogen atom in one of the aromatic rings. In different sections, the biotransformation and different types of toxicity are discussed in comparison to those of homocyclic PAHs. The last section focuses on the implications for risk assessment of PAHs. Two- and three-ringed azaarenes can be relatively easily transformed by bacteria, fungi, invertebrates, and vertebrates. The presence of the N-moiety in the smaller azaarenes leads to metabolic routes that partly differ from those of the homoaromatic analogues. Major metabolic products of the azaarenes appear to be ketones and mono- or dihydroxylated azaarenes. Microorganisms can further degrade these into multiple oxygen-containing compounds or they can open up the aza-containing aromatic ring and fully metabolize the products. Fungi and vertebrates were shown to produce the mutagenic dihydrodiol metabolites. The metabolism of the larger azaarenes in vertebrates proceeds analogous to homoaromatic PAH, because in these larger molecules the N-moiety has less influence. Transformation of the larger azaarenes by microorganisms proceeds much slower if occurring at all. Direct toxicity data of azaarenes are mostly restricted to the effects of acridine and quinoline on a relatively small number of species. From this limited set it becomes clear that differences between species are relatively small. As with homocyclic PAHs, toxicity generally increases with increasing number

  13. Neuroprotective effects of levetiracetam target xCT in astrocytes in parkinsonian mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Torigoe, Nao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Asanuma, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes but not neurons express cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), which takes up cystine, and consequently supplies the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. It is recognized that GSH synthesis in neurons is dependent on the expression of xCT in astrocytes. Previous studies reported that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti-epileptic drug, increased xCT expression in vivo. The purpose of this study was to examine neuroprotective effects of LEV in parkinsonian models and demonstrate xCT in astrocytes as a target of neuroprotection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We identified striatal astrocytes cultured with LEV showed significant increase in xCT expression and GSH levels. Preincubation of primary cultured mesencephalic dopamine neurons with conditioned media from LEV-treated astrocytes protected against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity. These protective effects were canceled by xCT inhibitor. Furthermore, reduction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in 6-OHDA-lesioned parkinsonian mice was significantly abrogated by repeated injections of LEV. Treatment with LEV significantly increased the expression of xCT in striatal astrocytes in the hemi-parkinsonian mice. In conclusion, LEV exerts neuroprotective effects against neurodegeneration via up-regulation of xCT and GSH in astrocytes. Thus, xCT in astrocytes could be a potential target in novel neuroprotective approaches to prevent degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione (GSH) is the most potent intrinsic antioxidant. Since extracellular cysteine is readily oxidized to form cystine, cystine transport mechanisms are essential to provide cells with cysteine. Cystine uptake is mediated by cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), expressed primarily on astrocytes, but not on neurons. Astrocytes take up cystine via xCT and reduce it to cysteine to supply cysteine, the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. This study demonstrated that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti

  14. DETROIT AIR TOXICS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will include both a risk assessment and a risk reduction component. The assessment component will capitalize on the strong air toxics database that currently exists for the Detroit area. Data from several monitoring studies/projects will be utilized to characterize ...

  15. MICROBIAL TOXICITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter cites examples of the common methods used to determine the toxicity of chemicals to bacteria. It covers only the most common methods, particularly those that are easy to perform. Numerous literature citations have been included to help illustrate how a method is used ...

  16. NEW HAVEN TOXICS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA will be working with the New Haven Department of Health to collect data and create an inventory of toxic air pollutants in the New Haven area. Under section 112 of the Clean Air Act, EPA and cities and states are required to reduce cancer and non-cancer health risks in urb...

  17. Productivity in Toxicity Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Ruth Reinke

    1973-01-01

    Personal bibliographies were obtained through a survey of the members of the Society of Toxicology. A group of 183 members showed a 16 percent increase in document output during 1968-1969 compared to 1960-1967. During 1960-1969, 221 members published or made available 1873 documents containing original toxicity data. (5 references) (Author)

  18. Quebec's Toxic Pollution Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    The best solution to the problems of increased pollution of Quebec lakes and rivers with toxic wastes and increased incidence of pollution related diseases is to educate children, to make them aware of the environment and man's interrelationship with it. Attitudes of concern, based on knowledge, must be developed so that as adults, they will take…

  19. Comparing toxic air pollutant programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    This article compares state and federal toxic air pollutant programs. The Clean Air Act Ammendments created a program for the control of Hazardous Air Pollutants based on the establishment of control technology standards. State toxic programs can be classified into two categories: control technology-based and ambient concentration-based. Many states have opened to implement the MACT standards while enforcing their own state air toxics programs. Specific topics discussed include the following: the Federal air toxics program; existing state regulations; New Jersey Air Toxic Program; New York Toxics program.

  20. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  1. Predictive Modeling of Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of alternative methods in conjunction with traditional in vivo developmental toxicity testing has the potential to (1) reduce cost and increase throughput of testing the chemical universe, (2) prioritize chemicals for further targeted toxicity testing and risk assessment,...

  2. Update on toxic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, F L; Needham, M

    2012-02-01

    The toxic myopathies are a clinically and pathologically diverse group of disorders that can be caused by a variety of therapeutic agents used in clinical practice, as well as various venoms and other biological toxins. The most important iatrogenic causes are the statin and fibrate cholesterol-lowering agents that can cause a severe necrotizing myopathy and acute rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The current update focuses on the mechanisms of statin myotoxicity and the importance of genetic predisposing factors for statin myopathy, as well as the recently described form of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, which is associated with antibodies to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase enzyme and is responsive to aggressive immunotherapy. Mitochondrial myopathies associated with antiretroviral agents and the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue clevudine, and recent reports of myopathies caused by ingestion of red yeast rice and toxic species of mushrooms are also discussed. PMID:21968786

  3. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  4. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  5. Blindness from quinine toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, P; Spalton, D J; Smith, S E

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of quinine overdose in a 47-year-old man who presented with blindness. Fundus photography demonstrates the acute and subsequent retinal changes, and his visual recovery to normal acuity with visual field constriction is documented. Pupillary and electrodiagnostic findings are recorded. Stellate ganglion block has been widely advocated as a helpful therapeutic measure, but out patient was treated with a unilateral stellate ganglion block without apparent benefit to that eye. From a review of the literature we believe that quinine produces its effects by toxicity on the retina rather than by vasoconstriction and that stellate ganglion block probably does not alter the natural history of the retinal toxicity. Images PMID:3281709

  6. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  7. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  8. Separations chemistry of toxic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.; Barr, M.; Barrans, R.

    1996-04-01

    Sequestering and removing toxic metal ions from their surroundings is an increasingly active area of research and is gaining importance in light of current environmental contamination problems both within the DOE complex and externally. One method of separating metal ions is to complex them to a molecule (a ligand or chelator) which exhibits specific binding affinity for a toxic metal, even in the presence of other more benign metals. This approach makes use of the sometimes subtle differences between toxic and non-toxic metals resulting from variations in size, charge and shape. For example, toxic metals such as chromium, arsenic, and technetium exist in the environment as oxyanions, negatively charged species with a characteristic tetrahedral shape. Other toxic metals such as actinides and heavy metals are positively charged spheres with specific affinities for particular donor atoms such as oxygen (for actinides) and nitrogen (for heavy metals). In most cases the toxic metals are found in the presence of much larger quantities of less toxic metals such as sodium, calcium and iron. The selectivity of the chelators is critical to the goal of removing the toxic metals from their less toxic counterparts. The approach was to build a ligand framework that complements the unique characteristics of the toxic metal (size, charge and shape) while minimizing interactions with non-toxic metals. The authors have designed ligands exhibiting specificity for the target metals; they have synthesized, characterized and tested these ligands; and they have shown that they exhibit the proposed selectivity and cooperative binding effects.

  9. TOXICITY SCREENING WITH ZEBRAFISH ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed toxicity screening will help EPA to prioritize chemicals for further testing, and it may also alert chemical manufacturers that some of their commercial products may be toxic. The proposed toxicity pathway studies will improve the research community’s abi...

  10. Keeping tabs on toxics.

    PubMed

    Young, J E

    1992-01-01

    The Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) is a list of all chemicals released by over 22,000 manufacturing sites across the US. The TRI was established by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act of 1986. The TRI is managed by the Environmental Protection Agency. It was opposed by the Reagan administration and many industry groups because it was seen as an increase in government paper work and regulation. It has turned out to be an easy-to-manage stimulate to change. Industry leaders have even proclaimed its ability to help raise awareness of pollution in the industry. The TRI is accessible through computers with modems on the TOXNET system at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda for about 25$-35$/hour. It is also available through RTK NET which is operated jointly by OMB Watch and the Unison Institute. TRI is by no means complete. It covers an estimated 5% of the total toxic release in the US. It monitors the release of only 330 toxic chemicals leaving about 500 more out. It does not count releases from sites that process less then 25,000 pounds or that use less than 10,000 pounds of a listed chemical. It also only monitors steel, paper, chemical, petroleum refining activities. It does not monitor the releases from other manufacturing like oil and gas extraction, warehousing, transportation, hazardous waste disposal, incineration, and mining. PMID:12317431

  11. Dioxins and human toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Natalija; Pašalić, Daria; Ferenčak, Goran; Gršković, Branka; Stavljenić Rukavina, Ana

    2010-12-01

    The term dioxins usually refers to polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). As 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has the highest toxic potential, the toxic potentials of other PCDDs and PCDFs are defined in comparison with it. Human exposure to dioxins can be environmental (background), occupational, or accidental pollution. In the human body, dioxins are in part metabolised and eliminated, and the rest is stored in body fat. People vary in their capacity to eliminate TCDD, but it is also dose-dependent; the elimination rate is much faster at higher than lower levels. The liver microsomal P4501A1 enzyme oxygenates lipophilic chemicals such as dioxins. It is encoded by the CYP1A1 gene. Cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates their carcinogenic action. It binds to dioxin, translocates to nucleus and together with hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT) and xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) increases the expression of CYP1A1.Dioxins are classified as known human carcinogens, but they also cause noncancerous effects like atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes. Long-term exposures to dioxins cause disruption of the nervous, immune, reproductive, and endocrine system. Short-term exposure to high levels impairs the liver function and causes chloracne. The most sensitive population to dioxin exposure are the foetuses and infants.A large number of health effects have been documented in the scientific literature, and they all place dioxins among the most toxic chemicals known to man. PMID:21183436

  12. Toxicity of hexamethylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2005-01-01

    Hexamethylendiamine (HMDA; CAS No. 124-09-4; 6055-52-3 for the dihydrochloride salt) is moderately toxic following acute doses/exposures with oral lethal doses in rats ranging from 750 to 1500 mg/kg. HMDA is extremely irritating to the skin and eyes and is not a sensitizer in guinea pigs. Repeated exposure inhalation studies have defined the upper respiratory tract to be the first target of HMDA. The irritation seen is proportional to the exposure concentration. Systemic damage is limited. Genetic testing is not extensive, but there is no indication of activity. HMDA is neither a developmental nor a reproductive toxin, but in one developmental study, the fetal No-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was lower than that of the maternal animal. No carcinogenicity studies have been conducted. Documented human experience is limited, but indications of HMDA's irritative properties are found in the literature. HMDA does not persist or bioaccumulate in the environment. The chemical is not particularly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates but is quite toxic to algae. HMDA is rapidly absorbed and metabolized by the rat with little tissue storage. PMID:15720033

  13. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There are few studies of the long-term consequences of nanoparticles on human health, but governmental agencies, including the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Japan’s Ministry of Health, have recently raised the question of whether seemingly innocuous materials such as carbon-based nanotubes should be treated with the same caution afforded known carcinogens such as asbestos. Since nanomaterials are increasing a part of everyday consumer products, manufacturing processes, and medical products, it is imperative that both workers and end-users be protected from inhalation of potentially toxic NPs. It also suggests that NPs may need to be sequestered into products so that the NPs are not released into the atmosphere during the product’s life or during recycling. Further, non-inhalation routes of NP absorption, including dermal and medical injectables, must be studied in order to understand possible toxic effects. Fewer studies to date have addressed whether the body can eventually eliminate nanomaterials to prevent particle build-up in tissues or organs. This critical review discusses the biophysicochemical properties of various nanomaterials with emphasis on currently available toxicology data and methodologies for evaluating nanoparticle toxicity. PMID:22170510

  14. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  15. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  16. [Acute toxic pneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R

    1998-06-15

    The nature and extent of the acute injury due to toxic inhalants depend on the inhalant's solubility in water pH and chemical reactivity, on the aerodynamic diameter of particles (when the inhalant is an aerosol), and on the degree of exposure. Initial signs and symptoms indicate upper airways and bronchial irritation. Laryngeal oedema and (or) severe bronchospasm may be rapidly lethal. After cessation of exposure a transient improvement is generally observed; however a delayed pulmonary oedema may occur within the first 48 hours. On the following days, bacterial surinfection is a common complication. Possible long-term sequelae are reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:9781191

  17. Herbal toxicity in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nyazema, N Z

    1986-01-01

    Indigenous natural drugs are in common use in Zimbabwe because modern life-saving drugs are beyond the reach of nearly 85% of the population. These natural drugs have caused a number of poisoning cases. In a study of the records of four hospitals from 1971 to 1982, carried out to see how many people had been poisoned with herbal remedies, it was found that the number had increased since 1971. 50 traditional healers were questioned about record-keeping and knowledge of toxicity and Health Assistants were also interviewed. PMID:3798540

  18. Control of air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.

    1995-03-01

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE`s Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne`s pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry.

  19. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  20. [Toxic epidermal necrolysis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Elizondo-Argueta, Sandra; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Martín de Jesús; Visoso-Palacios, Porfirio; Cedillo-Torres, Héctor; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl

    2006-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis is the prototype of a proapoptotic disease characterized by system CD95 dysrregulation. Drugs constitute the main antigenic triggers. Hystopatologically it is characterized by epidermis detachment and necrosis with apoptotic keratinocytes. Clinical presentation includes erithematous-ampullous lesions in the skin and mucous membranes. It is associated with serious complications such as severe sepsis and septic shock. The management in the intensive care unit includes support treatment and specific treatment with immunoglobulins that alter disease course. Recombinant activated Factor VII is effective to control the associated microvascular haemorraghe. PMID:17022310

  1. Neurological oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Farmery, Scott; Sykes, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    SCUBA diving has several risks associated with it from breathing air under pressure--nitrogen narcosis, barotrauma and decompression sickness (the bends). Trimix SCUBA diving involves regulating mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen and helium in an attempt to overcome the risks of narcosis and decompression sickness during deep dives, but introduces other potential hazards such as hypoxia and oxygen toxicity convulsions. This study reports on a seizure during the ascent phase, its potential causes and management and discusses the hazards posed to the diver and his rescuer by an emergency ascent to the surface. PMID:21900296

  2. Assessing mistletoe toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hall, A H; Spoerke, D G; Rumack, B H

    1986-11-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of mistletoe ingestion, data were collected on 14 cases of ingestion of one to three berries or one or two leaves of American mistletoe (Phoradendron sp) from 1982 to 1985. Eleven patients ingested berries and three ingested leaves; none became symptomatic. Nine patients were observed at home without intervention except poison center telephone follow-up. Five had induced emesis, including two who were referred to emergency departments for evaluation, where no findings other than ipecac-induced vomiting were noted. Also reviewed were data on a total of 318 cases of mistletoe ingestion reported to the Food and Drug Administration Poison Control case reporting system between 1978 and 1983 (n = 177) and the American Association of Poison Control Centers national data collection system (n = 141) in 1984. The majority remained asymptomatic and no deaths were recorded. These data allow the conclusion that ingestion of one to three mistletoe berries or one or two leaves is unlikely to produce serious toxicity. PMID:2877602

  3. Toxic compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. PMID:24214851

  4. The toxicity of diquat

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. G.; Hurst, E. W.

    1970-01-01

    Clark, D. G. and Hurst, E. W. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 51-55. The toxicity of diquat. The acute toxicity of diquat has been assessed in several species. The oral LD50 ranged from about 30 mg/kg in cattle to 231 mg/kg in the rat. Large doses of diquat gave rise to symptoms indicative of an action on the central nervous system, but smaller doses did not suggest an obvious mode of action to account for the deaths, which were sometimes delayed for up to 14 days. The 24-hour percutaneous LD50 in the rabbit was greater than 400 mg/kg. This dose did not irritate the skin. A drop of a 20% aqueous solution of diquat in the conjunctival sac of the rabbit eye caused only slight irritation. The chronic administration of diquat dichloride in the diet for several months led to bilateral cataract in the rat and the dog. A concentration of 0·05% in the rat diet caused bilateral opacities in all rats within 12 months, but 0·001% diquat did not cause any opacities in two years. Bilateral opacities of the lenses of all dogs occurred within 12 months of administration of 15 mg/kg/day, but 1·7 mg/kg/day was without effect after four years. PMID:5418919

  5. Management of thalidomide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Thalidomide has re-emerged as a novel antineoplastic agent with immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic activities. In the early sixties, it was withdrawn from the market after its infamous association with congenital abnormalities that left about 10,000 children affected world-wide. With strict regulations and precautions, thalidomide is now approved by the FDA for the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum. Its role in cancer therapy is promising, with clinical trials in the past 5 years showing significant activity in multiple myeloma. Several trials are ongoing in other malignancies, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, renal cell carcinoma, and prostate cancer. The major toxicities of thalidomide are birth defects, sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, somnolence, rash, fatigue, and constipation. Less common side effects include deep venous thrombosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, elevated liver enzymes, malaise, and peripheral edema. The incidence and severity of adverse events are related to dose and duration of therapy. Doses of the drug of 200 mg/day or less are usually well tolerated. In this review, we will discuss the incidence and management of the side effects of thalidomide and the precautions and interventions needed to minimize the toxicities of this drug. PMID:15334875

  6. [Imaging in acute toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J-L; Botelho, C; Nogueira, T; Vargas, M I; Audibert, C; Abu Eid, M; Bogorin, A; Bernardo, R; Jacques, C; Kremer, S; Zöllner, G

    2004-09-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly MR imaging, plays a major role for the diagnosis of many acute toxic encephalopathies. Toxic disorders are related to drugs (immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epileptic drugs, heroin...), to metals (lead, manganese, mercury...), and to industrial and environmental chemicals (solvent, carbon monoxide...). MR imaging with diffusion and perfusion imaging provides information regarding brain lesions induced by the toxic agents (vasogenic edema, cytotoxic edema, infarction, hemorrhage, demyelination...). PMID:15545943

  7. LITHIUM TOXICITY - A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ratanendra; Deb, Jayant Kumar; Sinha, Baxi Neeraj Prasad; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Lithium is the treatment for acute mania and bipolar disorders. Ever since its introduction in the psychiatric arsenal, case reports of toxicity have been appearing in the literature at regular intervals. This study was thus carried out to study the presentation and associated features of lithium toxicity. In this retrospective study, case record files of all patients suspected to have developed lithium toxicity during a five year period were retrieved. It was found that toxicity presented most commonly with cerebellar symptoms and appeared at lower serum levels. Lithium could be restarted albeit at a lower dose and with a gradual titration in a number of cases. PMID:21407839

  8. Toxicity-indicating structural patterns.

    PubMed

    von Korff, Modest; Sander, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a toxicity alerting system for uncharacterized compounds, which is based upon comprehensive tables of substructure fragments that are indicative of toxicity risk. These tables were derived computationally by analyzing the RTECS database and the World Drug Index. We provide, free of charge, a Java applet for structure drawing and toxicity risk assessment. In an independent investigation, we compared the toxicity classification performance of naive Bayesian clustering, k next neighbor classification, and support vector machines. To visualize the chemical space of both toxic and druglike molecules, we trained a large self-organizing map (SOM) with all compounds from the RTECS database and the IDDB. In summary, we found that a support vector machine performed best at classifying compounds of defined toxicity into appropriate toxicity classes. Also, SOMs performed excellently in separating toxic from nontoxic substances. Although these two methods are limited to compounds that are structurally similar to known toxic substances, our fragment-based approach extends predictions to compounds that are structurally dissimilar to compounds used in the training set. PMID:16562981

  9. Neomycin toxicity revisited.

    PubMed

    Masur, H; Whelton, P K; Whelton, A

    1976-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity represent the most hazardous side effects of the clincial use of neomycin sulfate. Despite therapeutic restriction of the latter compound to topical, irrigant, and bowel sterilization use, serious toxicity is still encountered. A 69-year-old patient was recently treated by us for acute renal failure and total deafness induced as a result of intermittent seven-day lavage of a surgical cavity with neomycin. Peritoneal dialysis reduced the serum concentration of the antibiotic and promoted complete recovery of renal function. The patient, however, remained deaf. This case serves as a reminder that neomycin can be absorbed systemically following its use as an irrigant solution. In such cases, it may produce an unsuspected form of "high output" renal failure and concomitant hearing loss. The renal failure is usually reveesible, but the hearing loss is frequently permanent. PMID:938230

  10. Coaching the toxic leader.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions. PMID:24830286

  11. Toxic epidermal necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Mehra, Tarun; Saulite, Ieva; Glatz, Martin; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Guenova, Emmanuella; Cozzio, Antonio; French, Lars E.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, life-threatening drug-induced skin disease with a mortality rate of approximately 30%. The clinical hallmark of TEN is a marked skin detachment caused by extensive keratinocyte cell death associated with mucosal involvement. The exact pathogenic mechanism of TEN is still uncertain. Recent advances in this field have led to the identification of several factors that might contribute to the induction of excessive apoptosis of keratinocytes. In addition, specific human leukocyte antigen types seem to be associated with certain drugs and the development of TEN. As well-controlled studies are lacking, patients are treated with various immunomodulators (e.g. intravenous immunoglobulin) in addition to the best supportive care. PMID:27239294

  12. Deoxynivalenol and its toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Vasatkova, Anna; Beklova, Miroslava; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of several mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species that frequently infect corn, wheat, oats, barley, rice, and other grains in the field or during storage. The exposure risk to human is directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains) or indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk, eggs). It has been detected in buckwheat, popcorn, sorgum, triticale, and other food products including flour, bread, breakfast cereals, noodles, infant foods, pancakes, malt and beer. DON affects animal and human health causing acute temporary nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and fever. This review briefly summarizes toxicities of this mycotoxin as well as effects on reproduction and their antagonistic and synergic actions. PMID:21217881

  13. Predicting mud toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bleler, R. )

    1991-10-01

    Acute toxicity of drilling muds is measured in the U.S. by the mysid shrimp test. Drilling muds that fail the test cannot be discharged into the Gulf of Mexico, and such muds and their cuttings must be brought onshore for disposal. Discharge of water-based muds that pass the test is permitted in most instances. Because of the economic implications associated with hauling cuttings and fluids, a model that predicts test results on the basis of mud composition is clearly desirable. This paper focuses on the modeling of mysid shrimp test data. European laboratories use different test species and procedures. It seems plausible to expect, however, that the line of reasoning used here could apply to the modeling of aquatic data on other test species once a sufficient quantity of such data becomes available.

  14. Deoxynivalenol and its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Vasatkova, Anna; Beklova, Miroslava; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2010-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of several mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species that frequently infect corn, wheat, oats, barley, rice, and other grains in the field or during storage. The exposure risk to human is directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains) or indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk, eggs). It has been detected in buckwheat, popcorn, sorgum, triticale, and other food products including flour, bread, breakfast cereals, noodles, infant foods, pancakes, malt and beer. DON affects animal and human health causing acute temporary nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and fever. This review briefly summarizes toxicities of this mycotoxin as well as effects on reproduction and their antagonistic and synergic actions. PMID:21217881

  15. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  16. Rethinking guideline toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The guidelines for risk assessment of plant protection products (PPPs) and other non-pharmaceuticals were developed over three decades ago and have generally not been updated to incorporate advancements in toxicology and exposure sciences. These guidelines recommend using maximum-tolerated-dose (MTD) even when human relevance of such high doses is mostly limited due to orders of magnitude margin-of-exposure. Conducting animal studies at such high doses often requires further mode-of-action (MoA) studies elucidating human relevance. In order to improve data, ILSI/HESI-ACSA technical committee proposed a tiered approach with emphasis on determining systemic dose of parent and/or metabolite(s) in test animals as biological effects are reflective of systemic rather than administered dose. Any deviation from linearity in systemic dose (saturation of absorption or elimination) in animal studies may have profound toxic effect(s) not expected to occur in likely human exposure scenarios and should be avoided. Toxicity studies should ideally be conducted at kinetically linear doses or slightly above the point of departure from linearity or kinetically-derived maximum dose (KMD) as the systemic dose nonlinearity is a more sensitive parameter occurring much earlier than the MTD endpoints. Therefore, determining systemic dose, especially KMD, in study animals is an improvement to hazard assessment of PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals allowing toxicologists to better understand findings in animals at systemically linear as well as nonlinear doses to likely human exposures which can easily be accomplished using core study animals as outlined below. Determining systemic dose in studies will also increase the understanding of initial potential MoA of a PPPs and other non-pharmaceuticals and reduce the use of animals by avoiding unnecessary additional MoA studies. PMID:25980640

  17. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  18. Toxicity data informatics: supporting a new paradigm for toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Richard, Ann M; Yang, Chihae; Judson, Richard S

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemical toxicity data at all levels of description, from treatment-level dose response data to a high-level summarized toxicity "endpoint," effectively circumscribe, enable, and limit predictive toxicology approaches and capabilities. Several new and evolving public data initiatives focused on the world of chemical toxicity information-as represented here by ToxML (Toxicology XML standard), DSSTox (Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity Database Network), and ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource)-are contributing to the creation of a more unified, mineable, and modelable landscape of public toxicity data. These projects address different layers in the spectrum of toxicological data representation and detail and, additionally, span diverse domains of toxicology and chemistry in relation to industry and environmental regulatory concerns. For each of the three projects, data standards are the key to enabling "read-across" in relation to toxicity data and chemical-indexed information. In turn, "read-across" capability enables flexible data mining, as well as meaningful aggregation of lower levels of toxicity information to summarized, modelable endpoints spanning sufficient areas of chemical space for building predictive models. By means of shared data standards and transparent and flexible rules for data aggregation, these and related public data initiatives are effectively spanning the divides among experimental toxicologists, computational modelers, and the world of chemically indexed, publicly available toxicity information. PMID:20020908

  19. TOXICITY CHARACTERIZATION PROCEDURES FOR ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN BULK SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have been pursuing development of toxicant characterization, isolation, and identification procedures for organic toxicants that can be applied in the context of 10-d solid-phase sediment tests measuring survival and growth of freshwater in the context of 10-d solid-phase sedi...

  20. AIR TOXICS CHEMISTRY: LIFETIME AND FATE OF AIR TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full assessment of the impact of the release of air toxic compounds into the atmosphere requires a detailed understanding of their atmospheres lifetimes and fates. The objective of this task is to begin to develop such data for the 33 classes of air toxic compounds identified ...

  1. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Rick M; Carriker, Neil E; Greeley, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. This brief communication describes a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash. PMID:25348557

  2. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authoritymore » (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.« less

  3. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.

  4. Identifying the cause of toxicity in an algal whole effluent toxicity study - an unanticipated toxicant.

    PubMed

    Naddy, Rami B; Tapp, Kelly; Rehner, Anita B; Pillard, David A; Schrage, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Toxicity was observed in whole effluent toxicity (WET) studies with the freshwater alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, in three consecutive monthly studies, (NOEC=50-75%). Toxicity was not observed to Ceriodaphnia dubia or the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas in concurrent studies. Selected toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests were conducted in a tiered approach to eliminate possible toxicants and progressively identify the causative agent. Filtration following alkaline adjustment (pH 10 or 11) was effective in eliminating significant growth effects and also reduced phosphate concentration. The TIE studies confirmed that the observed effluent toxicity was caused by excess ortho-phosphate in the effluent not by overstimulation or related to unfavorable N:P ratios; but due to direct toxicity. The 96-h 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of ortho-phosphate to P. subcapitata was 3.4 mg L⁻¹ while the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration was 4.8 mg L⁻¹. This study illustrates the value of multi-species testing and also provides an example of an effective TIE using algae identifying an unanticipated toxicant. PMID:21840029

  5. Toxic risks of inappropriate therapy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M J

    1990-02-01

    Drug therapy may produce toxicity. Patient individuality or drug interactions account for many cases of poisoning, but other factors such as genetic predisposition, drug contamination or human error are also known causes. Examples of various types of drug poisoning are given, illustrating the role of the clinical chemist in minimizing or studying drug toxicity. PMID:2184960

  6. POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments act as sinks for contaminants, where they may build up to toxic levels. Sediments containing toxic levels of contaminants pose a risk to aquatic life, human health, and wildlife. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that demonstrates chemicals in sediments are re...

  7. Toxic Substances in the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of toxic substances, examining pesticides and herbicides, heavy metals, industrial chemicals, and household substances. Includes a list of major toxic substances (indicating what they are, where they are found, and health concerns) and a student activity on how pesticides enter the food chain. (JN)

  8. Toxicity reduction in industrial effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, P.W.; Eckenfelder, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of manufacturing wastewaters to fish and other aquatic organisms is now being used by state and federal regulators to monitor and restrict industrial wastewater discharges. As a result, there is a great need for guidance on the subject of aquatic toxicity reduction in the field of industrial water pollution control. This book is a comprehensive reference source on the testing protocols, comparative data, and treatment techniques for effective toxicity reduction. Included in this book are detailed chapters covering various methods for toxicity reduction, such as the removal of metals, aerobic biological treatment, stripping of volatile organics, and management of sludges from toxic wastewater treatment. The book features: a complete overview of the subject, including background material for newcomers to the field; a basic summary and comparison of alternate treatment procedures; the latest methods for the identification of toxic components that readers can use for testing in their own laboratories; a description of applicable technologies for toxicity reduction; actual data from the use of processes that allow readers to compare technologies; solids management requirements including handling and disposal; useful economic comparisons of technologies; and illustrative case studies that demonstrate the application of the latest toxicity reduction technology and data to specific situations. Eleven chapters are processed separately in the appropriate data bases.

  9. Toxic releases from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-09-15

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results.

  10. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  11. The price function of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Mark D; Dranitsaris, George

    2009-03-01

    The high and accelerating price of new anticancer drugs is giving rise to increased concern. However, monetary price is not the only way to value chemotherapy. Toxic effects can also be seen as a form of payment in which "units" of wellbeing are exchanged for "units" of efficacy. Although this trading analogy is not perfect, a proposal can be made that toxicity is a type of price, and that one of its functions is to signal valuation, similar to the crucial signalling function of monetary price in the real economy. This price function of toxicity, to the extent where there is transparency about the real amounts of toxicity, can have two important and helpful consequences: acting as a brake on the increasing monetary price of new drugs, via a damping effect on demand; and assisting individual patients in the informed contemplation of chemotherapy decisions. However, there are two problems that currently impede the effective dissemination of this highly desirable toxicity information. First, a prediction of toxicity in individual patients is difficult. Second, the vast database of real toxic effects in community practice is rarely made available for public scrutiny. Both of these problems, which together constitute a form of hidden cost, are potentially resolvable at least to some extent. In the absence of accurate information on toxic effects, it is easy for monetary price to progressively diverge from true value. We believe that improved transparency with respect to toxic effects, and better toxicity prediction, offer a better and more genuinely market-orientated solution to the issue of price distortions than the bureaucratic imposition of price controls. PMID:19261259

  12. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Castelain, Florence; Humbert, Phillip

    2013-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe mucocutaneous drug-induced syndrome that causes massive keratinocyte apoptosis and therefore hydro-electrolytic disorders and systemic infection. TEN approximately affects one to two cases per million per year. Mortality rate may reach thirty percent of cases. Thus, TEN constitute a therapeutic emergency at diagnosis. Typically, clinical examination shows a mucocutaneous detachment involving more than thirty percent of body area. Definitive diagnosis is made on cutaneous biopsy with histological exam that shows the blister of necrotic keratinocytes. Main differential diagnosis are acute staphylococcus epidermis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, bullous fixed pigmented erythema, acute lupus erythematosus. In the early days, SCORTEN gives a good estimation and is now widely used as prognostic score. Drugs are generally considered as the main etiology of TEN but in some cases bacterial or viral infections could be involved. Physiopathology remains unclear even if recent advances have reported the possible implication of immune pathways based on activation of T and NK cells. Treatment of TEN requires to be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made and the patient is preferentially referred to a specialized unit. Supportive care consist in covering areas of cutaneous detachment. No other therapy have demonstrated its efficiency, but high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin might improve the prognosis. PMID:23373551

  13. Toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Castelain, Florence; Humbert, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe mucocutaneous drug-induced syndrome that causes massive keratinocyte apoptosis and therefore hydro-electrolytic disorders and systemic infection. TEN approximately affects one to two cases per million per year. Mortality rate may reach thirty percent of cases. Thus, TEN constitutes a therapeutic emergency at diagnosis. Typically, clinical examination shows a mucocutaneous detachment involving more than thirty percent of body area. Definitive diagnosis is made on cutaneous biopsy with histological exam that shows the blister of necrotic keratinocytes. Main differential diagnosis are acute staphylococcus epidermis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, bullous fixed pigmented erythema, acute lupus erythematosus. In the early days, SCORTEN gives a good estimation and is now widely used as prognostic score. Drugs are generally considered as the main etiology of TEN but in some cases bacterial or viral infections could be involved. Physiopathology remains unclear even if recent advances have reported the possible implication of immune pathways based on activation of T and NK cells. Treatment of TEN requires to be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made and the patient is preferentially referred to a specialized unit. Supportive care consist of covering areas of cutaneous detachment. No other therapy has demonstrated its efficiency, but high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin might improve the prognosis. PMID:23441982

  14. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  15. Toxic Picoplanktonic Cyanobacteria—Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowska, Natalia; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria of a picoplanktonic cell size (0.2 to 2.0 µm) are common organisms of both freshwater and marine ecosystems. However, due to their small size and relatively short study history, picoplanktonic cyanobacteria, in contrast to the microplanktonic cyanobacteria, still remains a poorly studied fraction of plankton. So far, only little information on picocyanobacteria toxicity has been reported, while the number of reports concerning their presence in ecosystems is increasing. Thus, the issue of picocyanobacteria toxicity needs more researchers’ attention and interest. In this report, we present information on the current knowledge concerning the picocyanobacteria toxicity, as well as their harmfulness and problems they can cause. PMID:25793428

  16. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  17. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  18. Multidrug toxicity involving sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Hughes, Rhome L; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-01-01

    A multidrug fatality involving sumatriptan is reported. Sumatriptan is a tryptamine derivative that acts at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and is used for the treatment of migraines. The decedent was a 21-year-old white female found dead in bed by her spouse. No signs of physical trauma were observed and a large number of prescription medications were discovered at the scene. Toxicological analysis of the central blood revealed sumatriptan at a concentration of 1.03 mg/L. Following therapeutic dosing guidelines, sumatriptan concentrations do not exceed 0.095 mg/L. Sumatriptan was isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. A tissue distribution study was completed with the following concentrations measured: 0.61 mg/L in femoral blood, 0.56 mg/L in iliac blood, 5.01 mg/L in urine, 0.51 mg/kg in liver, 3.66 mg/kg in kidney, 0.09 mg/kg in heart, 0.32 mg/kg in spleen, 0.01 mg/kg in brain, 15.99 mg/kg in lung and 78.54 mg/45 mL in the stomach contents. Carisoprodol, meprobamate, fluoxetine, doxylamine, orphenadrine, dextromethorphan and hydroxyzine were also present in the blood at the following concentrations: 3.35, 2.36, 0.63, 0.19, 0.06, 0.55 and 0.16 mg/L. The medical examiner ruled the cause of death as acute mixed drug toxicity and the manner of death as accident. PMID:25324526

  19. Zonisamide up-regulated the mRNAs encoding astrocytic anti-oxidative and neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, M E; Sugimoto, K; Kubo, M; Iwaki, H; Tsujii, T; Kyaw, W T; Nishikawa, N; Nagai, M; Tanaka, J; Nomoto, M

    2012-08-15

    Zonisamide has been proven as an effective drug for the recovery of degenerating dopaminergic neurons in the animal models of Parkinson's disease. However, several lines of evidence have questioned the neuroprotective capacity of zonisamide in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Although it suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration in animal models, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of zonisamide are not fully understood. The current study demonstrates the effects of zonisamide on astrocyte cultures and two 6-hydroxydopamine-induced models of Parkinson's disease. Using primary astrocyte cultures, we showed that zonisamide up-regulated the expression of mRNA encoding mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, metallothionein-2, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, and manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar responses to zonisamide were found in substantia nigra where the rats were pre-treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced toxicity by zonisamide pre-treatment was also confirmed using rat mesencephalic organotypic slice cultures of substantia nigra. In addition to this, zonisamide post-treatment also attenuated the nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that zonisamide protected dopamine neurons in two Parkinson's disease models through a novel mechanism, namely increasing the expression of some important astrocyte-mediated neurotrophic and anti-oxidative factors. PMID:22659113

  20. CADMIUM AS A RESPIRATORY TOXICANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer,...

  1. Developmental toxicity screening in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Catherine W; Ducharme, Nicole A; Bondesson, Maria; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2011-06-01

    Given the ever-increasing toxic exposure ubiquitously present in our environment as well as emerging evidence that these exposures are hazardous to human health, the current rodent-based regulations are proving inadequate. In the process of overhauling risk assessment methodology, a nonrodent test organism, the zebrafish, is emerging as tractable for medium- and high-throughput assessments, which may help to accelerate the restructuring of standards. Zebrafish have high developmental similarity to mammals in most aspects of embryo development, including early embryonic processes, and on cardiovascular, somite, muscular, skeletal, and neuronal systems. Here, we briefly describe the development of these systems and then chronicle the toxic impacts assessed following chemical exposure. We also compare the available data in zebrafish toxicity assays with two databases containing mammalian toxicity data. Finally, we identify gaps in our collective knowledge that are ripe for future studies. PMID:21671351

  2. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Talking to Your Child About Menstruation Cellulitis MRSA Staph Infections What Are Germs? Why Is Hand ... in? Feeling Fresh All About Menstruation Staph Infections MRSA Toxic Shock Syndrome Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  3. Environmental transformation of toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Wade, M J; Davis, B K; Carlisle, J S; Klein, A K; Valoppi, L M

    1993-01-01

    Because toxicity varies enormously with the chemical state of metals, transformations in the environment control the level of the human health hazard. Important transformation processes include adsorption and desorption from soils and sediments, oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions, biotic metabolism, formation of organic metal compounds, and bioaccumulation. The six metals detailed in this chapter--arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and selenium--were chosen because of their toxicity, frequency of occurrence at hazardous waste sites, and involvement in environmental contamination. PMID:8272980

  4. New directions in toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Westphal, Margit; Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Croteau, Maxine C; Andersen, Melvin E

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) published a groundbreaking report entitled Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy. The purpose of this report was to develop a long-range strategic plan to update and advance the way environmental agents are tested for toxicity. The vision focused on the identification of critical perturbations of toxicity pathways that lead to adverse human health outcomes using modern scientific tools and technologies. This review describes how emerging scientific methods will move the NRC vision forward and improve the manner in which the potential health risks associated with exposure to environmental agents are assessed. The new paradigm for toxicity testing is compatible with the widely used four-stage risk assessment framework originally proposed by the NRC in 1983 in the so-called Red Book. The Nrf2 antioxidant pathway provides a detailed example of how relevant pathway perturbations will be identified within the context of the new NRC vision for the future of toxicity testing. The implications of the NRC vision for toxicity testing for regulatory risk assessment are also discussed. PMID:21219154

  5. Magnesium status and digoxin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I S; Goh, E M; McKillop, U H; Stanford, C F; Nicholls, D P; Trimble, E R

    1991-01-01

    1. Eighty-one hospital patients receiving digoxin were separated into groups with and without digoxin toxicity using clinical criteria. Serum digoxin, sodium, potassium, calcium, creatinine, magnesium and monocyte magnesium concentrations were compared. 2. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had impaired colour vision (P less than 0.0001, Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test) and increased digoxin levels (1.89 (1.56-2.21) vs 1.34 (1.20-1.47) nmol l-1, P less than 0.01) (mean (95% confidence limits], though there was considerable overlap between two groups. 3. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had lower levels of serum magnesium (0.80 (0.76-0.84) vs 0.88 (0.85-0.91) mmol l-1, P less than 0.01) and monocyte magnesium (6.40 (5.65-7.16) vs 8.76 (7.81-9.71) mg g-1 DNA, P less than 0.01), but there were no significant differences in other biochemical parameters. A greater proportion of toxic subjects were receiving concomitant diuretic therapy (20/21 vs 37/60, P less than 0.05). 4. Magnesium deficiency was the most frequently identified significant electrolyte disturbance in relation to digoxin toxicity. In the presence of magnesium deficiency digoxin toxicity developed at relatively low serum digoxin concentrations. PMID:1768564

  6. Surviving (Even Thriving?) in a Toxic Workplace.

    PubMed

    White, Paul E; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Anything toxic is poisonous and harmful-including a toxic workplace. Surveys of hundreds of individuals and organizations reveal three primary areas that are common in unhealthy work environments: sick systems, toxic leaders, and dysfunctional colleagues. This article draws from research and offers practical steps on how to survive, if not change and thrive, in toxic workplaces. PMID:27295230

  7. TOXICITY TESTS FOR SEDIMENT QUALITY ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic sediments have contributed to a wide-variety of environmental problems around the world. The observed effects include direct toxic effects to aquatic life, bio-magnification of toxicants in the food chain, and economic impacts. This chapter discusses the use of toxicity...

  8. Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of homocysteine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, A A

    2009-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative processes as well as a complicating factor in normal pregnancy. Toxic effects of homocysteine and the product of its spontaneous oxidation, homocysteic acid, are based on their ability to activate NMDA receptors, increasing intracellular levels of ionized calcium and reactive oxygen species. Even a short-term exposure of cells to homocysteic acid at concentrations characteristic of hyperhomocysteinemia induces their apoptotic transformation. The discovery of NMDA receptors both in neuronal tissue and in several other tissues and organs (including immunocompetent cells) makes them a target for toxic action of homocysteine. The neuropeptide carnosine was found to protect the organism from homocysteine toxicity. Treatment of pregnant rats with carnosine under conditions of alimentary hyperhomocysteinemia increases viability and functional activity of their progeny. PMID:19645662

  10. Identification and confirmation of ammonia toxicity in contaminated sediments using a modified toxicity identification evaluation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sprang, P.A. Van; Janssen, C.R.

    1997-12-01

    Toxicity identification of sediment pore waters from four sites in the Upper Scheldt (Belgium) was assessed using a simplified and discriminative toxicity identification evaluation procedure. The samples from all locations exhibited acute toxicity toward the freshwater crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. Toxicity was removed or considerably reduced by the cation exchange resins and air stripping at pH 11. In addition, the toxicity of the pore waters was found to be highly pH dependent. Increased toxicity was observed at higher pH levels, whereas reduced toxicity was found at lower pH levels. Based on these results, ammonia was suggested as the main toxic agent. The presence of ammonia concentrations exceeding the 24-h median lethal concentration and comparison of the toxicity characterization profiles of the pore waters with those of the suspected toxicant supported this hypothesis. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the observed toxicity of the pore waters and the expected toxicity (due to the presence of the suspected toxicant) confirmed ammonia as the true toxic agent. Finally, the ratio between the expected ammonia toxicity and the observed toxicity from the characterization tests was approx. 1, meaning that all or most of the observed toxicity was caused by the presence of one toxicant (i.e., ammonia). The developed toxicity identification evaluation procedure is suggested as a useful tool for the identification and confirmation of toxicants in contaminated sediments.

  11. Metallothionein protection of cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, Curtis D. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of the cadmium (Cd)-binding protein from horse kidney in 1957 marked the birth of research on this low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich protein called metallothionein (MT) in Cd toxicology. MT plays minimal roles in the gastrointestinal absorption of Cd, but MT plays important roles in Cd retention in tissues and dramatically decreases biliary excretion of Cd. Cd-bound to MT is responsible for Cd accumulation in tissues and the long biological half-life of Cd in the body. Induction of MT protects against acute Cd-induced lethality, as well as acute toxicity to the liver and lung. Intracellular MT also plays important roles in ameliorating Cd toxicity following prolonged exposures, particularly chronic Cd-induced nephrotoxicity, osteotoxicity, and toxicity to the lung, liver, and immune system. There is an association between human and rodent Cd exposure and prostate cancers, especially in the portions where MT is poorly expressed. MT expression in Cd-induced tumors varies depending on the type and the stage of tumor development. For instance, high levels of MT are detected in Cd-induced sarcomas at the injection site, whereas the sarcoma metastases are devoid of MT. The use of MT-transgenic and MT-null mice has greatly helped define the role of MT in Cd toxicology, with the MT-null mice being hypersensitive and MT-transgenic mice resistant to Cd toxicity. Thus, MT is critical for protecting human health from Cd toxicity. There are large individual variations in MT expression, which might in turn predispose some people to Cd toxicity.

  12. Toxic chemical release inventory information.

    PubMed

    Bronson, R J

    1991-01-01

    As part of a U.S. government effort to inform the public about toxic or hazardous chemicals released into the environment, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are jointly producing the TRI (Toxic Chemical Release Inventory) databanks which consist of two separate files, TRI87 and TRI88. Both files reside on NLM's TOX-NET system. The files contain geographic information about reporting facilities and land, air, and water release data for approximately 300 listed chemicals. PMID:10111718

  13. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  14. Toxicity, bioavailability and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, S B; Rao, P V

    1993-11-01

    1. Environmental toxicology emphasizes the difference from traditional toxicology in which pure compounds of interest are added to purified diets, or injected into the test animals. When the objective is to study the fate and effects of trace elements in the environment, knowledge of the speciation of the elements and their physico-chemical forms is important. 2. Cadmium salts such as the sulfides, carbonates or oxides, are practically insoluble in water. However, these can be converted to water-soluble salts in nature under the influence of oxygen and acids. Chronic exposure to Cd is associated with renal toxicity in humans once a critical body burden is reached. 3. The solubility of As(III) oxide in water is fairly low, but high in either acid or alkali. In water, arsenic is usually in the form of the arsenate or arsenite. As(III) is systemically more poisonous than the As(V), and As(V) is reduced to the As(III) form before exerting any toxic effects. Organic arsenicals also exert their toxic effects in vivo in animals by first metabolizing to the trivalent arsenoxide form. Some methyl arsenic compounds, such as di- and trimethylarsines, occur naturally as a consequence of biological activity. The toxic effect of arsenite can be potentiated by dithiols, while As has a protective effect against the toxicity of a variety of forms of Se in several species. 4. Selenium occurs in several oxidation states and many selenium analogues of organic sulfur compounds exist in nature. Selenium in selenate form occurs in alkaline soils, where it is soluble and easily available to plants. Selenite binds tightly to iron and aluminum oxides and thus is quite insoluble in soils. Hydrogen selenide is a very toxic gas at room temperature. The methylated forms of Se are much less toxic for the organism than selenite. However, the methylated Se derivatives have strong synergistic toxicity with other minerals such as arsenic. 5. Aquatic organisms absorb and retain Hg in the tissues, as

  15. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype. PMID:25120226

  16. Chronic L-DOPA administration increases the firing rate but does not reverse enhanced slow frequency oscillatory activity and synchronization in substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Aristieta, A; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Miguelez, C; Morera-Herreras, T; Ugedo, L

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is associated with dysfunctional neuronal activity in several nuclei of the basal ganglia. Moreover, high levels of oscillatory activity and synchronization have also been described in both intra- and inter-basal ganglia nuclei and the cerebral cortex. However, the relevance of these alterations in the motor symptomatology related to Parkinsonism and LID is not fully understood. Recently, we have shown that subthalamic neuronal activity correlates with axial abnormal movements and that a subthalamic nucleus (STN) lesion partially reduces LID severity as well as the expression of some striatal molecular modifications. The aim of the present study was to assess, through single-unit extracellular recording techniques under urethane anaesthesia, neuronal activity of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and its relationship with LID and STN hyperactivity together with oscillatory and synchronization between these nuclei and the cerebral cortex in 6-OHDA-lesioned and dyskinetic rats. Twenty-four hours after the last injection of L-DOPA the firing rate and the inhibitory response to an acute challenge of L-DOPA of SNr neurons from dyskinetic animals were increased with respect to those found in intact and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the mean firing rate of SNr neurons and the severity of the abnormal movements (limb and orolingual subtypes). There was also a significant correlation between the firing activity of SNr and STN neurons recorded from dyskinetic rats. In addition, low frequency band oscillatory activity and synchronization both within the SNr or STN and with the cerebral cortex were enhanced in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals and not or slightly affected by chronic treatment with L-DOPA. Altogether, these results indicate that neuronal SNr firing activity is relevant in dyskinesia and may be driven by STN hyperactivity. Conversely, low frequency oscillatory activity and synchronization seem to be more important in PD because they are not influenced by prolonged L-DOPA administration. PMID:26852950

  17. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3 ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4+) was calculated as 222 ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7 vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3 vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  18. Sediment toxicity assessment through evaluation of the toxicity of interstitial water

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.

    1989-01-01

    The interstitial-water-toxicity approach is a multiphase procedure for assessing sediment toxicity using interstitial (i.e., pore) water. The use of pore water for sediment toxicity assessment was based on the strong correlations between contaminant concentrations in pore water and toxicity (and/or bioaccumulation) of sediment-associated contaminants by benthic macroinvertebrates. The approach combines the quantitation of pore water toxicity with toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify and quantify chemical components responsible for sediment toxicity. TIE involves recently developed procedures for the identification of toxic compounds in aqueous samples containing complex mixtures of chemicals. In the interstitial water-toxicity method, TIE procedures are implemented in three phases to characterize pore-water toxicity, identify the suspected toxicant, and confirm toxicant identification.

  19. Holiday Plants with Toxic Misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Zabrina N.; Stellpflug, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    Several plants are used for their decorative effect during winter holidays. This review explores the toxic reputation and proposed management for exposures to several of those, namely poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), English holly (Ilex aquifolium), American holly (Ilex opaca), bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), American mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum), and European mistletoe (Viscum album). PMID:23359840

  20. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF PHTHALATE ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters display several modes of toxicity in mammalian species. In the rat, in utero exposure at relatively low dosage levels disrupts development of the reproductive system of the male rat by altering fetal testis hormone production. This presentation is a review of t...

  1. Baltimore Air Toxics Study (BATS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Baltimore Air Toxics Study is one of the three urban air toxics initiatives funded by EPA to support the development of the national air toxics strategy. As part of this project, the Air Quality Integrated Management System (AIMS) is under development. AIMS is designed to bring together the key components of urban air quality management into an integrated system, including emissions assessment, air quality modeling, and air quality monitoring. Urban area source emissions are computed for a wide range of pollutants and source categories, and are joined with existing point source emissions data. Measured air quality data are used to evaluate the adequacy of the emissions data and model treatments as a function of season, meteorological parameters, and daytime/nighttime conditions. Based on tested model performance, AIMS provides the potential to improve the ability to predict air quality benefits of alternative control options for criteria and toxic air pollutants. This paper describes the methods used to develop AIMS, and provides examples from its application in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The use of AIMS in the future to enhance environmental management of major industrial facilities also will be addressed in the paper.

  2. AIR TOXICS HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to improve the scientific basis for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) assessments of human exposures to air toxics by developing improved human exposure models. The research integrates the major components of the exposure paradigm, i.e., sources, tr...

  3. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  4. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF COARSE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As determined in preliminary studies, we expect that coarse particle toxicity will be influenced by a variety of factors including particle components (e.g., crustal material vs. metals vs. biologics), particle concentration, and the differing composition of urban and ru...

  5. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  6. Blacks and the Toxics Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James H., Jr.; Oliver, Melvin L.

    1989-01-01

    Employs the case study approach to show how the Reagan Administration's assault on environmental policies more adversely affects blacks and other minority groups than whites. Reviews recent research that shows minorities heavily concentrated in dangerous occupations and communities where the risk of exposure to toxic pollutants is greatest. (JS)

  7. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  8. Gossypol Toxicity from Cottonseed Products

    PubMed Central

    Gadelha, Ivana Cristina N.; Fonseca, Nayanna Brunna S.; Oloris, Silvia Catarina S.; Melo, Marília M.

    2014-01-01

    Gossypol is a phenolic compound produced by pigment glands in cotton stems, leaves, seeds, and flower buds (Gossypium spp.). Cottonseed meal is a by-product of cotton that is used for animal feeding because it is rich in oil and proteins. However, gossypol toxicity limits cottonseed use in animal feed. High concentrations of free gossypol may be responsible for acute clinical signs of gossypol poisoning which include respiratory distress, impaired body weight gain, anorexia, weakness, apathy, and death after several days. However, the most common toxic effects is the impairment of male and female reproduction. Another important toxic effect of gossypol is its interference with immune function, reducing an animal's resistance to infections and impairing the efficiency of vaccines. Preventive procedures to limit gossypol toxicity involve treatment of the cottonseed product to reduce the concentration of free gossypol with the most common treatment being exposure to heat. However, free gossypol can be released from the bound form during digestion. Agronomic selection has produced cotton varieties devoid of glands producing gossypol, but these varieties are not normally grown because they are less productive and are more vulnerable to attacks by insects. PMID:24895646

  9. Holiday plants with toxic misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Evens, Zabrina N; Stellpflug, Samuel J

    2012-12-01

    Several plants are used for their decorative effect during winter holidays. This review explores the toxic reputation and proposed management for exposures to several of those, namely poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), English holly (Ilex aquifolium), American holly (Ilex opaca), bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), American mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum), and European mistletoe (Viscum album). PMID:23359840

  10. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) toxicity issues

    SciTech Connect

    LaHann, T.

    1995-11-01

    ISU`s Center for Toxicology Research has been conducting toxicity testing of borocaptate sodium (BSH) to aid in assessing if proposed human studies of BSH are likely to be acceptably safe. This report describes BSH interactions with other biological agents.

  11. The Problem with Toxic Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, John L.; Fossa, Arthur J.

    1980-01-01

    Traced is the historical development of toxic waste problems in western New York State from 1825 to the present. Three major data sources are described: Industrial Chemical Survey, Inventory of Industrial Waste Generation Study, and the Interagency Task Force Study, developed by the Department of Environmental Conservation to prevent future…

  12. Mercury toxicity. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Because mercury has several forms and because it produces subtle effects at chronic low-level exposures, mercury toxicity can be a difficult diagnosis to establish. Elemental mercury vapor accounts for most occupational and many accidental exposures. The main source of organic methyl mercury exposure in the general population is fish consumption. Children are at increased risk of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the home because it tends to settle to the floor. The chemical and physical forms of mercury determine its absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion pathways. The central nervous system and kidneys are key targets of mercury toxicity. Chelation therapy has been used successfully in treating patients who have ingested mercury salts or inhaled elemental mercury. There is no antidote for patients poisoned with organic mercury.7 references.

  13. Effects of micronutrients on metal toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Peraza, M A; Ayala-Fierro, F; Barber, D S; Casarez, E; Rael, L T

    1998-01-01

    There is growing evidence that micronutrient intake has a significant effect on the toxicity and carcinogenesis caused by various chemicals. This paper examines the effect of micronutrient status on the toxicity of four nonessential metals: cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic. Unfortunately, few studies have directly examined the effect of dietary deficiency or supplementation on metal toxicity. More commonly, the effect of dietary alteration must be deduced from the results of mechanistic studies. We have chosen to separate the effect of micronutrients on toxic metals into three classes: interaction between essential micronutrients and toxic metals during uptake, binding, and excretion; influence of micronutrients on the metabolism of toxic metals; and effect of micronutrients on secondary toxic effects of metals. Based on data from mechanistic studies, the ability of micronutrients to modulate the toxicity of metals is indisputable. Micronutrients interact with toxic metals at several points in the body: absorption and excretion of toxic metals; transport of metals in the body; binding to target proteins; metabolism and sequestration of toxic metals; and finally, in secondary mechanisms of toxicity such as oxidative stress. Therefore, people eating a diet deficient in micronutrients will be predisposed to toxicity from nonessential metals. PMID:9539014

  14. METHODS FOR AQUATIC TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS: PHASE III TOXICITY CONFIRMATION PROCEDURES FOR SAMPLES EXHIBITING ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1989, the guidance document for acutely toxic effluents titled Methods for Aquatic Toxicity Identification Evaluations: Phase III Toxicity Confirmation Procedures was published (EPA, 1989D)This manual and its companion documents (EPA, 1991A; EPA, 1992; EPA, 1993A) are intended...

  15. Toxicity reduction of photo processing wastewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1992-01-01

    The photo processing industry can be characterized by treatment processes and subsequent silver recovery. The effluents generated all contain various amounts of silver. The objectives of this study were to determine toxicity of photo processing effluents and to explore their toxicity mitigation. Six samples, from small shops to a major photo processing center, were studied. Two samples (I and VI) were found to be extremely toxic, causing 100 and 99% inhibition of duckweed frond reproduction, respectively, and were used for subsequent toxicity reduction experiments. Lime and sodium sulfide were effective for the toxicity reduction of Sample VI; both reduced its toxicity to negligible. Sample I was far more toxic and was first diluted to 2.2% and then treated with 0.5 g lime/100 mL, reducing toxicity from 100% to 12% inhibition.

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF SURFACTANTS IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of a number of anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants in manipulations associated with toxicity identification evaluations was studied. t was found that toxicity of the surfactants could be removed from aqueous samples via aeration, apparently through sublation. ...

  17. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF TRIALKYLTIN COMPOUNDS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triethyltin (TET) and trimethyltin (TMT) are neurotoxic organotin compounds which produce different patterns of toxicity in adult animals. Exposure to TET produces behavioral toxicity (decreased motor activity, grip strength, operant response rate and startle response amplitude) ...

  18. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  19. Toxic responses of bivalves to metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.; Menon, N.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Although there is a growing body of information on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important species of bivalves, literature on the lethal toxicity of metal mixtures to bivalves under controlled conditions is rather limited. In the present investigation the toxic effects of combinations of copper - mercury and copper - mercury and copper - cadmium at lethal levels of two marine bivalve species, Perna indica and Donax incarnatus, have been delineated.

  20. Liver toxicity of rosuvastatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Famularo, Giuseppe; Miele, Luca; Minisola, Giovanni; Grieco, Antonio

    2007-02-28

    We report here a case of clinically significant liver toxicity after a brief course of rosuvastatin, which is the first statin approved by the regulatory authorities since the withdrawal of cerivastatin. Whether rosuvastatin has a greater potential compared with other statins to damage the liver is unclear and the involved mechanisms are also unknown. However, rosuvastatin is taken up by hepatocytes more selectively and more efficiently than other statins, and this may reasonably represent an important variable to explain the hepatotoxic potential of rosuvastatin. Our report supports the view that a clinically significant risk of liver toxicity should be considered even when rosuvastatin is given at the range of doses used in common clinical practice. PMID:17451217

  1. Toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, P.J.; Dusenbery, D.B.; Williams, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a small free-living nematode that is representative of what may be the most abundant animal group. It has been promoted as a possible model organism for toxicity testing in the laboratory and in field evaluations in part because more is known about its biology than any other animal, Toxicity tests using C. elegans have been developed with lethality, reproduction, and behavior as end points. The tests have also been developed to varying degrees using standard laboratory media, water, and soil. The results of the tests when exposing C. elegans to a variety of metals, inorganic, and organic compounds indicate it is typically at least as sensitive as other species currently used, such as Daphnia and earthworms, and is generally much easier to maintain in the laboratory. The advantages and disadvantages of C. elegans and the state of development of the tests will be discussed.

  2. Acid Toxicity and Aquatic Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R.; Taylor, E. W.; Brown, D. J. A.; Brown, J. A.

    1989-04-01

    This book reviews and presents recent research on acid waters and their effects on aquatic animals. Starting with the environment, in order to assess why the problems have arisen in particular areas, the volume then deals with field and survival studies on invertebrates and vertebrates; examines the extent of the biological problem and the attempts that have been made to relate water quality and the susceptibility of animals. The natural progression of environmental and field studies, toxicity, and survival tests provide the background information for the physiological studies that follow. These form the major component of the book and they seek to analyze the toxic effects of acid waters and trace metals with cardiovascular and endocrinological effects.

  3. Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Iain P; Al Shahrani, Mesfer; Wainwright, Luke; Heales, Simon J R

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and ATP synthase (complex V) play an essential role in cellular energy production by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. In addition to inborn errors of metabolism, as well as secondary causes from disease pathophysiology, an impairment of oxidative phosphorylation can result from drug toxicity. These 'off-target' pharmacological effects can occur from a direct inhibition of MRC enzyme activity, an induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress, an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, an impairment of mitochondrial membrane structure or a disruption in the replication of mitochondrial DNA. The purpose of this review is to focus on the off-target mitochondrial toxicity associated with both commonly used pharmacotherapies and a topical 'weight loss' agent. The mechanisms of drug-induced mitochondrial impairment will be discussed together with putative therapeutic strategies to counteract the adverse effects of the pharmacotherapy. PMID:26992920

  4. Endocrine therapy toxicity: management options.

    PubMed

    Henry, N Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with adjuvant endocrine therapy, including tamoxifen and the aromatase inhibitors, has resulted in notable improvements in disease-free and overall survival for patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Despite their proven benefit, however, adherence to and persistence with the medications is poor in part because of bothersome side effects that can negatively affect quality of life. Retrospective analyses have identified possible predictors of development of toxicity. Reports have also suggested that development of toxicity may be a biomarker of better response to therapy. In addition, there has been considerable research investment into the management of these side effects, which may lead to improved adherence and persistence with therapy. However, although notable advances have been made, much more remains to be done to provide patients with truly personalized therapy for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:24857109

  5. Behavioral toxicity of selected radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landauer, M. R.; Davis, H. D.; Kumar, K. S.; Weiss, J. F.

    1992-10-01

    Effective radioprotection with minimal behavioral disruption is essential for the selection of protective agents to be used in manned spaceflight. This overview summarizes the studies on the behavioral toxicity of selected radioprotectors classified as phosphorothioates (WR-2721, WR-3689), bioactive lipids (16, 16 dimethylprostaglandin E2(DiPGE2), platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene C4), and immunomodulators (glucan, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, and interleukin-1). Behavioral toxicity was examined in laboratory mice using a locomotor activity test. For all compounds tested, there was a dose-dependent decrease in locomotor behavior that paralleled the dose-dependent increase in radioprotection. While combinations of radioprotective compounds (DiPGE2 plus WR-2721) increased radioprotection, they also decreased locomotor activity. The central nervous system stimulant, caffeine, was able to mitigate the locomotor decrement produced by WR-3689 or PAF.

  6. Severe amiodarone induced pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Nicholas; Yuhico, Luke S; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Szombathy, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    A known complication of Amiodarone therapy is Amiodarone induced Pulmonary Toxicity (APT). Several features of this adverse effect make it difficult to diagnosis and treat. The case of a 63-year-old male with classic radiographic and histologic findings of APT is discussed. Clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic findings, and treatment strategies are reviewed. The patient was successfully managed with pulse high dose steroid therapy. PMID:23205299

  7. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  8. 40 CFR 798.2450 - Inhalation toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inhalation toxicity. 798.2450 Section 798.2450 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2450 Inhalation toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment...

  9. 40 CFR 798.2650 - Oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oral toxicity. 798.2650 Section 798.2650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2650 Oral toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  10. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dermal toxicity. 798.2250 Section 798.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  11. 40 CFR 798.3260 - Chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chronic toxicity. 798.3260 Section 798.3260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3260 Chronic toxicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a chronic...

  12. TOXICITY PERSISTENCE IN PRICKLY PEAR CREEK, MONTANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Instream toxicity tests using the larval fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia reticulata were conducted on Prickly Pear Creek, Montana waters to study toxicity persistence in a stream. The toxicity source was Spring Creek, a tributary of Prickly Pear...

  13. Toxicity of vanadium to different freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beusen, J.M.; Neven, B.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the acute and subchronic toxicity of vanadium for various species of freshwater fish. The long-term toxicity and the effect of vanadium on the reproduction of Daphnia magna is also evaluated and compared with the toxicity of other metals.

  14. HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's air toxics program is moving toward a risk-based focus. The framework for such a focus was laid out in the National Air Toxics Program: Integrated Urban Strategy which included the requirement for EPA to conduct a National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) of human expos...

  15. Photoenhanced Toxicity of Oil to Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoenhanced toxicity is the increase in the toxicity of a chemical in the presence of ultraviolet light (UV), compared to toxicity elicited under conditions of minimal UV. Oil products, weathered oils, combusted oil products, and specific polycyclic aromatic compounds in oil ha...

  16. TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION STUDIES ON A HARBOR SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation summarizes the results of experiments on sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) techniques that allow researchers to characterize and identify chemical causes of acute toxicity in sediments that can be applied using the 10-d solid-phase sediment toxicity t...

  17. AIR TOXICS MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Toxics research program is designed to answer critical scientific questions that will result in more certain risk assessments and more effective risk management practices for stationary point, area, mobile, or indoor sources of air toxics. Research on air toxics is presen...

  18. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  19. TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES TO DAPHNIA MAGNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. It is widely assumed that the toxicity of nanoparticles will be less than that of their metallic ions. Also the effect of organics on metal toxicity is well established. Presented here are the resu...

  20. CAESAR models for developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The new REACH legislation requires assessment of a large number of chemicals in the European market for several endpoints. Developmental toxicity is one of the most difficult endpoints to assess, on account of the complexity, length and costs of experiments. Following the encouragement of QSAR (in silico) methods provided in the REACH itself, the CAESAR project has developed several models. Results Two QSAR models for developmental toxicity have been developed, using different statistical/mathematical methods. Both models performed well. The first makes a classification based on a random forest algorithm, while the second is based on an adaptive fuzzy partition algorithm. The first model has been implemented and inserted into the CAESAR on-line application, which is java-based software that allows everyone to freely use the models. Conclusions The CAESAR QSAR models have been developed with the aim to minimize false negatives in order to make them more usable for REACH. The CAESAR on-line application ensures that both industry and regulators can easily access and use the developmental toxicity model (as well as the models for the other four endpoints). PMID:20678183

  1. Developmental toxicity testing of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Paul C; Allais, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Preventative and therapeutic vaccines are increasingly used during pregnancy and present special considerations for developmental toxicity testing. The various components of the vaccine formulation (i.e., protein or polysaccharide antigen, adjuvants, and excipients) need to be assessed for direct effects on the developing conceptus. In addition, possible adverse influences of the induced antibodies on fetal and/or postnatal development need to be evaluated. A guidance document on the preclinical testing of preventative and therapeutic vaccines for developmental toxicity was issued by the FDA in 2006. Preclinical studies are designed to assess possible influences of vaccines on pre- and postnatal development. The choice of model animal for these experiments is influenced by species differences in the timing and extent of the transfer of the induced maternal antibodies to the fetus. The cross-placental transport of maternal immunoglobulins generally only occurs in late gestation and tends to be greater in humans and monkeys than in non-primate species. For many vaccines, the rabbit shows a greater rate of prenatal transfer of the induced antibodies than rodents. For biotechnology-derived vaccines that are not immunogenic in lower species, nonhuman primates may be the only appropriate models. It may be advisable to test new adjuvants using the ICH study designs for conventional pharmaceuticals in addition to the developmental toxicity study with the final vaccine formulation. PMID:23138897

  2. Toxicogenomic Biomarkers for Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kiyosawa, Naoki; Ando, Yosuke; Manabe, Sunao; Yamoto, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is a widely used technique in the preclinical stage of drug development to investigate the molecular mechanisms of toxicity. A number of candidate TGx biomarkers have now been identified and are utilized for both assessing and predicting toxicities. Further accumulation of novel TGx biomarkers will lead to more efficient, appropriate and cost effective drug risk assessment, reinforcing the paradigm of the conventional toxicology system with a more profound understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drug-induced toxicity. In this paper, we overview some practical strategies as well as obstacles for identifying and utilizing TGx biomarkers based on microarray analysis. Since clinical hepatotoxicity is one of the major causes of drug development attrition, the liver has been the best documented target organ for TGx studies to date, and we therefore focused on information from liver TGx studies. In this review, we summarize the current resources in the literature in regard to TGx studies of the liver, from which toxicologists could extract potential TGx biomarker gene sets for better hepatotoxicity risk assessment. PMID:22271975

  3. Antioxidant nutrients and adriamycin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Quiles, José L; Huertas, Jesús R; Battino, Maurizio; Mataix, José; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen

    2002-10-30

    The anthracycline antibiotic adriamycin (doxorubicin) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against a wide variety of cancers. However, its use is seriously limited by the development in the heart of acute and chronic toxic effects. Mechanisms of action and toxicity of adriamycin are briefly revised in this review. Among followed strategies to attenuate adriamycin toxicity are dosage optimisation, synthesis and use of analogues or combined therapy with antioxidants. The most promising results come from the combination of the drug delivery together with an antioxidant in order to reduce oxidative stress. Many antioxidants have been assayed with very different results. Among these molecules, metal ions chelators and low-molecular-mass agents that scavenge reactive oxygen species and that are synthesised in vivo have been widely studied. However, the present review will be exclusively focused on the antioxidants that are derived from the diet, in particular the role of vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, coenzyme Q, flavonoids, antioxidant components of virgin olive oil and selenium. PMID:12324201

  4. 40 CFR 80.915 - How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the statutory baseline defined in 40 CFR 80.45(b) and volumes are in gallons. (2) The toxics value, Ti... baseline toxics volume determined? 80.915 Section 80.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Baseline Determination § 80.915 How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?...

  5. 40 CFR 80.915 - How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the statutory baseline defined in 40 CFR 80.45(b) and volumes are in gallons. (2) The toxics value, Ti... baseline toxics volume determined? 80.915 Section 80.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Baseline Determination § 80.915 How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?...

  6. 40 CFR 80.915 - How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the statutory baseline defined in 40 CFR 80.45(b) and volumes are in gallons. (2) The toxics value, Ti... baseline toxics volume determined? 80.915 Section 80.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Baseline Determination § 80.915 How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?...

  7. 40 CFR 80.915 - How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the statutory baseline defined in 40 CFR 80.45(b) and volumes are in gallons. (2) The toxics value, Ti... baseline toxics volume determined? 80.915 Section 80.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Baseline Determination § 80.915 How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?...

  8. 40 CFR 80.915 - How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the statutory baseline defined in 40 CFR 80.45(b) and volumes are in gallons. (2) The toxics value, Ti... baseline toxics volume determined? 80.915 Section 80.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Baseline Determination § 80.915 How are the baseline toxics value and baseline toxics volume determined?...

  9. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    Manufactured nanomaterials have become ubiquitous in science, industry, and medicine. Although electron microscopy and surface probe techniques have improved understanding of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, much less is known about what makes nanomaterials toxic. Particulate matter less than 2.5 mum in effective aerodynamic diameter is easily inhaled and taken deep into the lungs. The toxicity of inhaled particulate matter is related to its size and surface chemistry; for instance, the smaller the size of particles, the greater their specific surface area. The chemistry and toxicity of insoluble particles depends on their surface area, since chemical reactions may happen with the environment on the surface. Oxidation and reduction may occur on the surfaces of particles after they are produced. For instance, it is known that carbonaceous particles from vehicle exhaust and industrial emission may interact with reactive species like ozone in their ambient environment, altering the surface chemistry of the particles. Reaction with species in the environment may cause changes in the chemical functionality of the surface and change the toxic properties of the particles when they are inhaled. Furthermore, metals on the surface of inhalable particles can contribute to their toxicity. Much attention has been given to the presence of iron on the surfaces of inhalable particles in the environment. After particle inhalation, particles are endocytosed by alveolar macrophages in the immune response to foreign matter. They are exposed to hydrogen peroxide in the oxidative burst, which can cause the iron-mediated production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction, causing oxidative stress that leads to inflammation and cell death. The toxicity of particles that contain metals depends on the redox activity and bioavailability of the metals, the causes of thich have not yet been adequately explored. In this thesis, electron paramagnetic spectroscopy showed

  10. Discovering less toxic ionic liquids by using the Microtox® toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fernández, F J; Bayo, J; Pérez de los Ríos, A; Vicente, M A; Bernal, F J; Quesada-Medina, J

    2015-06-01

    New Microtox® toxicity data of 16 ionic liquids of different cationic and anionic composition were determined. The ionic liquids 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate, [BMPyr(+)][TFO(-)], 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium chloride, [BMPyr(+)][Cl(-)], hydroxypropylmethylimidazolium fluoroacetate, [HOPMIM(+)][FCH2COO(-)], and hydroxypropylmethylimidazolium glycolate [HOPMIM(+)][glycolate(-)] were found to be less toxic than conventional organic solvent such as chloroform or toluene, accoding the Microtox® toxicity assays. The toxicity of pyrrolidinium cation was lower than the imidazolium and pyridinium ones. It was found that the inclusion of an hydroxyl group in the alkyl chain length of the cation also reduce the toxicity of the ionic liquid. To sum up, the Microtox® toxicity assays can be used as screening tool to easily determined the toxicity of a wide range of ionic liquids and the toxicity data obtained could allow the obtention of structure-toxicity relationships to design less toxic ionic liquids. PMID:25748519

  11. [Comprehensive Toxicity Evaluation and Toxicity Identification Used in Tannery and Textile Wastewaters].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Chen, Wen-yan; Wan, Yu-shan; Zheng, Guo-juan; Zhao, Yuan; Cai, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    To better evaluate the toxicity of tannery and textile effluents from various emission stages, the research attempted battery of toxicological bioassays and toxicological indices. The bioassays employed Microtox test, zebra fish embryo-larval test and algae (Chlorella vulgaris) test. Meanwhile, toxicological indices including Toxicity Unit (TU), Average Toxicity (AvTx), Toxic Print (TxPr), Most Sensitive Test (MST) and Potential Ecotoxic Effects Probe (PEEP) were applied. The results illustrated that PEEP was the most comprehensive index to take account of the emissions and toxic potential of effluents. PEEP values showed that the reduction rates of toxicity in tannery and textile effluents were 36. 8% and 23. 2%, respectively. Finally, based on the Microtox toxicity test, toxicants in textile effluent were identified through the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies. The results indicated that the main toxicant of textile effluent was non-polar organic pollutants, followed by filterable compounds, heavy metals, oxidizing substances and volatile components. PMID:26489331

  12. Toxic Stress: Effects, Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Hillary A.

    2014-01-01

    Children who experience early life toxic stress are at risk of long-term adverse health effects that may not manifest until adulthood. This article briefly summarizes the findings in recent studies on toxic stress and childhood adversity following the publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Report on the effects of toxic stress. A review of toxic stress and its effects is described, including factors of vulnerability, resilience, and the relaxation response. An integrative approach to the prevention and treatment of toxic stress necessitates individual, community and national focus. PMID:27417486

  13. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  14. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25457225

  15. Cryoprotectant Toxicity: Facts, Issues, and Questions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High levels of penetrating cryoprotectants (CPAs) can eliminate ice formation during cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs to cryogenic temperatures. But CPAs become increasingly toxic as concentration increases. Many strategies have been attempted to overcome the problem of eliminating ice while minimizing toxicity, such as attempting to optimize cooling and warming rates, or attempting to optimize time of adding individual CPAs during cooling. Because strategies currently used are not adequate, CPA toxicity remains the greatest obstacle to cryopreservation. CPA toxicity stands in the way of cryogenic cryopreservation of human organs, a procedure that has the potential to save many lives. This review attempts to describe what is known about CPA toxicity, theories of CPA toxicity, and strategies to reduce CPA toxicity. Critical analysis and suggestions are also included. PMID:25826677

  16. Cryoprotectant Toxicity: Facts, Issues, and Questions.

    PubMed

    Best, Benjamin P

    2015-10-01

    High levels of penetrating cryoprotectants (CPAs) can eliminate ice formation during cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs to cryogenic temperatures. But CPAs become increasingly toxic as concentration increases. Many strategies have been attempted to overcome the problem of eliminating ice while minimizing toxicity, such as attempting to optimize cooling and warming rates, or attempting to optimize time of adding individual CPAs during cooling. Because strategies currently used are not adequate, CPA toxicity remains the greatest obstacle to cryopreservation. CPA toxicity stands in the way of cryogenic cryopreservation of human organs, a procedure that has the potential to save many lives. This review attempts to describe what is known about CPA toxicity, theories of CPA toxicity, and strategies to reduce CPA toxicity. Critical analysis and suggestions are also included. PMID:25826677

  17. Combinatorial QSAR Modeling of Rat Acute Toxicity by Oral Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) toxicity models have become popular tools for identifying potential toxic compounds and prioritizing candidates for animal toxicity tests. However, few QSAR studies have successfully modeled large, diverse mammalian toxicity end...

  18. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds. Images Figure 2 PMID:9860885

  19. Lysophospholipase inhibition by organophosphorus toxicants.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Casida, John E

    2004-05-01

    Lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) are a large family of enzymes for removing lysophospholipids from cell membranes. Potent inhibitors are needed to define the importance of LysoPLAs as targets for toxicants and potential therapeutics. This study considers organophosphorus (OP) inhibitors with emphasis on mouse brain total LysoPLA activity relative to the mipafox-sensitive neuropathy target esterase (NTE)-LysoPLA recently established as 17% of the total activity and important in the action of OP delayed toxicants. The most potent inhibitors of total LysoPLA in mouse brain are isopropyl dodecylphosphonofluoridate (also for LysoPLA of Vibrio bacteria), ethyl octylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF), and two alkyl-benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides (BDPOs)[(S)-octyl and dodecyl] (IC50 2-8 nM). OP inhibitors acting in vitro and in vivo differentiate a more sensitive portion but not a distinct NTE-LysoPLA compared with total LysoPLA activity. For 10 active inhibitors, NTE-LysoPLA is 17-fold more sensitive than total LysoPLA, but structure-activity comparisons give a good correlation (r(2) = 0.94) of IC50 values, suggesting active site structural similarity or identity. In mice 4 h after intraperitoneal treatment with discriminating doses, EOPF, tribufos (a plant defoliant), and dodecanesulfonyl fluoride inhibit 41-57% of the total brain LysoPLA and 85-99% of the NTE-LysoPLA activity. Total LysoPLA as well as NTE-LysoPLA is decreased in activity in Nte(+/-)-haploinsufficient mice compared to their Nte(+/+) littermates. The lysolecithin level of spinal cord but not brain is elevated significantly following EOPF treatment (3 mg/kg), thereby focusing attention on localized rather than general alterations in lysophospholipid metabolism in OP-induced hyperactivity and toxicity. PMID:15094302

  20. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago; that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. PMID:24672596

  1. Toxicity of Alpholate to Cattle*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. A.

    1963-01-01

    Although Apholate is used as a sexual sterilant of both sexes of houseflies (Musca domestica L.) it can not be used for `systemic' chemosterilization of the prehypodermic larvae of the warble flies Hypoderma bovis (L.) and H. lineatum (De Vill.) because of its high toxicity to 4- to 5-month-old calves. An intramuscular dose of 2.5 mg./Kg. killed the calves in 5 to 7 days. The pathognomonic clinical signs were impaction of the rumen, anorexia, depression, and general weakness. The hematopoietic system was affected. There was marked leukocytopenia characterized by lymphocytopenia within 24 hours of Apholate injections. PMID:17649464

  2. Toxicity of Alpholate to Cattle.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A

    1963-10-01

    Although Apholate is used as a sexual sterilant of both sexes of houseflies (Musca domestica L.) it can not be used for ;systemic' chemosterilization of the prehypodermic larvae of the warble flies Hypoderma bovis (L.) and H. lineatum (De Vill.) because of its high toxicity to 4- to 5-month-old calves. An intramuscular dose of 2.5 mg./Kg. killed the calves in 5 to 7 days. The pathognomonic clinical signs were impaction of the rumen, anorexia, depression, and general weakness. The hematopoietic system was affected. There was marked leukocytopenia characterized by lymphocytopenia within 24 hours of Apholate injections. PMID:17649464

  3. Screening wastewater for toxicity to activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Several toxicity tests were compared to define their utility for prediction of toxicity to activated sludge. The tests included: (1) oxygen uptake rates in batch tests with activated sludge, (2) adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measurements in the same batch tests, (3) Warburg respirometer studies with activated sludge, and (4) a luminescent bacteria test (Microtox/sup TM/). An evaluation of the toxicity tests was made with several toxicants; nickel (II), mercury (II), 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC). Because of differences in toxic mechanism, some of the toxicants produced greater toxic effects in some tests than in other tests. The ATP levels decreased significant when uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation were studied (DCP and DNOC). Several procedures for measuring ATP were investigated and were found to be unsatisfactory when applied to activated sludge. A new method for extraction of ATP, which incorporated a sonic bath and trichloroacetic acid, was developed. The improved ATP method was used in the toxicity tests and for the additional studies. Current practice in environmental engineering relies on volatile suspended solids (VSS) as a measure of active biomass in activated sludge. After an improved ATP procedure was developed, ATP was investigated for estimation of active biomass. The fate of DCP in the toxicity tests was studied and an adsorptive mechanism was proposed that was based on membrane solubility. This mechanism explained the fate of DCP in the toxicity tests and is useful for understanding the fate of DCP in activated sludge.

  4. Toxicity of fluoride to aquatic species and evaluation of toxicity modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Krysta; Elphick, James; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene

    2015-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of fluoride to a variety of freshwater aquatic organisms and to establish whether water quality variables contribute substantively to modifying its toxicity. Water hardness, chloride, and alkalinity were tested as possible toxicity modifying factors for fluoride using acute toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca and Oncorhynchus mykiss. Chloride appeared to be the major toxicity modifying factor for fluoride in these acute toxicity tests. The chronic toxicity of fluoride was evaluated with a variety of species, including 3 fish (Pimephales promelas, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus namaycush), 3 invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia, H. azteca, and Chironomus dilutus), 1 plant (Lemna minor), and 1 alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Hyalella azteca was the most sensitive species overall, and O. mykiss was the most sensitive species of fish. The role of chloride as a toxicity modifying factor was inconsistent between species in the chronic toxicity tests. PMID:25732700

  5. TDP-43 toxicity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Armakola, Maria; Hart, Michael P.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2010-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an emerging tool for investigating the molecular pathways that underpin several human neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting motor neurons. The protein TDP-43 has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the disease, however the mechanisms by which TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis are unclear. To explore the mechanistic details that result in aberrant accumulation of TDP-43 and to discover potential strategies for therapeutic intervention, we employed a yeast TDP-43 proteinopathy model system. These studies allowed us to determine the regions of TDP-43 required for aggregation and toxicity and to define the effects of ALS-linked mutant forms of TDP-43. We have also been able to harness the power of yeast genetics to identify potent modifiers of TDP-43 toxicity using high-throughput yeast genetic screens. Here, we describe the methods and approaches that we have used in order to gain insight into TDP-43 biology and its role in disease. These approaches are readily adaptable to other neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:21115123

  6. Title III and toxic torts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnehausen, G.A.

    1989-07-01

    In July the second annual Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) report under Section 313 of Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and the computerized, national TRI data-base will be issued. Although the Environmental Protection Agency will not be able to aggregate the July, 1989 reports and issue its own annual report until early next year, we can expect political attention to focus quickly on whether total releases to air, land and water, and in particular total emissions to the air, have increased or decreased from 1987 to 1988. Because the reporting threshold for chemical manufacturing and processing facilities will drop from 75,000 to 50,000 pounds per year, the number of facilities reporting and number of chemicals reported should increase significantly, forcing up total releases. Bringing the totals down will be waste and release reduction efforts already underway in the chemical industry and elsewhere, and perhaps improved accuracy in measurement and estimation of releases. Additions to and deletions from the list of reportable chemicals will also have an effect. Nevertheless, any significant increase in aggregate totals, no matter what the explanation, will be bound to have a political impact on air toxics legislation, and spur public concern with the health risks of air pollution.

  7. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  8. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  9. Male-mediated developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Diana; Schmid, Thomas E; Baumgartner, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    Male-mediated developmental toxicity has been of concern for many years. The public became aware of male-mediated developmental toxicity in the early 1990s when it was reported that men working at Sellafield might be causing leukemia in their children. Human and animal studies have contributed to our current understanding of male-mediated effects. Animal studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested that genetic damage after radiation and chemical exposure might be transmitted to offspring. With the increasing understanding that there is histone retention and modification, protamine incorporation into the chromatin and DNA methylation in mature sperm and that spermatozoal RNA transcripts can play important roles in the epigenetic state of sperm, heritable studies began to be viewed differently. Recent reports using molecular approaches have demonstrated that DNA damage can be transmitted to babies from smoking fathers, and expanded simple tandem repeats minisatellite mutations were found in the germline of fathers who were exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. In epidemiological studies, it is possible to clarify whether damage is transmitted to the sons after exposure of the fathers. Paternally transmitted damage to the offspring is now recognized as a complex issue with genetic as well as epigenetic components. PMID:24369136

  10. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  11. [Toxic impurities in chlorhexidine digluconate].

    PubMed

    Kohlbecker, G

    1989-04-01

    Three preparations of chlorhexidine-digluconate were analysed for contamination with a newly developed high-pressure liquid chromatographic method. Of special interest was p-chloroaniline, a toxic as well as a carcinogenic compound. We found concentrations from 1.7 to 8.5 mmol p-chloroaniline per mol chlorhexidine-digluconate, i.e. five-fold differences in the different products. Besides p-chloroaniline many other contaminating substances were found, amongst others p-chlorophenyl-isocyanate and p-chlorophenyl-carbodiimide. The least contamination was found in a branded article, and the highest degree of contamination in a "no-name"-product. During a storage period of half a year in dark glass bottles in a solution of 0.2% under various light and temperature values the p-chloroaniline concentrations increased linearly with the period of storage, with the exception of storage in the dark at 5 degrees C. A constant temperature of 35 degrees C in the dark caused a greater increase than storing at 20-25 degrees C in the dark or the light or in direct sunlight. Therefore under similar conditions it is mostly warmth which causes an increase in toxic compounds. PMID:2702165

  12. Some food toxic for pets

    PubMed Central

    Kovalkovičová, Natália; Šutiaková, Irena; Pistl, Juraj; Šutiak, Václav

    2009-01-01

    According to world statistics, dogs and cats are the species that owners most frequently seek assistance with potential poisonings, accounting 95–98% of all reported animal cases. Exposures occur more commonly in the summer and in December that is associated with the holiday season. The majority (>90%) of animal poisonings are accidental and acute in nature and occur near or at the animal owner's home. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may also prove dangerous for their health. The aim of this review was to present common food items that should not be fed (intentionally or unintentionally) to dogs, i.e. chocolate, caffeine, and other methylxanthines, grapes, raisins, onion, garlic, avocado, alcohol, nuts, xylitol contained in chewing gum and candies, etc. Onion and avocado are toxic for cats, too. The clinical effects of individual toxicants and possible therapy are also mentioned. Knowing what human food has the potential to be involved in serious toxicoses should allow veterinarians to better educate their clients on means of preventing pet poisonings. It can be concluded that the best advice must surely be to give animal fodder or treats specifically developed for their diets. PMID:21217849

  13. Male-mediated developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Diana; Schmid, Thomas E; Baumgartner, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    Male-mediated developmental toxicity has been of concern for many years. The public became aware of male-mediated developmental toxicity in the early 1990s when it was reported that men working at Sellafield might be causing leukemia in their children. Human and animal studies have contributed to our current understanding of male-mediated effects. Animal studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggested that genetic damage after radiation and chemical exposure might be transmitted to offspring. With the increasing understanding that there is histone retention and modification, protamine incorporation into the chromatin and DNA methylation in mature sperm and that spermatozoal RNA transcripts can play important roles in the epigenetic state of sperm, heritable studies began to be viewed differently. Recent reports using molecular approaches have demonstrated that DNA damage can be transmitted to babies from smoking fathers, and expanded simple tandem repeats minisatellite mutations were found in the germline of fathers who were exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. In epidemiological studies, it is possible to clarify whether damage is transmitted to the sons after exposure of the fathers. Paternally transmitted damage to the offspring is now recognized as a complex issue with genetic as well as epigenetic components. PMID:24369136

  14. Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most

  15. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  16. Comparative Dietary Toxicities of Pesticides to Birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, R.G.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.; Kreitzer, J.F.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents measurements of the lethal dietary toxicity of 89 pesticidal chemicals to young bowhites, Japanese quail, ring-necked pheasants, and mallards. Toxicity is expressed as the median lethal concentration (LC 50) of active chemical in a 5-day ad libitum diet. LC 50's and associated statistics are derived by methods of probit analysis. Endrin consistently was the most toxic chemical while aldrin and dieldrin were among the six most toxic chemicals of those tested on all species. In general, organophosphates were less toxic than aldrin or dieldrin and herbicides were of a low order of toxicity. There were obvious inconsistencies in the relative sensitivity of the four species to various chemicals.

  17. Toxic Membrane Fractions from Mycoplasma fermentans1

    PubMed Central

    Gabridge, Michael G.; Murphy, William H.

    1971-01-01

    A recent isolate of Mycoplasma fermentans (strain K10, from human leukemic bone marrow) induced a lethal toxicity syndrome in mice. High doses of both viable and inactivated cells were toxic when injected intraperitoneally. Whole lysates and membranes from osmotically shocked cells killed mice, but cytoplasm did not. When membranes were dissolved in detergents and reaggregated by dialysis in the presence of Mg2+, the lipid-protein complex thus formed was toxic. Lipids extracted from membranes with chloroform-methanol did not kill mice. Protein-rich fractions (obtained by reaggregation plus acetone washes or ammonium sulfate precipitation of dissolved membranes) were also not toxic. No qualitative differences in proteins from three toxic isolates and three nontoxic laboratory strains of M. fermentans were detectable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The toxic factor contained in reaggregated membranes was heat-stable but sensitive to Pronase, trypsin, and lipase. Images PMID:5154902

  18. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Soriano, J. A.; Kosola, K. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The screening test method was used to investigate toxicity in polyethylene, polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate, polyaryl sulfone, polyether sulfone, polyphenyl sulfone, and polyphenylene sulfide. Changing from a rising temperature program to a fixed temperature program resulted on shorter times to animal responses. This effect was attributed in part to more rapid generation of toxicants. The toxicants from the sulfur containing polymers appeared to act more rapidly than the toxicants from the other polymers. It was not known whether this effect was due primarily to difference in concentration or in the nature of the toxicants. The carbon monoxide concentration found did not account for the results observed with the sulfur containing polymers. Polyphenyl sulfone appeared to exhibit the least toxicity among the sulfur containing polymers evaluated under these test conditions.

  19. Toxicity and safety of topical sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Mary K

    2007-01-01

    The safety and toxicity of sodium hypochlorite is reviewed with particular correlation to topical use. Since sodium hypochlorite is one of the most widely used chemicals in the environment, its safety has been established by long use and toxicity profile. This chapter reviews recent toxicology testing including routine systemic LD50, topical LD50, topical toxicology, irritation and sensitization. The resulting toxicity or safety profile clarifies the safe topical use of electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solution (ExSept, Amuchina 10%). PMID:17099299

  20. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05toxic level III" (IC50, 24htoxic effects of various types of ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. PMID:26923299

  1. Spiking sediment with organochlorines for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, M.H.; Chapman, P.M.; Norman, D.M.; Quintino, V.M.

    1997-07-01

    Sediment toxicity testing integrates responses to sediment variables and hence does not directly indicate cause and effect. One tool for determining cause and effect is sediment spiking, in which relatively uncontaminated sediment is amended with known amounts of contaminants, then tested for toxicity. However, sediment spiking methods vary considerably. The present study details appropriate methodologies (dry and wet spiking) for amending sediments with a range of organic contaminant concentrations, i.e., polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB). Target and actual concentrations were similar. A dose-response was determined, but PCB was not toxic in an acute sediment toxicity test. Chronic testing of these same sediments is reported in a companion article in this issue.

  2. Bridging environmental mixtures and toxic effects

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Sarah E.; Smith, Brian W.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    BRIDGES is a bioanalytical tool that combines passive sampling with the embryonic zebrafish developmental toxicity bioassay to provide a quantitative measure of the toxicity of bioavailable complex mixtures. Passive sampling devices (PSDs), which sequester and concentrate bioavailable organic contaminants from the environment, were deployed in the Willamette and Columbia Rivers within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund site in Portland, Oregon. Six sampling events were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009 and 2010. PSD extracts were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds and screened for 1201 chemicals of concern using deconvolution reporting software. The developmental toxicity of the extracts was analyzed using the embryonic zebrafish bioassay. BRIDGES provided site-specific, temporally resolved information about environmental contaminant mixtures and their toxicity. Multivariate modeling approaches were applied to paired chemical and toxic effects data sets to help unravel chemistry-toxicity associations. Modeling demonstrated a significant correlation between PAH concentrations and the toxicity of the samples and identified a subset of PAH analytes that were the most highly correlated with observed toxicity. Although this research highlights the complexity of discerning specific bioactive compounds in complex mixtures, it demonstrates methods for associating toxic effects with chemical characteristics of environmental samples. PMID:23001962

  3. Subchronic oral toxicity of zinc in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.M.; Domingo, J.L.; Colomina, M.T.; Mayayo, E.; Corbella, J.

    1988-07-01

    It is well known that zinc has important biological functions. Clinical manifestations in zinc-deficient animals include growth retardation, testicular atrophy, skin changes, and poor appetite. On the other hand, high levels of dietary zinc have been shown to induce copper deficiency in rats and to interfere with the metabolism of calcium and iron. Little is known on the oral toxicity of zinc in mammals. However, some toxic effects in human subjects, rodents, and sheep have been reported. In order to extend the information about the oral toxicity of zinc, a semichronic toxicity study of zinc acetate in rats has been carried out in this paper.

  4. Fumonisin toxicity in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, D R; Brown, T P; Weibking, T S; Rottinghaus, G E

    1992-07-01

    The effects of dietary fumonisin B1 were evaluated in young broiler chicks. The experimental design consisted of 5 treatments each with 9 randomly allotted male broiler chicks. Day-old chicks were fed diets containing 0 (feed control), 100, 200, 300, or 400 mg fumonisin B1/kg feed for 21 days. Response variables measured were chick performance, organ weights, serum biochemistry, and histologic parameters. Body weights and average daily gain dramatically decreased with increasing dietary fumonisin B1, and liver, proventriculus, and gizzard weights increased. Diarrhea, thymic cortical atrophy, multifocal hepatic necrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and rickets were present in chicks fed diets containing fumonisin B1. Serum calcium, cholesterol, and aspartate aminotransferase levels all increased at higher fumonisin dietary levels. Results indicate that fumonisin, from Fusarium moniliforme culture material, is toxic in young chicks. PMID:1515495

  5. Dermatological toxicity of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Shelnutt, Susan R; Goad, Phillip; Belsito, Donald V

    2007-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium causes two types of dermatological toxicities: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and skin ulcers. This report reviews the etiology, prevalence, pathology, dose-response, and prognosis of both of these reactions. Reports in the literature indicate that repeated exposure to hexavalent chromium in concentrations of 4-25 ppm can both induce sensitization and elicit chromium ACD. Exposure to 20 ppm hexavalent chromium can cause skin ulcers in nonsensitized people. The prevalence of chromium sensitivity in cement workers, exposed to 10-20 ppm hexavalent chromium for years, is approximately 4-5%. Chromium ACD can be a chronic debilitating disease, perhaps because chromium is ubiquitous in foods and in the environment and is difficult to avoid. Due to the high rates of sensitization in populations chronically exposed to chromium and the chronic nature of chromium ACD, some investigators recommend reducing the hexavalent chromiumconcentrations in consumer products, such as detergents, to less than 5 ppm. PMID:17612952

  6. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  7. Hematologic toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Danesi, R; Del Tacca, M

    2004-04-01

    The administration of immunosuppressive agents may be associated with the occurrence of hematologic toxicity, such as anemia, due to bone marrow suppression or hemolysis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The administration of azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil is more frequently associated with bone marrow suppression, while hemolytic-uremic syndrome may occur after administration of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, or muromonab (OKT3) and may be associated with the loss of the allograft. Moreover, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are rare, but potentially severe, complications of immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and cyclosporine; they are characterized by intravascular hemolysis due to mechanical destruction of red cells as a result of pathological changes in small blood vessels. Viral infections (cytomegalovirus), administration of antiviral agents (gancyclovir), inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor antagonists, antibacterial agents (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim), and allopurinol may aggravate bone marrow suppression, particularly when administered with agents that interfere with purine biosynthesis, including azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:15110637

  8. Toxic shock syndrome in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, A. J.; Peacocke, J. E.; Ewan, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1976, 53 confirmed or suspected cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) have been reported in Canada. Twenty-two cases occurred in 1980, and by October 1981 another 21 had been reported. In Canada, like the United States, where nearly 1200 cases have been recorded, TSS appears to be associated with tampon use, although a few cases have occurred in males and in nonmenstruating women. Of the 53 patients 3 died. The enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus is probably responsible for TSS. Manufacturers of tampons have now placed warning labels on tampon boxes and information on TSS in the instruction inserts. Women should select tampons of appropriate absorbency for the various stages of menstruation. PMID:7042059

  9. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  10. Cellular toxicity of nicotinamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczyński, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. Nicotinamide derivatives are known as new family of uremic toxins. These uremic compounds play a role in an increased oxidative stress and disturbances in cellular repair processes by inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. New members of this family were discovered and described. Their toxic properties were a subject of recent studies. This study evaluated the concentration of 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-triphosphate (4PYTP) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-monophosphate (4PYMP) in erythrocytes of patients with chronic renal failure. Serum and red blood cells were collected from chronic renal failure patients on conservative treatment, those treated with hemodialysis, and at different times from those who underwent kidney transplantation. Healthy volunteers served as a control group. Nicotinamide metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry based on originally discovered and described method. Three novel compounds were described: 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside (4PYR), 4PYMP, and 4PYTP. 4PYR concentration was elevated in the serum, whereas 4PYMP and 4PYTP concentrations were augmented in erythrocytes of dialysis patients. Interestingly, concentrations of these compounds were less elevated during the treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). After successful kidney transplantation, concentrations of 4PYR and 4PYMP normalized according to the graft function, whereas that of 4PYTP was still elevated. During the incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of 4PYR, concentration of 4PYMP rose very rapidly while that of 4PYTP increased slowly. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4PYR, as a toxic compound, was actively absorbed by erythrocytes and metabolized to the 4PYMP and 4PYTP, which may interfere with function and life span of these cells. PMID:22200423

  11. Hydroxychloroquine-related retinal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui Jen; Denniston, Alastair K; Rao, Vijay K; Gordon, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    HCQ is widely used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly lupus and RA. It is generally well tolerated, but retinopathy is a concern. Retinopathy is rare, but is sight threatening, generally irreversible and may progress even after cessation of therapy. Damage may be subclinical. Although a number of risk factors have been proposed (such as duration of therapy and cumulative dose), the many exceptions (e.g. retinopathy on low-dose HCQ, or no retinopathy after a very large cumulative dose of HCQ) highlight our limited understanding of the disease process. Novel technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) may provide the earliest structural and functional evidence of toxicity in these stages. Along with the well-established technique of central visual field testing (10-2 visual fields), these modalities are increasingly being used as part of screening programmes. The ideal single test with high sensitivity and high specificity for HCQ retinopathy has still not been achieved. Screening for HCQ retinopathy remains an area of considerable debate, including issues of when, who and how to screen. Commonly accepted risk factors include receiving >6.5 mg/kg/day or a cumulative dose of >1000 g of HCQ, being on treatment for >5 years, having renal or liver dysfunction, having pre-existing retinopathy and being elderly. HCQ continues to be a valuable drug in treating rheumatic disease, but clinicians need to be aware of the associated risks and to have arrangements in place that would enable early detection of toxicity. PMID:26428520

  12. Lead toxicity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Vig, E K; Hu, H

    2000-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that lead, even at relatively low levels of exposure, has the potential to harm not only the young and the occupationally-exposed, but also older people. Because they have been alive for a longer period of time, older adults have had more potential exposures to lead. They may have been exposed to lead while working in unregulated occupations, or they may have encountered more lead in the environment on a daily basis. Several large epidemiological studies have found that older people have higher blood and bone lead levels than younger adults. Additionally, sporadic clusters of acute lead exposure among older adults as a result of activities such as ceramic glaze hobby work and consumption of moonshine whiskey continue to be reported. After lead enters the body, it circulates in the blood reaching the soft tissues and bone. Researchers have learned that lead can hibernate within bone for decades. Although lead within bone is of uncertain toxicity to bone tissue, conditions of bone resorption, such as osteoporosis, can cause bone lead to reenter the bloodstream where it can then re-expose the soft tissue, and, potentially, exert delayed deleterious effects. Evidence is emerging that blood and bone lead levels, reflecting relatively modest exposures, are associated with hypertension, renal insufficiency, and cognitive impairment. Medical treatments that now exist to slow the rate of bone resorption may maintain lead within bones. On-going studies evaluating the relationship between body lead stores and both cognitive and renal impairment, as well as the potential modifying effect of bone resorption, will help determine whether bone resorption should be retarded specifically to preserve organ function. Physicians should be aware of potential past and present lead exposures among their older patients. Ongoing lead exposure should be prevented. In the future, treatment of osteoporosis may be undertaken not only to improve bone health but also to

  13. CHARACTERIZATION AND ISOLATION OF ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN WHOLE SEDIMENT TOXICITY INDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS (TIES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of whole sediment toxicity identification and evaluation (TIEs) methods has been under way for approximately four years. These methods are necessary to define cause and effect relationships in toxic sediments during ecological risk assessments, remediation and disposa...

  14. EFFECTS OF BRINE ADDITION ON EFFLUENT TOXICITY AND MARINE TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE) MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information is available concerning the effect of salinity adjustment on effluent storage and toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) performance. hese factors are important for accurate assessments of potential toxicity to marine organisms. he objective of this study was...

  15. Profiling the reproductive toxicity of chemicals from multigeneration studies in the toxicity reference database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multigeneration reproduction studies are used to characterize parental and offspring systemic toxicity, as well as reproductive toxicity of pesticides, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Results from 329 multigeneration studies on 316 chemicals have been digitized into sta...

  16. Direct toxicity assessment - Methods, evaluation, interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gruiz, Katalin; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Kunglné-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Hajdu, Csilla; Feigl, Viktória; Vaszita, Emese; Molnár, Mónika

    2016-09-01

    Direct toxicity assessment (DTA) results provide the scale of the actual adverse effect of contaminated environmental samples. DTA results are used in environmental risk management of contaminated water, soil and waste, without explicitly translating the results into chemical concentration. The end points are the same as in environmental toxicology in general, i.e. inhibition rate, decrease in the growth rate or in yield and the 'no effect' or the 'lowest effect' measurement points of the sample dilution-response curve. The measurement unit cannot be a concentration, since the contaminants and their content in the sample is unknown. Thus toxicity is expressed as the sample proportion causing a certain scale of inhibition or no inhibition. Another option for characterizing the scale of toxicity of an environmental sample is equivalencing. Toxicity equivalencing represents an interpretation tool which enables toxicity of unknown mixtures of chemicals be converted into the concentration of an equivalently toxic reference substance. Toxicity equivalencing, (i.e. expressing the toxicity of unknown contaminants as the concentration of the reference) makes DTA results better understandable for non-ecotoxicologists and other professionals educated and thinking based on the chemical model. This paper describes and discusses the role, the principles, the methodology and the interpretation of direct toxicity assessment (DTA) with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the necessity to integrate DTA results into environmental management of contaminated soil and water. The paper also introduces the benefits of the toxicity equivalency method. The use of DTA is illustrated through two case studies. The first case study focuses on DTA of treated wastewater with the aim to characterize the treatment efficacy of a biological wastewater treatment plant by frequent bioassaying. The second case study applied DTA to investigate the cover layers of two bauxite residue (red mud

  17. SAND SPIKED WITH COPPER AS A REFERENCE TOXICANT MATERIAL FOR SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTING: A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Routine use of solid-phase sediment toxicity tests for scientific and regulatory purposes necessitates the development of solid-phase reference toxicant materials. n order to evaluate an approach for developing such materials, 12 solid-phase 96-h reference toxicant tests were con...

  18. DETECTION OF TOXICANT(S) ON BUILDING SURFACES FOLLOWING CHEMICAL ATTACK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical step prior to reoccupation of any facility following a chemical attack is monitoring for toxic compounds on surfaces within that facility. Low level detection of toxicant(s) is necessary to ensure that these compounds have been eliminated after building decontaminatio...

  19. Catalytic Destruction Of Toxic Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed process disposes of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil or carbon beds safely and efficiently. Oxidizes toxic materials without producing such other contaminants as nitrogen oxides. Using air, fuel, catalysts, and steam, system consumes less fuel and energy than decontamination processes currently in use. Similar process regenerates carbon beds used in water-treatment plants.

  20. Teach with Databases: Toxics Release Inventory. [Multimedia].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barracato, Jay; Spooner, Barbara

    This curriculum unit provides students with real world applications of science as it pertains to toxic releases into the environment. This boxed package contains the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Teacher's Guide, TRI Database Basics guide, comprehensive TRI compact disk with user's guide, "Getting Started: A Guide to Bringing Environmental…

  1. Psychosis as Harbinger of Phenytoin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Borasi, Manish; Verma, R. Pravin; Gupta, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis with phenytoin use has earlier been reported only in the context of Vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency. We report a rare case of phenytoin toxicity manifesting as psychosis in the absence of Vitamin deficiency. The importance of recognition of psychosis as a harbinger of phenytoin toxicity and implications for management are discussed. PMID:26862279

  2. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  3. The facts about sunn hemp toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) is an annual plant widely grown in the tropics. The genus Crotalaria includes some species known to be toxic to animals. Development of seed producing cultivars for the continental USA at Auburn University, AL, has raised the question if its seed and forage are toxic...

  4. America's Poisoned Playgrounds: Children and Toxic Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedberg, Louis

    Next to chemical and farm workers, today's children are at the greatest risk from toxic chemicals. Through their normal play activities, children are exposed to a frightening array of toxic hazards, including lead, pesticides, arsenic, and unknown dangers from abandoned landfills and warehouses. Through a series of documented examples, the author…

  5. ENCOURAGING TOXIC USE REDUCTION IN ACADEMIC LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project seeks to balance essential research with its associated environmental burdens by promoting the use of less toxic and less polluting alternatives to commonly used toxic chemicals. MIT seeks to use the purchasing process to provide researchers with the o...

  6. 40 CFR 261.24 - Toxicity characteristic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... characteristic of toxicity if, using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, test Method 1311 in “Test... Hexachlorobutadiene 87-68-3 0.5 D034 Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 3.0 D008 Lead 7439-92-1 5.0 D013 Lindane 58-89-9...

  7. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  8. BIOEQUIVALENCE APPROACH FOR WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current...

  9. COMMUNITY SCALE AIR TOXICS MODELING WITH CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration and movement for an urban air toxics control strategy is toward a community, exposure and risk-based modeling approach, with emphasis on assessments of areas that experience high air toxic concentration levels, the so-called "hot spots". This strategy will requir...

  10. 40 CFR 261.24 - Toxicity characteristic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Toxicity characteristic. (a) A solid waste (except manufactured gas plant waste) exhibits the... Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods,” EPA Publication SW-846, as incorporated by... purpose of this section. (b) A solid waste that exhibits the characteristic of toxicity has the...

  11. Biomonitoring for toxics control in NPDES permitting

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, R.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-04-01

    To explore the uses of biological monitoring in control and regulation of toxic wastewaters, the Water Pollution Control Federation Ecology Committee sponsored a workshop at the New Orleans Annual Meeting. This article summarizes the major topics that were discussed: overview of monitoring; rationale for using biomonitoring in permitting; EPA's assessment methodology; and issues in the water quality-based toxics control process.

  12. 40 CFR 156.62 - Toxicity Category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES Human Hazard and Precautionary Statements § 156.62 Toxicity Category... being the highest toxicity category. Most human hazard, precautionary statements, and human personal... 0.2 mg/liter >0.2 thru 2 mg/liter >2 thru 20 mg/liter >20 mg/liter Eye irritation Corrosive;...

  13. Save the Bay's "Toxic Diet" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Diana

    1994-01-01

    Although progress has been made in curbing industrial pollutants in larger communities, small, nonindustrial communities lack strategies for reducing unregulated toxic sources to the influent stream. This article outlines one environmental organization's model for reducing these toxic sources that can be used to help small communities nationwide.…

  14. INTERNATIONAL SOURCE WATER TOXICITY MONITORING CONSORTIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many researchers in the field of time-relevant, on-line toxicity monitors for source water protection believe that some mechanism to guide and prioritize research in this emerging field would be beneficial. On-line toxicity monitors are tools designed to screen water quality and ...

  15. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  16. [Pulmonary toxicity of free radicals of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Housset, B; Junod, A

    1983-01-01

    Free oxygen radicals result from aerobic cellular metabolism; their toxicity is prevented by immediate degradation due to an endless variety of biochemical systems. The nature of these radicals, their cellular production as well as the defence mechanism which oppose their toxic effects are successively and briefly analysed. The potential role of these radicals in the genesis of different lung diseases is still poorly understood. However, certain toxic agents (oxygen, gas pollutants, ionising radiation, toxic products) can act as a whole or at least in part by their intermediaries. The experimental arguments in favour of this hypothesis are reviewed in passing. If the relative importance of the toxic mechanism is still imprecise, free radicals are certainly implicated in pulmonary disease and constitute a new aspect of respiratory patho-physiology. PMID:6189156

  17. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Nauss, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.117 references.

  18. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Kavet, R; Nauss, K M

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor. PMID:2264926

  19. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  20. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  1. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  2. Specific global responses to N and Fe nutrition in toxic and non-toxic Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alexova, Ralitza; Dang, The Cuong; Fujii, Manabu; Raftery, Mark J; Waite, T David; Ferrari, Belinda C; Neilan, Brett A

    2016-02-01

    The bloom-forming cyanobacteria species Microcystis aeruginosa includes toxic and non-toxic (microcystin-producing) strains. Certain stress conditions stimulate synthesis of microcystin (MCYST) and enhance the binding of the MCYST molecule to proteins. In this quantitative proteomic study, we compared the response of a wild-type toxic strain PCC 7806, an mcyH(-) knockout non-toxic strain, and a naturally occurring non-toxic strain, PCC 7005, after 8 days in low iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) starvation in order to assess the benefit of MCYST synthesis in non-optimal conditions. Fe limitation increased MCYST synthesis and caused an accumulation of phycobilisome proteins and the ferric iron transporter FutA only in the toxic PCC 7806 but not the non-toxic strains. In N starvation, photosynthetic, C and N metabolism proteins were more abundant in the non-toxic strains, as were chaperones and proteases. Significant interaction between nutrient availability and toxicity existed for thioredoxin peroxidase and several thioredoxin-regulated proteins. We propose a competition of MCYST for binding sites in thioredoxin-regulated proteins during oxidative stress (low Fe) but not in growth-limiting conditions (low N). This then leads to differences in the regulation of C:N metabolism in toxic and non-toxic M. aeruginosa in nutrient-replete and nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:26119859

  3. The parenteral toxicity of Cyclofem.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K M

    1994-04-01

    The intraperitoneal median lethal dose of Cyclofem [Cyclo-Provera, C-P; depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA)+estradiol cypionate (EC)] in mice was greater than 2500 mg/kg. The subcutaneous median lethal dose in mice and rats was greater than 1000 mg/kg. The suspension containing 50 mg/ml DMPA and 10 mg/ml EC used in all toxicology studies was not irritating to rabbit muscle. Chronic parenteral toxicity studies of Cyclofem were conducted in mice, rats and monkeys for 18, 22 and 24 months, respectively. Monthly doses were 2.5, 7.5 and 25 mg/kg Cyclofem in all species, 25 mg/kg DMPA and 25 mg/kg EC. Cyclofem was nontoxic but produced hormonal effects in all species. Decreased survival noted in the rodent studies was likely due to excessive EC dose. Mammary gland adenocarcinomas and pituitary adenomas were increased in the chronic rat study. Literature indicates the tumors were likely the result of the excessive hormone dose and were specific to rodents. In monkeys, Cyclofem was nontoxic, hormonally active, and noncarcinogenic at all doses including 50 times the human dose. PMID:8013218

  4. Fumonisin toxicity in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Weibking, T S; Ledoux, D R; Brown, T P; Rottinghaus, G E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of dietary fumonisin B1 were evaluated in young turkey poults. The experimental design consisted of 3 treatments, with 24 female turkey poults allotted randomly per treatment. Day-old poults were fed diets containing 0 mg (feed control), 100 mg, and 200 mg fumonisin B1/kg feed for 21 days. Body weight gains and efficiency of feed conversion decreased linearly with increasing dietary fumonisin. Liver, kidney, and pancreas weights increased linearly with increasing dietary fumonisin, and spleen and heart weights decreased. Serum aspartate aminotransferase levels increased with increasing dietary fumonisin, and serum cholesterol; alkaline phosphatase, mean cell volume, and mean cell hemoglobin all decreased. Biliary hyperplasia, hypertrophy of Kupffer's cells, thymic cortical atrophy, and moderate widening of the proliferating and degenerating hypertrophied zones of tibial physes were present in poults fed diets containing fumonisin B1. Results indicate that fumonisin B1, from Fusarium moniliforme culture material, is toxic in young poults, and the poult appears to be more sensitive to fumonisin than the broiler chick. PMID:8466985

  5. Immunological protection against digoxin toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Donald H.; Butler, Vincent P.

    1971-01-01

    The lethal dose of digoxin was determined by administering 10 ml of a digoxin-saline solution to 26 nonimmunized rabbits through an ear vein over a 10 min period. Rabbits receiving less than 0.45 mg/kg digoxin showed no toxic effect, whereas all 15 rabbits that received 0.5 mg/kg developed an early arrhythmia and died within 1 hr. Moreover, eight rabbits which had been immunized with antigens unrelated to digoxin or injected with Freund's adjuvant mixture all died after receiving 0.6 mg/kg digoxin. Thus, it was concluded that 0.6 mg/kg digoxin was uniformly lethal in rabbits that had not been immunized or had received antigens unrelated to digoxin. By way of contrast, 17 rabbits immunized with a digoxin-albumin conjugate in complete Freund's adjuvant formed digoxin-specific antibodies and survived doses of digoxin varying between 0.6 and 0.9 mg/kg. In 10 rabbits immunized with digoxin-albumin conjugates, digoxin-specific antibody titers were determined following the administration of digoxin. There was a significant fall in antibody titer. This study indicates that rabbits protected by digoxin-specific antibodies suffer no acute adverse effects from an amount of digoxin which is uniformly lethal in nonimmunized rabbits and in rabbits immunized with other antigens. Images PMID:5547280

  6. Lead shot toxicity to passerines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity of a single size 7.5 lead shot to passerines. No mortalities or signs of plumbism were observed in dosed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) fed a commercial diet, but when given a more natural diet, three of 10 dosed birds died within 1 day. For all survivors from which shot were recovered, all but one excreted the shot within 24 h of dosing, whereas, the dead birds retained their shot. Shot erosion was significantly greater (P < 0.05) when weathered shot were ingested compared to new shot, and the greatest erosion was observed in those birds that died (2.2-9.7%). Blood lead concentrations of birds dosed with new shot were not significantly different (P=0.14) from those of birds exposed to weathered shot. Liver lead concentrations of birds that died ranged from 71 to 137 ppm, dry weight. Despite the short amount of time the shot was retained, songbirds may absorb sufficient lead to compromise their survival.

  7. Prevention of Childhood Lead Toxicity.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Blood lead concentrations have decreased dramatically in US children over the past 4 decades, but too many children still live in housing with deteriorated lead-based paint and are at risk for lead exposure with resulting lead-associated cognitive impairment and behavioral problems. Evidence continues to accrue that commonly encountered blood lead concentrations, even those below 5 µg/dL (50 ppb), impair cognition; there is no identified threshold or safe level of lead in blood. From 2007 to 2010, approximately 2.6% of preschool children in the United States had a blood lead concentration ≥5 µg/dL (≥50 ppb), which represents about 535 000 US children 1 to 5 years of age. Evidence-based guidance is available for managing increased lead exposure in children, and reducing sources of lead in the environment, including lead in housing, soil, water, and consumer products, has been shown to be cost-beneficial. Primary prevention should be the focus of policy on childhood lead toxicity. PMID:27325637

  8. Styrene toxicity: an ecotoxicological assessment.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, B F; Mulligan, C N

    1997-12-01

    Although other aromatic compounds (e.g., benzene, toluene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), etc.) have been thoroughly studied over the years, styrene has been given little attention probably due to its lower rate of industrial use. In addition, it is less toxic than benzene and PAH, proven carcinogens. However, it is classified as a mutagen and thus potentially carcinogenic. Its main use is in the production of the polymer polystyrene and in the production of plastics, rubber, resins, and insulators. Entry into the environment is mainly through industrial and municipal discharges. In this review, the toxicological effects of styrene on humans, animals, and plants are discussed. Its mode of entry and methods of monitoring its presence are examined. Although its effects on humans and aquatic life have been studied, the data on short- or long-term exposures to plants, birds, and land animals are insufficient to be conclusive. Since exposure to workers can result in memory loss, difficulties in concentration and learning, brain and liver damage, and cancer, development of accurate methods to monitor its exposure is essential. In addition, the review outlines the present state of styrene in the environment and suggests ways to deal with its presence. It might appear that the quantities are not sufficient to harm humans, but more data are necessary to evaluate its effect, especially on workers who are regularly exposed to it. PMID:9469867

  9. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  10. Oxygen toxicity during artificial ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Brewis, R. A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Repeated pulmonary collapse and changes suggestive of a severe alveolar-capillary diffusion defect were observed over a period of 20 days in a patient who was receiving artificial ventilation because of status epilepticus. Profound cyanosis followed attempts to discontinue assisted ventilation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator employed was found to be delivering approximately 90% oxygen on the air-mix setting and pulmonary oxygen toxicity was suspected. Radiological improvement and progressive resolution of the alveolar-capillary block followed gradual reduction of the inspired concentration over nine days. The management and prevention of this complication are discussed. The inspired oxygen concentration should be routinely monitored in patients receiving intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and the concentration should not be higher than that required to maintain adequate oxygenation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator has an inherent tendency to develop high oxygen concentrations on the air-mix setting, and the machine should therefore be driven from a compressed air source unless high concentrations of oxygen are essential. Images PMID:4900444

  11. Toxic congener-specific analysis of PCBs: assessment of toxicity in equivalents of TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Olafsson, P.G.; Bryan, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution capillary gas chromatographic analysis of the polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) present in snapping turtle eggs, provided quantitative data on selected toxic congeners. The concentrations of these congeners have been converted into equivalent toxic concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD). The toxic equivalent factors (TEFs), necessary to effect this transformation were derived from EC/sub 50/ values (half the concentration of the toxic congener required to produce the maximum effect) for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) induction associated with the corresponding toxic PCB congener or isomer. Summation of the resulting toxic equivalents provided a composite assessment of the toxicity of the PCB mixture in terms of an equivalent concentration of TCDD.

  12. Predicting the toxicity of metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Balistrieri, Laurie S; Mebane, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of single and multiple metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) solutions to trout is predicted using an approach that combines calculations of: (1) solution speciation; (2) competition and accumulation of cations (H, Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) on low abundance, high affinity and high abundance, low affinity biotic ligand sites; (3) a toxicity function that accounts for accumulation and potency of individual toxicants; and (4) biological response. The approach is evaluated by examining water composition from single metal toxicity tests of trout at 50% mortality, results of theoretical calculations of metal accumulation on fish gills and associated mortality for single, binary, ternary, and quaternary metal solutions, and predictions for a field site impacted by acid rock drainage. These evaluations indicate that toxicity of metal mixtures depends on the relative affinity and potency of toxicants for a given aquatic organism, suites of metals in the mixture, dissolved metal concentrations and ratios, and background solution composition (temperature, pH, and concentrations of major ions and dissolved organic carbon). A composite function that incorporates solution composition, affinity and competition of cations for two types of biotic ligand sites, and potencies of hydrogen and individual metals is proposed as a tool to evaluate potential toxicity of environmental solutions to trout. PMID:23973545

  13. Paraquat: model for oxidant-initiated toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bus, J.S.; Gibson, J.E.

    1984-04-01

    Paraquat, a quaternary ammonium bipyridyl herbicide, produces degenerative lesions in the lung after systemic administration to man and animals. The pulmonary toxicity of paraquat resembles in several ways the toxicity of several other lung toxins, including oxygen, nitrofurantoin and bleomycin. Although a definitive mechanism of toxicity of parquat has not been delineated, a cyclic single electron reduction/oxidation of the parent molecule is a critical mechanistic event. The redox cycling of paraquat has two potentially important consequences relevant to the development of toxicity: generation of activated oxygen (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen perioxide, hydroxyl radical) which is highly reactive to cellular macromolecules; and/or oxidation of reducing equivalents (e.g., NADPH, reduced glutathione) necessary for normal cell function. Paraquat-induced pulmonary toxicity, therefore, is a potentially useful model for evaluation of oxidant mechanisms of toxicity. Furthermore, characterization of the consequences of intracellular redox cycling of xenobiotics will no doubt provide basic information regarding the role of this phenomena in the development of chemical toxicity. 105 references, 2 figures.

  14. Incidence of digoxin toxicity in outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, J F; Robbins, L J; Hammermeister, K E; Roth, S C; Hammond, W S

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of digoxin toxicity among patients in hospitals has declined in recent years. To evaluate whether a similar decline has occurred in ambulatory care, we reviewed randomly selected medical records for 183 outpatients receiving ongoing treatment with digoxin at 10 urban and rural Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the Rocky Mountain region. The prevalence of traditional risk factors for digoxin toxicity--elevated serum digoxin and serum creatinine levels, hypokalemia, and a new prescription of an interacting drug-was established from computerized laboratory and pharmacy records. Of the 183 patients, 50 (27.3%) had one or more risk factors for digoxin toxicity: serum digoxin levels were elevated in 13.6% of patients in whom a level was obtained, with hypokalemia in 14.3%, elevated creatinine levels in 17.9%, and possible drug interactions in 5.5% of patients over a 1-year period. Nevertheless, digoxin toxicity occurred in only 2 persons (1.1% or 1.4 per 100 patient-years of treatment). We conclude that digoxin toxicity was rare in this group of outpatients, even in persons presumed to be at high risk because of metabolic abnormalities, increased digoxin concentrations, or the use of interacting drugs. The low rate of digoxin toxicity in outpatients parallels the decline in the incidence of toxicity observed in hospital-based studies. PMID:7810124

  15. Toxic material advisory report - 2-mercaptoethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholc, N. M.; White, O. Jr.; Baloyi, R. S.; Silverstein, B. D.

    1983-03-01

    A review of the animal toxicity data for 2-ME is presented. The results revealed that chronic inhalation exposures at a concentration of 6 mg/m/sup 3/ produced decreased oxygen consumption, lymphopenia, and neutrophilia. Comparison of acute toxicity data for 2-ME with data of structurally similar compounds suggests that 2-ME may be 2.3 times more toxic than butanethiol (TLV = 0.5 ppM), 6.5 times more toxic than ethanethiol, and 6 times more toxic than propanethiol (TLV = 0.5 ppM) via oral administration but may be comparable to propanethiol and less toxic than butanethiol and ethanethiol by the inhalation route of exposure. The TLVs for ethanethiol, methanethiol, and butanethiol were based on discomfort to human volunteers rather than toxicity. Since 2-ME has many effects similar to those of the thiols discussed and its odor threshold falls in the range of other thiols, by analogy the exposure limit for 2-ME should be comparable to the TLVs for butanethiol and ethanethiol. An interim exposure limit (IEL) of 0.5 ppM for a time-weighted average concentration during an 8-hour work shift is recommended. As with other thiols, a nuisance problem due to 2-ME odors and complaints of odor may serve as a primary reason for controlling workplace concentrations.

  16. Toxicity of common ions to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A.; DuFresne, D.L.; Evans, J.

    1995-12-31

    Produced waters from oil and gas drilling operations are typically very saline, and these may cause acute toxicity to marine organisms due to osmotic imbalances as well as to an excess or deficiency of specific common ions. In order to better understand the relationship between toxicity and ion concentration, laboratory toxicity tests were conducted using mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside (Menidia beryllina). For each species the ionic concentration of standard laboratory water was proportionally increased or decreased to produce test solutions with a range of salinities. Organisms were exposed for 48 hours. Individual ions (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnetsium, strontium, chloride, bromide, sulfate, bicarbonate, and borate) were also manipulated to examine individual ion toxicity. The three test species differ in their tolerance of salinity. Mysid shrimp show a marked decrease in survival at salinities less than approximately 5 ppt. Both fish species tolerated low salinity water, however, silversides were less tolerant of saline waters (salinity greater than 40 ppt). There were also significant differences in the responses of the organisms to different ions. The results show that the salinity of the test solution may play an important role in the responses of the organisms to the produced water effluent. Predictable toxicity/ion relationships developed in this study can be used to estimate whether toxicity in a produced water is a result of common ions, salinity, or some other unknown toxicant.

  17. Measuring chronic toxicity using luminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, H.; Bulich, A.

    1994-12-31

    Bioassays using luminescent bacteria are routinely used to assess the acute toxicity of environmental samples. Two physiological characteristics of these test organisms, a short division cycle and the inducible luciferase pathway, provide functional attributes for measuring chronic toxicity. Freeze-dried luminescent bacteria, following inoculation into appropriate growth medium, initiate a series of reproductive cycles while inducing a complex series of metabolic pathways resulting in production of bioluminescence. Toxic chemicals or samples which inhibit any aspect of this reproductive cycle or induction of light production are detected in low concentrations. The development of this bioassay is based upon a detailed understanding of the growth requirements and biochemistry of this organism and the genetics of luciferase induction. A defined growth medium was developed which supports the necessary cell growth and luciferase induction, yet which does not mask the presence of toxic substances. To perform the assay, the test organisms are inoculated into a series of cuvettes containing growth medium and dilutions of the sample. After 18 hrs incubation at 27 C, control cuvettes show high light levels while sample dilutions containing toxic materials show decreasing light levels. Details of the test protocol and reproducibility are presented. Sensitivity data from this chronic toxicity test are summarized and compared with the Microtox{reg_sign} acute test and the Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity test method. This test method is about 20 times more sensitive than Microtox and exhibits sensitivity similar to C. dubia for tested metals and organic compounds.

  18. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects. PMID:16193763

  19. T3DB: the toxic exposome database

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David; Arndt, David; Pon, Allison; Sajed, Tanvir; Guo, An Chi; Djoumbou, Yannick; Knox, Craig; Wilson, Michael; Liang, Yongjie; Grant, Jason; Liu, Yifeng; Goldansaz, Seyed Ali; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    The exposome is defined as the totality of all human environmental exposures from conception to death. It is often regarded as the complement to the genome, with the interaction between the exposome and the genome ultimately determining one's phenotype. The ‘toxic exposome’ is the complete collection of chronically or acutely toxic compounds to which humans can be exposed. Considerable interest in defining the toxic exposome has been spurred on by the realization that most human injuries, deaths and diseases are directly or indirectly caused by toxic substances found in the air, water, food, home or workplace. The Toxin-Toxin-Target Database (T3DB - www.t3db.ca) is a resource that was specifically designed to capture information about the toxic exposome. Originally released in 2010, the first version of T3DB contained data on nearly 2900 common toxic substances along with detailed information on their chemical properties, descriptions, targets, toxic effects, toxicity thresholds, sequences (for both targets and toxins), mechanisms and references. To more closely align itself with the needs of epidemiologists, toxicologists and exposome scientists, the latest release of T3DB has been substantially upgraded to include many more compounds (>3600), targets (>2000) and gene expression datasets (>15 000 genes). It now includes extensive data on ‘normal’ toxic compound concentrations in human biofluids as well as detailed chemical taxonomies, informative chemical ontologies and a large number of referential NMR, MS/MS and GC-MS spectra. This manuscript describes the most recent update to the T3DB, which was previously featured in the 2010 NAR Database Issue. PMID:25378312

  20. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/temperature/humidity (FIFH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the Kennedy

  1. Toxicity of Oxidatively Degraded Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Wiecinski, Paige N.; Metz, Kevin M.; King Heiden, Tisha C.; Louis, Kacie M.; Mangham, Andrew N.; Hamers, Robert J.; Heideman, Warren; Peterson, Richard E.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2014-01-01

    Once released into the environment, engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) are subjected to processes that may alter their physical or chemical properties, potentially altering their toxicity vis-à-vis the as-synthesized materials. We examined the toxicity to zebrafish embryos of CdSecore/ZnSshell quantum dots (QDs) before and after exposure to an in vitro chemical model designed to simulate oxidative weathering in soil environments based on a reductant-driven Fenton’s reaction. Exposure to these oxidative conditions resulted in severe degradation of the QDs: the Zn shell eroded, Cd2+ and selenium were released, and amorphous Se-containing aggregates were formed. Weathered QDs exhibited higher potency than did as-synthesized QDs. Morphological endpoints of toxicity included pericardial, ocular and yolk sac edema, non-depleted yolk, spinal curvature, tail malformations, and craniofacial malformations. To better understand the selenium-like toxicity observed in QD exposures, we examined the toxicity of selenite, selenate and amorphous selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). Selenite exposures resulted in high mortality to embryos/larvae while selenate and SeNPs were non-toxic. Co-exposures to SeNPs + CdCl2 resulted in dramatic increase in mortality and recapitulated the morphological endpoints of toxicity observed with weathered QD exposures. Cadmium body burden was increased in larvae exposed to weathered QDs or SeNP + CdCl2 suggesting the increased potency of weathered QDs was due to selenium modulation of cadmium toxicity. Our findings highlight the need to examine the toxicity of eNPs after they have undergone environmental weathering processes. PMID:23815598

  2. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/ temperature / humidity (FTH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the

  3. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    DOEpatents

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Levin, Bruce L.; Leonard, Jonathan

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  4. RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

  5. APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

  6. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CL SENIOR; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; I OLMEZ; J LIGHTY; JOL WENDT; JOSEPH J HELBLE; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1998-12-08

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, the Lignite Research Council, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO combustion systems, and new power generation x plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1998 through 30 September 1998. During this period distribution of all three Phase II coals was completed. Standard analyses for the whole coal samples were also completed. Mössbauer analysis of all project coals and fractions received to date has been completed in order to obtain details of the iron mineralogy. The analyses of arsenic XAFS data for two of the project coals and for some high arsenic coals have been completed. Duplicate splits of the Ohio 5,6,7 and North Dakota lignite samples were taken through all four steps of the selective leaching procedure. Leaching analysis of the Wyodak coal has recently commenced. Preparation of polished coal/epoxy pellets for probe/SEM studies is underway. Some exploratory mercury LIII XAFS work was carried

  7. Cardiovascular Toxicities from Systemic Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuang; Wong, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is unfortunately a potential short- or long-term sequela of breast cancer therapy. Both conventional chemotherapeutic agents such as anthracyclines and newer targeted agents such as trastuzumab can cause varying degrees of cardiac dysfunction. Type I cardiac toxicity is dose-dependent and irreversible, whereas Type II is not dose-dependent and is generally reversible with cessation of the drug. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the cardiovascular effects of systemic breast cancer treatments, with a focus on the putative mechanisms of toxicity, the role of biomarkers, and potential methods of preventing and minimizing cardiovascular complications. PMID:25538891

  8. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of toxicity of engineered nanoparticles to representatives of various trophic levels, including bacteria, plants, and multicellular aquatic/terrestrial organisms, to highlight important challenges within the field of econanotoxicity, challenges that analytical chemists are expertly poised to address. PMID:23427995

  9. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  10. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. F.; Cohen, J. J.; McKone, T. E.

    1980-06-01

    Work in the area of hazard indices was reviewed. A geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground is presented. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking water levels; a persistence factor to chracterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  11. [An acute toxicity study of bromantane].

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, L I; Verovskiĭ, V E; Iezhitsa, I N; Spasov, A A

    2000-01-01

    The toxicity of bromantan was evaluated by conventional acute tests (according to Belen'kiĭ) and by the behavioral activity data (according to Irvin). A method of integral graphical representation of the behavioral activity data is suggested, according to which the results are plotted as a "dose trajectory." Using the dose trajectory constructed for bromantan, the levels of therapeutic, toxic, and lethal doses were calculated. It was established that catecholaminergic effects account for the mechanism of therapeutic action of bromantan, while cholinergic effects determine the drug action in toxic doses. PMID:10763112

  12. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure. PMID:23569765

  13. Parkinson's Disease: Is It a Toxic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Gad ELhak, Seham A.; Ghanem, Abdel Aziz A.; AbdelGhaffar, Hassan; El Dakroury, Sahar; Salama, Mohamed M.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the neurodegenerative diseases which we can by certainty identify its pathology, however, this confidence disappeares when talking about the cause. A long history of trials, suggestions, and theories tried linking PD to a specific causation. In this paper, a new suggestion is trying to find its way, could it be toxicology? Can we—in the future—look to PD as an occupational disease, in fact, many clues point to the possible toxic responsibility—either total or partial—in causing this disease. Searching for possible toxic causes for PD would help in designing perfect toxic models in animals. PMID:21152209

  14. Toxicity of amphetamines: an update.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Márcia; Carmo, Helena; Costa, Vera Marisa; Capela, João Paulo; Pontes, Helena; Remião, Fernando; Carvalho, Félix; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes

    2012-08-01

    Amphetamines represent a class of psychotropic compounds, widely abused for their stimulant, euphoric, anorectic, and, in some cases, emphathogenic, entactogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. These compounds derive from the β-phenylethylamine core structure and are kinetically and dynamically characterized by easily crossing the blood-brain barrier, to resist brain biotransformation and to release monoamine neurotransmitters from nerve endings. Although amphetamines are widely acknowledged as synthetic drugs, of which amphetamine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) are well-known examples, humans have used natural amphetamines for several millenniums, through the consumption of amphetamines produced in plants, namely cathinone (khat), obtained from the plant Catha edulis and ephedrine, obtained from various plants in the genus Ephedra. More recently, a wave of new amphetamines has emerged in the market, mainly constituted of cathinone derivatives, including mephedrone, methylone, methedrone, and buthylone, among others. Although intoxications by amphetamines continue to be common causes of emergency department and hospital admissions, it is frequent to find the sophism that amphetamine derivatives, namely those appearing more recently, are relatively safe. However, human intoxications by these drugs are increasingly being reported, with similar patterns compared to those previously seen with classical amphetamines. That is not surprising, considering the similar structures and mechanisms of action among the different amphetamines, conferring similar toxicokinetic and toxicological profiles to these compounds. The aim of the present review is to give an insight into the pharmacokinetics, general mechanisms of biological and toxicological actions, and the main target organs for the toxicity of amphetamines. Although there is still scarce knowledge from novel amphetamines to draw mechanistic insights, the long-studied classical

  15. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  16. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  17. Application of toxicity identification evaluation procedure to toxic industrial effluent in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ra, Jin-Sung; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Lee, Sun-Hong; Kim, Sang Don

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was applied to the effluent from a pharmaceutical industrial complex, following the US EPA TIE guidelines. The whole effluent toxicity (WET) test found toxicity greater than 16toxic units (TU) in the effluent. Dissolved non-polar organic compounds were identified as the major contributor to the observed toxicity in the TIE manipulations in phases I and II. Among the 48 organic compounds identified, three compounds (i.e., acetophenone, benzoimide, and benzothiazole) were related to the pharmaceutical production procedure; however, no contribution to toxicity was predicted in the compounds. The results of the ECOSAR model, which predicts toxicity, indicated that the alkane compounds caused significant toxicity in the effluent. The toxicity test and heavy metal analysis, which used IC and ICP/MS, identified that particulate and heavy metals, such as Cu and Zn, contributed to the remaining toxicity, except dissolved organics. The results showed the applicability of the TIE method for predicting regional effluents produced by the industrial pharmaceutical complex in this study. Although the location was assumed to be affected by discharge of pharmaceutical related compounds in the river, no correlations were observed in the study. Based on the results, advanced treatment processes, such as activated carbon adsorption, are recommended for the wastewater treatment process in this location. PMID:25997865

  18. USE OF TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE IDENTIFY, AND CONFIRM HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM TOXICITY IN AN INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was conducted on effluent from a major industrial discharger. Initial monitoring showed slight chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia; later sample showed substantial toxicity to C. dubia. Chemical analysis detected hexavalent chromium ...

  19. Quantitative Predictive Models for Systemic Toxicity (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models to identify systemic and specific target organ toxicity were developed to help transition the field of toxicology towards computational models. By leveraging multiple data sources to incorporate read-across and machine learning approaches, a quantitative model of systemic ...

  20. REGULATORY APPLICATIONS OF POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the use of porewater toxicity tests in regulatory applications, including their potential use in the development of sediment quality guideline (SQG) values. Specifically, the following discussion focuses on the appropriateness and readin...

  1. CHATTANOOGA AIR TOXICS (CATS) MONITORING RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (CHCAPCB), the United States Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 (Region 4), and other stakeholders, in a cooperative effort, conducted an air toxics study in the Chattanooga area (city population approximately 285...

  2. [Arsine: an unknown industrial chemical toxic].

    PubMed

    Plantamura, J; Dorandeu, F; Burnat, P; Renard, C

    2011-07-01

    Arsines family includes many compounds with various toxicities. Arsenic trihydride or arsine is the most toxic form of arsenic. Powerful haemolytic gas, it has never been used as a chemical weapon because its toxicity is not immediate and it is non persistent. However, cases of industrial poisoning with arsine are still identified in spite of a strict regulation at work. It is also identified as a potential toxic of chemical terrorism. This agent, of which the mechanism of action is still not well defined, is badly recognized because of intoxications rarity. However, fast detection means are available. Health professionals and especially those who are involved in piratox plan need to learn to recognize arsine intoxication (hematuria, oliguria, haemolytic anemia) in order to provide early, specific treatment and avoid damages. PMID:21840437

  3. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  4. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mandate Congressional Testimony Board of Scientific Counselors Regional Offices Program Overview ATSDR en Español A-Z Index Multimedia Tools Special Initiatives Publications Sites Toxic Substances Health Registries ...

  5. PPAR involvement in PFAA developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are found in the environment and in serum of wildlife and humans. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are developmentally toxic in rodents. The effects of in utero exposure include increas...

  6. Poultry litter toxicity comparison from various bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Kelly, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Poultry litter contains many toxic chemicals including Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Se and PCBs. Poultry litter leachate has been shown to be more toxic to marine luminescent organisms (Photobacterium phosphoreum) than other farm animal manures. A comparison of toxicity of the poultry litter leachate was undertaken using various bioassays. The EC{sub 50} (or LC{sub 50}) value for the leachate with the Microtox and Daphnia bioassays was 2.9 g/L/ Nitrobacter and Pseudomonas bioassays were not useful in determining the leachate toxicity because of the nutritional properties of the litter. Poultry litter leachate was found to be mutagenic to strains TA 97, TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102 using the Ames Test.

  7. E-Cigarettes Emit Toxic Vapors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160107.html E-Cigarettes Emit Toxic Vapors: Study Levels depend on ... findings could be important to both makers of e-cigarettes and regulators who want to reduce the ...

  8. TOXIC ORGANIC VOLATILIZATION FROM LAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodology was evaluated for estimating volatilization of toxic organic chemicals from unsaturated soils. Projections were compared with laboratory data for simulated rapid infiltration wastewater treatment systems receiving primary municipal wastewater spiked with a suite of 18...

  9. Mitochondria as a Target of Environmental Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Joel N.

    2013-01-01

    Enormous strides have recently been made in our understanding of the biology and pathobiology of mitochondria. Many diseases have been identified as caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and many pharmaceuticals have been identified as previously unrecognized mitochondrial toxicants. A much smaller but growing literature indicates that mitochondria are also targeted by environmental pollutants. We briefly review the importance of mitochondrial function and maintenance for health based on the genetics of mitochondrial diseases and the toxicities resulting from pharmaceutical exposure. We then discuss how the principles of mitochondrial vulnerability illustrated by those fields might apply to environmental contaminants, with particular attention to factors that may modulate vulnerability including genetic differences, epigenetic interactions, tissue characteristics, and developmental stage. Finally, we review the literature related to environmental mitochondrial toxicants, with a particular focus on those toxicants that target mitochondrial DNA. We conclude that the fields of environmental toxicology and environmental health should focus more strongly on mitochondria. PMID:23629515

  10. Thermoregulation and its influence on toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Spencer, Pamela J; Hotchkiss, Jon; Miller, Diane B; Hinderliter, Paul M; Pauluhn, Juergen

    2008-02-28

    The thermoregulatory system of laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of chemical toxicants. Because temperature directly affects the reaction of virtually all biological processes, it is critical to consider how changes in the thermoregulatory response to a toxicant may affect physiological, behavioral, and pathological endpoints. Researchers in industry and government laboratories are often faced with addressing how changes in body temperature of their experimental subjects may affect the outcome of a particular toxicity test and/or screening panel. However, many toxicologists are either unaware of the importance or ignore the potential impact of a toxic-induced change in body temperature. This paper endeavors to summarize the importance of thermoregulation in the study of toxicology and propose recommendations for thermometry that researchers may utilize in their toxicological studies. PMID:18096291

  11. PHOXOCEPHALID AMPHIPOD BIOASSAY FOR MARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative toxicity of marine sediment can be accurately determined through acute, static bioassays with the phoxocepalid amphipod Repoxynius abronius. Mortality and sublethal effects on emergence from sediment and reburial behavior are determined after ten day exposure in 1-L ...

  12. Unknown toxic exposures. Arts and crafts materials.

    PubMed

    Grabo, T N

    1997-03-01

    1. Arts and crafts material containing toxic chemicals have been found to be hazardous to human health. 2. Artists/craftspersons, who also may be employed in industry, often are unaware or not adequately informed about the toxic nature of many art products. 3. The occupational health nurse is in a critical position to identify and monitor the worker exposed to toxic chemicals both in the workplace and at home/art studio. 4. Education about hazardous substances can prevent illness or injury. With expertise in public health, occupational health nurses are in a key position to provide community education about the dangers of toxic art materials to the general public and the health care community. PMID:9146113

  13. Toxic Metabolite Produced by Aspergillus wentii

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. T.; Ayres, J. C.; Koehler, P. E.; Chassis, G.

    1974-01-01

    Mycelial extracts of an Aspergillus wentii strain grown on yeast-extract sucrose medium and initially isolated from country-cured ham were highly toxic when inoculated into chicken embryos or fed to mice. Moldy corn and rice were less toxic when fed to mice. Water extracts of moldy corn or rice or culture filtrates from yeast-extract sucrose medium were not toxic. Purification by thin-layer chromatography followed by crystallization yielded orange-red crystals that showed high toxicity and had a melting point of 285 to 286 C. Chloroform solutions of the crystals had absorption maxima at 270, 295, and 452 nm. The smallest amount of this component necessary to have zero hatchability of fertile eggs was 50 μg/egg. PMID:4823420

  14. Developmental Toxicity Assays Using the Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Matthew D.; Montgomery, Sara L.; Prince, Lisa; Vorojeikina, Daria

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) has long been a premier model for developmental biologists and geneticists. The utility of Drosophila for toxicology studies has only recently gained broader recognition as a tool to elaborate molecular genetic mechanisms of toxic substances. In this article two practical applications of Drosophila for developmental toxicity assays are described. The first assay takes advantage of newly developed methods to render the fly embryo accessible to small molecules, toxicants and drugs. The second assay engages straightforward exposures to developing larvae and easy to score outcomes of adult development. With the extensive collections of flies that are publicly available and the ease with which to create transgenic flies, these two assays have a unique power for identifying and characterizing molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways specific to the mode of action of a number of toxicants and drugs. PMID:24789363

  15. NEUROBEHAVIORAL CONSEQUENCES OF POSTNATAL EXPOSURE TO TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Behavioral teratology is the study of the functional consequences of exposure to toxicants during the period of nervous system development. These agents include therapeutic drugs, food additives, hormones, alcohol, drugs of abuse, heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, and x-irradia...

  16. THERMOREGULATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Christopher J.; Spencer, Pamela J.; Hotchkiss, Jon; Miller, Diane B.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Pauluhn, Jeurgen

    2008-02-28

    The thermoregulatory system of laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of chemical toxicants. Because temperature directly affects the reaction of virtually all biological processes, it is critical to consider how changes in the thermoregulatory response to a toxicant may affect physiological, behavioral, and pathological endpoints. Researchers in industry and government laboratories are often faced with addressing how changes in body temperature of their experimental subjects may affect the outcome of a particular toxicity test and/or screening panel. However, many toxicologists are either unaware of the importance or ignore the potential impact of a toxic-induced change in body temperature. This paper endeavors to summarize the importance of thermoregulation in the study of toxicology and propose recommendations for thermometry that researchers may utilize in their toxicological studies.

  17. A WET TALE: TOXICITY OF COMPLEX EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This course covers standards, regulations, policy, guidance and technical aspects of implementing the whole effluent toxicity program. The curriculum incorporates rationale and information on WET test requirements from USEPA documents, such as the Technical Support Document for W...

  18. Lindane toxicity to one year old calves

    SciTech Connect

    Venant, A.; Borrel, S.; Mallet, J. ); Sery, C. )

    1991-05-01

    Lindane (the gamma isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6 hexachlorocyclohexane) is still recommended and used as seed treatment and for control of pests especially against lice and ticks on sheep and cattle (but not on dairy cattle and laying hens). Unlike others organochlorine pesticides, lindane does not persist in the environment or in living animals. Multitest data have established that is not a highly toxic pesticide. About domestic animals toxicity, no exact data is available and LD50 is not exactly known. Values obtained after an accidental intoxication allow the authors to have some data on toxicity levels and on toxic origin symptoms. During the last year, one case of intoxication of calves was investigated on 30 calves (sprayed against ectoparasite with lindane) in which 5 died. Results are reported in the present work.

  19. Acute aquatic toxicity of alkyl phenol ethoxylates

    SciTech Connect

    Schueuermann G2 )

    1991-04-01

    The recently derived log Kow (octanol/water partition coefficient in logarithmic form) increment for a nonterminal oxyethylene unit was used to calculate a quantitative structure-activity relationships for literature data on the acute crustacean toxicity of polyoxyethylene surfactants. The resulting log Kow regression parameters are between the corresponding values for nonpolar and polar narcosis, which supports an interpretation of the surfactants' aquatic toxicity on the basis of another distinct mode of action. Furthermore, a comparison with calculated water solubility data indicates that for log Kow greater than 5 an aquatic toxicity decrease due to a solubility limit is expected, which gets support from two other sets on toxicity data of nonyl phenol polyethoxylates.

  20. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.