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Sample records for 6-hydroxydopamine 6-ohda-lesioned rats

  1. Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also investigate whether 130-Hz subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) affects blink abnormalities, as it does in PD patients. Like PD patients, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit reflex blink hyperexcitability, impaired blink plasticity, and a reduced spontaneous blink rate. At 130 Hz, but not 16 Hz, STN DBS eliminates reflex blink hyperexcitability and restores both short- and long-term blink plasticity. Replicating its lack of effect in PD patients, 130-Hz STN DBS does not reinstate a normal temporal pattern or rate to spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These data show that the 6-OHDA lesioned rat is an ideal model system for investigating the neural bases of reflex abnormalities in PD and highlight the complexity of PD's effects on motor control, by showing that dopamine depletion does not affect all blink systems via the same neural mechanisms. PMID:25673748

  2. Walking pattern analysis after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion and transplantation of foetal dopaminergic progenitor cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Alexander; Wessolleck, Johanna; Papazoglou, Anna; Metz, Gerlinde A; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-05-16

    Functional sensorimotor recovery after transplantation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons has been well documented in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson's disease. However, the functional restoration of more specific gait-related patterns such as skilled walking, balance, and individual limb movements have been insufficiently studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioural effects of intrastriatal DA grafts on different aspects of normal and skilled walking in rats following unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. Rats were subjected to drug-induced rotation, detailed footprint analysis, and assessment of skilled walking in the ladder rung walking test prior and after the transplantation of E14 ventral mesencephalon-derived progenitor cells. Good DAergic graft survival, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, was accompanied by a compensation of drug-induced rotational asymmetries. Interestingly, the analysis of walking patterns displayed a heterogeneous graft-induced response in skilled and non-skilled limb use. Grafted animals made fewer errors with their contralateral limbs in skilled walking than the sham-transplanted rats, and they improved their ipsi- and contralateral limb rotation. However, the parameter distance between feet showed a delayed recovery, and the stride length was not affected by the DA grafts at all. These findings indicate that ectopic intrastriatal transplantation of E14 ventral mesencephalon-derived cells promotes recovery of gait balance and stability, but does not ameliorate the shuffling gait pattern associated with 6-OHDA lesions. A full restoration of locomotor gait pattern might require a more complete and organotypic reconstruction of the mesotelencephalic DAergic pathway. PMID:19124044

  3. Nitrosative and cognitive effects of chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA lesion.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-García, G; Palafox-Sánchez, V; Limón, I D

    2015-04-01

    Besides motor disturbances, other symptoms found in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) are deficits in both learning and memory. The nigro-striatal-cortical pathway is affected in this pathology, with this neuronal circuit involved in cognitive processes such as spatial working memory (SWM). However, cognitive dysfunction appears even when the patients are receiving L-DOPA treatment. There is evidence that the dopamine metabolism formed by L-DOPA generates free radicals such as nitric oxide, which may cause damage through the nitrosative stress (NS). The aim of this study was to evaluate both the effects of chronic L-DOPA administration on SWM and the production of NS in rats using an intra-nigral lesion caused by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Post-lesion, the animals were administered orally with L-DOPA/Carbidopa (100-mg/kg) for 20 days. An SWM task in a Morris water maze was conducted post-treatment. Nitrite levels and immunoreactivity of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) were evaluated in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the dorsal striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. Our results show that chronic L-DOPA administration in rats with intra-nigral 6-OHDA-lesion caused significant increases in SWM deficit, nitrite levels and the immunoreactivity of 3-NT, iNOS and GFAP in the nigro-striatal-cortical pathway. These facts suggest that as L-DOPA can induce NS in rats with dopaminergic intra-nigral lesion, it could play a key role in the impairment of the SWM, and thus can be considered as a toxic mechanism that induces cognitive deficit in PD patients. PMID:25644418

  4. High frequency stimulation of the STN restored the abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and the globus pallidus of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Jue-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-05-19

    Many studies showed that abnormal oscillations in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to the well-studied beta synchronization, high-voltage spindles (HVSs), another type of abnormal oscillation observed in PD, are neglected. To explore the role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in HVSs regulation, we simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in the globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in the primary motor cortex(M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats before, during, and after STN-DBS. Consistent with our previous study, HVSs occurrence, duration, and relative power and coherence between the M1 cortex and GP increased in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We found that high but not low frequency stimulation restored the abnormal HVSs activity and motor deficit. These results suggest that the STN is involved in the abnormal oscillation between the M1 cortex and GP.

  5. RGS4 is involved in the generation of abnormal involuntary movements in the unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wai Kin D; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure; Bezard, Erwan; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2014-10-01

    Regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS) proteins are implicated in striatal G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) sensitisation in the pathophysiology of l-DOPA-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), also known as dyskinesia (LID), in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated RGS protein subtype 4 in the expression of AIMs in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID. The effects of RGS4 antisense brain infusion on the behavioural and molecular correlates of l-DOPA priming in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were assessed. In situ hybridisation revealed that repeated l-DOPA/benserazide treatment caused an elevation of RGS4 mRNA levels in the striatum, predominantly in the lateral regions. The increased expression of RGS4 mRNA in the rostral striatum was found to positively correlate with the behavioural (AIM scores) and molecular (pre-proenkephalin B, PPE-B expression) markers of LID. We found that suppressing the elevation of RGS4 mRNA in the striatum by continuous infusion of RGS4 antisense oligonucleotides, via implanted osmotic mini-pumps, during l-DOPA priming, reduced the induction of AIMs. Moreover, ex vivo analyses of the rostral dorsolateral striatum showed that RGS4 antisense infusion attenuated l-DOPA-induced elevations of PPE-B mRNA and dopamine-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding, a marker used for measuring dopamine receptor super-sensitivity. Taken together, these data suggest that (i) RGS4 proteins play an important pathophysiological role in the development and expression of LID and (ii) suppressing the elevation of RGS4 mRNA levels in l-DOPA priming attenuates the associated pathological changes in LID, dampening its physiological expression. Thus, modulating RGS4 proteins could prove beneficial in the treatment of dyskinesia in PD.

  6. Measuring dopaminergic function in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat: a comparison of PET and microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background [18 F]fluorodopa (FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of levodopa (LDOPA) metabolism and is widely used to study Parkinson's disease. We examined how [18 F]FDOPA PET-derived kinetic parameters relate the dopamine (DA) and DA metabolite content of extracellular fluid measured by microdialysis to aid in the interpretation of data from both techniques. Methods [18 F]FDOPA PET imaging and microdialysis measurements were performed in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (n = 8) and normal control rats (n = 3). Microdialysis testing included baseline measurements and measurements following acute administration of LDOPA. PET imaging was also performed using [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), which is a ligand for the vesicular monoamine transporter marker and allowed assessment of denervation severity. Results The different methods provided highly correlated data. Lesioned rats had reduced DA metabolite concentrations ipsilateral to the lesion (p < 0.05 compared to controls), with the concentration being correlated with FDOPA's effective distribution volume ratio (EDVR; r = 0.86, p < 0.01) and DTBZ's binding potential (BPND; r = 0.89, p < 0.01). The DA metabolite concentration in the contralateral striatum of severely (>80%) lesioned rats was lower (p < 0.05) than that of less severely lesioned rats (<80%) and was correlated with the ipsilateral PET measures (r = 0.89, p < 0.01 for BPND) but not with the contralateral PET measures. EDVR and BPND in the contralateral striatum were not different from controls and were not correlated with the denervation severity. Conclusions The demonstrated strong correlations between the PET and microdialysis measures can aid in the interpretation of [18 F]FDOPA-derived kinetic parameters and help compare results from different studies. The contralateral striatum was affected by the lesioning and so cannot always serve as an unaffected control. PMID:24088510

  7. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist reduces L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Lu; Yang, Xinxin; Ma, Yaping; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) has been used as an effective drug for treating dopamine depletion-induced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long-term administration of L-DOPA produces motor complications. L-DOPA has also been found to modify the two key signaling cascades, protein kinase A/dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), in striatal neurons, which are thought to play a pivotal role in forming motor complications. In the present study, we tested the possible effect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist on L-DOPA-stimulated abnormal behavioral and signaling responses in vivo. Intermittent L-DOPA administration for 3 weeks induced motor fluctuation in a rat model of PD induced by intrastriatal infusion of dopamine-depleting neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A single injection of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 had no effect on L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation. However, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 significantly attenuated abnormal behavioral responses to L-DOPA in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Similarly, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 influence the L-DOPA-induced alteration of DARPP-32 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation status in striatal neurons. These data provide evidence for the active involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of L-DOPA action during PD therapy.

  8. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist reduces L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lu; Yang, Xinxin; Ma, Yaping; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) has been used as an effective drug for treating dopamine depletion-induced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, long-term administration of L-DOPA produces motor complications. L-DOPA has also been found to modify the two key signaling cascades, protein kinase A/dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), in striatal neurons, which are thought to play a pivotal role in forming motor complications. In the present study, we tested the possible effect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist on L-DOPA-stimulated abnormal behavioral and signaling responses in vivo. Intermittent L-DOPA administration for 3 weeks induced motor fluctuation in a rat model of PD induced by intrastriatal infusion of dopamine-depleting neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A single injection of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 had no effect on L-DOPA-induced motor fluctuation. However, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 significantly attenuated abnormal behavioral responses to L-DOPA in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Similarly, chronic injections of WIN-55,212-2 influence the L-DOPA-induced alteration of DARPP-32 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation status in striatal neurons. These data provide evidence for the active involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of L-DOPA action during PD therapy. PMID:25395834

  9. Alternative splicing of AMPA receptor subunits in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal corticostriatal plasticity is a key mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Antagonists at glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, such as IEM 1460, reduce induction and expression of dyskinesia in rat and non-human primate models of PD. AMPA receptor function is regulated by post-transcriptional splicing of subunit mRNA to produce flip and flop isoforms, which may therefore influence corticostriatal plasticity. The aim of this work was to evaluate alterations in alternative splicing of striatal AMPA receptor subunits in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID and PD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 12.5 μg 6-OHDA injections into the right medial forebrain bundle. In experiment 1, to assess acute dyskinesia, rats received L-DOPA/benserazide (6/15 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 21 days. In experiment 2, to assess dyskinesia priming, rats received vehicle, L-DOPA+vehicle or L-DOPA+IEM 1460 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) for 21 days. Animals were humanely killed 1h following final treatment in experiment 1, and 48 h following final treatment in experiment 2. Coronal sections of rostral striatum were processed for in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using oligonucleotide probes specific for the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits and their flip and flop isoforms. L-DOPA treatment increased GluR2-flip mRNA expression in the lesioned striatum of both groups; this was blocked by the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist IEM 1460. GluR1-flip expression was increased after 48 h drug washout but not in acute LID. There were no changes in expression of flop isoforms. Alternative splicing of AMPAR subunits contributes to abnormal striatal plasticity in the induction and expression of LID. Increases in GluR2-flip expression depend on activation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, which are a potential target of anti-dyskinetic therapies. PMID:23360800

  10. Dopaminergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells survive and integrate into 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jingli; Yang, Ming; Poremsky, Elizabeth; Kidd, Sarah; Schneider, Jay S; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-07-01

    Cell replacement therapy could be an important treatment strategy for Parkinson's disease (PD), which is caused by the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the midbrain (mDA). The success of this approach greatly relies on the discovery of an abundant source of cells capable of mDAergic function in the brain. With the paucity of available human fetal tissue, efforts have increasingly focused on renewable stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells offer great promise in this regard. If hiPS cells can be differentiated into authentic mDA neuron, hiPS could provide a potential autologous source of transplant tissue when generated from PD patients, a clear advantage over human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Here, we report that mDA neurons can be derived from a commercially available hiPS cell line, IMR90 clone 4, using a modified hES differentiation protocol established in our lab. These cells express all the markers (Lmx1a, Aldh1a1, TH, TrkB), follow the same mDA lineage pathway as H9 hES cells, and have similar expression levels of DA and DOPAC. Moreover, when hiPS mDA progenitor cells are transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned PD rats, they survive long term and many develop into bona fide mDA neurons. Despite their differentiation and integration into the brain, many Nestin+ tumor-like cells remain at the site of the graft. Our data suggest that as with hES cells, selecting the appropriate population of mDA lineage cells and eliminating actively dividing hiPS cells before transplantation will be critical for the future success of hiPS cell replacement therapy in PD patients.

  11. Decreased synaptic plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex underlies short-term memory deficits in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Ben, Juliana; Guaita, Gisele O; Pita, Inês R; Sequeira, Ana C; Pereira, Frederico C; Walz, Roger; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor dysfunction associated with dopaminergic degeneration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). However, motor symptoms in PD are often preceded by short-term memory deficits, which have been argued to involve deregulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We now used a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat PD model to explore if alterations of synaptic plasticity in DLS and mPFC underlie short-term memory impairments in PD prodrome. The bilateral injection of 6-OHDA (20μg/hemisphere) in the DLS caused a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (>80%) and decreased monoamine levels in the striatum and PFC, accompanied by motor deficits evaluated after 21 days in the open field and accelerated rotarod. A lower dose of 6-OHDA (10μg/hemisphere) only induced a partial degeneration (about 60%) of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with no gross motor impairments, thus mimicking an early premotor stage of PD. Notably, 6-OHDA (10μg)-lesioned rats displayed decreased monoamine levels in the PFC as well as short-term memory deficits evaluated in the novel object discrimination and in the modified Y-maze tasks; this was accompanied by a selective decrease in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in the mPFC, but not in DLS, without changes of synaptic transmission in either brain regions. These results indicate that the short-term memory dysfunction predating the motor alterations in the 6-OHDA model of PD is associated with selective changes of information processing in PFC circuits, typified by persistent changes of synaptic plasticity.

  12. Behavioral and biochemical correlates of the dyskinetic potential of dopaminergic agonists in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat.

    PubMed

    Carta, Anna R; Frau, Lucia; Lucia, Frau; Pinna, Annalisa; Annalisa, Pinna; Pontis, Silvia; Silvia, Pontis; Simola, Nicola; Nicola, Simola; Schintu, Nicoletta; Nicoletta, Schintu; Morelli, Micaela; Micaela, Morelli

    2008-07-01

    Prolonged treatment with L-DOPA induces highly disabling dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In contrast, dopaminergic agonists display variably dyskinetic outcome, depending on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile. The present study was aimed at assessing behavioral and biochemical correlates of intense or mild dyskinesia displayed by the different dopamine (DA) receptors stimulation in a rat model of PD. The effect of subchronic stimulation of the D(1) receptor by SKF38393, and the D(2)/D(3) receptor by ropinirole was evaluated in unilaterally 6-hydroxyDA-lesioned rats. Sensitization of contralateral turning (SCT) behavior and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) were assessed as behavioral correlates of dyskinetic responses. Opioid peptides mRNA in the dorsolateral striatum (dlStr) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) mRNA content in globus pallidus (GP), were evaluated as an index of neuroadaptive changes occurring in the direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways. Subchronic SKF38393 caused AIMs and SCT whereas ropinirole elicited SCT only, indicating that both drugs induced some dyskinetic response, albeit of different type. Peptides mRNA evaluation in dlStr, showed that SKF38393 subchronic treatment was associated to an overexpression of both dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (ENK) mRNAs, in the direct and indirect striatal pathway respectively. In contrast, a decrease in DYN mRNA levels only was observed after treatment with ropinirole. Analysis of GAD67 mRNA levels in the GP showed an increase after both D(1) and D(2)/D(3) agonist treatments. Results suggest that presence of SCT alone or SCT plus AIMs might represent correlates of the differential severity of dyskinetic movements induced by treatment with low (ropinirole) or high (SKF38393) dyskinetic potential. Neuroadaptive increases in opioid peptide expression in both direct and indirect striatal pathways were associated to the appearance of AIMs alone. In contrast, increase of GAD67 m

  13. Effect of WR-1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced catalepsy and IL-6 level in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play a key role in pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger WR-1065 on catalepsy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of interleukin 6(IL-6) and striatum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental model of PD. Materials and Methods: Seventy two male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups and 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat) was infused unilaterally into substantia nigra pars copmacta (SNc) to induce PD. Catalepsy was measured by standard bar test, CSF level of IL-6 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and SOD activity measured by spectrophotometric method. In pre-treatment groups WR-1065 (20, 40 and 80 μg/2 μl/rat/day, for 3 days) was infused into the SNc before 6-OHDA administration and 21 days later, as a recovery period, behavioral and molecular assay tests were done. Results: Our results showed that pre-treatment with WR-1065 improved (P<0.001) 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in a dose dependent manner. In 6-OHDA-lesioned animals SOD activity in SNc and CSF level of IL-6 was decreased markedly (P<0.001) when compared with non-lesioned group, while pre-treatment with WR-1065(P<0.001) restored their levels up to the normal range. Conclusion: Our study indicated that pre-treatment with WR-1065 could modulate catalepsy and IL-6 level in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Also WR1065 could increase SOD activity up to normal range. It can be regarded as an anti-oxidative drug in prevention or adjunctive therapy of PD. PMID:27403255

  14. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages.

  15. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Pseudoginsenoside-F11 on a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian Yu; Yang, Jing Yu; Wang, Fang; Fu, Shi Yuan; Hou, Yue; Jiang, Bo; Ma, Jie; Song, Cui; Wu, Chun Fu

    2013-01-01

    Pseudoginsenoside-F11 (PF11), a component of Panax quinquefolism (American ginseng), plays a lot of beneficial effects on disorders of central nervous system. In this paper, the neuroprotective effect of PF11 on Parkinson's disease (PD) and the possible mechanism were investigated in a rat PD model. PF11 was orally administered at 3, 6, and 12 mg/kg once daily for a period of 2 weeks before and 1 week after the unilateral lesion of left medial forebrain bundle (MFB) induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The results showed that PF11 markedly improved the locomotor, motor balance, coordination, and apomorphine-induced rotations in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in substantia nigra (SN) and the content of extracellular dopamine (DA) in striatum were also significantly increased after PF11 treatment. Moreover, significant reduction in the levels of striatal extracellular hydroxyl radical (∙OH), detected as 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (2,3- and 2,5-DHBA), and increase in the level of striatal extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) were observed in the PF11-treated groups compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Taken together, we propose that PF11 has potent anti-Parkinson property possibly through inhibiting free radical formation and stimulating endogenous antioxidant release. PMID:24386001

  17. Neuroprotective effect of thymoquinone, the nigella sativa bioactive compound, in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced hemi-parkinsonian rat model.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Reza; Roghani, Mehrdad; Khalili, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder with progressive degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons for which current treatments afford symptomatic relief with no-prevention of disease progression. Due to the neuroprotective property of the Nigella sativa bioactive compound thymoquinone (TQ), this study was undertaken to evaluate whether TQ could improve behavioral and cellular abnormalities and markers of oxidative stress in an experimental model of early PD in rat. Unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats were daily pretreated p.o. with TQ at doses of 5 and/or 10 mg/Kg three times at an interval of 24 h. After 1 week, apomorphine caused contralateral rotations, a reduction in the number of neurons on the left side of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) was observed, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite level in midbrain homogenate increased and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced in the 6-OHDA lesion group. TQ pretreatment significantly improved turning behavior, prevented loss of SNC neurons, and lowered level of MDA. These results suggest that TQ could afford neuroprotection against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity that is partly due to the attenuation of lipid peroxidation and this may provide benefits, along with other therapies, in neurodegenerative disorders including PD.

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Thymoquinone, the Nigella Sativa Bioactive Compound, in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Hemi-Parkinsonian Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghat, Reza; Roghani, Mehrdad; Khalili, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder with progressive degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons for which current treatments afford symptomatic relief with no-prevention of disease progression. Due to the neuroprotective property of the Nigella sativa bioactive compound thymoquinone (TQ), this study was undertaken to evaluate whether TQ could improve behavioral and cellular abnormalities and markers of oxidative stress in an experimental model of early PD in rat. Unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats were daily pretreated p.o. with TQ at doses of 5 and/or 10 mg/Kg three times at an interval of 24 h. After 1 week, apomorphine caused contralateral rotations, a reduction in the number of neurons on the left side of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) was observed, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite level in midbrain homogenate increased and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced in the 6-OHDA lesion group. TQ pretreatment significantly improved turning behavior, prevented loss of SNC neurons, and lowered level of MDA. These results suggest that TQ could afford neuroprotection against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity that is partly due to the attenuation of lipid peroxidation and this may provide benefits, along with other therapies, in neurodegenerative disorders including PD. PMID:24734075

  19. Berberine chloride pretreatment exhibits neuroprotective effect against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal insult in rat

    PubMed Central

    Negahdar, Feraidoon; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Roghani, Mehrdad; Mehraeen, Fereshteh; Poorghayoomi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a rather common movement disorder as a result of the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the substantianigra. Current treatments for PD afford symptomatic relief with no prevention of disease progression. Due to the neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic potential of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine (BBR), this study was conducted to assess whether BBR pretreatment could attenuate behavioral and neuronal derangement in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced model of PD in the rat. Unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA-lesioned rats received BBR at doses of 25 and/or 50 mg/kg (i.p.) three times at an interval of 24 h, started 2 days before the surgery. After 1 week, apomorphine caused significant contralateral rotations and a significant reduction in the number of Nissl-stained and tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons on the left side of the substantianigra. BBR pretreatment at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly reduced rotations and prevented loss of TH-positive neurons. These results indicate pre-lesion administration of BBR could protect against 6-OHDA toxicity and this may be of benefit besides other available therapies in PD. PMID:26664381

  20. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Depressive-Like Symptoms and Modulates BDNF Signaling in 6-Hydroxydopamine Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min; Wang, Ke; Yu, Yan; Su, Wen-Ting; Jiang, Xin-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the beneficial effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on motor behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role and potential mechanisms of EA in PD-associated depression remain unclear. In the present study, a rat model of PD with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions in the medial forebrain bundle was treated using EA for 4 weeks. We found that 100 Hz EA improved several motor phenotypes. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical analysis showed that EA had a minimal impact on the TH-positive profiles of the ipsilateral ventral tegmental area. Compared with the 6-OHDA group, long-term EA stimulation significantly increased sucrose solution consumption and decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. EA treatment did not alter dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels in the striatum and hippocampus. Noticeably, EA treatment reversed the 6-OHDA-induced abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the midbrain and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that EA at 100-Hz possesses the ability to improve depressive-like symptoms in PD rats, which is, at least in part, due to the distinct effect of EA on the mesostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways. Moreover, BDNF seems to participate in the effect of EA in PD. PMID:27525025

  1. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Depressive-Like Symptoms and Modulates BDNF Signaling in 6-Hydroxydopamine Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Wang, Ke; Yu, Yan; Su, Wen-Ting; Jiang, Xin-Xin; Yang, Jian; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the beneficial effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on motor behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role and potential mechanisms of EA in PD-associated depression remain unclear. In the present study, a rat model of PD with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions in the medial forebrain bundle was treated using EA for 4 weeks. We found that 100 Hz EA improved several motor phenotypes. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical analysis showed that EA had a minimal impact on the TH-positive profiles of the ipsilateral ventral tegmental area. Compared with the 6-OHDA group, long-term EA stimulation significantly increased sucrose solution consumption and decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. EA treatment did not alter dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels in the striatum and hippocampus. Noticeably, EA treatment reversed the 6-OHDA-induced abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the midbrain and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that EA at 100-Hz possesses the ability to improve depressive-like symptoms in PD rats, which is, at least in part, due to the distinct effect of EA on the mesostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways. Moreover, BDNF seems to participate in the effect of EA in PD. PMID:27525025

  2. RNAi-mediated silencing of HLA A2 suppressed acute rejection against human fibroblast xenografts in the striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caixia; Xu, Yunzhi; Zheng, Deyu; Sun, Xiaohong; Xu, Qunyuan; Duan, Deyi

    2016-08-15

    Major histocompatibility complex class l (MHC I) molecules play a role in determining whether transplanted cells will be accepted or rejected, and masking of MHC I on donor cells has been found useful for immunoprotection of neural xenografts. In the present study, primary human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF), HELF treated with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA A2, MHC I in humans) (siHELF), and rat embryonic lung fibroblasts (RELF) were stereotaxically grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats to explore whether knockdown of HLA A2 could reduce host immune responses against xenografts. Before lentiviral infection, the cells were transduced with retroviruses harboring tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA. Knockdown of HLA A2 protein was examined by Western blotting. The immune responses (the number of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in the brain and peripheral blood), glial reaction, and survival of human fibroblasts were quantitatively evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry at 4d, 2w, and 6w post-graft. Animal behaviors were assessed by counting apomorphine-induced rotations pre- and post-grafts. It was shown that a lower level of HLA A2 was observed in siHELF grafts than in HELF grafts, and knockdown of HLA A2 decreased rat immune responses, as indicated by less remarkable increases in the number of CD8 and CD4 T-cells in the brain and the ratio of CD4:CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood in rats grafted with siHELF. Rats grafted with siHELF exhibited a significant improvement in motor asymmetry post-transplantation and a better survival of human fibroblasts at 2w. The increasing number of activated microglia and the decreasing number of astrocytes were found in three groups of rats post-implantation. These data suggested that RNAi-mediated knockdown of HLA A2 could suppress acute rejection against xenogeneic human cell transplants in the rat brain. PMID:27397073

  3. Effects of discontinuing a high-fat diet on mitochondrial proteins and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Delin; Shuler, Jeffrey M; Raider, Kayla D; Rogers, Robert S; Wheatley, Joshua L; Geiger, Paige C; Stanford, John A

    2015-07-10

    Diet-induced obesity can increase the risk for developing age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial and proteasomal mechanisms are involved in both insulin resistance and PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether diet intervention could influence mitochondrial or proteasomal protein expression and vulnerability to 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion in rats' nigrostriatal system. After a 3 month high-fat diet regimen, we switched one group of rats to a low-fat diet for 3 months (HF-LF group), while the other half continued with the high-fat diet (HF group). A chow group was included as a control. Three weeks after unilateral 6-OHDA lesions, HF rats had higher fasting insulin levels and higher Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), indicating insulin resistance. HOMA-IR was significantly lower in HF-LF rats than HF rats, indicating that insulin resistance was reversed by switching to a low-fat diet. Compared to the Chow group, the HF group exhibited significantly greater DA depletion in the substantia nigra but not in the striatum. DA depletion did not differ between the HF-LF and HF group. Proteins related to mitochondrial function (such as AMPK, PGC-1α), and to proteasomal function (such as TCF11/Nrf1) were influenced by diet intervention, or by 6-OHDA lesion. Our findings suggest that switching to a low-fat diet reverses the effects of a high-fat diet on systemic insulin resistance, and mitochondrial and proteasomal function in the striatum. Conversely, they suggest that the effects of the high-fat diet on nigrostriatal vulnerability to 6-OHDA-induced DA depletion persist.

  4. Behavioural Assessment of the A2a/NR2B Combination in the Unilateral 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rat Model: A New Method to Examine the Therapeutic Potential of Non-Dopaminergic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Van Damme, Xavier; De Wolf, Catherine; Schwarting, Rainer; Scheller, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopaminergic therapies are often associated with the development of motor complications. Attention has therefore been focused on the use of non-dopaminergic drugs. This study developed a new behavioural method capable of demonstrating the added value of combining adenosinergic and glutamatergic receptor antagonists in unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Rats were dosed orally with Tozadenant, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, and three different doses of Radiprodil, an NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The drugs were given alone or in combination and rats were placed in an open-field for behavioural monitoring. Video recordings were automatically analysed. Five different behaviours were scored: distance traveled, ipsi- and contraversive turns, body position, and space occupancy. The results show that A2A or NR2B receptor antagonists given alone or in combination did not produce enhanced turning as observed with an active dose of L-Dopa/benserazide. Instead the treated rats maintained a straight body position, were able to shift from one direction to the other and occupied a significantly larger space in the arena. The highest “Tozadenant/Radiprodil” dose combination significantly increased all five behavioural parameters recorded compared to rats treated with vehicle or the same doses of the drugs alone. Our data suggest that the A2A/NR2B antagonist combination may be able to stimulate motor activity to a similar level as that achieved by L-Dopa but in the absence of the side-effects that are associated with dopaminergic hyperstimulation. If these results translate into the clinic, this combination could represent an alternative symptomatic treatment option for PD. PMID:26322641

  5. Increased efficacy of the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the median forebrain bundle in small rats, by modification of the stereotaxic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Torres, E M; Lane, E L; Heuer, A; Smith, G A; Murphy, E; Dunnett, S B

    2011-08-30

    The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion is the most widely used rat model of Parkinson's disease. A single unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle (MFB) selectively destroys dopamine neurons in the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), removing more than 95% of the dopamine innervation from target areas. The stereotaxic coordinates used to deliver 6-OHDA to the MFB have been used in our laboratory successfully for more than 25 years. However, in recent years we have observed a decline in the success rate of this lesion. Previously regular success rates of >80% of rats lesioned, have become progressively more variable, with rates as low as 20% recorded in some experiments. Having excluded variability of the neurotoxin and operator errors, we hypothesized that the change seen might be due to the use of smaller rats at the time of first surgery. An attempt to proportionally adjust the lesion coordinates base on head size did not increase lesion efficacy. However, in support of the small rat hypothesis it was observed that, using the standard coordinates, rat's heads had a "nose-up" position in the stereotaxic fame. Adjustment of the nose bar to obtain a flat head position during surgery improved lesion success, and subsequent adjustments of the lesion coordinates to account for smaller head size led to a greatly increased lesion efficacy (>90%) as assessed by amphetamine induced rotation.

  6. Intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine results in an increased number of tyrosine hydroxylase immune-positive cells in the rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Wachter, B; Caradonna, S; Gittinger, K; Schläger, A; Küppers, E

    2014-11-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) results in increased proliferation and de-differentiation of rat cortical astrocytes into progenitor-like cells 4 days after lesion (Wachter et al., 2010). To find out if these cells express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthesis pathway, we performed immunohistochemistry in the rat cortex following intraventricular injection of 6-OHDA. Four days after injection we demonstrated a strong emergence of TH-positive (TH(+)) somata in the cortices of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. The number of TH(+) cells in the cortex of 6-OHDA-lesioned animals was 15 times higher than in sham-operated animals, where virtually no TH(+) somata occurred. Combining TH immunohistochemistry with classical Nissl stain yielded complete congruency, and ∼45% of the TH(+) cells co-expressed calretinin, which indicates an interneuron affiliation. There was no co-staining of TH with other interneuron markers or with glial markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or the neural stem/progenitor marker Nestin, nor could we find co-localization with the proliferation marker Ki67. However, we found a co-localization of TH with glial progenitor cell markers (Sox2 and S100β) and with polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), which has been shown to be expressed in immature, but not recently generated cortical neurons. Taken together, this study seems to confirm our previous findings with respect to a 6-OHDA-induced expression of neuronal precursor markers in cells of the rat cortex, although the TH(+) cells found in this study are not identical with the potentially de-differentiated astrocytes described recently (Wachter et al., 2010). The detection of cortical cells expressing the catecholaminergic key enzyme TH might indicate a possible compensatory role of these cells in a dopamine-(DA)-depleted system. Future studies are needed to determine

  7. Characterization of Fetal Antigen 1/Delta-Like 1 Homologue Expressing Cells in the Rat Nigrostriatal System: Effects of a Unilateral 6-Hydroxydopamine Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, Rémy; Ducray, Angélique D.; Jensen, Pia; Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Jensen, Charlotte H.; Meyer, Morten; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1/delta-like 1 homologue (FA1/dlk1) belongs to the epidermal growth factor superfamily and is considered to be a non-canonical ligand for the Notch receptor. Interactions between Notch and its ligands are crucial for the development of various tissues. Moreover, FA1/dlk1 has been suggested as a potential supplementary marker of dopaminergic neurons. The present study aimed at investigating the distribution of FA1/dlk1-immunoreactive (-ir) cells in the early postnatal and adult midbrain as well as in the nigrostriatal system of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian adult rats. FA1/dlk1-ir cells were predominantly distributed in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta (SNc) and in the ventral tegmental area. Interestingly, the expression of FA1/dlk1 significantly increased in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-ir cells during early postnatal development. Co-localization and tracing studies demonstrated that FA1/dlk1-ir cells in the SNc were nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, and unilateral 6-OHDA lesions resulted in loss of both FA1/dlk1-ir and TH-ir cells in the SNc. Surprisingly, increased numbers of FA1/dlk1-ir cells (by 70%) were detected in dopamine-depleted striata as compared to unlesioned controls. The higher number of FA1/dlk1-ir cells was likely not due to neurogenesis as colocalization studies for proliferation markers were negative. This suggests that FA1/dlk1 was up-regulated in intrinsic cells in response to the 6-OHDA-mediated loss of FA1/dlk1-expressing SNc dopaminergic neurons and/or due to the stab wound. Our findings hint to a significant role of FA1/dlk1 in the SNc during early postnatal development. The differential expression of FA1/dlk1 in the SNc and the striatum of dopamine-depleted rats could indicate a potential involvement of FA1/dlk1 in the cellular response to the degenerative processes. PMID:25723595

  8. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD.

  9. LPA signaling is required for dopaminergic neuron development and is reduced through low expression of the LPA1 receptor in a 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Ethan Y; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Sun, Feng-Xiang; Han, Hai-Lin; Han, Hui-Rong; Lin, Zhi-Juan; Pan, Zhi-Fang; Qu, Mei-Hua; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that activates at least five known G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1-LPA5. The nervous system is a major locus for LPA1 expression. LPA has been shown to regulate neuronal proliferation, migration, and differentiation during central nervous system development as well as neuronal survival. Furthermore, deficient LPA signaling has been implicated in several neurological disorders including neuropathic pain and schizophrenia. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that results from the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The specific molecular pathways that lead to DA neuron degeneration, however, are poorly understood. The influence of LPA in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into DA neurons in vitro and LPA1 expression in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in vivo were examined in the present study. LPA induced neuronal differentiation in 80.2 % of the MSC population. These MSCs developed characteristic neuronal morphology and expressed the neuronal marker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), while expression of the glial marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was absent. Moreover, 27.6 % of differentiated MSCs were positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker for DA neurons. In the 6-OHDA PD rat model, LPA1 expression in the substantia nigra was significantly reduced compared to control. These results suggest LPA signaling via activation of LPA1 may be necessary for DA neuron development and survival. Furthermore, reduced LPA/LPA1 signaling may be involved in DA neuron degeneration thus contributing to the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:26169757

  10. Calretinin-containing axons and neurons are resistant to an intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, K; Kimber, T A; Shults, C W

    2000-06-01

    Relative preservation of dopaminergic axons in patches and a subcallosal layer was observed in the dorsal, lateral and caudal striatum 4 weeks after intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxin selective for catecholaminergic neurons. Since calcium binding proteins are reported to provide neuroprotective influence in neurons, differences in the distribution of the calcium binding proteins might be related to the different vulnerabilities of dopaminergic neurons and axons to neurotoxins. To address this possibility, we characterized patches of relatively dense tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) axons in intrastriatal 6-OHDA lesioned rats, focusing on two calcium binding proteins, calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR). The patches and subcallosal layer of preserved dopaminergic axons in the striatum of rats lesioned with 6-OHDA contained CR, a 31-kDa calcium-binding protein, but interestingly not CB. Dopaminergic neurons containing CR in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were relatively spared compared to those that did not contain CR. Taken together, our data indicate that dopaminergic axons and neurons containing CR in the nigrostriatal pathway are more resistant to 6-OHDA lesion than those that do not contain CR.

  11. Gait analysis in three different 6-hydroxydopamine rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Wangming; Chang, Jingyu; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Weixin; Yang, Yong; Wen, Peng; Li, Min; Xiao, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Gait deficits are important clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) but are rarely studied. In this study we made three different rat PD models by administration of 6-hydroxydopamine into caudate putamen (CPU), medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and substantia nigra compact (SNC). We evaluated the gait changes in these models by using a computer-assisted CatWalk system. Correlations of gait parameters with tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels in the CPU and SNC were also investigated. The gait readouts were significantly impaired in both the MFB and SNC groups. However, the MFB group showed a more pronounced impairment than the SNC group. In contrast, only mild and incomplete gait impairment occurred in the CPU group. In addition, some gait parameters demonstrated close correlation with the protein levels of TH. This paper suggests that the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced MFB model is more propitious to study gait dysfunction than the other two models and the CatWalk system can provide reliable and objective criteria to stratify gait changes arising from 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. These findings may hold promise in the study of PD disease progression and new therapeutic methods.

  12. Intraventricular administration of endoneuraminidase-N facilitates ectopic migration of subventricular zone-derived neural progenitor cells into 6-OHDA lesioned striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhang, Yong-Xin; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Chen, Sha-Sha; Hao, Qiang; Lu, Tao; Qu, Ting-Yu; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a carbohydrate polymer associated with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), plays an important role in the migration, differentiation and maturation of neuroblasts. Endoneuraminidase-N (Endo-N) can specifically cleave PSA from NCAM. The objective of the present study was to examine: the effect of Endo-N on characteristics of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro; whether intraventricular administration of Endo-N could increase ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, and whether migrated NPCs could differentiate into neuronal and glial cells. In in vitro study, Endo-N was found to inhibit the migration of NPCs, and to enhance the differentiation of NPCs. In in vivo study, mice sequentially received injections of 6-OHDA into the right striatum, Endo-N into the right lateral ventricle, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneally. The data showed that intraventricular injections of Endo-N disorganized the normal structure of the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and drastically increased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (IR) cells in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum. In addition, a number of BrdU-IR cells were double labeled for doublecortin (DCX), NeuN or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The results suggest that interruption of neuroblast chain pathway with Endo-N facilitates ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into the lesioned striatum, and migrated NPCs can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26724216

  13. Cholecystokinin tetrapeptide improves water maze performance of neonatally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned young rats.

    PubMed

    Rex, André; Fink, Heidrun

    2004-09-01

    This study addressed the proposed memory-modulating effect of the cholecystokinin (CCK) 2 agonist Boc-CCK-4 in rats using a Morris water maze. In the brain, CCK is colocalized and interacts with dopamine, respectively. To impair dopaminergic neurotransmission, and consequently, dopamine-mediated learning and memory, rat pups received the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the left [Day 5 postnatal (p.n.)] and right (Day 8 p.n.) ventricles (50 microg/5 microl each). After 6-OHDA treatment, dopamine brain levels were reduced by 60% on Day 50 p.n. Lesioned rats had a lower body weight but normal swimming abilities. In the acquisition phase of the water maze (Day 50 p.n.), sham-lesioned rats learned quickly, compared to lesioned rats. Treatment with Boc-CCK-4 (40 microg/kg ip) did not affect performance in sham-lesioned rats but restored the learning curve in lesioned rats without increasing swimming speed indicating a better spatial learning in the dopamine-depleted rats. In summary, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of CCK2 receptors may counteract cognitive deficits of dopamine-depleted rats.

  14. The effects of dorsal bundle injections of 6-hydroxydopamine on avoidance responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Fibiger, H C; Mason, S T

    1978-12-01

    1 The effect of injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the fibres of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle on acquisition, retention and extinction of active avoidance in rats were examined. 2 6-OHDA injections severely depleted noradrenaline in all forebrain areas assayed, with the interesting exception of the septum. No significant effect on dopamine concentrations in various forebrain regions was found. 3 Acquisition and retention of active avoidance was not altered by the lesion. Marked resistance to extinction was seen when the unconditioned stimulus (shock) was removed. 4 A comparison with work by other authors in which both forebrain noradrenaline and dopamine were depleted suggest that the alteration in extinction seen in both studies is a noradrenergic effect, whereas the deficits in acquisition and retention found previously are dopaminergic in origin.

  15. Apomorphine-induced biphasic circling behaviour in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. A pharmacological kindling phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Coward, D M

    1983-06-01

    Factors governing the development of apomorphine-induced biphasic circling behaviour in rats having unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the substantia nigra were investigated. It was found that a post-lesion time of at least 2--3 weeks and the repeated exposure to apomorphine were essential for its development. Optimal results were obtained when animals received weekly apomorphine, 0.05 mg/kg sc, in post-lesion weeks 6, 7 and 8. Pretreatment with haloperidol, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg ip 1 h beforehand in post-lesion week 9, converted the biphasic response into an enhanced, uniphasic one. The findings suggest that the development of the biphasic response to apomorphine is a multi-factorial process representing a pharmacological kindling phenomenon.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Barros Silva, R; Santos, N A G; Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Barbosa, F; Oliveira Souza, V C; Kinoshita, A; Baffa, O; Del-Bel, E; Santos, A C

    2013-03-13

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a botanical compound abundant in honeybees' propolis. It has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. Its beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, have also been suggested and some mechanisms have been proposed. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are critical events in neurodegeneration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the downstream activation of caspase-3 have been suggested as targets of the protective mechanism of CAPE. Most of the studies addressing the protective effect of CAPE have been performed in cell culture. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effect of CAPE against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. It also demonstrates, for the first time, the inhibitory effect of CAPE on mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), a mediator of neuronal death that triggers cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metal chelation was demonstrated in the brain-affected areas of the rats treated with 6-OHDA and CAPE. Additionally, we demonstrated that CAPE does not affect brain mitochondrial function. Based on these findings and on its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, CAPE is a promising compound to treat Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Ceftriaxone Ameliorates Motor Deficits and Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. There is no current promising treatment for neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons. Ceftriaxone is a beta-lactam antibiotic and has been reported to offer neuroprotective effects (Rothstein, J.-D., Patel, S., Regan, M.-R., Haenggeli, C., Huang, Y.-H., Bergles, D.-E., Jin, L., Dykes, H.-M., Vidensky, S., Chung, D.-S., Toan, S.-V., Bruijn, L.-I., Su, Z.-Z., Gupta, P., and Fisher, P.-B. (2005) Beta-lactam antibiotics offer neuroprotection by increasing glutamate transporter expression Nature433, 73–77). In the present study, efficacy of ceftriaxone in neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons and amelioration of motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease were investigated. Ceftriaxone was administrated in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Using behavioral tests, grip strength and numbers of apomorphine-induced contralateral rotation were declined in the ceftriaxone-treated group. More importantly, cell death of dopaminergic neurons was found to decrease. In addition, both the protein expression and immunoreactivity for GLT-1 were up-regulated. The present results strongly indicate that ceftriaxone is a potential agent in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22860178

  18. Motor activity and gene expression in rats with neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Yoshinori; Ishido, Masami; Morita, Masatoshi; Oka, Syuichi; Niki, Etsuo

    2004-10-01

    A rat model of a hyperkinetic disorder was used to investigate the mechanisms underlying motor hyperactivity. Rats received an intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine on post-natal day 5. At 4 weeks of age, the animals showed significant motor hyperactivity during the dark phase, which was attenuated by methamphetamine injection. Gene expression profiling was carried out in the striatum and midbrain using a DNA macroarray. In the striatum at 4 weeks, there was increased gene expression of the NMDA receptor 1 and tachykinins, and decreased expression of a GABA transporter. At 8 weeks, expression of the NMDA receptor 1 in the striatum was attenuated, with enhanced expression of the glial glutamate/aspartate transporter. In the midbrain, a number of genes, including the GABA transporter gene, showed decreased expression at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, gene expression was augmented for the dopamine transporter, D4 receptor, and several genes encoding peptides, such as tachykinins and their receptors. These results suggest that in the striatum the neurotransmitters glutamate, GABA and tachykinin may play crucial roles in motor hyperactivity during the juvenile period. Several classes of neurotransmitters, including dopamine and peptides, may be involved in compensatory mechanisms during early adulthood. These data may prompt further neurochemical investigations in hyperkinetic disorders.

  19. Sensorimotor assessment of the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Glajch, Kelly E.; Fleming, Sheila M.; Surmeier, D. James; Osten, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by marked impairments in motor function caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Animal models of PD have traditionally been based on toxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), that selectively lesion dopaminergic neurons. Motor impairments from 6-OHDA lesions of SNc neurons are well characterized in rats, but much less work has been done in mice. In this study, we compare the effectiveness of a series of drug-free behavioral tests in assessing sensorimotor impairments in the unilateral 6-OHDA mouse model, including six tests used for the first time in this PD mouse model (the automated treadmill “DigiGait” test, the challenging beam test, the adhesive removal test, the pole test, the adjusting steps test, and the test of spontaneous activity) and two tests used previously in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice (the limb-use asymmetry “cylinder” test and the manual gait test). We demonstrate that the limb-use asymmetry, challenging beam, pole, adjusting steps, and spontaneous activity tests are all highly robust assays for detecting sensorimotor impairments in the 6-OHDA mouse model. We also discuss the use of the behavioral tests for specific experimental objectives, such as simple screening for well-lesioned mice in studies of PD cellular pathophysiology or comprehensive behavioral analysis in preclinical therapeutic testing using a battery of sensorimotor tests. PMID:22178078

  20. Cortex Fraxini (Qingpi) Protects Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ya; Zhang, Huan; Lam, Kim-Hung; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder having close relationship with oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cortex Fraxini (QP) is a kind of traditional Chinese medicinal herb with antioxidant properties. It may be a potential candidate for preventing the development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the key objective of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of QP water extract on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. It was found that QP water extract possesses strong antioxidant property with SC50 = 0.15 mg/mL. Total phenolic content of QP water extract was found to be 200.78 ± 2.65 mg GAE/g. QP water extract's free radical scavenging capacity was demonstrated by reversing the increased level of intracellular ROS induced by 6-OHDA, using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Moreover, QP water extract (0.5 mg/mL) could remarkably increase the viability of PC12 cells treated with 6-OHDA. The protective effect of QP water extract was found to be via inhibiting MEK/ERK pathway and reversing PI3-K/Akt/GSK3β pathway. The current results suggest that QP might be a potential candidate for preventing the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD. PMID:26347850

  1. Voluntary exercise reduces the neurotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine in maternally separated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa Vuyisile; Russell, Vivienne Ann

    2010-01-01

    Maternal separation has been associated with development of anxiety-like behaviour and learning impairments in adult rats. This has been linked to changes in brain morphology observed after exposure to high levels of circulating glucocorticoids during the stress-hyporesponsive period (P4 to P14). In the present study, adult rats that had been subjected to maternal separation (180 min/day for 14 days) during the stress-hyporesponsive period, received unilateral infusions of a small dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) into the medial forebrain bundle. The results showed that voluntary exercise had a neuroprotective effect in both non-stressed and maternally separated rats in that there was a decrease in forelimb akinesia (step test) and limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Maternal separation increased forelimb akinesia and forelimb use asymmetry and reduced the beneficial effect of exercise on forelimb akinesia. It also reduced exploratory behaviour, consistent with anxiety-like behaviour normally associated with maternal separation. Exercise appeared to reduce dopamine neuron destruction in the lesioned substantia nigra when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere. However, this appeared to be due to a compensatory decrease in completely stained tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in the contralateral, non-lesioned substantia nigra. In agreement with reports that maternal separation increases the 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopamine terminals in the striatum, there was a small increase in dopamine neuron destruction when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere but there was no difference in dopamine cell number, suggesting that exposure to maternal separation did not exacerbate dopamine cell loss. PMID:20206210

  2. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  3. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  4. 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the rat neostriatum impair sequential learning in a serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Eckart, Moritz Thede; Huelse-Matia, Moriah Christina; McDonald, Rebecca S; Schwarting, Rainer K -W

    2010-04-01

    Sequential behavior has been intensively investigated in humans using so-called serial reaction time tasks(SRTT), in which visual stimuli are either presented in a random or sequential order. Typically, when the stimulus presentation follows a previously learned sequential order,reaction times are decreased compared to random stimulus presentation and become partly automated. A vast amount of SRTT findings indicates that sequential learning and performance seem to be mediated amongst others by the basal ganglia-especially the striatum-and the neurotransmitter dopamine therein. In this study we used an operant rat version of the human four choice SRTT to investigate the effect of bilateral neostriatal dopamine lesions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine on sequential learning. The rats' task was to respond rapidly to illuminated holes by nose-poking into them. During extensive training, the position of the illuminated hole followed a 12-item sequence. The outcome of this sequential training was also investigated in two tests, namely an interference test, where stimulus presentation switched between this sequential and a pseudo random order every five minutes, and a violation test, in which only one sequence item was eventually skipped. The neurotoxic lesions, which was placed before the start of training, led to the expected sub-total dopamine depletions (i.e. residual levels around 34-56% of controls), especially in the medial neostriatum. These lesions did not lead to general motor deficits in a catalepsy task, but moderate deficits in locomotion in an activity box, which largely recovered with time after lesion. In the SRTT, rats with lesions showed impaired learning, that is, less response accuracy and slower reaction times than the control group.During a subsequent test with alternating phases of sequential and random stimulus presentations, reaction times and accuracy of the control group were superior during sequential as compared to random stimulus phases. In the

  5. Intranigral grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue in adult 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats can induce behavioral recovery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R E; Becker, J B

    1997-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions can reduce and even reverse rotational behavior in response to direct and indirect dopamine agonists. These grafts can ameliorate deficits on simple spontaneous behaviors, but do not improve complex behaviors that require the skilled integration of the use of both paws. We report here that rats with grafts into the DA-depleted substantia nigra, that receive cyclosporine A, can experience recovery on spontaneous behaviors that mimic those observed in Parkinson's disease. Specific cyclosporine A treatment conditions can differentially affect whether intranigral grafts normalize paw use during initiation or termination of a movement sequence. These findings may have important implications for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:9171159

  6. Molecular hydrogen is protective against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal degeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan; Ito, Mikako; Fujita, Yasunori; Ito, Masafumi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Masuda, Akio; Suzuki, Yumi; Maesawa, Satoshi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Hirayama, Masaaki; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohta, Shigeo; Ohno, Kinji

    2009-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen serves as an antioxidant that reduces hydroxyl radicals, but not the other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In the past year, molecular hydrogen has been reported to prevent or ameliorate eight diseases in rodents and one in human associated with oxidative stress. In Parkinson's disease, mitochondrial dysfunction and the associated oxidative stress are major causes of dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra. We examined effects of approximately 50%-saturated molecular hydrogen in drinking water before or after the stereotactic surgery on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostrital degeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Methamphetamine-induced behavioral analysis showed that molecular hydrogen prevented both the development and progression of the nigrostrital degeneration. Tyrosine hydroxylase staining of the substantia nigra and striatum also demonstrated that pre- and post-treatment with hydrogen prevented the dopaminergic cell loss. Our studies suggest that hydrogen water is likely able to retard the development and progression of Parkinson's disease. PMID:19356598

  7. R-apomorphine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Liang, Li-Wu; Chen, Zheng-Jing; Ji, Hui-Ru; Wang, Mei-Kang; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Li, Cao; Xu, Jian-Yang

    2006-11-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was not only to assess the retrograde degenerative changes in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, but also to use this 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of R-apomorphine (R-APO). Methods The partial lesion was obtained by intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA. R-APO administration (10 mg/kg, s.c.) started 15 min prior to lesioning and continued daily for another 22 days post surgery. Testing was carried out 5 weeks after lesioning. We investigated the histology and associated behavior and neurochemical changes. Structural and functional deficits were quantified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) / Nissl-staining cell number counting, striatal dopamine (DA) content determination and amphetamine-induced rotation analysis. Results R-APO-treatment attenuated the amphetamine-induced ipsiversive rotation 5 weeks after the lesion induction. R-APO administration for 22 days significantly reduced the size of the lesion at the level of the SN from 50% (control group) to 69%. Moreover, the cell shape resembled that observed in the intact animals. R-APO treatment significantly increased the number of cells in both the lesion and the intact sides of VTA by 60%, suggesting selective neurotrophic effect of R-APO in this area. Finally, R-APO-treatment significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion and normalized dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios. Conclusion We conclude that R-APO has neuroprotective and possible neurotrophic effect on a striatal lesion with 6-OHDA, suggesting that this drug may have rescuing properties in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease. These effects are more pronounced in VTA and enhance with duration of treatment. PMID:17690718

  8. Electroacupuncture Produces the Sustained Motor Improvement in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiahui; Sun, Min; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and research evidence has shown that electroacupuncture (EA) promotes recovery of motor function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the “efficacy span” of EA treatment, especially the long-term effect of EA that is thought to last after the cessation of EA treatment, has not been investigated. The present study thus investigated and compared the effect of EA during and after chronic EA application on motor activity and dopamine lesions in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD. Chronic EA treatment (30 min a day, 6 days a week for 2 or 4 weeks) significantly attenuated motor deficiency and reduced dopamine neuron degeneration. Remarkably, EA showed a long-lasting effect after the cessation of EA stimulation. At 2 and 4 weeks after the termination of EA, EA continued to improve motor function in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Consistent with sustained behavioral effects, EA induced an enduring increase in the dopamine turnover ratio in the striatum 2 weeks after the cessation of EA treatment. Here we demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of EA outlasted the duration of EA application. During a relatively long period of time after the completion of EA treatment, EA is able to continue to improve motor function and enhance dopamine availability in 6-OHDA-lesioned PD mice. PMID:26894437

  9. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D. Luke; Collier, Timothy J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1) did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2) did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3) did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation. PMID:26222442

  10. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects.

  11. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  12. The 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration produces microglia-like NG2 glial cells in the rat substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Inden, Masatoshi; Minamino, Hideaki; Abe, Mari; Takata, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Neuron/glial 2 (NG2)-expressing cells are often referred to as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. NG2-expressing cells have also been identified as multipotent progenitor cells. However, microglia-like NG2 glial cells have not been fully examined in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we chose two rat models of PD, i.e., intranigral or intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), since the cell bodies of dopamine (DA) neurons, which form a nigrostriatal pathway, are in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) while their nerve terminals are in the striatum. In the nigral 6-OHDA-injected model, activated NG2-positive cells were detected in the SNpc but not in the striatum. In contrast, in the striatal 6-OHDA-injected model, these cells were detected in both the SNpc and the striatum. In both models, activated NG2-positive cells were located close to surviving tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the SNpc. In addition, activated NG2-positive cells in the SNpc coexpressed ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1), a microglia/macrophage marker. Interestingly, these double-positive glial cells coexpressed glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). These results suggest that microglia-like NG2 glial cells may help protect DA neurons and may lead to new therapeutic targets in PD.

  13. 6-OHDA lesions to amygdala and hippocampus attenuate memory-enhancing effect of the 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Winnicka, M M; Braszko, J J; Wiśniewski, K

    1998-05-01

    We have previously shown that facilitatory effect of angiotensin II (AII) on the retrieval of memory is mediated by the dopaminergic system. In the present study, we searched for the influence of the 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II [AII(3-7)] on the retrieval processes in a passive avoidance situation after bilateral 6-OHDA lesions to the central amygdala (CA) and the CA4 field of the hippocampus (HI). AII(3-7) given 15 min before the retention testing, at the intracerebroventricular dose of 1 nmol, significantly prolonged avoidance latencies in sham-operated rats (i.e. improved retrieval of memory for the electric footshock experienced during the learning trial). Bilateral lesions to CA totally abolished, and to HI significantly diminished, this facilitatory effect. An increase of spontaneous locomotor activity in rats lesioned to CA and a decrease in rats lesioned to HI were unlikely to interfere with the cognitive effect of AII (3-7). These results suggest that the anatomical substrate of facilitating retrieval of information activity of AII(3-7) is closely related to the dopaminergic projection from the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra to CA and HI.

  14. Neuroprotection by scorpion venom heat resistant peptide in 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng-Ming; Zhao, Dan; Yu, De-Qin; Li, Sheng-Long; An, Dong; Peng, Yan; Xu, Hong; Sun, Yi-Ping; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Wan-Qin

    2014-12-25

    Neuroprotective effect of scorpion venom on Parkinson's disease (PD) has already been reported. The present study was aimed to investigate whether scorpion venom heat resistant peptide (SVHRP) could attenuate ultrastructural abnormalities in mitochondria and oxidative stress in midbrain neurons of early-stage PD model. The early-stage PD model was established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (20 μg/3 μL normal saline with 0.1% ascorbic acid) into the striatum of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats unilaterally. The rats were intraperitoneally administered with SVHRP (0.05 mg/kg per day) or vehicle (saline) for 1 week. Two weeks after 6-OHDA treatment, the rats received behavior tests for validation of model. Three weeks after 6-OHDA injection, the immunoreactivity of dopaminergic neurons were detected by immunohistochemistry staining, and the ultrastructure of neuronal mitochondria in midbrain was observed by electron microscope. In the meantime, the activities of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the mitochondria of the midbrain neurons, as well as the inhibitory ability of hydroxyl free radical and the antioxidant ability in the serum, were measured by corresponding kits. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced the optical density of dopaminergic neurons, induced damage of mitochondrial ultrastructure of midbrain neurons, decreased SOD activity, increased MAO-B activity and MDA content, and reduced the antioxidant ability of the serum. SVHRP significantly reversed the previous harmful effects of 6-OHDA in early-stage PD model. These findings indicate that SVHRP may contribute to neuroprotection by preventing biochemical and ultrastructure damage changes which occur during early-stage PD. PMID:25516514

  15. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson’s Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson’s disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  16. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson’s Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson’s disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine.

  17. The dual dopamine-glutamate phenotype of growing mesencephalic neurons regresses in mature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bérubé-Carrière, Noémie; Riad, Mustapha; Dal Bo, Grégory; Lévesque, Daniel; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Descarries, Laurent

    2009-12-20

    Coexpression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) mRNAs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and colocalization of these proteins in axon terminals of the nucleus accumbens (nAcb) have recently been demonstrated in immature (15-day-old) rat. After neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion, the proportion of VTA neurons expressing both mRNAs and of nAcb terminals displaying the two proteins was enhanced. To determine the fate of this dual phenotype in adults, double in situ hybridization and dual immunolabeling for TH and VGLUT2 were performed in 90-day-old rats subjected or not to the neonatal 6-OHDA lesion. Very few neurons expressed both mRNAs in the VTA and substantia nigra (SN) of P90 rats, even after neonatal 6-OHDA. Dually immunolabeled terminals were no longer found in the nAcb of normal P90 rats and were exceedingly rare in the nAcb of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, although they had represented 28% and 37% of all TH terminals at P15. Similarly, 17% of all TH terminals in normal neostriatum and 46% in the dopamine neoinnervation of SN in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were also immunoreactive for VGLUT2 at P15, but none at P90. In these three regions, all dually labeled terminals made synapse, in contradistinction to those immunolabeled for only TH or VGLUT2 at P15. These results suggest a regression of the VGLUT2 phenotype of dopamine neurons with age, following normal development, lesion, or sprouting after injury, and a role for glutamate in the establishment of synapses by these neurons.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of D-psicose on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Maki K; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Nakanose, Koichi; Watanabe, Yasuo; Hatano, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Nagata, Mitsuhiro; Izumori, Ken; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2005-11-01

    We evaluated the neuroprotective effects of D-psicose, one of the rare sugars, on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced apoptosis in catecholaminergic PC12 cells, the in vitro model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Apoptotic characteristics of PC12 cells were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. The results showed that D-psicose at a concentration of 50 mM, exerted significant protective effects against the 6-OHDA (200 muM)-induced PC12 cell apoptosis, while other sugars had little or no protective effects. We have observed a significant increase in the level of intracellular glutathione after 24 h in 6-OHDA (200 muM) treated cells, while a decrease in the level was observed at 3 h and 6 h. Also, a synergistic exposure to D-psicose and 6-OHDA for 24 h showed a significant increase in intracellular glutathione level. Therefore, these results suggest that D-psicose may play a potential role as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by inducing an up-regulation of intracellular glutathione.

  19. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype.

  20. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26730494

  1. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons.

  2. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh; Patri, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence.

  3. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence. PMID:27034665

  4. Activation and blockade of prelimbic 5-HT6 receptors produce different effects on depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yi-Na; Guo, Yuan; Du, Cheng-Xue; Zhang, Jin; Yao, Lu; Yu, Shu-Qi; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-01

    The role of prelimbic (PrL) 5-HT6 receptors in depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-related depression. Here we reported that 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility time as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 induced depressive-like responses in sham-operated rats, and produced antidepressant-like effects in the lesioned rats. However, 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB258585 produced antidepressant-like effects in sham-operated rats, and increased the expression of depressive-like behaviors in the lesioned rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of WAY208466 and SB258585 decreased or increased dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, habenula and ventral hippocampus in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, respectively. WAY208466 increased the firing rate of PrL glutamate neurons in the two groups of rats, while SB258585 decreased the firing rate of the neurons. Compared to sham-operated rats, the duration of WAY208466 and SB258585 action on the firing rate of glutamate neurons was markedly prolonged in the lesioned rats. The lesion did not change the co-localization of 5-HT6 receptor and glutamate neurons in the PrL. These findings indicate that 5-HT6 receptors in the PrL are involved in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors, which attribute to changes in DA and NA levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions. Additionally, the results suggest that the lesion leads to a supersensitization of 5-HT6 receptors on glutamate neurons in the PrL.

  5. A rat model of striatonigral degeneration generated by simultaneous injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle and quinolinic acid into the striatum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung Ho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Shin, Eun Sil; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2014-11-01

    A double toxin-double lesion strategy is well-known to generate a rat model of striatonigral degeneration (SND) such as multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type. However, with this model it is difficult to distinguish SND from Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we propose a new rat model of SND, which is generated by simultaneous injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle and quinolinic acid into the striatum. Stepping tests performed 30 min after intraperitoneal L-dopa administration at 6 weeks post-surgery revealed an L-dopa response in the PD group but not the SND group. Apomorphine-induced rotation tests revealed no rotational bias in the SND group, which persisted for 2 months, but contralateral rotations in the PD group. MicroPET scans revealed glucose hypometabolism and dopamine transporter impairment on the lesioned striatum in the SND group. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining in the SND group revealed that 74.7% of nigral cells on the lesioned side were lost after lesion surgery. These results suggest that the proposed simultaneous double toxin-double lesion method successfully created a rat model of SND that had behavioral outcomes, multitracer microPET evaluation, and histological aspects consistent with SND pathology. This model will be useful for future study of SND. PMID:25408589

  6. 6-Hydroxydopamine induces distinct alterations in GDF5 and GDNF mRNA expression in the rat nigrostriatal system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Aisling M; Walsh, Sinéad; Wyatt, Sean; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2014-02-21

    Growth/differentiation factor (GDF)5 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are neurotrophic factors that promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. Both factors have potent neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in rat models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and represent promising new therapies for PD. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GDF5, GDNF and their receptors in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in rat models of PD. It found that endogenous GDF5, GDNF and their receptors are differentially expressed in two 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of PD. In both striatal and medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion models, striatal levels of GDF5 mRNA increased at 10 days post-lesion, while GDNF mRNA levels in the nigrostriatal system decreased after 10 and 28 days. Midbrain mRNA levels for both GDF5 receptors transiently increased after striatal lesion, whereas those of two GDNF receptors decreased at later time-points in both models. Despite the fact that exogenous GDF5 and GDNF have comparable effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo, their endogenous responses to neurotoxic injury are different. This highlights the importance of studying neurotrophic factor expression at distinct disease stages and in various animal models of PD.

  7. Early expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in a toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Serratos, Iris N; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Gómez, Isabel; Rangel-López, Edgar; Santamaria, Abel

    2016-04-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is commonly involved in different neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. The cellular signaling associated to RAGE activation may occur upon binding to different ligands. In this study we investigated whether the toxic model produced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats comprises early noxious responses related to RAGE-mediated signaling cascades. In order to explore a possible interaction between 6-OHDA and RAGE, affinity parameters of RAGE with 6-OHDA were estimated by different means. The possible binding sites of 6-OHDA with the VC1 homodimer for both rat and human RAGE were also modeled. Our results show that the striatal infusion of 6-OHDA recruits RAGE upregulation, as evidenced by an early expression of the receptor. 6-OHDA was also found to bind the VC1 homodimer, although its affinity was moderate when compared to other ligands. This work contributes to the understanding of the role of RAGE activation for 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. [Effects of hypothalamic microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on estral cycle and morphology of the genital tract in the female rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sala, M A; Oteui, J T; Benedetti, W I

    1975-01-01

    To determine whether central catecholaminergic pathways are involved in the neural contral of gonadotrophin secretion, they were interrupted at the hypothalamic level by microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The effects on ovulation, estral cycle and ovarian and uterine histology were studied. Microinjections of 50 mug of 6-OHDA hydrobromyde were made bilaterally into the anterolateral hypothalamus in a group of rats. Another group was injected with 25 mug of 6-OHDA, while a control group recieved an equivalent volume (5 mul) of saline with ascorbic acid. Animals injected with 50 mug of 6-OHDA showed blockade of ovulation, vaginal cytology characteristics of persistent estrous, polyfollicular ovaries and enlarged uteri with hypertrophic endometrial glands. In the group injected with 25 mug, similiar effects were demonstrated, but the number of affected animals was smaller than that in the 50 mug group. Control animals dit not show modifications, either in estral cycle or in ovarian and uterine histology. These results suggest that 6-OHDA injected into the anterolateral hypothalmus interferes with catecholaminergic pathways that participate in the neural control of ovulation.

  9. Activation and blockade of serotonin7 receptors in the prelimbic cortex regulate depressive-like behaviors in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q J; Du, C X; Tan, H H; Zhang, L; Li, L B; Zhang, J; Niu, X L; Liu, J

    2015-12-17

    The role of serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors in the regulation of depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the prelimbic (PrL) sub-region of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involve in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. The lesion induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) increased sucrose consumption, and decreased immobility time in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, indicating the induction of antidepressant-like effects. Further, intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6 μg/rat) decreased sucrose consumption, and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of AS19 (2 μg/rat) increased dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the mPFC, habenula and ventral hippocampus (vHip) in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6 μg/rat) decreased 5-HT levels in the habenula and vHip, and the levels of NA in the mPFC, habenula and vHip in the two groups of rats. The results suggest that 5-HT7 receptors in the PrL play an important role in the regulation of these behaviors, which attribute to changes in monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions after activation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors.

  10. Interactions of CaMKII with dopamine D2 receptors: roles in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, SuFang; Xie, ChengLong; Wang, Qiang; Liu, ZhenGuo

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a synapse-enriched kinase in mammalian brains. This kinase interacts with various synaptic proteins to regulate expression and function of interacting proteins and thereby modulates synaptic transmission. CaMKII and its interacting partners are also believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we found that CaMKIIα binds to dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vitro. A distal region in the D2R third intracellular loop harbors CaMKIIα binding. Endogenous CaMKIIα was also found to interact with native D2Rs in rat striatal neurons in which D2Rs are expressed at a high level. In addition, in a rat 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned model of PD, chronic levodopa administration induced characteristic dyskinesia. In parallel, levodopa induced an increase in CaMKIIα-D2R interactions in striatal neurons. Intrastriatal injection of a Tat-fusion and CaMKIIα-D2R interaction-dead peptide (Tat-D2Ri) reversed this increase in the interaction between two proteins. Tat-D2Ri also alleviated dyskinetic behaviors induced by levodopa. These results reveal a new interaction between CaMKIIα and D2Rs in striatal neurons which is sensitive to long-term administration of levodopa in PD rats. Prevention of the response of CaMKIIα-D2R interactions to levodopa can alleviate levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:25351365

  11. Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon improve allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryuichiro; Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Abe, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hisae; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Koganemaru, Go; Kuramashi, Aki; Funahashi, Hideki; Magata, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Keiichi; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2014-06-24

    We previously reported that a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease showed allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation of the ipsilateral side of the rat hindpaw. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) on the withdrawal response in 6-OHDA rats. The withdrawal threshold in response to the mechanical stimulation of the rat hindpaw was measured using von Frey filaments. In the ipsilateral side of the 6-OHDA lesions, the withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation significantly increased in 6-OHDA rats with VM grafts compared with those with sham grafts, but did not change in the contralateral side at 5 weeks after transplantation. The present results suggest that the intrastriatal grafts of fetal VM may relieve pain sensation induced by mechanical stimulation in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:24831182

  12. Co-transplantation of carotid body and ventral mesencephalic cells as an alternative approach towards functional restoration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S; Agrawal, A K; Chaturvedi, R K; Seth, K; Srivastava, N; Sinha, C; Shukla, Y; Khanna, V K; Seth, P K

    2004-10-01

    Exogenous administration of various neurotrophic factors has been shown to protect neurons in animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Several attempts are being made to search a tissue source simultaneously expressing many of these neurotrophic factors. Carotid body (CB) contains oxygen-sensitive glomus cells rich in dopamine (DA) and expresses glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3. We have attempted to study the functional restoration following co-transplantation of CB cells and ventral mesencephalic cells (VMC) in a 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of PD. A significant recovery (p < 0.001) in d-amphetamine-induced circling behavior (80%) and spontaneous locomotor activity (85%) was evident in co-transplanted animals at 12 weeks post-transplantation as compared to lesioned animals. Similarly, a significant (p < 0.001) restoration was observed in DA-D(2) receptor binding (77%), striatal DA (87%) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (85%) levels and nigral DA (75%) and DOPAC (74%) levels. Functional recovery was accompanied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and quantification of TH-positive cells by image analysis revealed a significant restoration in TH-immunoreactive (IR) fiber density in striatum, as well as TH-IR neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in co-transplanted animals over VMC-transplanted animals. The result suggests that co-transplantation of CB cells along with VMC provides better and long-term functional restoration in the rat model of PD, possibly by supporting the survival of newly grafted cells as well as remaining host DA neurons. PMID:15447661

  13. Neuroprotective activity of peripherally administered liver growth factor in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio Sánchez; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Miranda, Cristina; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Bazán, Eulalia

    2013-01-01

    Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen purified some years ago that promotes proliferation of different cell types and the regeneration of damaged tissues, including brain tissue. Considering the possibility that LGF could be used as a therapeutic agent in Parkinson's disease, we analyzed its potential neuroregenerative and/or neuroprotective activity when peripherally administered to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. For these studies, rats subjected to nigrostriatal lesions were treated intraperitoneally twice a week with LGF (5 microg/rat) for 3 weeks. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the last LGF treatment. The results show that LGF stimulates sprouting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive terminals and increases tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression, as well as dopamine levels in the denervated striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In this structure, LGF activates microglia and raises tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein levels, which have been reported to have a role in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection. Besides, LGF stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and CREB, and regulates the expression of proteins which are critical for cell survival such as Bcl2 and Akt. Because LGF partially protects dopamine neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra, and reduces motor deficits in these animals, we propose LGF as a novel factor that may be useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  14. Decreased HCN2 expression in STN contributes to abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and globus pallidus of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Ju-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-08-27

    Abnormal oscillation in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. High-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the main type abnormal oscillations in Parkinson's disease, are regulated by dopamine D2-like receptors but not D1-like receptors. However, little is known about how dopamine D2-like receptors regulate HVSs and the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated2 (HCN2) in HVSs regulation. We simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in primary motor cortex (M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats. The expression of HCN2 and dopamine D2 receptor in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was examined by immunochemical staining and Western blotting. We also tested the role of HCN2 in HVSs regulation by using pharmacological and shRNA methodology. We found that dopamine D2-like receptor agonists suppressed the increased HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. HCN2 was co-expressed with dopamine D2 receptor in the STN, and dopamine depletion decreased the expression of HCN2 as well as dopamine D2 receptor which contribute to the regulation of HVSs. HCN2 was down regulated by HCN2 shRNA, which thereby led to an increase in the HVSs in naïve rats while HCN2 agonist reduced the HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results suggest that HCN2 in the STN is involved in abnormal oscillation regulation between M1 cortex and GP.

  15. Adaptive down-regulation of the serotonin transporter in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease and after chronic pramipexole treatment.

    PubMed

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, K; Wardas, J; Kosmowska, B; Domin, H; Śmiałowska, M; Głowacka, U; Ossowska, K

    2016-02-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion induced by bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections into the ventrolateral region of the caudate-putamen (CP) in rats, modeling preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease, induces a "depressive-like" behavior which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole (PRA). The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of the above lesion and chronic PRA treatment on binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT) in different brain regions. As before, 6-OHDA (15 μg/2.5 μl) was administered bilaterally into the CP. PRA (1mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously twice a day for 2 weeks. Serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons of the dorsal raphe (DR) were immunostained for tryptophan hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively, and were counted stereologically. Binding of [(3)H]GBR 12,935 to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and [(3)H]citalopram to SERT was analyzed autoradiographically. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA injections decreased the number of dopaminergic, but not serotonergic neurons in the DR. 6-OHDA reduced the DAT binding in the CP, and SERT binding in the nigrostriatal system (CP, substantia nigra (SN)), limbic system (ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAC), amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFCX), habenula, hippocampus) and DR. A significant positive correlation was found between DAT and SERT binding in the CP. Chronic PRA did not influence DAT binding but reduced SERT binding in the above structures, and deepened the lesion-induced losses in the core region of the NAC, SN, VTA and PFCX. The present study indicates that both the lesion of dopaminergic neurons and chronic PRA administration induce adaptive down-regulation of SERT binding. Moreover, although involvement of stimulation of dopaminergic transmission by chronic PRA in its "antidepressant" effect seems to be prevalent, additional contribution of SERT inhibition cannot be excluded.

  16. Differential toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and rat brain mitochondria: protective role of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-González, Javier; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Méndez-Álvarez, Estefanía; Rose, Sarah; Hikima, Atsuko; Jenner, Peter; Soto-Otero, Ramón

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are two pathophysiological factors often associated with the neurodegenerative process involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is able to cause dopaminergic neurodegeneration in experimental models of PD by an oxidative stress-mediated process, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. It has been established that some antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are often altered in PD, which suggests a potential role of these enzymes in the onset and/or development of this multifactorial syndrome. In this study we have used high-resolution respirometry to evaluate the effect of 6-OHDA on mitochondrial respiration of isolated rat brain mitochondria and the lactate dehydrogenase cytotoxicity assay to assess the percentage of cell death induced by 6-OHDA in human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Our results show that 6-OHDA affects mitochondrial respiration by causing a reduction in both respiratory control ratio (IC(50) = 200 ± 15 nM) and state 3 respiration (IC(50) = 192 ± 17 nM), with no significant effects on state 4(o). An inhibition in the activity of both complex I and V was also observed. 6-OHDA also caused cellular death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (IC(50) = 100 ± 9 μM). Both SOD and CAT have been shown to protect against the toxic effects caused by 6-OHDA on mitochondrial respiration. However, whereas SOD protects against 6-OHDA-induced cellular death, CAT enhances its cytotoxicity. The here reported data suggest that both superoxide anion and hydroperoxyl radical could account for 6-OHDA toxicity. Furthermore, factors reducing the rate of 6-OHDA autoxidation to its p-quinone appear to enhance its cytotoxicity. PMID:22821477

  17. Behavioral and Cellular Modulation of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia by β-Adrenoceptor Blockade in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbach, David; Ostock, Corinne Y.; Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L.; Dupre, Kristin B.; Barnum, Christopher J.; Bhide, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    Chronic dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) leads to deleterious motor sequelae known as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). No known therapeutic can eliminate LID, but preliminary evidence suggests that dl-1-isopropylamino-3-(1-naphthyloxy)-2-propanol [(±)propranolol], a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) antagonist, may reduce LID. The present study used the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine model of PD to characterize and localize the efficacy of (±)propranolol as an adjunct to therapy with l-DOPA. We first determined whether (±)propranolol was capable of reducing the development and expression of LID without impairing motor performance ON and OFF l-DOPA. Coincident to this investigation, we used reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques to analyze the effects of chronic (±)propranolol on markers of striatal activity known to be involved in LID. To determine whether (±)propranolol reduces LID through βAR blockade, we subsequently examined each enantiomer separately because only the (−)enantiomer has significant βAR affinity. We next investigated the effects of a localized striatal βAR blockade on LID by cannulating the region and microinfusing (±)propranolol before systemic l-DOPA injections. Results showed that a dose range of (±)propranolol reduced LID without deleteriously affecting motor activity. Pharmacologically, only (−)propranolol had anti-LID properties indicating βAR-specific effects. Aberrant striatal signaling associated with LID was normalized with (±)propranolol cotreatment, and intrastriatal (±)propranolol was acutely able to reduce LID. This research confirms previous work suggesting that (±)propranolol reduces LID through βAR antagonism and presents novel evidence indicating a potential striatal locus of pharmacological action. PMID:21402691

  18. Early toxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in the rat striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; García, Esperanza; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-12-01

    The early effects of 6-OHDA as a Parkinsonian model in rodents are relevant since pharmacological and toxicological points of view, as they can explain the acute and chronic deleterious events occurring in the striatum. In this study, we focused our attention on the neurochemical and motor dysfunction produced after a pulse infusion of 6-OHDA, paying special attention to the capacity of this molecule to induce neurotransmitter release and behavioural alterations. Extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, glycine and GABA were all assessed in striatal dialysates in freely moving rats immediately after exposed to a single pulse of 6-OHDA in dorsal striatum, and major behavioural markers of motor alterations were simultaneously explored. Enhanced release of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine was found immediately after 6-OHDA pulse. Delayed glutamate and glycine release were detected and a biphasic effect on GABA was observed. Mostly serotonin and dopamine outflow, followed by glutamate, correlated with wet dog shakes and other behavioural qualitative alterations. Early dopamine release, accompanied by other neurotransmitters, can generate an excitatory environment affecting the striatal neurons with immediate consequences for behavioural performance. In turn, these changes might be accounting for later features of toxicity described in this model.

  19. Neuroprotective Activity of Peripherally Administered Liver Growth Factor in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio Sánchez; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Miranda, Cristina; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Bazán, Eulalia

    2013-01-01

    Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen purified some years ago that promotes proliferation of different cell types and the regeneration of damaged tissues, including brain tissue. Considering the possibility that LGF could be used as a therapeutic agent in Parkinson’s disease, we analyzed its potential neuroregenerative and/or neuroprotective activity when peripherally administered to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. For these studies, rats subjected to nigrostriatal lesions were treated intraperitoneally twice a week with LGF (5 microg/rat) for 3 weeks. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the last LGF treatment. The results show that LGF stimulates sprouting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive terminals and increases tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression, as well as dopamine levels in the denervated striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In this structure, LGF activates microglia and raises tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein levels, which have been reported to have a role in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection. Besides, LGF stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and CREB, and regulates the expression of proteins which are critical for cell survival such as Bcl2 and Akt. Because LGF partially protects dopamine neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra, and reduces motor deficits in these animals, we propose LGF as a novel factor that may be useful in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23861803

  20. Dopamine-dependent modulation of rat globus pallidus excitation by nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Alain; Barrientos, Rafael; Alatorre, Alberto; Delgado, Alfonso; Perez-Capistran, Teresa; Chuc-Meza, Eliezer; García-Ramirez, Martha; Querejeta, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    The globus pallidus (GP) coordinates information processing in the basal ganglia nuclei. The contribution of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) to the spiking activity of GP neurons is largely unknown. Several studies have reported that the effect of nAChRs in other nuclei depends on dopaminergic input. Via in vivo single unit extracellular recordings and intranuclear drug infusions, we analyzed the effects of local activation and blockade of nAChRs in neurons of both sham and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. In sham rats, the local application of nicotine and edrophonium (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) increases GP neurons spiking rate. Local application of mecamylamine, a neuronal nicotinic cholinergic antagonist, diminishes pallidal neurons spiking rate, an effect not produced by d-tubocurarine, a peripheral nicotinic cholinergic antagonist. Moreover, mecamylamine blocks the excitatory effect evoked by nicotine and edrophonium. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, local infusion of nicotine does not change pallidal neurons firing rate. Our results show that there is a tonic cholinergic input to the GP that increases their spiking rate through the activation of nAChRs and that this effect depends on functional dopaminergic pathways.

  1. Early-onset cortico-cortical synchronization in the hemiparkinsonian rat model.

    PubMed

    Jávor-Duray, B N; Vinck, M; van der Roest, M; Mulder, A B; Stam, C J; Berendse, H W; Voorn, P

    2015-02-01

    Changes in synchronized neuronal oscillatory activity are reported in both cortex and basal ganglia of Parkinson's disease patients. The origin of these changes, in particular their relationship with the progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, is unknown. Therefore, in the present study we studied interregional neuronal synchronization in motor cortex and basal ganglia during the development of dopaminergic degeneration induced by a unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the rat medial forebrain bundle. We performed serial local field potential recordings bilaterally in the motor cortex and the subthalamic nucleus of the lesioned hemisphere prior to, during, and after development of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell loss. We obtained signal from freely moving rats in both resting and walking conditions, and we computed local spectral power, interregional synchronization (using phase lag index), and directionality (using Granger causality). After neurotoxin injection the first change in phase lag index was an increment in cortico-cortical synchronization. We observed increased bidirectional Granger causality in the beta frequency band between cortex and subthalamic nucleus within the lesioned hemisphere. In the walking condition, the 6-OHDA lesion-induced changes in synchronization resembled that of the resting state, whereas the changes in Granger causality were less pronounced after the lesion. Considering the relatively preserved connectivity pattern of the cortex contralateral to the lesioned side and the early emergence of increased cortico-cortical synchronization during development of the 6-OHDA lesion, we suggest a putative compensatory role of cortico-cortical coupling. PMID:25392174

  2. Protective effect of L-kynurenine and probenecid on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced striatal toxicity in rats: implications of modulating kynurenate as a protective strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; González-Herrera, Irma Gabriela; García, Esperanza; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The neuroactive metabolite at the kynunerine pathway, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a well-known competitive antagonist at the co-agonist glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), and also decreases the extracellular levels of glutamate by blocking α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAchr) located on glutamatergic terminals. KYNA has been often reported to be neuroprotective in different neurotoxic models. The systemic administration of L-kynurenine (L-KYN)--the precursor of KYNA--together with probenecid (PROB)--an inhibitor of organic acids transport--to rodents increases KYNA levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. The striatal infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to rodents is one of the common models used to simulate Parkinson's disease (PD). Different studies have linked PD alterations with excessive glutamatergic transmission in the striatum since NMDAr antagonists exert beneficial effects in PD models. In this work we investigated the effect that a systemic administration of L-KYN+PROB exerted on the toxic model induced by 6-OHDA in rats. PROB (50 mg/kg, i.p.) + L-KYN (75 mg/kg, i.p.) were given to rats for seven consecutive days. On day two of treatment, the animals were infused with a single injection of 6-OHDA (20 μg/2 μl) into the right striatum. Fourteen days post-lesion, rotation behavior was assessed as a marker of motor impairment. The total levels of dopamine (DA) were also estimated in striatal tissue samples of 6-OHDA-treated animals as a neurochemical marker of damage. In addition, twenty eight days post-lesion, the striatal damage was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohistochemistry against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the same animals. Neurodegeneration was also assessed by Fluoro Jade staining. 6-OHDA infusion increased rotation behavior, striatal reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration, while DA levels were decreased. For all markers evaluated, we observed protective

  3. Striatal pleiotrophin overexpression provides functional and morphological neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine model.

    PubMed

    Gombash, Sara E; Lipton, Jack W; Collier, Timothy J; Madhavan, Lalitha; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Terpstra, Brian T; Spieles-Engemann, Anne L; Daley, Brian F; Wohlgenant, Susan L; Thompson, Valerie B; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Mandel, Ronald J; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2012-03-01

    Neurotrophic factors are integrally involved in the development of the nigrostriatal system and in combination with gene therapy, possess great therapeutic potential for Parkinson's disease (PD). Pleiotrophin (PTN) is involved in the development, maintenance, and repair of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The present study examined the ability of striatal PTN overexpression, delivered via psueudotyped recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2/1 (rAAV2/1), to provide neuroprotection and functional restoration from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Striatal PTN overexpression led to significant neuroprotection of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and THir neurite density in the striatum, with long-term PTN overexpression producing recovery from 6-OHDA-induced deficits in contralateral forelimb use. Transduced striatal PTN levels were increased threefold compared to adult striatal PTN expression and approximated peak endogenous developmental levels (P1). rAAV2/1 vector exclusively transduced neurons within the striatum and SNpc with approximately half the total striatal volume routinely transduced using our injection parameters. Our results indicate that striatal PTN overexpression can provide neuroprotection for the 6-OHDA lesioned nigrostriatal system based upon morphological and functional measures and that striatal PTN levels similar in magnitude to those expressed in the striatum during development are sufficient to provide neuroprotection from Parkinsonian insult.

  4. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  5. The Use of Perinatal 6-Hydroxydopamine to Produce a Rodent Model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Darin J; Breese, George R

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurologically, metabolically, and behaviorally devastating condition that has eluded complete characterization and adequate treatment. While it is known that the disease is intimately associated with dysfunction of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) gene that codes for an enzyme of purine metabolism (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase) and is associated with neurological, behavioral, as well as metabolic dysfunction, the mechanisms of the neurobehavioral manifestations are as yet unclear. However, discoveries over the past few decades not only have created useful novel animal models (e.g., the HPRT-deficient mouse and the serendipitously discovered perinatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA lesion model), but also have expanded into epigenetic, genomic, and proteomic approaches to better understand the mechanisms underlying this disease. The perinatal 6-OHDA model, in addition to modeling self-injury and dopamine depletion in the clinical condition, also underscores the profound importance of development in the differential course of maladaptive progression in the face of a common/single neurotoxic insult at different ages. Recent developments from clinical and basic science efforts attest to the fact that while the disease would seem to have a simple single gene defect at its core, the manifestations of this defect are profound and unexpectedly diverse. Future efforts employing the 6-OHDA model and others in the context of the novel technologies of genome editing, chemo- and opto-genetics, epigenetics, and further studies on the mechanisms of stress-induced maladaptations in brain all hold promise in taking our understanding of this disease to the next level. PMID:27029809

  6. The vermicelli handling test: a simple quantitative measure of dexterous forepaw function in rats.

    PubMed

    Allred, Rachel P; Adkins, DeAnna L; Woodlee, Martin T; Husbands, Lincoln C; Maldonado, Mónica A; Kane, Jacqueline R; Schallert, Timothy; Jones, Theresa A

    2008-05-30

    Loss of function in the hands occurs with many brain disorders, but there are few measures of skillful forepaw use in rats available to model these impairments that are both sensitive and simple to administer. Whishaw and Coles previously described the dexterous manner in which rats manipulate food items with their paws, including thin pieces of pasta [Whishaw IQ, Coles BL. Varieties of paw and digit movement during spontaneous food handling in rats: postures, bimanual coordination, preferences, and the effect of forelimb cortex lesions. Behav Brain Res 1996;77:135-48]. We set out to develop a measure of this food handling behavior that would be quantitative, easy to administer, sensitive to the effects of damage to sensory and motor systems of the CNS and useful for identifying the side of lateralized impairments. When rats handle 7 cm lengths of vermicelli, they manipulate the pasta by repeatedly adjusting the forepaw hold on the pasta piece. As operationally defined, these adjustments can be easily identified and counted by an experimenter without specialized equipment. After unilateral sensorimotor cortex (SMC) lesions, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and striatal dopamine depleting (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA) lesions in adult rats, there were enduring reductions in adjustments made with the contralateral forepaw. Additional pasta handling characteristics distinguished between the lesion types. MCAO and 6-OHDA lesions increased the frequency of several identified atypical handling patterns. Severe dopamine depletion increased eating time and adjustments made with the ipsilateral forepaw. However, contralateral forepaw adjustment number most sensitively detected enduring impairments across lesion types. Because of its ease of administration and sensitivity to lateralized impairments in skilled forepaw use, this measure may be useful in rat models of upper extremity impairment.

  7. Short-Term Treatment with Silymarin Improved 6-OHDA-Induced Catalepsy and Motor Imbalance in Hemi-Parkisonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Rasool; Eyvari Brooshghalan, Shahla; Farajniya, Safar; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Sharifi, Hamdolah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by disabling motor abnormalities, which include tremor, muscle stiffness, paucity of voluntary movements, and postural instability. Silymarin (SM) or milk thistle extract, is known to own antioxidative, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of SM, on 6-OHDA-induced motor-impairments (catalepsy and imbalance) in the rats. Methods: Experimental model of PD was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 8 μg/2 μl/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Catalepsy and motor coordination were assessed by using of bar test and rotarod respectively. Results: The results showed a significant (p<0.001) increase in catalepsy of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats whereas; in SM (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p for 5 days) treated hemi-parkinsonian rats catalepsy was decreased markedly (p<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant (p<0.001) increase in motor-imbalance of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. SM improved motor coordination significantly (p<0.001) in a dose dependent manner and increased motor balance. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that short-term treatment with SM could improve 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy and motor imbalance in rats. We suggest that SM can be used as adjunctive therapy along with commonly used anti-parkinsonian drugs. However, further clinical trial studies should be carried out to prove this hypothesis. PMID:26819917

  8. Apomorphine-induced turning behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats is increased by histidine and decreased by histidine decarboxylase, histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, and an H3 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Qing; Hu, Dan-Na; Liu, Fu-Xin; Chen, Zhong; Luo, Jian-Hong

    2008-09-01

    The role of histamine and its receptors in basal ganglia neurocircuitry was assessed in apomorphine-induced turning behavior. Rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta and medial forebrain bundle were administered histaminergic agents, and apomorphine-induced turning behavior was tested on Days 7 and 14 post-lesion. Compared with saline-treated rats, histidine (500 mg/kg, i.p.), a precursor of histamine, increased turning behavior (p<0.05), while alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 25 microg, i.c.v.), an irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, decreased turning behavior (p<0.05) but only on Day 14 post-lesion. Both the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine (10 and 50 microg, i.c.v.) and the H(2) receptor antagonist cimetidine (10 and 50 microg, i.c.v.) significantly decreased turning behavior on Days 7 and 14 post-lesion. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist immepip (10 microg, i.c.v.) decreased turning behavior (p<0.05) on Day 14 post-lesion. The present findings indicate the complex interactions of histamine on basal ganglia function.

  9. S-allyl cysteine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in the rat striatum: involvement of Nrf2 transcription factor activation and modulation of signaling kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Macías-Silva, Marina; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Maldonado, Perla D; González-Trujano, María Eva; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacological activation at the basal ganglia of the transcription factor Nrf2, guardian of redox homeostasis, holds a strong promise for the slow progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a potent Nrf2 activator in the brain still must be found. In this study, we have investigated the potential use of the antioxidant compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC) in the activation of Nrf2 in 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA)-intoxicated rats. In the rat striatum, SAC by itself promoted the Nrf2 dissociation of Keap-1, its nuclear translocation, the subsequent association with small MafK protein, and further binding of the Nrf2/MafK complex to ARE sequence, as well as the up-regulation of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes HO-1, NQO-1, GR, and SOD-1. In vivo and in vitro experiments to identify signaling pathways activated by SAC pointed to Akt as the most likely kinase participating in Nrf2 activation by SAC. In PC12 cells, SAC stimulated the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and inhibited JNK1/2/3 activation. In the rat striatum, the SAC-induced activation of Nrf2 is likely to contribute to inhibit the toxic effects of 6-OHDA evidenced by phase 2 antioxidant enzymes up-regulation, glutathione recovery, and attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and lipid peroxides formation. These early protective effects correlated with the long-term preservation of the cellular redox status, the striatal dopamine (DA) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and the improvement of motor skills. Therefore, this study indicates that, in addition to direct scavenging actions, the activation of Nrf2 by SAC might confer neuroprotective responses through the modulation of kinase signaling pathways in rodent models of PD, and suggests that this antioxidant molecule may have a therapeutic value in this human pathology.

  10. The effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on trace element and antioxidant levels in rats following 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal insult.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Moosa, Zulfiah; Daniels, Willie M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2014-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a metal toxin found commonly in the environment. Studies have shown severe neurotoxic effects of MeHg poisoning especially during pregnancy where it crosses the foetoplacental and the blood brain barrier of the foetus leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in the offspring. These deficits may predispose offspring to neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure (2.5 mg/L in drinking water from GND 1-GND 21) on the trace element status in the brain of adolescent offspring (PND 28). Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured in their blood plasma. In a separate group of animals that was also exposed prenatally to MeHg, 6-hydroydopamine (6-OHDA) was administered at PND 60 as a model of neuronal insult. Trace element and TAC levels were compared before and after 6-OHDA exposure. Prenatal MeHg treatment alone resulted in significantly higher concentrations of zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in the brain of offspring at PND 28 (p < 0.05), when compared to controls. In contrast, brain iron levels in MeHg-exposed adolescent offspring were significantly lower than their controls (p < 0.05). Following 6-OHDA exposure, the levels of iron, zinc, copper and manganese were increased compared to sham-lesioned offspring (p < 0.05). Prenatal MeHg exposure further increased these trace element levels thereby promoting toxicity (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity was not significantly different in MeHg and control groups prior to lesion. However, following 6-OHDA administration, MeHg-exposed animals had a significantly lower TAC than that of controls (p < 0.05). Brain TAC levels were higher in adult male rats than in female rats during adolescence however male rats that had been exposed to MeHg in utero failed to show this increase at PND 74. Prenatal MeHg exposure results in trace element dyshomeostasis in the brain of offspring and reduces total

  11. Altered extracellular striatal in vivo biotransformation of the opioid neuropeptide dynorphin A(1-17) in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Klintenberg, Rebecka; Andrén, Per E

    2005-02-01

    The in vivo biotransformation of dynorphin A(1-17) (Dyn A) was studied in the striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats by using microdialysis in combination with nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probes were implanted into both hemispheres of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Dyn A (10 pmol microl(-1)) was infused through the probes at 0.4 microl min(-1) for 2 h. Samples were collected every 30 min and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The results showed for the first time that there was a difference in the Dyn A biotransformation when comparing the two corresponding sides of the brain. Dyn A metabolites 1-8, 1-16, 5-17, 10-17, 7-10 and 8-10 were detected in the dopamine-depleted striatum but not in the untreated striatum. Dyn A biotransformed fragments found in both hemispheres were N-terminal fragments 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-11, 1-12 and 1-13, C-terminal fragments 2-17, 3-17, 4-17, 7-17 and 8-17 and internal fragments 2-5, 2-10, 2-11, 2-12, and 8-15. The relative levels of these fragments were lower in the dopamine-depleted striatum. The results imply that the extracellular in vivo processing of the dynorphin system is being disturbed in the 6-OHDA-lesion animal model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:15706626

  12. Assessment of the Protection of Dopaminergic Neurons by an α7 Nicotinic Receptor Agonist, PHA 543613 Using [18F]LBT-999 in a Parkinson’s Disease Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sérrière, Sophie; Doméné, Aurélie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Mothes, Céline; Bodard, Sylvie; Rodrigues, Nuno; Guilloteau, Denis; Routier, Sylvain; Page, Guylène; Chalon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The inverse association between nicotine intake and Parkinson’s disease (PD) is well established and suggests that this molecule could be neuroprotective through anti-inflammatory action mediated by nicotinic receptors, including the α7-subtype (α7R). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an agonist of α7R, PHA 543613, on striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. Adult male Wistar rats were lesioned in the right striatum and assigned to either the PHA group (n = 7) or the Sham group (n = 5). PHA 543613 hydrochloride at the concentration of 6 mg/kg (PHA group) or vehicle (Sham group) was intra-peritoneally injected 2 h before 6-OHDA lesioning and then at days 2, 4, and 6 post-lesion. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 7 days post-lesion using [18F]LBT-999 to quantify the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). After PET imaging, neuroinflammation was evaluated in same animals in vitro through the measurement of the microglial activation marker 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) by quantitative autoradiography with [3H]PK-11195. The DAT density reflecting the integrity of dopaminergic neurons was significantly decreased while the intensity of neuroinflammation measured by TSPO density was significantly increased in the lesioned compared to intact striatum in both groups. However, these both modifications were partially reversed in the PHA group compared to Sham. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the degree of lesion and the intensity of neuroinflammation was evidenced. These findings indicate that PHA 543613 exerts neuroprotective effects on the striatal dopaminergic neurons associated with a reduction in microglial activation in this model of PD. This reinforces the hypothesis that an α7R agonist could provide beneficial effects for the treatment of PD. PMID:26389120

  13. Three-dimensional elemental bio-imaging of Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn and P in a 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; George, Jessica L; Grimm, Rudolph; Wilkins, Simon; Adlard, Paul A; Cherny, Robert A; Bush, Ashley I; Finkelstein, David I; Doble, Philip

    2010-11-01

    Three dimensional maps of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and phosphorous (P) in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned mouse brain were constructed employing a novel quantitative laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging method known as elemental bio-imaging. The 3D maps were produced by ablating serial consecutive sections taken from the same animal. Each section was quantified against tissue standards resulting in a three dimensional map that represents the variation of trace element concentrations of the mouse brain in the area surrounding the substantia nigra (SN). Damage caused by the needle or the toxin did not alter the distribution of Zn, and Cu but significantly altered Fe in and around the SN and both Mn and Fe around the needle track. A 20% increase in nigral Fe concentration was observed within the lesioned hemisphere. This technique clearly shows the natural heterogeneous distributions of these elements throughout the brain and the perturbations that occur following trauma or intoxication. The method may applied to three-dimensional modelling of trace elements in a wide range of tissue samples. PMID:21072366

  14. 6-hydroxydopamine and aggression in cats.

    PubMed

    Beleslin, D B; Samardzić, R; Stefanović-Denić, K

    1981-01-01

    The effect of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injected into the cerebral ventricles on behaviour of singly- and group-housed cats was investigated. 6-OHDA in doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg was administered every morning for 5 to 8 days. In small doses 6-OHDA in singly- and group-housed cats evoked motor phenomena such as tremor, ataxia, rigidity, weakness and sometimes clonic-tonic convulsions. Occasionally restlessness, irritability and rage were observed. Large doses of 6-OHDA in group-housed cats, after a short latent period (2-3 days) produced aggression which intensified on subsequent injections, and thereafter, on repeated administrations, no longer occurred. The aggression consisted of restlessness, irritability, anger, rage, apprehension, threat, attack, fighting, flight and crying. Of autonomic phenomena mydriasis, dyspnea and sometimes piloerection were observed. The aggression was initiated by the most restless cat, or by disturbing the animals, such as by moving the cage. When 6-OHDA no longer produced aggressive behaviour, motor changes such as tremor, ataxia, rigidity, walking on broad base, weakness with adynamia and clonic-tonic convulsions developed. These latter symptoms were produced by large doses of 6-OHDA in singly-housed cats. In these animals spontaneous signs of aggressive behaviour usually were not observed, although if handled they showed rage, snarling and hissing. When singly-housed cats were kept in the same cage with group-housed animals, the singly-housed cats usually became aggressive. It appears that hyperactivity induced aggression in 6-OHDA-treated cats. PMID:7195585

  15. Respiratory deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tuppy, M; Barna, B F; Alves-Dos-Santos, L; Britto, L R G; Chiavegatto, S; Moreira, T S; Takakura, A C

    2015-06-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. In addition to deficits in voluntary movement, PD involves a disturbance of breathing regulation. However, the cause and nature of this disturbance are not well understood. Here, we investigated breathing at rest and in response to hypercapnia (7% CO2) or hypoxia (8% O2), as well as neuroanatomical changes in brainstem regions essential for breathing, in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Bilateral injections of 6-OHDA (24μg/μl) into the striatum decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+))-neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), transcription factor phox2b-expressing neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus and neurokinin-1 receptors in the ventral respiratory column. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, respiratory rate was reduced at rest, leading to a reduction in minute ventilation. These animals also showed a reduction in the tachypneic response to hypercapnia, but not to hypoxia challenge. These results suggest that the degeneration of TH(+) neurons in the SNpc leads to impairment of breathing at rest and in hypercapnic conditions. Our data indicate that respiratory deficits in a 6-OHDA rat model of PD are related to downregulation of neural systems involved in respiratory rhythm generation. The present study suggests a new avenue to better understand the respiratory deficits observed in chronic stages of PD.

  16. Sequential bilateral striatal lesions have additive effects on single skilled limb use in rats.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2007-02-27

    Unilateral dopamine depletion in rats induced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the nigrostriatal system causes permanent impairments in limb use. The disturbances in limb use, including impairments in skilled reaching, are most severe on the side contralateral to the lesion. A number of studies, however, have also described ipsilateral deficits in skilled reaching. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sequential bilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions on skilled reaching movements in rats to compare the contribution of contra- versus ipsilateral motor control. Rats were trained in a reaching task to grasp food pellets with their preferred paw prior to receiving an intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection on the side contralateral to the preferred paw. The lesion significantly reduced reaching success along with qualitative impairments in limb use. In addition, animals displayed asymmetry in limb use and contraversive rotation bias after an apomorphine challenge. Three weeks later, animals received a second lesion induced by intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection into the hemisphere ipsilateral to the preferred paw. This lesion exaggerated the previous impairments in limb use and further reduced reaching success of the preferred paw. In the ladder rung walking task, additional impairments were found only in the forelimb ipsilateral to the first lesion. The findings of additive effects of sequential bilateral lesions suggest that both the contra- and ipsilateral striatum control single limb use. This supports the notion of bilateral control of skilled forelimb use by the mesostriatal dopaminergic system. PMID:17182115

  17. A novel therapeutic approach to 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease in rats via supplementation of PTD-conjugated tyrosine hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shaoping; Fu Ailing; Wang Yuxia; Yu Leiping; Jia Peiyuan; Li Qian; Jin Guozhang; Sun Manji . E-mail: Sunmj@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-07-21

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether the protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) fusion protein was effective on the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats. An expression vector pET-PTD-TH harbouring the PTD-TH gene was constructed and transformed to the Escherichia coli BL21 cells for expression. The expressed recombinant PTD-TH with a molecular weight of 61 kD was successfully transduced (1 {mu}M) into the dopaminergic SH-sy5y human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and visualized by immunohistochemical assay. An in vivo experiment in rats showed that the iv administered PTD-TH protein (8 mg/kg) permeated across the blood-brain barrier, penetrated into the striatum and midbrain, and peaked at 5-8 h after the injection. The behavioral effects of PTD-TH on the apomorphine-induced rotations in the PD model rats 8 weeks after the 6-OHDA lesion showed that a single bolus of PTD-TH (8 mg/kg) iv injection caused a decrement of 60% of the contralateral turns on day 1 and 40% on days 5-17. The results imply that iv delivery of PTD-TH is therapeutically effective on the 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats, the PTD-mediated human TH treatment opening a promising therapeutic direction in treatment of PD.

  18. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:26363150

  19. The locus coeruleus Is Directly Implicated in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinsonian Rats: An Electrophysiological and Behavioural Study

    PubMed Central

    Miguelez, Cristina; Aristieta, Asier; Cenci, Maria Angela; Ugedo, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Despite being the most effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, L-DOPA causes a development of dyskinetic movements in the majority of treated patients. L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is attributed to a dysregulated dopamine transmission within the basal ganglia, but serotonergic and noradrenergic systems are believed to play an important modulatory role. In this study, we have addressed the role of the locus coeruleus nucleus (LC) in a rat model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo and behavioural and immunohistochemical approaches were applied in rats rendered dyskinetic by the destruction of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons followed by chronic treatment with L-DOPA. The results showed that L-DOPA treatment reversed the change induced by 6-hydroxydopamine lesions on LC neuronal activity. The severity of the abnormal involuntary movements induced by L-DOPA correlated with the basal firing parameters of LC neuronal activity. Systemic administration of the LC-selective noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine did not modify axial, limb, and orolingual dyskinesia, whereas chemical destruction of the LC with ibotenic acid significantly increased the abnormal involuntary movement scores. These results are the first to demonstrate altered LC neuronal activity in 6-OHDA lesioned rats treated with L-DOPA, and indicate that an intact noradrenergic system may limit the severity of this movement disorder. PMID:21931808

  20. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  1. Effect of exercise on dopamine neuron survival in prenatally stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa V.; Kellaway, Lauriston A.; Daniels, William M. U.

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal stress has been associated with increased vulnerability to psychiatric disturbances including schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Elevated maternal circulating stress hormones alter development of neural circuits in the fetal brain and cause long-term changes in behaviour. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether mild prenatal stress increases the vulnerability of dopamine neurons in adulthood. A low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) was unilaterally infused into the medial forebrain bundle of nerve fibres in the rat brain in order to create a partial lesion of dopamine neurons which was sufficient to cause subtle behavioural deficits associated with early onset of Parkinson’s disease without complete destruction of dopamine neurons. Voluntary exercise appeared to have a neuroprotective effect resulting in an improvement in motor control and decreased asymmetry in the use of left and right forelimbs to explore a novel environment as well as decreased asymmetry of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased dopamine cell loss in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Prenatal stress appeared to enhance the toxic effect of 6-OHDA possibly by reducing the compensatory adaptations to exercise. PMID:19844780

  2. Efficient Expression of Igf-1 from Lentiviral Vectors Protects In Vitro but Does Not Mediate Behavioral Recovery of a Parkinsonian Lesion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Broadstock, Martin; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy approaches delivering neurotrophic factors have offered promising results in both preclinical and clinical trials of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, failure of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in phase 2 clinical trials has sparked a search for other trophic factors that may retain efficacy in the clinic. Direct protein injections of one such factor, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, in a rodent model of PD has demonstrated impressive protection of dopaminergic neurons against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity. However, protein infusion is associated with surgical risks, pump failure, and significant costs. We therefore used lentiviral vectors to deliver Igf-1, with a particular focus on the novel integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs). A neuron-specific promoter, from the human synapsin 1 gene, excellent for gene expression from IDLVs, was additionally used to enhance Igf-1 expression. An investigation of neurotrophic effects on primary rat neuronal cultures demonstrated that neurons transduced with IDLV-Igf-1 vectors had complete protection on withdrawal of exogenous trophic support. Striatal transduction of such vectors into 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, however, provided neither protection of dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons nor improvement of animal behavior.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of Portulaca oleracea extracts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Martins, Waleska B; Rodrigues, Sheyla A; Silva, Hatamy K; Dantas, Camila G; Júnior, Waldecy DE Lucca; Filho, Lauro Xavier; Cardoso, Juliana C; Gomes, Margarete Z

    2016-09-01

    The Portulaca oleracea L. (Portulacaceae) is a cosmopolitan species with a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. We investigated the effects of P. oleracea extracts in a 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease, a debilitating disorder without effective treatments. Chemical profiles of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of whole plant were analyzed by thin layer chromatography and the antioxidant activity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrilhidrazila method. Male Wistar rats received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine and were treated with vehicle or extracts (oral, 200 and 400 mg/kg) daily for two weeks. The behavioral open field test was conducted at days 1 and 15. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed 4 weeks after surgery to quantify tyrosine-hydroxylase cell counts in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Extracts presented antioxidant activity in concentrations above 300 µg/kg. The chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of Levodopa, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids and polysaccharides. Both extracts improved motor recovery 15 days after lesion and protected from tyrosine-hydroxylase cell loss after 4 weeks, but these effects were more evident for the aqueous extract. Because the dopamine precursor is present, in addition to antioxidant compounds and neuroprotective effects, P. oleracea can be considered as potential strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:27508995

  4. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Microarray expression profiling in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Park, Bokyung; Oh, Chang-Ki; Choi, Won-Seok; Chung, In Kwon; Youdim, Moussa B H; Oh, Young J

    2011-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To discover potential key molecules in this process, we utilized cDNA microarray technology to obtain an expression profile of transcripts in MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. Using a self-organizing map algorithm, data mining and clustering were combined to identify distinct functional subgroups of genes. We identified alterations in the expression of 81 genes in eight clusters. Among these genes, we verified protein expression patterns of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 and sequestosome 1 using both cell culture and rat brain models of PD. Immunological analyses revealed increased expression levels as well as aggregated distribution patterns of these gene products in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated dopaminergic neurons. In addition to the identification of other proteins that are known to be associated with protein aggregation, our results raise the possibility that a more widespread set of proteins may be associated with the generation of protein aggregates in dying neurons. Further research to determine the functional roles of other altered gene products within the same cluster as well as the seven remaining clusters may provide new insights into the neurodegeneration that underlies PD pathogenesis.

  6. Extracellular toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine on PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, D; Torch, S; Nissou, M F; Benabid, A L; Verna, J M

    2000-04-14

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is usually thought to cross cell membrane through dopamine uptake transporters, to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species. In this study, we show that the anti-oxidants catalase, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine are able to reverse the toxic effects of 6-OHDA. These two latter compounds considerably slow down 6-OHDA oxidation in a cell free system suggesting a direct chemical interaction with the neurotoxin. Moreover, desipramine does not protect PC12 cells and 6-OHDA is also strongly toxic towards non-catecholaminergic C6 and NIH3T3 cells. These results thus suggest that 6-OHDA toxicity on PC12 cells mainly involves an extracellular process. PMID:10754220

  7. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  8. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David G; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle

    2015-09-15

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chronic unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine depletion with 6-OHDA results in decreased intensity, bandwidth, and complexity of ultrasonic vocalizations. However, it is unclear if mild/acute dopamine depletion, paralleling earlier stages of PD, results in vocalization deficits, or to what degree vocalization parameters are correlated with other dopamine-dependent indicators of lesion severity or percent of tyrosine hydroxylase (%TH) loss. Here, we assayed ultrasonic vocalizations, forelimb asymmetry, and apomorphine rotations in rats with a range of unilateral dopamine loss resulting from 6-OHDA or vehicle control infusions to the medial forebrain bundle at acute (72 h) and chronic (4 weeks) time points post-infusion. The %TH loss was evaluated at 4 weeks. At 72 h, forelimb asymmetry and %TH loss were significantly correlated, while at 4 weeks, all measures of lesion severity were significantly correlated with each other. Call complexity was significantly correlated with all measures of lesion severity at 72 h but only with %TH loss at 4 weeks. Bandwidth was correlated with forelimb asymmetry at both time points. Duration was significantly correlated with all dopamine depletion measures at 4 weeks. Notably, not all parameters were affected universally or equally across time. These results suggest that vocalization deficits may be a sensitive index of acute and mild catecholamine loss and further underscores the need to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying vocal deficits in PD.

  9. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats.

  10. Decomposition of abnormal free locomotor behavior in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; von Nicolai, Constantin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Hamel, Wolfgang; Engel, Andreas K.; Moll, Christian K.

    2013-01-01

    Poverty of spontaneous movement, slowed execution and reduced amplitudes of movement (akinesia, brady- and hypokinesia) are cardinal motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease that can be modeled in experimental animals by brain lesions affecting midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Most behavioral investigations in experimental parkinsonism have employed short-term observation windows to assess motor impairments. We postulated that an analysis of longer-term free exploratory behavior could provide further insights into the complex fine structure of altered locomotor activity in parkinsonian animals. To this end, we video-monitored 23 h of free locomotor behavior and extracted several behavioral measures before and after the expression of a severe parkinsonian phenotype following bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the rat dopaminergic substantia nigra. Unbiased stereological cell counting verified the degree of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive cell loss in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. In line with previous reports, overall covered distance and maximal motion speed of lesioned animals were found to be significantly reduced compared to controls. Before lesion surgery, exploratory rat behavior exhibited a bimodal distribution of maximal speed values obtained for single movement episodes, corresponding to a “first” and “second gear” of motion. 6-OHDA injections significantly reduced the incidence of second gear motion episodes and also resulted in an abnormal prolongation of these fast motion events. Likewise, the spatial spread of such episodes was increased in 6-OHDA rats. The increase in curvature of motion tracks was increased in both lesioned and control animals. We conclude that the discrimination of distinct modes of motion by statistical decomposition of longer-term spontaneous locomotion provides useful insights into the fine structure of fluctuating motor functions in a rat analog of Parkinson's disease. PMID:24348346

  11. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have established that selective damage to the early-developing components of the mesostriatal dopamine system produces profound changes in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated behaviors, while decreasing D1 receptor density. In order to better understand the effects of early intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions, we studied the ontogenetic expression (postnatal days 7, 14, 35 and 90) of D1 and D2 receptors, and their corresponding messenger RNAs, in rats that had received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine or vehicle lesions on postnatal day 1. Using receptor autoradiography, significant (P < 0.05) decreases in [3H]SCH 23390 binding to D1 receptors in the rostral and caudal dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals were evident by postnatal day 7, and remained depressed at all future time points. A significant decrease in D1 receptor concentration occurred in the dorsolateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). [3H]Spiperone binding to D2 receptor sites was unchanged throughout the entire study. In situ hybridization for D1 and D2 messenger RNA expression showed contrasting results. 6-Hydroxydopamine induced significant decreases of D1 messenger RNA levels in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate by postnatal day 7. By postnatal day 14, messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of the 6-hydroxydopamine group, and remained elevated thereafter. D1 messenger RNA levels became elevated in the lateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). The opposing changes in D1 receptor concentrations and the messenger RNA encoding the protein did not occur as a consequence of increased transport of D1 receptors to striatonigral terminals. D2 messenger RNA levels in the dorsal caudate were significantly decreased on postnatal day 7, and became higher than controls at postnatal day 14, but were unchanged from controls at later time points

  12. 6-Hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharides induced DNA damage in astrocytes: involvement of nitric oxide and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Goswami, Poonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Joshi, Neeraj; Sharma, Sharad; Nath, C; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide on astrocytes. Rat astrocyte C6 cells were treated with different concentration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for 24 h. Both neurotoxins significantly decreased the viability of astrocytes, augmented the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the astrocyte marker--glial fibrillar acidic protein. A significantly decreased mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, caspase-3 mRNA level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage was observed in 6-OHDA/LPS treated astroglial cells. 6-OHDA/LPS treatment also caused the significantly increased expression of iNOS and nitrite level. Findings showed that 6-OHDA/LPS treatment caused mitochondrial dysfunction mediated death of astrocytes, which significantly involve the nitric oxide. Since we have observed significantly increased level of iNOS along with mitochondrial impairment and apoptotic cell death in astrocytes, therefore to validate the role of iNOS, the cells were co-treated with iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG, 100 μM). Co-treatment of AG significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA/LPS induced cell death, mitochondrial activity, augmented ROS level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage. GFAP and caspase-3 expression were also inhibited with co-treatment of AG, although the extent of inhibition was different in both experimental sets. In conclusion, the findings showed that iNOS mediated increased level of nitric oxide acts as a key regulatory molecule in 6-OHDA/LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptotic death of astrocytes.

  13. Protective effect of methanolic extract of Garcinia indica fruits in 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Antala, Bhaveshkumar V.; Patel, Manishkumar S.; Bhuva, Satish V.; Gupta, Shiv; Rabadiya, Samir; Lahkar, Mangala

    2012-01-01

    Context: Several studies have reported that antioxidants play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD). Garcinia indica extract is a natural antioxidant, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of methanolic extract of Garcinia indica (GIM) against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxicity for striatal dopaminergic neurons in the rat. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups namely control, 6-OHDA model, and GIM (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight suspended in one ml of 0.1% carboxymethyl cellulose). The treatment was started three days before surgery and continued for next 14 days. The surgery was done on third day in all groups for administration of 6-OHDA into the right striatum and right substantia nigra, whereas control group injected with 6-OHDA vehicle. Various behavior and biochemical tests (Apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, Stepping test, Initiation time, Postural balance test, and Disengage time) were used to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of GIM. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnett's test was used to compare inter-group differences. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: GIM had significant (P<0.05, P<0.01) preventive effect in biochemical tests, i.e., dopamine and its metabolites measurement and in various behavior tests, i.e., apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, stepping test, initiation time, postural balance test, and disengage time as compared to 6-OHDA-treated rats. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that GIM acted as an effective neuroprotective agent for striatal dopaminergic neurons in 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of PD. PMID:23248394

  14. Pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons through paraplegin against 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun Ki; Park, Hyeon Soo; Cho, Jea Hyeon; Kim, Gon Sup; Won, Chungkil

    2015-01-21

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates various physiological and psychological functions, such as movement, motivation, behavior, and learning. DA exerts its function through DA receptors and a series of studies have reported the role of DAergic receptors in preventing DAergic neuronal degeneration. Here, we studied the DA receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of the D2-like receptor agonists against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced DAergic neurodegeneration. D2-like receptor agonists were administered in the substantia nigra in vivo and to primary cultured neurons. Treatment of 6-OHDA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and paraplegin (mitochondrial regulation protein) immunoreactivity, whereas pretreatment with quinpirole (a full D2-like receptor agonist) preserved TH and paraplegin reactivity. This led us to test which DA receptors were necessary for the neuroprotective effect and whether paraplegin can be regulated by D2 or D3 receptor agonists. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor selective agonist, sumanirole, did not preserve TH and paraplegin reactivity from 6-OHDA. However, the D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole, protected TH reactivity and restored paraplegin expression to the control level in the presence of 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pretreatment with the D3 receptor antagonist GR103691 reduced TH and paraplegin expression levels. These results suggest that the D3 receptor agonist may protect DA neurons from the effect of 6-OHDA through the modulation of the mitochondrial regulation protein paraplegin. PMID:25514384

  15. Role of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in 6-Hydroxydopmaine-induced Catalepsy-like Immobilization in Rats: a Therapeutic Approach for Treating Catalepsy of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    eyhani-rad, Siamak; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Javad; Samini, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that buspirone, a partial agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors, improves motor dysfunctions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and haloperidol in rats. The present work extends these findings by investigating the role of 5-HT1A receptors on catalepsy-like immobilization in rats, a model of Parkinson’s disease. Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OH-dopamine (8 μg/2μL/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra, compact part (SNc) and assayed by bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after the drugs administration. The involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy was studied through intraperitoneal (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/Kg IP) and intrasubstantia nigra, compact part (10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) injection of 8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OHDPAT) as well as administration of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-pthalimmido) butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/Kg, NAN-190, IP). NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) and 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP and 10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) increased and decreased 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy respectively. In normal (non 6-OHDA-lesioned) rats, NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) increased the elapsed time in bar-test while 8-OHDPAT did not produce any significant effect. The anticataleptic effect of 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP) was reversed markedly by co-injection with NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP). These findings suggest that 5-HT1A receptors are involved in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy-like immobilization. PMID:24250551

  16. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  17. Adipose stromal cells-conditioned medium blocks 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huiying; Wang, Jimmy; Du, Nicole; Tan, Jiangning; Johnstone, Brian; Du, Yansheng

    2013-06-01

    A recent in vivo study suggested that the delivery of adipose stromal cells (ASCs) protected rat brains from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanism that underlies this neuroprotection remains unknown. It was suggested that ASCs-induced neuroprotection possibly resulting from released factors from ASCs. In this study, we investigated whether and how cell-free conditioned media collected from ASCs (ASC-CM) protect neurons against neurotoxicity induced by 6-OHDA in cultured rat rostral mesencephalic neurons (RMN) and cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). We now report that ASC-CM protects both RMN and CGN against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. Exposure of CGN to 6-OHDA resulted in a significant increases in neuronal ROS and cell death. As expected, pretreatments with ASC-CM dramatically block both 6-OHDA-induced ROS and neurotoxicity. Additionally, ASC-CM also directly attenuated H2O2-induced neuronal death. Our results suggest that ASC-CM could block 6-OHDA-induced neuronal death by inhibiting both 6-OHDA-induced ROS generation and ROS-induced neurotoxicity in neurons. Both antioxidative and neuroprotective effects of ASC-CM may be beneficial in the therapy for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Alcoholic extract of Bacopa monniera Linn. protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced changes in behavioral and biochemical aspects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shobana, Chandrasekar; Kumar, Radhakrishnan Ramesh; Sumathi, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the commonest neurodegenerative diseases, and oxidative stress has been evidenced to play a vital role in its causation. In this study, we evaluated whether alcoholic extract of Bacopa monniera (AEBM), an antioxidant and memory enhancer can slow the neuronal injury in a 6-OHDA-rat model of Parkinson's. Rats were treated with 20 and 40 mg/kg bodyweight of AEBM for 3 weeks. On Day 21, 2 μl of 6-OHDA (12 μg in 0.01 % in ascorbic acid-saline) was infused into the right striatum, while the control group received 2 μl of vehicle. Three weeks after the 6-OHDA injection, the rats were tested for neurobehavioral activity (rotarod, locomotor activity, grip test, forced swim test, radial arm maze) and were killed after 6 weeks for the estimation of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, activities of glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). The deficits in behavioral activity due to 6-OHDA lesioning were significantly and dose dependently restored by AEBM. Lesioning was followed by an increased lipid peroxidation and significant depletion of reduced GSH content in the substantia nigra, which was prevented with AEBM pretreatment. The activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, CAT and SOD in striatum were reduced significantly by lesioning, which were restored significantly and dose dependently by AEBM. This study indicates that the extract of B. monniera might be helpful in attenuating 6-OHDA-induced lesioning in rats.

  19. Antidyskinetic Effect of 7-Nitroindazole and Sodium Nitroprusside Associated with Amantadine in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bortolanza, Mariza; Bariotto-Dos-Santos, Keila D; Dos-Santos-Pereira, Maurício; da-Silva, Célia Aparecida; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2016-07-01

    Amantadine is the noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate, receptor activated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. It is the only effective medication used to alleviate dyskinesia induced by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in Parkinson's disease patients. Unfortunately, adverse effects as abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia limit its clinical utility. Combined effective symptomatic treatment modalities may lessen the liability to undesirable events. Likewise drugs known to interfere with nitrergic system reduce AIMs in animal models of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to analyze an interaction between amantadine, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (7-nitroindazole, 7NI), and nitric oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) in 6-hydroxydopamine-(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats (microinjection in the medial forebrain bundle) presenting L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (20 mg/kg, gavage, during 21 days). We confirm that 7NI-30 mg/kg, SNP-2/4 mg/kg and amantadine-40 mg/kg, individually reduced AIMs. Our results revealed that co-administration of sub-effective dose of amantadine (10 mg/kg) plus sub-effective dose of 7NI (20 mg/kg) potentiates the effect of reducing AIMs scores when compared to the effect of the drugs individually. No superior benefit on L-DOPA-induced AIMs was observed with the combination of amantadine and SNP. The results revealed that combination of ineffective doses of amantadine and 7NI represents a new strategy to increase antidyskinetic effect in L-DOPA-induced AIMs. It may provide additional therapeutic benefits to Parkinson's disease patients from these disabling complications at lower and thus safer and more tolerable doses than required when either drug is used alone. To close, we discuss the paradox of both nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and/or donor produced AIMs reduction by targeting nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27053252

  20. Protective effects of neurotrophic factor-secreting cells in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sadan, Ofer; Bahat-Stromza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Pisnevsky, Anat; Peretz, Hagit; Ilan, Avihay Bar; Bulvik, Shlomo; Shemesh, Noam; Krepel, Dana; Cohen, Yoram; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. In our laboratory, a novel protocol has been developed to induce bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into neurotrophic factors- secreting cells (NTF-SC), thus combining stem cell-based therapy with the NTF-based neuroprotection. These cells produce and secrete factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor. Conditioned medium of the NTF-SC that was applied to a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) 1 h before exposure to the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) demonstrated marked protection. An efficacy study was conducted on the 6-OHDA-induced lesion, a rat model of Parkinson's disease. The cells, either MSC or NTF-SC, were transplanted on the day of 6-OHDA administration and amphetamine-induced rotations were measured as a primary behavior index. We demonstrated that when transplanted posterior to the 6-OHDA lesion, the NTF-SC ameliorated amphetamine-induced rotations by 45%. HPLC analysis demonstrated that 6-OHDA induced dopamine depletion to a level of 21% compared to the untreated striatum. NTF-SC inhibited dopamine depletion to a level of 72% of the contralateral striatum. Moreover, an MRI study conducted with iron-labeled cells, followed by histological verification, revealed that the engrafted cells migrated toward the lesion. In a histological assessment, we found that the cells induced regeneration in the damaged striatal dopaminergic nerve terminal network. We therefore conclude that the induced MSC have a therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative processes and diseases, both by the NTFs secretion and by the migratory trait toward the diseased tissue.

  1. Chronic Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation Protects Against 6-hydroxydopamine Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amol P.; Fuentes, Romulo; Zhang, Hao; Vinholo, Thais; Wang, Chi-Han; Freire, Marco Aurelio M.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Although L-dopa continues to be the gold standard for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), it presents long-term complications. Deep brain stimulation is effective, but only a small percentage of idiopathic PD patients are eligible. Based on results in animal models and a handful of patients, dorsal column stimulation (DCS) has been proposed as a potential therapy for PD. To date, the long-term effects of DCS in animal models have not been quantified. Here, we report that DCS applied twice a week in rats treated with bilateral 6-OHDA striatal infusions led to a significant improvement in symptoms. DCS-treated rats exhibited a higher density of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and higher neuronal cell count in the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to a control group. These results suggest that DCS has a chronic therapeutical and neuroprotective effect, increasing its potential as a new clinical option for treating PD patients.

  2. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-01

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. PMID:27222379

  3. Forskolin promotes the development of ethanol tolerance in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, G.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    Partial depletion of brain norepinephrine by 6-hydroxydopamine prevents the development of functional tolerance to ethanol in mice. This blockade of tolerance development was overcome by daily intracerebroventricular injections of forskolin. These results suggest that interaction of norepinephrine with post-synaptic ..beta..-adrenergic receptors, and activation of adenylate cyclase, is important for the development of ethanol tolerance. Interaction of norepinephrine with ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors may be less crucial, since treatment with a phorbol ester activator of protein kinase C did not restore the development of tolerance in mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. The importance of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system for development of ethanol tolerance, in addition to its previously-reported role in long-term potentiation, suggests that this system may influence neuroadaptive processes in general. 26 references, 2 figures.

  4. 6-Hydroxydopamine inhibits some effects of mescaline centrally administered to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Reina, R A; Braga, P

    1977-12-19

    The narcotic antagonist naloxone does not antagonize antinociception elicited in the rabbit by 100 microgram/kg of mescaline centrally administered, whereas pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) inhibits this mescaline effect. Stereotyped behavior of rabbits following central mescaline administration is also prevented by 6-hda pretreatment. Since 6-OHDA in known to produce a degeneration of catecholamine containing nerve terminals, a crucial role of catecholamines is suggested in the complex of effects seen in the rabbit after central administration of the hallucinogen.

  5. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of the anteromedial ventral striatum impair opposite-sex urinary odor preference in female mice.

    PubMed

    DiBenedictis, Brett T; Olugbemi, Adaeze O; Baum, Michael J; Cherry, James A

    2014-11-01

    Rodents rely upon their olfactory modality to perceive opposite-sex pheromonal odors needed to motivate courtship behaviors. Volatile and nonvolatile components of pheromonal odors are processed by the main (MOS) and accessory olfactory system (AOS), respectively, with inputs converging in the medial amygdala (Me). The Me in turn targets the mesolimbic dopamine system, including the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) and shell (AcbSh), the ventral pallidum (VP), medial olfactory tubercle (mOT) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). We hypothesized that pheromone-induced dopamine (DA) release in the ventral striatum (particularly in the mAcb and mOT) may mediate the normal preference of female mice to investigate male pheromones. We made bilateral 6-OHDA lesions of DA fibers innervating either the mAcb alone or the mAcb+mOT in female mice and tested estrous females' preference for opposite-sex urinary odors. We found that 6-OHDA lesions of either the mAcb alone or the mAcb+mOT significantly reduced the preference of sexually naïve female mice to investigate breeding male urinary odors (volatiles as well as volatiles+nonvolatiles) vs. estrous female urinary odors. These same neurotoxic lesions had no effect on subjects' ability to discriminate between these two urinary odors, on their locomotor activity, or on their preference for consuming sucrose. The integrity of the dopaminergic innervation of the mAcb and mOT is required for female mice to prefer investigating male pheromones.

  6. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  7. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation in 6-OHDA nigro-striatal lesioned rats with and without transplants of dissociated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Drucker-Colín, R; Durán-Vázquez, A; Salín-Pascual, R J; Verdugo-Díaz, L; Mendoza-Ramírez, J L; Jiménez-Anguiano, A

    1996-08-12

    Since both REM sleep deprivation and unilateral 6-OHDA lesions induce supersensitivity of DA receptors, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the response of rats with such lesions would be modified by REM sleep deprivation. In addition, the effect of grafts of dissociated chromaffin cells was also tested. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions were subjected to 24 or 72 h of REM sleep deprivation and tested with various doses of apomorphine to determine turning behavior frequencies. At end of those experiments, the animals were transplanted with dissociated chromaffin cells and turning behavior was tested again. The results showed that REM sleep deprivation nearly doubled the turning behavior frequency, that chromaffin cell grafts decreased it, but that REM deprivation in grafted animals still seemed to produce an increase of post-synaptic supersensitivity independent of denervation. The results were discussed in terms of the possible relationship of sleep with Parkinson's disease through the DA system.

  8. Circadian distribution of motor-activity in unilaterally 6-hydroxy-dopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Baier, Paul Christian; Branisa, Pablo; Koch, Reinhard; Schindehütte, Jan; Paulus, Walter; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2006-02-01

    Sleep abnormalities in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently consist in a reduction of total sleep time and efficacy and subsequent excessive daytime sleepiness. As it remains unclear whether these phenomena are part of the disease itself or result from pharmacological treatment, animal models for investigating the pathophysiology of sleep alterations in PD may add knowledge to this research area. In the present study, we investigate whether changes in circadian motor activity occur in 6-OHDA-lesioning model for PD, and allow a screening for disturbed sleep-waking behaviour. Activity measurements of six male Wistar rats with 6-OHDA-lesions in the medial forebrain bundle and six controls were carried out in two consecutive 12:12 h light-dark (LD) cycles. A computer-based video-analysis system, recording the animals' movement tracks was used. Distance travelled and number of transitions between movement periods and resting periods were determined. Although 6-OHDA-lesioned animals show a reduced locomotor activity compared to non-lesioned rats, the circadian distribution basically remained intact. However, some lesioning effects were more pronounced in the resting phase than in the activity phase, possibly paralleling nocturnal akinesia in PD. In order to further elucidate the described phenomena, it will be necessary to perform studies combining sleep recordings with locomotor activity measurements.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of intranasally delivered mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Lusine; Schäfer, Richard; von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas; Bernhard, Felix; Verleysdonk, Stephan; Buadze, Marine; Lourhmati, Ali; Klopfer, Tim; Schaumann, Felix; Schmid, Barbara; Koehle, Christoph; Proksch, Barbara; Weissert, Robert; Reichardt, Holger M; van den Brandt, Jens; Buniatian, Gayane H; Schwab, Matthias; Gleiter, Christoph H; Frey, William H

    2011-02-01

    Safe and effective cell delivery remains one of the main challenges in cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. Graft survival, sufficient enrichment of therapeutic cells in the brain, and avoidance of their distribution throughout the peripheral organs are greatly influenced by the method of delivery. Here we demonstrate for the first time noninvasive intranasal (IN) delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the brains of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. IN application (INA) of MSCs resulted in the appearance of cells in the olfactory bulb, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Out of 1 × 10⁶ MSCs applied intranasally, 24% survived for at least 4.5 months in the brains of 6-OHDA rats as assessed by quantification of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) DNA. Quantification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive EGFP-MSCs showed that 3% of applied MSCs were proliferative 4.5 months after application. INA of MSCs increased the tyrosine hydroxylase level in the lesioned ipsilateral striatum and substantia nigra, and completely eliminated the 6-OHDA-induced increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate (dUTP)-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining of these areas. INA of EGFP-labeled MSCs prevented any decrease in the dopamine level in the lesioned hemisphere, whereas the lesioned side of the control animals revealed significantly lower levels of dopamine 4.5 months after 6-OHDA treatment. Behavioral analyses revealed significant and substantial improvement of motor function of the Parkinsonian forepaw to up to 68% of the normal value 40-110 days after INA of 1 × 10⁶ cells. MSC-INA decreased the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines-interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, -6, -12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ (IFN-γ, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-in the lesioned side to their

  10. Up-regulation of divalent metal transporter 1 in 6-hydroxydopamine intoxication is IRE/IRP dependent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Song, Ning; Xu, Huamin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wang, Jun; Xie, Junxia

    2010-03-01

    Iron plays a key role in Parkinson's disease (PD). Increased iron content of the substantia nigra (SN) has been found in PD patients, and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) has been shown to be up-regulated in the SN of both MPTP-induced PD models and PD patients. However, the mechanisms underlying DMT1 up-regulation are largely unknown. In the present study, we observed that in the SN of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats, DMT1 with the iron responsive element (IRE, DMT1+IRE), but not DMT1 without IRE (DMT1-IRE), was up-regulated, suggesting that increased DMT1+IRE expression might account for nigral iron accumulation in PD rats. This possibility was further assessed in an in vitro study using 6-OHDA-treated and DMT1+IRE-over-expressing MES23.5 cells. In 6-OHDA-treated MES23.5 cells, increased iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1 and IRP2 expression was observed, while silencing of IRPs dramatically diminished 6-OHDA-induced DMT1+IRE up-regulation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine fully suppressed IRPs up-regulation by inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced oxidative stress. Increased DMT1+IRE expression resulted in increased iron influx by MES23.5 cells. Our data provide direct evidence that DMT1+IRE up-regulation can account for IRE/IRP-dependent 6-OHDA-induced iron accumulation initiated by 6-OHDA-induced intracellular oxidative stress and that increased levels of intracellular iron result in aggravated oxidative stress. The results of this study provide novel evidence supporting the use of anti-oxidants in the treatment of PD, with the goal of inhibiting iron accumulation by regulation of DMT1 expression. PMID:20125122

  11. Functionality of NGF-protected PC12 cells following exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Edel T.; Loughlin, John P.; Herbert, Kate Reed; Dockery, Peter; Samali, Afshin; Doyle, Karen M.; Gorman, Adrienne M. . E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie

    2006-12-29

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is often used in models of Parkinson's disease since it can selectively target and kill dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra. In this study, pre-treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibited apoptosis and necrosis by 6-OHDA, including caspase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release. Notably, cells exposed to 6-OHDA in the presence of NGF were subsequently capable of proliferation (when replated without NGF), or neurite outgrowth (with continued presence of NGF). Following 7 days growth in the presence of NGF, expression of {beta}III tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase and increased intracellular catecholamines was detectable in PC12 cells, features characteristic of functional dopaminergic neurons. NGF-pre-treated PC12 cells retained expression of {beta}III-tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase, but not catecholamine content following 6-OHDA exposure. These data indicate that NGF-protected cells maintained some aspects of functionality and were subsequently capable of proliferation or differentiation.

  12. Behavioral effects of lesions in the A10 dopaminergic area of the rat.

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1977-03-18

    Experiments have been carried out with 150 rats in order to study some psychophysiological functions of the mesencephalocortico limbic dopaminergic A10 group. Lesions in the A10 area were made by using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) local injections; 2 small volumes of injections were used at the same concentration (2 mug/1 mul or 1 mug/0.5 mul). In a first experiment the effects of these two injections were tested on locomotor activity measured in a circular corridor, 10 and 30 days after surgery. Injections provoked hyperactivity, mainly during nocturnal basal activity periods, but not during initial exploratory activity periods. The larger the injection, the more important the hyperactivity was. The larger injections induced important food spillage evidence through the wire floor of the home cage and perturbation in a passive avoidance learning. There was no change in body weight or in amount of ingested food. In a second experiment, the effects of local injection of 6-OHDA in the other CA structures or bundles situated in or near the ventral tegmental area were tested. Injections in the substantia nigra compacta, in the noradrenergic ventral bundle, in the dorsal periventricular system-tegmental radiations did not provoke locomotor hyperactivity. In a third experiment, a possible role of the median raphe (MR) nucleus in the A10-lesion induced hyperactivity was tested: first, radiofrequency MR lesions were made and no durable significant hyperactivity was recorded; secondly, 6-OHDA (1 mug/0.5 mul) was injected into the A10 area and activity was measured 10 days later: these injections provoked significant hyperactivity during the nocturnal basal and the diurnal basal activity periods. It might be concluded that neither the neighboring CA fibers nor the MR were directly involved in the ventral tegmental -- 6-OHDA lesions syndrome. Anatomical controls by using the Fink-Heimer silver impregnating method have demonstrated, first, that the 6-OHDA injections did not

  13. Nogo-A Neutralization Improves Graft Function in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Stefanie; Di Santo, Stefano; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal human ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic neurons into the striatum is a promising strategy to compensate for the characteristic dopamine deficit observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This therapeutic approach, however, is currently limited by the high number of fetuses needed for transplantation and the poor survival and functional integration of grafted dopaminergic neurons into the host brain. Accumulating evidence indicates that contrasting inhibitory signals endowed in the central nervous system (CNS) might support neuronal regeneration. Hence, in the present study we aimed at improving survival and integration of grafted cells in the host brain by neutralizing Nogo-A, one of the most potent neurite growth inhibitors in the CNS. For that purpose, VM tissue cultures were transplanted into rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion causing a hemi-PD model and concomitantly treated for 2 weeks with intra-ventricular infusion of neutralizing anti-Nogo-A antibodies. Motor behavior using the cylinder test was assessed prior to and after transplantation as functional outcome. At the end of the experimental period the number of dopaminergic fibers growing into the host brain, the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons in the grafts as well as graft size was examined. We found that anti-Nogo-A antibody infusion significantly improved the asymmetrical forelimb use observed after lesions as compared to controls. Importantly, a significantly three-fold higher dopaminergic fiber outgrowth from the transplants was detected in the Nogo-A antibody treated group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Nogo-A neutralization showed a tendency for increased survival of dopaminergic neurons (by two-fold) in the grafts. No significant differences were observed for graft volume and the number of dopaminergic neurons co-expressing G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channel subunit two between groups. In sum, our findings support the

  14. Nogo-A Neutralization Improves Graft Function in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Stefanie; Di Santo, Stefano; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal human ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic neurons into the striatum is a promising strategy to compensate for the characteristic dopamine deficit observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). This therapeutic approach, however, is currently limited by the high number of fetuses needed for transplantation and the poor survival and functional integration of grafted dopaminergic neurons into the host brain. Accumulating evidence indicates that contrasting inhibitory signals endowed in the central nervous system (CNS) might support neuronal regeneration. Hence, in the present study we aimed at improving survival and integration of grafted cells in the host brain by neutralizing Nogo-A, one of the most potent neurite growth inhibitors in the CNS. For that purpose, VM tissue cultures were transplanted into rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion causing a hemi-PD model and concomitantly treated for 2 weeks with intra-ventricular infusion of neutralizing anti-Nogo-A antibodies. Motor behavior using the cylinder test was assessed prior to and after transplantation as functional outcome. At the end of the experimental period the number of dopaminergic fibers growing into the host brain, the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons in the grafts as well as graft size was examined. We found that anti-Nogo-A antibody infusion significantly improved the asymmetrical forelimb use observed after lesions as compared to controls. Importantly, a significantly three-fold higher dopaminergic fiber outgrowth from the transplants was detected in the Nogo-A antibody treated group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Nogo-A neutralization showed a tendency for increased survival of dopaminergic neurons (by two-fold) in the grafts. No significant differences were observed for graft volume and the number of dopaminergic neurons co-expressing G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channel subunit two between groups. In sum, our findings support the

  15. The effects of glutathione and ascorbic acid on the oxidations of 6-hydroxydopa and 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Nappi, A J; Vass, E

    1994-12-15

    The interactions of ascorbic acid (AA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in the oxidations of the catecholaminergic neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopa (TOPA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) were investigated by both high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) and spectrometric methods. These comparative studies showed TOPA and 6-OHDA to be extremely unstable, with 100% of the trihydroxyphenyls oxidized within 0.5 min at physiological pH in potassium phosphate buffer. Neither AA nor GSH was found capable of significantly impeding the oxidations of these trihydroxyphenyls, or of regenerating these substances by reducing back their oxidation products, even though such a redox exchange mechanism was demonstrated for AA and the dihydroxyphenyl dopamine. Although ineffective in keeping TOPA and 6-OHDA as reduced molecules, GSH may nevertheless influence the neurotoxicity of trihydroxyphenyls by interacting with their oxidation products forming glutathionyl conjugates, thereby switching the reaction pathway away from potentially toxic eumelanin precursors and toward the production of pheomelanin. Electrochemical analyses established the formation of two oxidation products derived from each trihydroxyphenyl, one detected at -100 mV and the other at +700 mV. AA had no effect on either oxidation product, whereas GSH significantly decreased the levels of both oxidation products. The component detected at +700 mV is the cyclized, reduced leukochrome. The identity of the component detected at -100 mV was not established, but it is considered to be either the p-quinone or the cyclized, oxidized aminochrome.

  16. Cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity via its antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by degeneration and loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Increasing evidence has indicated that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therapeutic options that target the antioxidant machinery may have potential in the treatment of PD. Cordycepin, a nucleoside isolated from Cordyceps species displayed potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity as well as underlying mechanisms is still unclear. In this present study, we investigated the protective effect of cordycepin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism. We observed that cordycepin effectively inhibited 6-OHDA-induced cell death, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cordycepin also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA as observed in the reduction of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial as well as the inhibition of caspase-3. In addition cordycepin markedly reduced cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Cordycepin also significantly increased the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in 6-OHDA-treated cells. The results obtained unambiguously demonstrated that cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity through its potent antioxidant activity. PMID:27261571

  17. Ultrastructural confirmation of neuronal protection by melatonin against the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine cell damage.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Antolín, I; Rodriguez, C

    1999-02-13

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin used in the induction of experimental Parkinson's disease in both animals and cultured neuronal cells. Biochemical and molecular approaches showed previously that low doses of 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, while high doses of this neurotoxin induced necrosis. Melatonin has been shown to protect against the neuronal programmed cell death induced by 6-OHDA, although it was not able to prevent the massive necrotic cellular death occurring after the addition of high doses of the neurotoxin. In the present work, we demonstrate by ultrastructural analysis that although low doses of 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, it also damaged the non-apoptotic cells, morphologically corresponding this damage to incipient and reversible necrotic lesions. When the doses of the neurotoxin increase, there are still apoptotic cells, although most of the cells show necrotic irreversible lesions. We also found that melatonin partially prevents the incipient necrotic lesions caused by low doses of 6-OHDA. The fact that melatonin was shown in previous work to prevent apoptosis caused by low doses of 6-OHDA, but not necrosis induced by high doses of the neurotoxin, seemed to indicate that this agent is only able to protect against apoptosis. However, our present results, melatonin preventing also the incipient necrotic neuronal lesions, suggest that this hormone may provide a general protection against cell death, suggesting that higher doses should be tried in order to prevent the necrotic cell death induced by high doses of the neurotoxin.

  18. Melatonin prevents apoptosis induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in neuronal cells: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Uria, H; Antolin, I; Esteban, M M; Rodriguez, C

    1998-04-01

    It was recently reported that low doses of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induce apoptosis of naive (undifferentiated) and neuronal (differentiated) PC12 cells, and this system has been proposed as an adequate experimental model for the study of Parkinson's disease. The mechanism by which this neurotoxin damages cells is via the production of free radicals. Given that the neurohormone melatonin has been reported 1) to be a highly effective endogenous free radical scavenger, 2) to increase the mRNA levels and the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, and 3) to inhibit apoptosis in other tissues, we have studied the ability of melatonin to prevent the programmed cell death induced by 6-OHDA in PC12 cells. We found that melatonin prevents the apoptosis caused by 6-OHDA in naive and neuronal PC12 cells as estimated by 1) cell viability assays, 2) counting of the number of apoptotic cells, and 3) analysis and quantification of DNA fragmentation. Exploration of the mechanisms used by melatonin to reduce programmed cell death revealed that this chemical mediator prevents the 6-OHDA induced reduction of mRNAs for several antioxidant enzymes. The possibility that melatonin utilized additional mechanisms to prevent apoptosis of these cells is also discussed. Since this endogenous agent has no known side effects and readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier, we consider melatonin to have a high clinical potential in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases, although more research on the mechanisms is yet to be done.

  19. Isoliquiritigenin isolated from licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Chun, Hong Sung

    2012-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) is a medicinal herb containing various bioactive components implicated in antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and neuroprotective effects, but the effects of licorice against Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dopaminergic cell death have not been studied. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of isoliquiritigenin (ISL) isolated from Glycyrrhiza uralensis on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in a dopaminergic cell line, SN4741. ISL (1 µM) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA (50 µM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation and apoptotic cell death. ISL pretreatment effectively suppressed 6-OHDA-mediated upregulation of Bax, p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p-p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, cytochrome c release, and caspase 3 activation. In addition, ISL significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction. Pharmacological inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) pathway reversed ISL-mediated neuroprotection against 6-OHDA toxicity in SN4741 cells. These results provide the first evidence that ISL can protect dopaminergic cells under oxidative stress conditions by regulating the apoptotic process.

  20. Protective effects of Althaea officinalis L. extract in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced hemi-Parkinsonism model: behavioral, biochemical and histochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Maryam; Alirezaei, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in humans. In this regard, the neuroprotective effect of Althaea officinalis (AO) has already been reported. Therefore, this study examined whether administration of AO extract would improve behavioral, biochemical and structural abnormalities in an experimental animal model of PD in rats. For this purpose, we induced hemi-Parkinsonism by unilateral intranigral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 8 μg/5 μl saline-ascorbate). The rats were pretreated i.p. with AO extract (10 mg/kg) started 6 days before surgery and continued until the 3rd day post-surgery. Regarding oxidative stress, brain MDA concentration (as a lipid peroxidation marker) increased significantly in the 6-OHDA-administered group in comparison with rats pretreated with AO extract. It was found that AO treatment attenuated rotational behavior in the 6-OHDA-administered group and protected the neurons of substantia nigra pars compacta against 6-OHDA toxicity. Overall, AO extract administration indicated neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA-induced hemi-Parkinsonism in rats.

  1. Functional repression of cAMP response element in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chalovich, Elisabeth M; Zhu, Jian-hui; Caltagarone, John; Bowser, Robert; Chu, Charleen T

    2006-06-30

    Impaired survival signaling may represent a central mechanism in neurodegeneration. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is an oxidative neurotoxin used to injure catecholaminergic cells of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although 6-OHDA elicits phosphorylation of several kinases, downstream transcriptional effects that influence neuronal cell death are less defined. The cAMP response element (CRE) is present in the promoter sequences of several important neuronal survival factors. Treatment of catecholaminergic neuronal cell lines (B65 and SH-SY5Y) with 6-OHDA resulted in repression of basal CRE transactivation. Message levels of CRE-driven genes such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the survival factor Bcl-2 were decreased in 6-OHDA-treated cells, but message levels of genes lacking CRE sequences were not affected. Repression of CRE could be reversed by delayed treatment with cAMP several hours after initiation of 6-OHDA injury. Furthermore, restoration of CRE-driven transcription was associated with significant neuroprotection. In contrast to observations in other model systems, the mechanism of CRE repression did not involve decreased phosphorylation of its binding protein CREB. Instead, total CREB and phospho-CREB (pCREB) were increased in the cytoplasm and decreased in the nucleus of 6-OHDA-treated cells. 6-OHDA also decreased nuclear pCREB in dopaminergic neurons of primary mouse midbrain cultures. Co-treatment with cAMP promoted/restored nuclear localization of pCREB in both immortalized and primary culture systems. Increased cytoplasmic pCREB was observed in degenerating human Parkinson/Lewy body disease substantia nigra neurons but not in age-matched controls. Notably, cytoplasmic accumulation of activated upstream CREB kinases has been observed previously in both 6-OHDA-treated cells and degenerating human neurons, supporting a potential role for impaired nuclear import of phosphorylated signaling proteins.

  2. Effects of 6-hydroxydopamine exposure on motor activity and biochemical expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chien-Wei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Chen, Wu-Fu

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, current treatments for PD are mainly palliative. Recently, researchers discovered that neurotoxins can induce Parkinsonian-like symptoms in zebrafish. No study to date has investigated the characteristics of PD, such as neuroinflammation factors, oxidative stress, or ubiquitin dysfunction, in this model. Therefore, the current study was aimed at utilizing commonly used clinical drugs, minocycline, vitamin E, and Sinemet, to test the usefulness of this model. Previous studies had indicated that DA cell loss was greater with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) than with other neurotoxins. Thus, we first challenged zebrafish with 6-OHDA immersion and found a significant reduction in zebrafish locomotor activity; we then reversed the locomotor disruptions by treatment with vitamin E, Sinemet, or minocycline. The present study also analyzed the mRNA expression of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b, because the expression of these molecular targets has been shown to result in attenuation in mammalian models of PD. Vitamin E, Sinemet, and minocycline significantly reversed 6-OHDA-induced changes of parkin, pink1, and cd-11b mRNA expression in zebrafish. Moreover, we assessed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to confirm the therapeutic effects of vitamin E tested on this PD model and established that vitamin E reversed the 6-OHDA-induced damage on TH expression. Our results provide some support for the validity of this in vivo Parkinson's model, and we hope that this model will be more widely used in the future.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of swimming training in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Goes, A T R; Souza, L C; Filho, C B; Del Fabbro, L; De Gomes, M G; Boeira, S P; Jesse, C R

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopamine (DA) depletion in the striatum. Exercise has been shown to be a promising non-pharmacological approach to reduce the risk of neurodegeneration diseases. This study was designed to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of swimming training (ST) in a mouse model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in mice. The present study demonstrated that a 4-week ST was effective in attenuating the following impairments resulting from 6-OHDA exposure: (i) depressive-like behavior in the tail suspension test; (ii) increase in the number of falls in the rotarod test; (iii) impairment on long-term memory in the object recognition test; (iv) increase of the reactive species and interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) levels; (v) inhibition of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity; (vi) rise of the glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities and vii) decrease of DA, homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels. The mechanisms involved in this study are the modulation of GPx, GR and GST activities as well as IL-1β level in a PD model induced by 6-OHDA, protecting against the decrease of DA, DOPAC and HVA levels in the striatum of mice. These findings reinforce that one of the effects induced by exercise on neurodegenerative disease, such as PD, is due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We suggest that exercise attenuates cognitive and motor declines, depression, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation induced by 6-OHDA supporting the hypothesis that exercise can be used as a non-pharmacological tool to reduce the symptoms of PD.

  4. Differential degradation of motor deficits during gradual dopamine depletion with 6-hydroxydopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Willard, A M; Bouchard, R S; Gittis, A H

    2015-08-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder whose cardinal motor symptoms arise due to the progressive loss of dopamine. Although this dopamine loss typically progresses slowly over time, currently there are very few animal models that enable incremental dopamine depletion over time within the same animal. This type of gradual dopamine depletion model would be useful in studies aimed at the prodromal phase of PD, when dopamine levels are pathologically low but motor symptoms have not yet presented. Utilizing the highly characterized neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we have developed a paradigm to gradually deplete dopamine levels in the striatum over a user-defined time course - spanning weeks to months - in C57BL/6 mice. Dopamine depletions were achieved by administration of five low-dose injections (0.75μg) of 6-OHDA through an implanted intracranial bilateral cannula targeting the medial forebrain bundle. Levels of dopamine within the striatum declined linearly with successive injections, quantified using tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and high-performance liquid chromatography. Behavioral testing was carried out at each time point to study the onset and progression of motor impairments as a function of dopamine loss over time. We found that spontaneous locomotion, measured in an open field, was robust until ∼70% of striatal dopamine was lost. Beyond this point, additional dopamine loss caused a sharp decline in motor performance, reaching a final level comparable to that of acutely depleted mice. Similarly, although rearing behavior was more sensitive to dopamine loss and declined linearly as a function of dopamine levels, it eventually declined to levels similar to those seen in acutely depleted mice. In contrast, motor coordination, measured on a vertical pole task, was only moderately impaired in gradually depleted mice, despite severe impairments observed in acutely depleted mice. These results demonstrate the importance of the temporal

  5. Carnosic acid protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death through upregulation of parkin pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Parkin is a Parkinson's disease (PD)-linked gene that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). This study explored whether carnosic acid (CA) from rosemary protects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity via upregulation of parkin in vivo and in vitro. We found that the reduction in proteasomal activity by 6-OHDA was attenuated in SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with 1 μM CA. Immunoblots showed that CA reversed the induction of ubiquitinated protein and the reduction of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin protein in 6-OHDA-treated SH-SY5Y cells and rats. Moreover, in a transgenic OW13 Caenorhabditis elegans model of PD that expresses human α-synuclein in muscle cells, CA reduced α-synuclein accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. In cells pretreated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, CA no longer reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated induction of cleavage of caspase 3 and poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and no longer reversed the suppression of proteasome activity. When parkin expression was silenced by use of small interfering RNA, the ability of CA to inhibit apoptosis and induce proteasomal activity was significantly reduced. The reduction in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by CA was associated with the induction of parkin, which in turn upregulated the UPS and then decreased cell death. PMID:27091487

  6. PHARMACOLOGICAL REGULATION OF DIGESTION IN THE ANAUTOGENOUS FLESH FLY, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, BY SIMPLE INJECTION OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE.

    PubMed

    Bil, Magdalena; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Female anautogenous Sarcophaga flesh flies need a protein meal to start large-scale yolk polypeptides (YPs) production and oocyte maturation. Protein meal rapidly elicits a brain-dependent increase in midgut proteolytic activity. Trypsin and chymotrypsin together represent over 80% of protease activity in liver-fed flies. Abdominal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) dose-dependently prohibits this increase in proteolytic activity at translational level in a similar way as post liver feeding decapitation. Delayed injection of 6-OHDA later than 6 h post liver meal has no effect. In flesh flies, chemical decapitation by 6-OHDA, by interrupting the brain-gut dopaminergic signaling, can be used as tool for the controlled inhibition of midgut proteolytic activity and subsequent ovarial development. Inhibition of ovarial development is probably indirect due to a deficit in circulating amino acids needed for YPs synthesis.

  7. Dopamine depletion in either the dorsomedial or dorsolateral striatum impairs egocentric Cincinnati water maze performance while sparing allocentric Morris water maze learning.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H; Seroogy, Kim B; Skelton, Matthew R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2015-02-01

    Both egocentric route-based learning and spatial learning, as assessed by the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively, are impaired following an 80% dopamine (DA) loss in the neostriatum after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration in rats. The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) are implicated in different navigational learning types, namely the DLS is implicated in egocentric learning while the DMS is implicated in spatial learning. This experiment tested whether selective DA loss through 6-OHDA lesions in the DMS or DLS would impair one or both types of navigation. Both DLS and DMS DA loss significantly impaired route-based CWM learning, without affecting spatial or cued MWM performance. DLS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 75% DA loss in this region, with no changes in other monoamine levels in the DLS or DMS. DMS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 62% DA loss in this region, without affecting other monoamine levels in the DMS or DLS. The results indicate a role for DA in DLS and DMS regions in route-based egocentric but not spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning deficits may require more pervasive monoamine reductions within each region before deficits are exhibited. This is the first study to implicate DLS and DMS DA in route-based egocentric navigation. PMID:25451306

  8. Cathepsin X promotes 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis of PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Pišlar, Anja Hafner; Zidar, Nace; Kikelj, Danijel; Kos, Janko

    2014-07-01

    The cysteine carboxypeptidase cathepsin X is an important player in degenerative processes under normal ageing and pathological conditions. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of cathepsin X in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity in the pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 and neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Cells exposed to 6-OHDA demonstrated alterations in the protein level of cathepsin X and activity of cathepsin X. Downregulation of cathepsin X expression by siRNA attenuated the neuronal death caused by 6-OHDA. Treatment with specific cathepsin X inhibitor AMS36 protected cells against 6-OHDA mediated cytotoxicity, resulting in reduced cell death and apoptosis. Furthermore, AMS36 reversed 6-OHDA-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase and attenuated 6-OHDA-induced activation of caspase-3, triggering apoptosis, intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction, including the release of cytochrome c and an imbalanced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, AMS36 interfered with NF-κB activation by blocking degradation of IκBα, preventing NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. Our data provide the first evidence that inhibition of cathepsin X protects both, PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity and indicate that cathepsin X may be responsible for dopamine neuron death, involved in the pathogenic cascade event for the neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

  9. Neuroprotection by 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate in a 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Morroni, Fabiana; Sita, Giulia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-11-17

    A number of pathogenic factors have been implicated in the progression of Parkinson׳s disease (PD), including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, excitotoxicity, and signals mediating apoptosis cascade. 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) is a major component in wasabi, a very popular spice in Japan and a member of the Brassica family of vegetables. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of 6-MSITC in a PD mouse model. Mice were treated with 6-MSITC (5mg/kg twice a week) for four weeks after the unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). On the 28th day, 6-OHDA-injected mice showed behavioral impairments, a significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, lesioned mice showed reduced glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities. Notably, 6-MSITC demonstrated neuroprotective effects in our experimental model strongly related to the preservation of functional nigral dopaminergic neurons, which contributed to the reduction of motor dysfunction induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that the beneficial effects of 6-MSITC could be attributed to the decrease of apoptotic cell death and to the activation of glutathione-dependent antioxidant systems. These findings may render 6-MSITC as a promising molecule for further pharmacological studies on the investigation for disease-modifying treatment in PD. PMID:25257035

  10. Anterior ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons are not involved in the motivational effects of bromocriptine, pramipexole and cocaine in drug-free rats.

    PubMed

    Ouachikh, Omar; Dieb, Wisam; Durif, Franck; Hafidi, Aziz

    2014-04-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease has been attributed to dopamine replacement therapies and/or a lesion of the dopaminergic system. Dopaminergic neuronal loss targets the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We hypothesize that dopamine replacement therapy is responsible for the potential reinforcement effect in Parkinson's disease, by acting on the neuronal reward circuitry. We previously demonstrated that the posterior (p) VTA, which projects to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), is implicated in the motivational effect of dopamine receptor agonists in 6-OHDA bilateral pVTA-lesioned drug-free animals. In the present study we investigated the implication of the anterior (a) VTA in the potential reinforcement effect of dopamine receptor agonists. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral paradigm, we investigated the motivational effects of dopamine receptor agonists (bromocriptine and pramipexole), and cocaine in rats with a 6-OHDA bilateral lesion of the aVTA. Bromocriptine and pramipexole did not induce a significant CPP at 1mg/kg in both sham and bilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. However bromocriptine induced CPP only at a dose of 3mg/kg in both animal groups. Moreover cocaine, which is known to increase dopamine release, induced reinforcing effects in both 6-OHDA-lesioned and sham rats. Our data show a lack of involvement of aVTA dopamine neurons in the motivational effects of bromocriptine, pramipexole and cocaine.

  11. Expression of Tgfβ1 and Inflammatory Markers in the 6-hydroxydopamine Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stefan Jean-Pierre; Zhou, Xiaolai; Machado, Venissa; Wree, Andreas; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been described as a common hallmark of PD and is believed to further trigger the progression of neurodegenerative events. Injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) are widely used to induce degeneration of mDA neurons in rodents as an attempt to mimic PD and to study neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation as well as potential therapeutic approaches. In the present study, we addressed microglia and astroglia reactivity in the SN and the caudatoputamen (CPu) after 6-OHDA injections into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and further analyzed the temporal and spatial expression patterns of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in this mouse model of PD. We provide evidence that activated microglia as well as neurons in the lesioned SN and CPu express Transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfβ1), which overlaps with the downregulation of pro-inflammatory markers Tnfα, and iNos, and upregulation of anti-inflammatory markers Ym1 and Arg1. Taken together, the data presented in this study suggest an important role for Tgfβ1 as a lesion-associated factor that might be involved in regulating microglia activation states in the 6-OHDA mouse model of PD in order to prevent degeneration of uninjured neurons by microglia-mediated release of neurotoxic factors such as Tnfα and nitric oxide (NO). PMID:26869879

  12. Effects of the neuroprotectant lubeluzole on the cytotoxic actions of veratridine, barium, ouabain and 6-hydroxydopamine in chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Abad, María F; López, Manuela G; Hernández-Guijo, Jesús M; Zapater, Pedro; Gandía, Luis; Sánchez-García, Pedro; García, Antonio G

    1998-01-01

    Incubation of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with veratridine (10–100 μM) during 24 h, caused a concentration-dependent release of the cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the bathing medium, an indicator of cell death. Lubeluzole or its R(−) enantiomer, R91154, did not enhance LDH release. Both lubeluzole and R91154 (0.3–10 μM) decreased the veratridine-induced LDH release. Penfluridol did not increase LDH release at concentrations 0.003–1 μM; 3–10 μM increased LDH release to 50–60%, after 24 h exposure. Penfluridol (0.03–0.3 μM) did not protect against the cytotoxic effects of veratridine; at 1 μM, 15% protection was produced. Higher concentrations (3–10 μM) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of veratridine. Ba2+ ions caused a concentration-dependent increase of LDH release. This cytotoxic effect was partially prevented by 3 μM lubeluzole and fully counteracted by 1 μM penfluridol. R91154 was less potent than lubeluzole and only protected against the lesion induced by 0.5 mM Ba2+. Ouabain (10 μM during 24 h) increased LDH release to about 30%. Both lubeluzole (0.3–10 μM) and the lower concentrations of penfluridol (0.003–0.3 μM) prevented the ouabain cytotoxic effects. At higher concentrations (3 μM), penfluridol increased drastically the ouabain cytotoxic effects. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) caused significant cytotoxic effects at 30 and 100 μM. Lubeluzole (3–10 μM) or penfluridol (0.03–0.3 μM) had no cytoprotective effects against 6-OHDA. Lubeluzole (3 μM), R91154 (3 μM) and penfluridol (1 μM) blocked the current through Na+ channels in voltage-clamped chromaffin cells (INa) by around 20–30%. Ca2+ current through Ca2+ channels (ICa) was inhibited 57% by lubeluzole and R91154 and 50% by penfluridol. The effects of penfluridol were not washed out, but those of lubeluzole and R91154 were readily reversible. Lubeluzole (3 μM) induced reversible blockade of the

  13. Baicalein prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SH-SY5Y cells via inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation and up-regulation of DJ-1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Hua; Yu, Hai-Tao; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Du, Guan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the mechanism of cell damage in Parkinson's disease (PD). 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a dopamine analog which specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Baicalein has been previously reported to have potential in the treatment of PD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of baicalein against 6-OHDA injury in SH-SY5Y cells. The results showed that baicalein significantly alleviated alterations of mitochondrial redox activity and mitochondrial membrane potential induced by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells compared with vehicle group. Futhermore, baicalein decreased the production of ROS and upregulated the DJ-1 protein expression in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, baicalein also inhibited ROS production and lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 6.32 ± 0.03 μM) in rat brain mitochondia. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of baicalein against 6-OHDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may involve inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation and upregulation of DJ-1 protein expression. PMID:24288000

  14. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Kang, X-y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-l; Li, Y-q; Gao, D-s

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  15. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Kang, X-Y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-L; Li, Y-Q; Gao, D-S

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  16. Curcumin I protects the dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y from 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity through attenuation of p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jaisin, Yamaratee; Thampithak, Anusorn; Meesarapee, Benjawan; Ratanachamnong, Piyanee; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Phivthong-Ngam, Laddawal; Phumala-Morales, Noppawan; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Sanvarinda, Yupin

    2011-02-11

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin used to induce oxidative cell death of dopaminergic neurons in experimental models of PD. Curcumin I, or diferuloylmethane is a pure compound isolated from Curcuma longa Linn. that has been reported to have neuroprotective properties. The precise mechanism, however, remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the mechanisms by which curcumin I exerts its effects, using 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y. In our experiments, pretreatment with curcumin I improved cell viability, and significantly reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further investigations revealed a reduction of p53 phosphorylation and decrease of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, as measured by mRNA expression and protein level. Taken together, these findings indicate that curcumin I protects dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA-induced toxicity via the reduction of ROS production, and subsequent attenuation of p53 phosphorylation and reduction of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. PMID:21167259

  17. Chemical and biological evaluation of nephrocizin in protecting nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells by 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2012-12-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. This model is crucial in the search for compounds that diminish 6-OHDA-induced nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cell death. Nephrocizin (luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside), a flavone glycoside, was isolated from widely distributed plants. The protective effects of pre-treatment with nephrocizin on the induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by 6-OHDA and its oxidative products, H₂O₂-, and p-quinone, were evaluated herein. Nephrocizin promoted cell viability, scavenged ROS-related products, increased cellular glutathione (GSH) levels, and reduced caspase-3 and -8 activities in 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂-, or p-quinone-treated PC12 cells. Furthermore, nephrocizin-conjugated metabolites in PC12 cells were identified with the boronate-affinity method and LC-MS technology, and preferential regioselectivity at the C2' and C5' positions by the nephrocizin-GSH (or NAC) adduct method was observed. These lines of evidence established that nephrocizin could form a dimer to diminish the intracellular ROS. These results demonstrate the first neuroprotective mechanism of nephrocizin against 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂- or p-quinone-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via chemical and biological studies. These dietary antioxidants are potential candidates for use in intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  19. Chemical and biological evaluation of nephrocizin in protecting nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells by 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2012-12-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. This model is crucial in the search for compounds that diminish 6-OHDA-induced nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cell death. Nephrocizin (luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside), a flavone glycoside, was isolated from widely distributed plants. The protective effects of pre-treatment with nephrocizin on the induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells by 6-OHDA and its oxidative products, H₂O₂-, and p-quinone, were evaluated herein. Nephrocizin promoted cell viability, scavenged ROS-related products, increased cellular glutathione (GSH) levels, and reduced caspase-3 and -8 activities in 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂-, or p-quinone-treated PC12 cells. Furthermore, nephrocizin-conjugated metabolites in PC12 cells were identified with the boronate-affinity method and LC-MS technology, and preferential regioselectivity at the C2' and C5' positions by the nephrocizin-GSH (or NAC) adduct method was observed. These lines of evidence established that nephrocizin could form a dimer to diminish the intracellular ROS. These results demonstrate the first neuroprotective mechanism of nephrocizin against 6-OHDA-, H₂O₂- or p-quinone-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via chemical and biological studies. These dietary antioxidants are potential candidates for use in intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22954731

  20. Paeoniflorin inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells via suppressing reactive oxygen species-mediated PKCδ/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Li, R; Yu, C; Xu, T; Zhang, X; Dong, M

    2015-01-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common devastating human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no curative therapy is available for PD. Paeoniflorin, a monoterpene glucoside isolated from the Paeonia lactiflora Pall., possesses wide pharmacological effects in the nervous system. This study aims at evaluating the effect of paeoniflorin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced apoptosis and to characterize involved signal transduction pathways in PC12 cells. Our results showed that paeoniflorin suppresses mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of PC12 cells induced by 6-OHDA, and anti-apoptotic effects of paeoniflorin on PC12 cells might mainly result from its antioxidant capability by increasing glutathione (GSH). Moreover, we also found that paeoniflorin can dramatically attenuate the 6-OHDA-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) translocation without affecting phosphorylation of Akt, JNK, p38, and ERK1/2. 6-OHDA-induced protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) upregulation was blocked by paeoniflorin treatment in PC12 cells. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium or NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 could partially attenuate 6-OHDA-induced cell death. Together, our results indicate that the inhibition of PC12 cell apoptosis by paeoniflorin might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)/PKCδ/NF-κB signaling pathway. This evidence supports the pharmacological potential of paeoniflorin in the management of neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress, including PD. PMID:25446358

  1. Nonenzymatic role of acetylcholinesterase in neuritic sprouting: regional changes in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase after neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Ryde, Ian T; Wrench, Nicola; Card, Jennifer A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is postulated to play a nonenzymatic role in the development of neuritic projections. We gave the specific neurotoxin, 6-OHDA to rats on postnatal day (PN) 1, a treatment that destroys noradrenergic nerve terminals in the forebrain while producing reactive sprouting in the brainstem. AChE showed profound decreases in the forebrain that persisted in males over the entire phase of major synaptogenesis, from PN4 through PN21; in the brainstem, AChE was increased. Parallel examinations of choline acetyltransferase, an enzymatic marker for cholinergic nerve terminals, showed a different pattern of 6-OHDA-induced alterations, with initial decreases in both forebrain and brainstem in males and regression toward normal by PN21; females were far less affected. The sex differences are in accord with the greater plasticity of the female brain and its more rapid recovery from neurotoxic injury; our findings indicate that these differences are present well before puberty. These results support the view that AChE is involved in neurite formation, unrelated to its enzymatic role in cholinergic neurotransmission. Further, the results for choline acetyltransferase indicate that early depletion of norepinephrine compromises development of acetylcholine systems, consistent with a trophic role for this neurotransmitter.

  2. Nonenzymatic role of acetylcholinesterase in neuritic sprouting: regional changes in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase after neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Ryde, Ian T; Wrench, Nicola; Card, Jennifer A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is postulated to play a nonenzymatic role in the development of neuritic projections. We gave the specific neurotoxin, 6-OHDA to rats on postnatal day (PN) 1, a treatment that destroys noradrenergic nerve terminals in the forebrain while producing reactive sprouting in the brainstem. AChE showed profound decreases in the forebrain that persisted in males over the entire phase of major synaptogenesis, from PN4 through PN21; in the brainstem, AChE was increased. Parallel examinations of choline acetyltransferase, an enzymatic marker for cholinergic nerve terminals, showed a different pattern of 6-OHDA-induced alterations, with initial decreases in both forebrain and brainstem in males and regression toward normal by PN21; females were far less affected. The sex differences are in accord with the greater plasticity of the female brain and its more rapid recovery from neurotoxic injury; our findings indicate that these differences are present well before puberty. These results support the view that AChE is involved in neurite formation, unrelated to its enzymatic role in cholinergic neurotransmission. Further, the results for choline acetyltransferase indicate that early depletion of norepinephrine compromises development of acetylcholine systems, consistent with a trophic role for this neurotransmitter. PMID:19452616

  3. The Longitudinal Transcriptomic Response of the Substantia Nigra to Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Reveals Significant Upregulation of Regeneration-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Grabinski, Tessa; Mattingly, Zachary R.; Winn, Mary E.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Lipton, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the study of gene expression at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 16 weeks in the substantia nigra (SN) after intrastriatal 6-OHDA in the Sprague-Dawley rat (rattus norvegicus) would identify cellular responses during the degenerative process that could be axoprotective. Specifically, we hypothesized that genes expressed within the SN that followed a profile of being highly upregulated early after the lesion (during active axonal degeneration) and then progressively declined to baseline over 16 weeks as DA neurons died are indicative of potential protective responses to the striatal 6-OHDA insult. Utilizing a κ-means cluster analysis strategy, we demonstrated that one such cluster followed this hypothesized expression pattern over time, and that this cluster contained several interrelated transcripts that are classified as regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) including Atf3, Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Gpnmb, Sox11, Mmp19, Srgap1, Rab15,Lifr, Trib3, Tgfb1, and Sema3c. All exemplar transcripts tested from this cluster (Sprr1a, Ecel1, Gadd45a, Atf3 and Sox11) were validated by qPCR and a smaller subset (Sprr1a, Gadd45a and Sox11) were shown to be exclusively localized to SN DA neurons using a dual label approach with RNAScope in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of RAGs is typically associated with the response to axonal injury in the peripheral nerves and was not previously reported as part of the axodegenerative process for DA neurons of the SN. Interestingly, as part of this cluster, other transcripts were identified based on their expression pattern but without a RAG provenance in the literature. These "RAG-like" transcripts need further characterization to determine if they possess similar functions to or interact with known RAG transcripts. Ultimately, it is hoped that some of the newly identified axodegeneration-reactive transcripts could be exploited as axoprotective therapies in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25992874

  4. 6-Hydroxydopamine activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway through p38 MAPK-mediated, p53-independent activation of Bax and PUMA.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Galindo, Maria F; Concannon, Caoimhín G; Segura, Miguel F; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Llecha, Nuria; Comella, Joan X; Prehn, Jochen H M; Jordan, Joaquin

    2008-03-01

    Mitochondrial alterations have been associated with the cytotoxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a widely used toxin to study Parkinson's disease. In previous work, we have demonstrated that 6-OHDA increases mitochondrial membrane permeability leading to cytochrome c release, but the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Herein we studied the mechanism of increased mitochondrial permeability of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to 6-OHDA. Cytochrome c release induced by 6-OHDA occurred, in both SH-SY5Y cells and primary cultures, in the absence of mitochondrial swelling or a decrease in mitochondrial calcein fluorescence, suggesting little involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in this process. In contrast, 6-OHDA-induced cell death was associated with a significant translocation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein from the cytosol to mitochondria and with a significant induction of the BH3-only protein PUMA. Experiments in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in Bax or PUMA demonstrated a role for both proteins in 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. Although 6-OHDA elevated both total and nuclear p53 protein levels, activation of p53 was not essential for subsequent cell death. In contrast, we found that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was activated early during 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SKF86002 potently inhibited PUMA induction, green fluorescent protein-Bax redistribution and apoptosis in response to 6-OHDA. These data demonstrate a critical involvement of p38 MAPK, PUMA, and Bax in 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis.

  5. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β by lithium chloride suppresses 6-hydroxydopamine-induced inflammatory response in primary cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Ting; Li, Qiang; Huang, Jian-Kang; Chen, Rong-Fu; Sun, Xiao-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence has emerged to suggest that neuroinflammatory process is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Activated microglia and astrocytes are found in the substantia nigra (SN) of Parkinson's disease brains as well as in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Although reactive astrocytes are involved in the progression of PD, the role of reactive astrocytes in neuroinflammation of PD has received limited attention to date. Recently, Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was identified as a crucial regulator of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism by which 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induces inflammatory response in astrocytes and observe the anti-inflammatory effect of lithium chloride (LiCl) on 6-OHDA-treated astrocytes. In the present study, we found that glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was markedly upregulated in the presence of 6-OHDA. Moreover, our results revealed that proinflammatory molecules including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2), prostaglandins E2 (PGE2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were obviously increased in astrocytes exposed to 6-OHDA. Western blot analysis revealed that 6-OHDA significantly increased dephosphorylation/activation of GSK-3β as well as the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65. Besides, GSK-3β inhibitor LiCl and SB415286 inhibited the GSK-3β/NF-κB signaling pathway, leading to the reduction of proinflammatory molecules in 6-OHDA-activated astrocytes. These results confirmed that GSK-3β inhibitor LiCl and SB415286 provide protection against neuroinflammation in 6-OHDA-treated astrocytes. Therefore, GSK-3β may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of PD.

  6. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of the prefrontal cortex in monkeys enhance performance on an analog of the Wisconsin Card Sort Test: possible interactions with subcortical dopamine.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A C; De Salvia, M A; Wilkinson, L S; Collins, P; Muir, J L; Everitt, B J; Robbins, T W

    1994-05-01

    The effects of 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the prefrontal cortex in monkeys were investigated on two cognitive tests of prefrontal function, spatial delayed response, and attentional set shifting. The latter test provided a componential analysis of the Wisconsin Card Sort Test, a commonly used clinical test of frontal lobe function in man. Acquisition of a visual compound discrimination requiring a shift of attention from one dimension to another (extradimensional shift), for example, shapes to lines, was significantly improved. This enhancement was behaviorally specific in that there were no effects on acquisition of a discrimination that required the continued maintenance of an attentional set toward one particular dimension (intradimensional shift), nor any effects on a series of visual or spatial discrimination reversals that involved the repeated shifting of responding between two exemplars from the same dimension. In contrast, spatial delayed response performance was impaired, in agreement with previous results. Neurochemical measures showed a marked depletion of dopamine limited to the prefrontal cortex and a smaller loss of prefrontal noradrenaline. This was accompanied by a long-term adaptive change in the striatum such that extracellular dopamine in the caudate nucleus, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, was elevated in response to potassium stimulation as long as 18 months postsurgery. It is proposed that attentional set shifting is mediated by a balanced interaction between prefrontal and striatal dopamine, and that elevated dopamine contributes to the improvement in attentional set-shifting ability. This interpretation is consistent with the impairment in attentional set-shifting ability observed in patients with Parkinson's disease or with damage to the frontal lobes using the same test as used here for infrahuman primates.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells: involvement of hydrogen peroxide-dependent and -independent action.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Nishio, Keiko; Ogawa, Yoko; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Masuo, Yoshinori; Niki, Etsuo

    2007-03-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated from 6-OHDA are involved in its cytotoxicity; however, the contribution and role of ROS in 6-OHDA-induced cell death have not been fully elucidated. In the present study using PC12 cells, we observed the generation of 50 microM H2O2 from a lethal concentration of 100 microM 6-OHDA within a few minutes, and compared the sole effect of H2O2 with 6-OHDA. Catalase, an H2O2-removing enzyme, completely abolished the cytotoxic effect of H2O2, while a significant but partial protective effect was observed against 6-OHDA. 6-OHDA induced peroxiredoxin oxidation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. Catalase exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against the peroxiredoxin oxidation, and cytochrome c release induced by 6-OHDA; however, caspase-3 activation was not effectively inhibited by catalase. On the other hand, 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation was inhibited in the presence of caspase-8, caspase-9, and calpain inhibitors. These results suggest that the H2O2 generated from 6-OHDA plays a pivotal role in 6-OHDA-induced peroxiredoxin oxidation, and cytochrome c release, while H2O2- and cytochrome c-independent caspase activation pathways are involved in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. These findings may contribute to explain the importance of generated H2O2 and secondary products as a second messenger of 6-OHDA-induced cell death signal linked to Parkinson's disease.

  8. In vivo visualization and monitoring of viable neural stem cells using noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyung-Jun; Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Han Kyu; Jang, Jaeho; Lee, Song; Youn, Hyewon; Jin, Yeona; Kim, Seung U; Kim, E Edmund; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Dong Soo

    2013-06-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been proposed as a treatment for Parkinson disease (PD). The aim of this study was to monitor the viability of transplanted NSCs expressing the enhanced luciferase gene in a mouse model of PD in vivo. The PD animal model was induced by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The behavioral test using apomorphine-induced rotation and positron emission tomography with [18F]N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2'-carbomethoxy-3'-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ([18F]FP-CIT) were conducted. HB1.F3 cells transduced with an enhanced firefly luciferase retroviral vector (F3-effLuc cells) were transplanted into the right striatum. In vivo bioluminescence imaging was repeated for 2 weeks. Four weeks after transplantation, [18F]FP-CIT PET and the rotation test were repeated. All 6-OHDA-injected mice showed markedly decreased [18F]FP-CIT uptake in the right striatum. Transplanted F3-effLuc cells were visualized on the right side of the brain in all mice by bioluminescence imaging. The bioluminescence intensity of the transplanted F3-effLuc cells gradually decreased until it was undetectable by 10 days. The behavioral test showed that stem cell transplantation attenuated the motor symptoms of PD. No significant change was found in [18F]FP-CIT imaging after cell transplantation. We successfully established an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system for the detection of transplanted NSCs in a mouse model of PD. NSC transplantation induced behavioral improvement in PD model mice.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of human mesenchymal stem cells on neural cultures exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine: implications for reparative therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lidia; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Diana, Valentina; Zennaro, Eleonora; Mellone, Manuela; Calzarossa, Cinzia; Cerri, Silvia; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Polli, Elio; Blandini, Fabio; Silani, Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell (SC) transplantation represents a promising tool to treat neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), but positive therapeutic outcomes require elucidation of the biological mechanisms involved. Therefore, we investigated human Mesenchymal SCs (hMSCs) ability to protect murine differentiated Neural SCs (mdNSCs) against the cytotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in a co-culture model mimicking the in vivo neurovascular niche. The internalization of 6-OHDA mainly relies on its uptake by the dopamine active transporter (DAT), but its toxicity could also involve other pathways. We demonstrated that mdNSCs consistently expressed DAT along the differentiative process. Exposure to 6-OHDA did not affect hMSCs, but induced DAT-independent apoptosis in mdNSCs with generation of reactive oxygen species and caspases 3/7 activation. The potential neuroprotective action of hMSCs on mdNSCs exposed to 6-OHDA was tested in different co-culture conditions, in which hMSCs were added to mdNSCs prior to, simultaneously, or after 6-OHDA treatment. In the presence of the neurotoxin, the majority of mdNSCs acquired an apoptotic phenotype, while co-cultures with hMSCs significantly increased their survival (up to 70%) in all conditions. Multiplex human angiogenic array analysis on the conditioned media demonstrated that cytokine release by hMSCs was finely modulated. Moreover, sole growth factor addition yielded a similar neuroprotective effect on mdNSCs. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that hMSCs protect mdNSCs against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, and rescue cells from ongoing neurodegeneration likely through the release of multiple cytokines. Our findings provide novel insights for the development of therapeutic strategies designed to counteract the neurodegenerative processes of PD.

  10. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  11. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  12. Dopaminergic Lesions of the Dorsolateral Striatum in Rats Increase Delay Discounting in an Impulsive Choice Task

    PubMed Central

    Tedford, Stephanie E.; Persons, Amanda L.; Napier, T. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated dopamine transmission in striatal circuitry is associated with impulsivity. The current study evaluated the influence of dopaminergic inputs to the dorsolateral striatum on impulsive choice, one aspect of impulsive behavior. We implemented an operant task that measures impulsive choice in rats via delay discounting wherein intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) was used as the positive reinforcer. To do so, rats were anesthetized to allow implanting of a stimulating electrode within the lateral hypothalamus of one hemisphere and bilateral dorsal striatal injections of the dopaminergic toxin, 6-OHDA (lesioned) or its vehicle (sham). Following recovery, rats were trained in a delay discounting task wherein they selected between a small ICSS current presented immediately after lever pressing, and a large ICSS current presented following a 0 to 15s delay upon pressing the alternate lever. Task acquisition and reinforcer discrimination were similar for lesioned and sham rats. All rats exhibited an initial preference for the large reinforcer, and as the delay was increased, preference for the large reinforcer was decreased indicating that the subjective value of the large reinforcer was discounted as a function of delay time. However, this discounting effect was significantly enhanced in lesioned rats for the longer delays. These data reveal a contribution of dopaminergic inputs to the dorsolateral striatum on impulsive choice behavior, and provide new insights into neural substrates underlying discounting behaviors. PMID:25927685

  13. Dopaminergic lesions of the dorsolateral striatum in rats increase delay discounting in an impulsive choice task.

    PubMed

    Tedford, Stephanie E; Persons, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated dopamine transmission in striatal circuitry is associated with impulsivity. The current study evaluated the influence of dopaminergic inputs to the dorsolateral striatum on impulsive choice, one aspect of impulsive behavior. We implemented an operant task that measures impulsive choice in rats via delay discounting wherein intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) was used as the positive reinforcer. To do so, rats were anesthetized to allow implanting of a stimulating electrode within the lateral hypothalamus of one hemisphere and bilateral dorsal striatal injections of the dopaminergic toxin, 6-OHDA (lesioned) or its vehicle (sham). Following recovery, rats were trained in a delay discounting task wherein they selected between a small ICSS current presented immediately after lever pressing, and a large ICSS current presented following a 0 to 15 s delay upon pressing the alternate lever. Task acquisition and reinforcer discrimination were similar for lesioned and sham rats. All rats exhibited an initial preference for the large reinforcer, and as the delay was increased, preference for the large reinforcer was decreased indicating that the subjective value of the large reinforcer was discounted as a function of delay time. However, this discounting effect was significantly enhanced in lesioned rats for the longer delays. These data reveal a contribution of dopaminergic inputs to the dorsolateral striatum on impulsive choice behavior, and provide new insights into neural substrates underlying discounting behaviors.

  14. Frequency Matters: Beta Band Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Induces Parkinsonian-like Blink Abnormalities in Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The synchronized beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia-cortical networks in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be responsible for PD motor symptoms or an epiphenomenon of dopamine loss. We investigated the causal role of beta band activity in PD motor symptoms by testing the effects of beta frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) on blink reflex excitability, amplitude, and plasticity in normal rats. Delivering 16 Hz STN DBS produced the same increase in blink reflex excitability and impairment in blink reflex plasticity in normal rats as occurs in rats with 6-OHDA lesions and PD patients. These deficits were not an artifact of STN DBS because when these normal rats received 130 Hz STN DBS, their blink characteristics were the same as without STN DBS. To demonstrate the blink reflex disturbances with 16 Hz STN DBS were frequency specific, we tested the same rats with 7 Hz STN DBS, a theta band frequency typical of dystonia. In contrast to beta stimulation, 7 Hz DBS exaggerated blink reflex plasticity as occurs in focal dystonia. Thus, without destroying dopamine neurons or blocking dopamine receptors, frequency specific STN DBS can be used to create PD- or dystonic-like symptoms in a normal rat. PMID:25146113

  15. Small molecule TrkB agonist deoxygedunin protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA and MPTP induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuke; Xu, Yan; Chen, Guiqin; Ma, Kai; Han, Chao; Guo, Zhenli; Zhang, Zhentao; Ye, Keqiang; Cao, Xuebing

    2015-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and dopamine (DA) content loss in the striatum correlate well with disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophin family and is necessary for the survival and development of DA neurons in the SN. Deficits in BDNF/TrkB receptors signaling contribute to the dysfunction of PD. Deoxygedunin, a derivative of gedunin produced from Indian neem tree, binds TrkB receptor and activates TrkB and its downstream signaling cascades in a BDNF-independent manner, and possesses neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of deoxygedunin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were treated with deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for one month started two weeks before 6-OHDA lesion (pre-treatment), or for two weeks right after lesion (post-treatment), with isovolumetric vehicle as control and normal. Mice were given deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for 2 weeks and administrated with MPTP twice at the dose of 20 mg/kg (i.p.) on day 7. The results revealed that pretreatment with deoxygedunin improved PD models' behavioral performance and reduced dopaminergic neurons loss in SN, associated with the activation of TrkB receptors and its two major signaling cascades involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Thus, our current study indicates that deoxygedunin, as a small molecule TrkB agonist, displays prominent neuroprotective properties, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:26282118

  16. Anti-oxidation and Antiapoptotic Effects of Chondroitin Sulfate on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Injury Through the Up-Regulation of Nrf2 and Inhibition of Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuanxia; Hou, Lin; Sun, Fusheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zheng; Gao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Wang, Dachao; Lv, Yuqiang; Zhao, Xiaodan

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the protective effect and molecular mechanism of chondroitin sulfate (CS) against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced toxicity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. The results showed that CS could protect SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced injury. The subsequent mechanism study showed that the anti-oxidation of CS may partly be mediated through inhibiting the intracellular reactive oxygen species overproduction, recovering the reduction of nuclear NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression and the reduction of antioxidants activity induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, CS pretreatment significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced cell apoptosis and nuclear condensation. 6-OHDA-induced dysfunctions, including the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increase of intracellular free Ca(2+), imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax ratio, release of Cyt-c from the mitochondria and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were attenuated by CS pretreatment, which demonstrated that CS suppressed 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells possibly through mitochondria protection. These results suggest that CS exhibits anti-oxidation through the up-regulation of Nrf2 along with endogenous antioxidant, and reduces apoptosis via inhibiting the mitochondrial pathway to protect SH-SY5Y cells damaged by 6-OHDA.

  17. Curcumin I mediates neuroprotective effect through attenuation of quinoprotein formation, p-p38 MAPK expression, and caspase-3 activation in 6-hydroxydopamine treated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Meesarapee, Benjawan; Thampithak, Anusorn; Jaisin, Yamaratee; Sanvarinda, Pimtip; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Morales, Noppawan Phumala; Sanvarinda, Yupin

    2014-04-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) selectively enters dopaminergic neurons and undergoes auto-oxidation resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species and dopamine quinones, subsequently leading to apoptosis. This mechanism mimics the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and has been used to induce experimental Parkinsonism in both in vitro and in vivo systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of curcumin I (diferuloylmethane) purified from Curcuma longa on quinoprotein production, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (p-p38), and caspase-3 activation in 6-OHDA-treated SH-SY5Y dopaminergic cells. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y with curcumin I at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, and 20 μM, significantly decreased the formation of quinoprotein and reduced the levels of p-p38 and cleaved caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the levels of the dopaminergic neuron marker, phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase (p-TH), were also dose-dependently increased upon treatment with curcumin I. Our results clearly demonstrated that curcumin I protects neurons against oxidative damage, as shown by attenuation of p-p38 expression, caspase-3-activation, and toxic quinoprotein formation, together with the restoration of p-TH levels. This study provides evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin I in the chemoprevention of oxidative stress-related neurodegeneration.

  18. Metallothionein-III protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing expression of heme oxygenase-1 in a PI3K and ERK/Nrf2-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-09-15

    The zinc-binding protein metallothionein-III (MT-III) is associated with resistance to neuronal injury. However, the underlying mechanism for its effects is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that MT-III prevents the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells challenged with the Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) by a mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK kinase/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) dependent induction of the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with MT-III significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced generation of ROS, caspase-3 activation, and subsequent cell death. Also, MT-III up-regulates HO-1 expression and this expression confers neuroprotection against oxidative injury induced by 6-OHDA. Moreover, MT-III induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of MT-III-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K and ERK1/2 activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and neuroprotection. Taken together, these results suggest that the PI3K and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathway controls the intracellular levels of ROS by regulating the expression of the antioxidant enzyme HO-1.

  19. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  20. Pretreatment With Fragments of Substance-P or With Cholecystokinin Differentially Affects Recovery From Sub-Total Nigrostriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, S.; Huston, J. P.; Schwarting, R. K. W.

    1999-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P is known to have mnemogenic and reinforcing actions and can exert neurotrophic and regenerative effects in vitro as well as in vivo. Furthermore, our previous work in the rat showed that either pre- or post-lesion treatment with substance P can promote functional recovery in cases of partial nigrostriatal dopamine lesions. Other work has provided evidence that the effects of substance P might be differentially encoded by its C- and N-terminal fragments. The C-terminal fragment was found to be reinforcing, whereas the mnemogenic as well as neurotrophic properties have been ascribed to the N-terminal sequences. Given these relations, we asked here whether pre-lesion treatment with either a C- or an N-terminal fragment of substance P might differentially affect the behavioral and neurochemical outcome of nigrostriatal dopamine lesions. Therefore, either substance P1−7 or substance P5−11 (37 nmol/kg each) was administered intraperitoneally daily for eight consecutive days before unilateral 6-hydroxy-dopamine lesions of the substantia nigra. Control rats received prelesion treatment with vehicle. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of pre-treatment with Boc-cholecystokinin-4 (0.91 nmol/kg), as we had found an increase in dopamine metabolism in animals that were pre-treated with cholecystokinin-8 in a former study. In accordance with our previous work, drug treatment effects were observed when excluding animals with most severe dopamine lesions: In animals with partial lesions (residual neostriatal dopamine levels of more than 10%), lesion-dependent asymmetries in turning behavior were observed in animals that were pre-treated with vehicle-, substance P1−7 , or Boc-cholecysto-kinin–4,. whereas turning after pre-treatment with substance P5−11 was not significantly asymmetrical. Furthermore, the ipsi- and contra-lateral neostriatal dopamine levels did not differ significantly in this group. Moreover, pre treatment with substance

  1. Regulation of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites in the rat hippocampus following neurochemical lesions.

    PubMed

    Bolger, G T; Basile, A S; Janowsky, A J; Paul, S M; Skolnick, P

    1987-01-01

    The effects of catecholaminergic, cholinergic, serotonergic, and glutaminergic terminal destruction and neurotransmitter depletion on [3H]nitrendipine binding to rat brain membranes were determined using the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, and kainic acid and the neurotransmitter-depleting agent reserpine. Following intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine there were time-dependent increases (14-23%) in the density but not change in the affinity of hippocampal [3H]nitrendipine binding sites. 6-Hydroxydopamine significantly increased [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus 4 and 10 days following injection. However, no significant change in binding was observed at 16 and 26 days. [3H]Nitrendipine binding in the cerebral cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and brain stem was unaffected by 6-hydroxydopamine. Neither 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine nor kainic acid affected [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Acute and chronic reserpinization also did not affect [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results indicate that dihydropyridine calcium antagonist bindings sites in rat brain are subject to brain region-specific regulation following neurochemical lesions and may be present in their largest densities on postsynaptic membranes.

  2. Partial dopaminergic denervation-induced impairment in stimulus discrimination acquisition in parkinsonian rats: a model for early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Andrew L; Olumolade, Oluyemi O; Otani, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) produces progressive nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) denervation resulting in cognitive and motor impairment. However, it is unknown whether cognitive impairments, such as instrumental learning deficits, are associated with the early stage PD-induced mild DA denervation. The current study sought to model early PD-induced instrumental learning impairments by assessing the effects of low dose (5.5μg), bilateral 6OHDA-induced striatal DA denervation on acquisition of instrumental stimulus discrimination in rats. 6OHDA (n=20) or sham (n=10) lesioned rats were tested for stimulus discrimination acquisition either 1 or 2 weeks post surgical lesion. Stimulus discrimination acquisition across 10 daily sessions was used to assess discriminative accuracy, or a probability measure of the shift toward reinforced responding under one stimulus condition (Sd) away from extinction, when reinforcement was withheld, under another (S(d) phase). Striatal DA denervation was assayed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) staining intensity. Results indicated that 6OHDA lesions produced significant loss of dorsal striatal TH staining intensity and marked impairment in discrimination acquisition, without inducing akinetic motor deficits. Rather 6OHDA-induced impairment was associated with perseveration during extinction (S(Δ) phase). These findings suggest that partial, bilateral striatal DA denervation produces instrumental learning deficits, prior to the onset of gross motor impairment, and suggest that the current model is useful for investigating mild nigrostriatal DA denervation associated with early stage clinical PD.

  3. β-Ecdysterone Protects SH-SY5Y Cells Against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Apoptosis via Mitochondria-Dependent Mechanism: Involvement of p38(MAPK)-p53 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi; Niu, Yingcai; Liang, Yini; Zhang, Xiaojie; Dong, Miaoxian

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder pathologically characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. No curative therapy is available for PD. We recently found that phytoestrogen β-ecdysterone (β-Ecd) is able to reduce MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. This study investigated the potential of β-Ecd to protect against SH-SY5Y cell apoptosis induced by the PD-related neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and the underlying mechanism for this cytoprotection. In the present study, pretreatment with β-Ecd significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by a mitochondria-dependent pathway, as indicated by downregulation of Bax and PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) expression, suppressing ΔΨm loss, inhibiting cytochrome c release, and attenuating caspase-9 activation. Furthermore, we showed that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38(MAPK))-dependent p53 promoter activity contributed to the protection of SH-SY5Y cells from apoptosis, which was validated by the use of SB203580 or p38β dominant negative (DN) mutants. Additionally, knock-down apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) by specific shRNA and blockade reactive oxygen species (ROS) by pharmacological inhibitor competently prevented β-Ecd-mediated inhibition of p38(MAPK) and ASK1 phosphorylation, respectively. These data provide the first evidence that β-Ecd protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, possibly through mitochondria protection and p53 modulation via ROS-dependent ASK1-p38(MAPK) pathways. The neuroprotective effects of β-Ecd make it a promising candidate as a therapeutic agent for PD.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of dimerumic acid and deferricoprogen from Monascus purpureus NTU 568-fermented rice against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in differentiated pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Context Oxidative stress plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Rice fermented with Monascus purpureus Went (Monascaceae) NTU 568 (red mould rice) was found to contain antioxidants, including dimerumic acid (DMA) and deferricoprogen (DFC). Objective The effects of DMA and DFC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cytotoxicity and potential protective mechanisms in differentiated PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were investigated. Materials and methods DMA (0-60 μM) or DFC (0-10 μM) was co-treated with 6-OHDA (200 μM, 24 h exposure) in differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell viability and intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assays, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide staining by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of cell protein expression. Results DMA and DFC significantly increased cell viability to 72% and 81% in 6-OHDA-induced differentiated PC-12 cell cultures, respectively. Furthermore, DMA and DFC reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of extracellular and intercellular ROS by 25% and 20%, respectively, and decreased NADPH oxidase-2 expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and decreased activation of caspase-3 via regulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 protein expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. Conclusion DMA and DFC may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting ROS formation and apoptosis. These results showed that the metabolites from M. purpureus NTU 568 fermentation were potential therapeutic agents for PD induced by oxidative damage and should be encouraged for further research. PMID:26794209

  5. β-Ecdysterone Protects SH-SY5Y Cells Against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Apoptosis via Mitochondria-Dependent Mechanism: Involvement of p38(MAPK)-p53 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi; Niu, Yingcai; Liang, Yini; Zhang, Xiaojie; Dong, Miaoxian

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder pathologically characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. No curative therapy is available for PD. We recently found that phytoestrogen β-ecdysterone (β-Ecd) is able to reduce MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. This study investigated the potential of β-Ecd to protect against SH-SY5Y cell apoptosis induced by the PD-related neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and the underlying mechanism for this cytoprotection. In the present study, pretreatment with β-Ecd significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by a mitochondria-dependent pathway, as indicated by downregulation of Bax and PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) expression, suppressing ΔΨm loss, inhibiting cytochrome c release, and attenuating caspase-9 activation. Furthermore, we showed that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38(MAPK))-dependent p53 promoter activity contributed to the protection of SH-SY5Y cells from apoptosis, which was validated by the use of SB203580 or p38β dominant negative (DN) mutants. Additionally, knock-down apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) by specific shRNA and blockade reactive oxygen species (ROS) by pharmacological inhibitor competently prevented β-Ecd-mediated inhibition of p38(MAPK) and ASK1 phosphorylation, respectively. These data provide the first evidence that β-Ecd protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, possibly through mitochondria protection and p53 modulation via ROS-dependent ASK1-p38(MAPK) pathways. The neuroprotective effects of β-Ecd make it a promising candidate as a therapeutic agent for PD. PMID:27229883

  6. Pharmacological stimulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 4 in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Comparison between a positive allosteric modulator and an orthosteric agonist

    PubMed Central

    Iderberg, Hanna; Maslava, Natallia; Thompson, Analisa D.; Bubser, Michael; Niswender, Colleen M.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K.; Cenci, M. Angela

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4) negatively modulates GABA and glutamate release in the ‘indirect pathway’ of the basal ganglia, and has thus been proposed as a potential target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Here, we present an extensive comparison of the behavioural effects produced by the mGlu4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0364770, and the mGlu4 orthosteric agonist, LSP1-2111, in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. The compounds' activity was initially assessed in a test of haloperidol-induced catalepsy in intact rats, and effective doses were then evaluated in the hemiparkinsonian animal model. Neither of the two compounds modified the development of dyskinetic behaviours elicited by chronic treatment with full doses of l-DOPA. When given together with l-DOPA to rats with already established dyskinesias, neither VU0364770 nor LSP1-2111 modified the abnormal involuntary movement scores. VU0364770 potentiated, however, the motor stimulant effect of a sub-threshold l-DOPA dose in certain behavioural tests, whereas LSP1-2111 lacked this ability. Taken together, these results indicate that a pharmacological stimulation of mGlu4 lacks intrinsic antidyskinetic activity, but may have DOPA-sparing activity in Parkinson's disease. For the latter indication, mGlu4 PAMs appear to provide a better option than orthosteric agonists. PMID:25749357

  7. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of sonic hedgehog into the striatum stimulates neuroregeneration in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Dong, Weiren; Guo, Suiqun; Zhao, Shu; He, Suifen; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Yinjuan; Wang, Haihong

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the nigrostriatal pathway, consisting of dopaminergic neuronal projections from the substantia nigra to the striatum, degenerates. Viral transduction is currently the most promising in vivo strategy for delivery of therapeutic proteins into the brain for treatment of PD. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is necessary for cell proliferation, differentiation and neuroprotection in the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressed N-terminal product of SHH (SHH-N) in a PD model rat. A lentiviral vector containing SHH-N was stereotactically injected into the striatum 24 h after a striatal 6-OHDA lesion. We found that overexpressed SHH-N attenuated behavioral deficits and reduced the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and the loss of dopamine fibers in the striatum. In addition, fluoro-ruby-labeled nigrostriatal projections were also repaired. Together, our results demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of using the strategy of lentivirus-mediated Shh-N delivery to delay nigrostriatal pathway degeneration. This strategy holds the potential for therapeutic application in the treatment of PD.

  8. Differential Dopamine Receptor Occupancy Underlies L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Gurdal; Thompson, Lachlan H.; Lavisse, Sonia; Ozgur, Merve; Rbah-Vidal, Latifa; Dollé, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side effect of an otherwise effective L-DOPA treatment in Parkinson's patients. The prevailing view for the underlying presynaptic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) suggests that surges in dopamine (DA) via uncontrolled release from serotonergic terminals results in abnormally high level of extracellular striatal dopamine. Here we used high-sensitivity online microdialysis and PET imaging techniques to directly investigate DA release properties from serotonergic terminals both in the parkinsonian striatum and after neuronal transplantation in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Although L-DOPA administration resulted in a drift in extracellular DA levels, we found no evidence for abnormally high striatal DA release from serotonin neurons. The extracellular concentration of DA remained at or below levels detected in the intact striatum. Instead, our results showed that an inefficient release pool of DA associated with low D2 receptor binding remained unchanged. Taken together, these findings suggest that differential DA receptor activation rather than excessive release could be the underlying mechanism explaining LID seen in this model. Our data have important implications for development of drugs targeting the serotonergic system to reduce DA release to manage dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:24614598

  9. The plasma cyclic AMP response to catecholamines as potentiated by phentolamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kunitada, S; Ui, M

    1978-05-15

    Norepinephrine failed to increase plasma cyclic AMP when injected alone into fasted rats, in contrast with sharp increases elicited by isoproterenol, epinephrine or tyramine. In rats pretreated with 6-hydroxydopamine or cocain, however, there was significant increase in plasma cyclic AMP after norepinephrine injection, suggesting that the rapid neuronal catecholamine uptake was at least partly responsible for the lack of norepinephrine action. Phentolamine was very effective in enhancing the epinephrine-, norepinephrine- or tyramine-induced increase in plasma cyclic AMP but without effect on the isoproterenol-induced increase. Blockade of postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, rather than of presynaptic receptors, is likely to be involved in the phentolamine potentiation, since it was even observed in rats treated with 6-hydroxydopamine or cocaine. A discussion is presented regarding the mechanism by which cyclic AMP generation is influenced by the alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor interaction on effector cell membranes.

  10. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FST increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or l-threo-3

  11. The effect of central chemical sympathectomy on the oxygen uptake; anaerobic glycolysis and lactic acid dehydrogenase activity in the retina of white rats.

    PubMed

    Pojda, S M; Brus, R

    1976-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were injected intraventricularly with two doses of 250 mcg of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in two consecutive days. Two weeks later the oxygen uptake, anaerobic glycolysis and lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the retina were determined. The decrease of oxygen uptake (-28%), anaerobic glycolysis (-31%) and LDH activity (-12%) in rats treated with 6-OHDA in comparison to control animals was found. The possible role of the adrenergic system in regulation of the metabolism of the retina is discussed.

  12. (+)-Dinapsoline: an efficient synthesis and pharmacological profile of a novel dopamine agonist.

    PubMed

    Sit, Sing-Yuen; Xie, Kai; Jacutin-Porte, Swanee; Taber, Matthew T; Gulwadi, Amit G; Korpinen, Carolyn D; Burris, Kevin D; Molski, Thaddeus F; Ryan, Elaine; Xu, Cen; Wong, Henry; Zhu, Juliang; Krishnananthan, Subramaniam; Gao, Qi; Verdoorn, Todd; Johnson, Graham

    2002-08-15

    A highly convergent synthesis was developed for the novel dopamine agonist dinapsoline (12) (Ghosh, D.; Snyder, S. E.; Watts, V. J.; Mailman, R. B.; Nichols, D. E. 8,9-Dihydroxy-2,3,7, 11b-tetrahydro-1H-naph[1,2,3-de]isoquinoline: A Potent Full Dopamine D(1) Agonist Containing a Rigid beta-Phenyldopamine Pharmacophore. J. Med. Chem. 1996, 39 (2), 549-555). The crucial step in the new synthesis was a free radical-initiated cyclization to give the complete dinapsoline framework. The improved synthesis required half as many steps as the original procedure (Nichols, D. E.; Mailman, R.; Ghosh, D. Preparation of novel naphtho[1,2,3-de]isoquinolines as dopamine receptor ligands. PCT Int. Appl. WO 9706799 A1, Feb 27, 1997). One of the late-stage intermediates (11) was resolved into a pair of enantiomers. From there, the (R)-(+)-12 (absolute configuration by X-ray) of dinapsoline was identified as the active enantiomer. In unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, (+)-dinapsoline showed robust rotational behavior comparable to that of an external benchmark, trans-4,5,5a,6,7,11b-hexahydro-2-propyl-benzo[f]thieno[2,3-c]quinoline-9,10-diol, hydrochloride 18 (Michaelides, M. R.; Hong, Y. Preparation of heterotetracyclic compounds as dopamine agonists. PCT Int. Appl. WO 9422858 A1, Oct 13, 1994).

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of A Standardized Flavonoid Extract of Safflower Against Neurotoxin-Induced Cellular and Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Shi, Chunyan; Cao, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Yongfei; Wang, Chen; Lei, Hui; Jiang, Hanjie; Ablat, Nuramatjan; Xu, Jiamin; Li, Wan; Ma, Yingcong; Qi, Xianrong; Ye, Min; Pu, Xiaoping; Han, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Safflower has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives of safflower can bind DJ-1, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and flavonoid extract of safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE) was isolated from safflower and mainly contained flavonoids. Two marker compounds of SAFE, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and anhydrosafflor yellow B, were proven to suppress microtubule destabilization and decreased cell area, respectively. We confirmed that SAFE in dripping pill form could improve behavioural performances in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD, partially via the suppression of α-synuclein overexpression or aggregation, as well as the suppression of reactive astrogliosis. Using an MRI tracer-based method, we found that 6-OHDA could change extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters, including a decrease in tortuosity and the rate constant of clearance and an increase in the elimination half-life of the tracer in the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. SAFE treatment could partially inhibit the changes in ECS diffusion parameters, which might provide some information about neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Consequently, our results indicate that SAFE is a potential therapeutic herbal product for treatment of PD. PMID:26906725

  15. Phloroglucinol attenuates motor functional deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease by enhancing Nrf2 activity.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Junghwa; Zhang, Rui; Hong, Bo-Hyun; Yang, Eun-Jung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Choi, Moonseok; Kim, Ki Cheon; Noh, Su-Jin; Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Nam-Ho; Hyun, Jin Won; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) has therapeutic effects in cellular and animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is the second most common, chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease, and is clinically characterized with motor dysfunctions such as bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, gait impairment, and resting tremor. In the brains of PD patients, dopaminergic neuronal loss is observed in the Substantia nigra. Although the exact mechanisms underlying PD are largely unknown, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are thought to be critical factors that induce the onset of the disease. Here, phloroglucinol administration was shown to attenuate motor functional deficits evaluated with rota-rod and apomorphine-induced rotation tests in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD animal models. Moreover, phloroglucinol ameliorated the loss of synapses as assessed with protein levels and immunoreactivity against synaptophysin in the midbrain region of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In addition, in SH-SY5Y cultures, the cytotoxicity of 6-OHDA was reduced by pre-treatment with phloroglucinol. The increase in the reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation and 8-hydroxyguanine caused by treatment with 6-OHDA was attenuated by phloroglucinol in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, phloroglucinol treatment rescued the reduced levels of nuclear Nrf2, antioxidant enzymes, i.e., catalase and glutathione peroxidase, in 6-OHDA-treated cells. Taken together, phloroglucinol has a therapeutic potential for treatment of PD.

  16. Pleiotrophin over-expression provides trophic support to dopaminergic neurons in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin is known to promote the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in vitro and is up-regulated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To establish whether pleiotrophin has a trophic effect on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing pleiotrophin in the substantia nigra of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Results The viral vector induced pleiotrophin over-expression by astrocytes in the substantia nigra pars compacta, without modifying endogenous neuronal expression. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells as well as the area of their projections in the lesioned striatum was higher in pleiotrophin-treated animals than in controls. Conclusions These results indicate that pleiotrophin over-expression partially rescues tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies and terminals of dopaminergic neurons undergoing 6-hydroxydopamine-induced degeneration. PMID:21649894

  17. Comparative study of the neurotrophic effects elicited by VEGF-B and GDNF in preclinical in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yue, X; Hariri, D J; Caballero, B; Zhang, S; Bartlett, M J; Kaut, O; Mount, D W; Wüllner, U; Sherman, S J; Falk, T

    2014-01-31

    Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) has recently been shown to be a promising novel neuroprotective agent for several neurodegenerative conditions. In the current study we extended previous work on neuroprotective potential for Parkinson's disease (PD) by testing an expanded dose range of VEGF-B (1 and 10 μg) and directly comparing both neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects of VEGF-B in progressive unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD models to a single dose of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, 10 μg), that has been established by several groups as a standard in both preclinical PD models. In the amphetamine-induced rotational tests the treatment with 1 and 10 μg VEGF-B resulted in significantly improved motor function of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared to vehicle-treated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats in the neuroprotection paradigm. Both doses of VEGF-B caused an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell and fiber count in the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum in the neuroprotective experiment. The effect size was comparable to the effects seen with GDNF. In the neurorestoration paradigm, VEGF-B injection had no significant effect in either the behavioral or the immunohistochemical analyses, whereas GDNF injection significantly improved the amphetamine-induced rotational behavior and reduced TH-positive neuronal cell loss in the SN. We also present a strong positive correlation (p=1.9e-50) of the expression of VEGF-B with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in fatty acid metabolism in rat midbrain, pointing to the mitochondria as a site of action of VEGF-B. GDNF showed a positive correlation with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes that was not nearly as strong (p=0.018). VEGF-B counteracted rotenone-induced reduction of (a) fatty acid transport protein 1 and 4 levels and (b) both Akt protein and phosphorylation levels in SH-SY5Y cells. We further verified VEGF-B expression in the human SN pars compacta of healthy

  18. Murine model for Parkinson's disease: from 6-OH dopamine lesion to behavioral test.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Fabio S L; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Houzel, Jean-Christophe; Rehen, Stevens K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 6.5 million people worldwide, irrespective of gender, social, ethnic, economic, or geographic boundaries. Key symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity and bradikinesia, develop when about 3/4 of dopaminergic cells are lost in the substantia nigra, and fail to provide for the smooth, coordinated regulation of striatal motor circuits. Depression and hallucinations are common, and dementia eventually occurs in 20% of patients. At this time, there is no treatment to delay or stop the progression of PD. Rather, the medications currently available aim more towards the alleviation of these symptoms. New surgical strategies may reversibly switch on the functionally damaged circuits through the electrical stimulation of deep brain structures, but although deep brain stimulation is a major advance, it is not suitable for all patients. It remains therefore necessary to test new cell therapy approaches in preclinical models. Selective neurotoxic disruption of dopaminergic pathways can be reproduced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tertahydropyridine) whereas depleting drugs and oxidative-damaging chemicals may also reproduce specific features of PD in rodents. Unlike MPTP, 6-OHDA lesions cause massive irreversible neuronal loss, and can be uni- or bilateral. The 6-OHDA lesion model is reliable, leads to robust motor deficits, and is the most widely used after 40 years of research in rats. As interactions between grafted cells and host can now be studied more thoroughly in mice rather than in rats, the model has been transposed to mice, where it has been recently characterized. In this video, we demonstrate how to lesion the left nigro-striatal pathway of anesthetized mice by slowly delivering 2.0 microL of 6-OHDA through a stereotaxically inserted micro-syringe needle. The loss of dopaminergic input occurs within days, and the functional impairments can be monitored over post-operative weeks and

  19. Murine model for Parkinson's disease: from 6-OH dopamine lesion to behavioral test.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Fabio S L; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Houzel, Jean-Christophe; Rehen, Stevens K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 6.5 million people worldwide, irrespective of gender, social, ethnic, economic, or geographic boundaries. Key symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity and bradikinesia, develop when about 3/4 of dopaminergic cells are lost in the substantia nigra, and fail to provide for the smooth, coordinated regulation of striatal motor circuits. Depression and hallucinations are common, and dementia eventually occurs in 20% of patients. At this time, there is no treatment to delay or stop the progression of PD. Rather, the medications currently available aim more towards the alleviation of these symptoms. New surgical strategies may reversibly switch on the functionally damaged circuits through the electrical stimulation of deep brain structures, but although deep brain stimulation is a major advance, it is not suitable for all patients. It remains therefore necessary to test new cell therapy approaches in preclinical models. Selective neurotoxic disruption of dopaminergic pathways can be reproduced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tertahydropyridine) whereas depleting drugs and oxidative-damaging chemicals may also reproduce specific features of PD in rodents. Unlike MPTP, 6-OHDA lesions cause massive irreversible neuronal loss, and can be uni- or bilateral. The 6-OHDA lesion model is reliable, leads to robust motor deficits, and is the most widely used after 40 years of research in rats. As interactions between grafted cells and host can now be studied more thoroughly in mice rather than in rats, the model has been transposed to mice, where it has been recently characterized. In this video, we demonstrate how to lesion the left nigro-striatal pathway of anesthetized mice by slowly delivering 2.0 microL of 6-OHDA through a stereotaxically inserted micro-syringe needle. The loss of dopaminergic input occurs within days, and the functional impairments can be monitored over post-operative weeks and

  20. Pharmacological modulation of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia in transplanted hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gaynor A; Breger, Ludivine S; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    Foetal cell transplantation in patients with Parkinson's disease can induce motor complications independent of L-DOPA administration, known as graft-induced dyskinesia. In the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease, post-transplantation abnormal movements can develop in response to an amphetamine challenge, a behaviour which is used to model graft-induced dyskinesia. Although L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia has been well characterised pharmacologically, we lack knowledge on the modulation of post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia which may shed light on the mechanisms underlying graft-induced dyskinesia. We assessed a series of drugs effective at reducing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia against post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. Agents include: dopaminergic antagonists (D₁: CP94253; D₂: SCH-22390; D₃: nafadotride), serotonergic agonists (5-HT(1A): 8-OH-DPAT; 5-HT(1B): CP94253), opioid antagonist (μ: naloxone), cannabinoid agonist (CB₁: WIN55, 212-2), adrenergic antagonist (α₁ and α₂: yohimbine) and glutamatergic antagonists (NMDA: amantadine and MK-801; mGluR5: MTEP; AMPA: IEM1460). Abnormal involuntary movements in response to amphetamine were decreased by SCH-22390, raclopride, CP94253 and 8-OH-DPAT, yet were unaltered by naloxone, WIN55, 212-2, yohimbine, amantadine, MTEP and IEM1460. Unusually, MK-801 increased the appearance of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. The results suggest that dopaminergic, serotoninergic and glutamatergic systems are likely to have a fundamental role in the development of graft-induced dyskinesias, which are mechanistically distinct from L-DOPA-induced behvaviours. Importantly, the expression of D₁ and D₂ receptors was unrelated to the severity of AIMs.

  1. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Counteracts Cortical Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats. PMID:24621597

  2. Drug-induced rotation intensity in unilateral dopamine-depleted rats is not correlated with end point or qualitative measures of forelimb or hindlimb motor performance.

    PubMed

    Metz, G A; Whishaw, I Q

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacological induction of rotational (circling) behavior is widely used to assess the effects of lesions to the dopaminergic system and the success of treatment strategies in rat models of Parkinson's disease. While the number of rotations under apomorphine, L-DOPA and amphetamine is related to the extent of dopamine depletion after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine system, the relationship of the intensity of rotational behavior to the degree of impairment in motor behavior is unclear. The present study examined this question by correlating rotational behavior and motor abilities in a rat analogue for Parkinson's disease produced by unilateral nigrostriatal bundle lesion with 6-hydroxydopamine. Ipsiversive and contraversive rotation was measured in the rats following systemic administration of low and high doses of apomorphine, the dopamine precursor L-DOPA, and amphetamine. The motor assessment included end point and qualitative measures of fore- and hindlimbs assessed in a skilled reaching task and a skilled ladder rung walking task. The intensity of drug-induced rotation did not correlate with the measures of motor performance. We conclude that independence of rotational behavior and motor performance argues that both the assessment of 6-hydroxydopamine behavioral deficits and potential treatments for the functional deficits require comprehensive assessment, including both measures of rotation and motor behavior. PMID:11983318

  3. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression.

  4. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression. PMID:26119238

  5. Altered pallido-pallidal synaptic transmission leads to aberrant firing of globus pallidus neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Miguelez, Cristina; Morin, Stéphanie; Martinez, Audrey; Goillandeau, Michel; Bezard, Erwan; Bioulac, Bernard; Baufreton, Jérôme

    2012-11-15

    The pattern of activity of globus pallidus (GP) neurons is tightly regulated by GABAergic inhibition. In addition to extrinsic inputs from the striatum (STR-GP) the other source of GABA to GP neurons arises from intrinsic intranuclear axon collaterals (GP-GP). While the contribution of striatal inputs has been studied, notably its hyperactivity in Parkinson's disease (PD), the properties and function of intranuclear inhibition remain poorly understood. Our objective was therefore to test the impact of chronic dopamine depletion on pallido-pallidal transmission. Using patch-clamp whole-cell recordings in rat brain slices, we combined electrical and optogenetic stimulations with pharmacology to differentiate basic synaptic properties of STR-GP and GP-GP GABAergic synapses. GP-GP synapses were characterized by activity-dependent depression and insensitivity to the D(2) receptor specific agonist quinpirole and STR-GP synapses by frequency-dependent facilitation and quinpirole modulation. Chronic dopamine deprivation obtained in 6-OHDA lesioned animals boosted the amplitude of GP-GP IPSCs but did not modify STR-GP transmission and increased the amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Replacement of calcium by strontium confirmed that the quantal amplitude was increased at GP-GP synapses. Finally, we demonstrated that boosted GP-GP transmission promotes resetting of autonomous activity and rebound-burst firing after dopamine depletion. These results suggest that GP-GP synaptic transmission (but not STR-GP) is augmented by chronic dopamine depletion which could contribute to the aberrant GP neuronal activity observed in PD.

  6. Curcumin improves neurofunctions of 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Shilei; Nie, Qingmei; Li, Zhifang; Du, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that curcumin (CM), a natural ingredient isolated from Zingiberaceae, exerts the effect of inhibiting hippocampal injury in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced parkinsonian rat. However, the potential effect of CM on 6-OHDA-injured substantia nigra (SN) needs to be investigated. This study aimed to further evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of CM against damaged SN in rats. Methodologically, Parkinson's disease (PD) rat was prepared by using a surgical approach of injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the SN. Morris water maze, open-field assays, and rotarod test were used to assess the neurobehavioral manifestations. Neurotransmitter contents in the SN were determined by using the biochemical tests. Western blotting was employed to evaluate the target protein expressions. The representative data showed that CM protected against 6-OHDA-induced neural impairments in the SN, as evidenced by improved memory abilities, elevated intercalatum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and reduced concentration of malonaldehyde (MDA). In addition, dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) levels were increased in the SN. Moreover, intercalatum heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was lowered, while basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and receptor tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) expressions were up-regulated, respectively. Taken together, the findings indicate that curcum in exerts neuroprotection in the SN via ameliorating neurofunctions of PD rats. PMID:26922613

  7. Localization and characterization of (/sup 3/H)desmethylimipramine binding sites in rat brain by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Rainbow, T.C.

    1983-05-01

    The high affinity binding sites for the antidepressant desmethlyimipramine (DMI) have been localized in rat brain by quantitative autoradiography. There are high concentrations of binding sites in the locus ceruleus, the anterior ventral thalamus, the ventral portion of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and the dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. The distribution of DMI binding sites is in striking accord with the distribution of norepinephrine terminals. Pretreatment of rats with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, which causes a selective degeneration of catecholamine terminals, results in 60 to 90% decrease in DMI binding. These data support the idea that high affinity binding sites for DMI are located on presynaptic noradrenergic terminals.

  8. Dopamine receptor activation promotes adult neurogenesis in an acute Parkinson model

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Beate; Desplats, Paula; Hagl, Christian; Klucken, Jochen; Aigner, Robert; Ploetz, Sonja; Laemke, Jörn; Karl, Alexandra; Aigner, Ludwig; Masliah, Eliezer; Buerger, Erich; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation of neural progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of Parkinson disease (PD) patients and animal models is decreased. It was previously demonstrated that the neurotransmitter dopamine modulates cell proliferation in the embryonic brain. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether oral treatment with the dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole (PPX) modulates adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/ olfactory bulb system in a dopaminergic lesion model. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned adult rats received either PPX (1,0 mg/kg) or PBS orally twice daily and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, a cell proliferation marker) for 10 days and were perfused immediately after treatment or 4 weeks after PPX withdrawal. Stereological analysis revealed a significant augmentation in SVZ proliferation by PPX. Consecutively, enhanced neuronal differentiation and more new neurons were present in the olfactory bulb 4 weeks after PPX withdrawal. In addition, dopaminergic neurogenesis was increased in the olfactory bulb after PPX treatment. Motor activity as assessed by using an open field paradigm was permanently increased even after long term PPX withdrawal. In addition, we demonstrate that D2 and D3 receptors are present on adult rat SVZ derived neural progenitors in vitro, and PPX specifically increased mRNA levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and paired box gene 6 (Pax6). Oral PPX treatment selectively increases adult neurogenesis in the SVZ-olfactory bulb system by increasing proliferation and cell survival of newly generated neurons. Analyzing the neurogenic fate decisions mediated by D2/D3 signaling pathways may lead to new avenues to induce neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:19619535

  9. Animal models to guide clinical drug development in ADHD: lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Wickens, Jeffery R; Hyland, Brian I; Tripp, Gail

    2011-10-01

    We review strategies for developing animal models for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a behavioural disorder of unknown aetiology and pathophysiology. Current understanding suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the aetiology of ADHD. The involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in the pathophysiology of ADHD is probable. We review the clinical features of ADHD including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity and how these are operationalized for laboratory study. Measures of temporal discounting (but not premature responding) appear to predict known drug effects well (treatment validity). Open-field measures of overactivity commonly used do not have treatment validity in human populations. A number of animal models have been proposed that simulate the symptoms of ADHD. The most commonly used are the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (6-OHDA) animals. To date, however, the SHR lacks treatment validity, and the effects of drugs on symptoms of impulsivity and inattention have not been studied extensively in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. At the present stage of development, there are no in vivo models of proven effectiveness for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in ADHD. However, temporal discounting is an emerging theme in theories of ADHD, and there is good evidence of increased value of delayed reward following treatment with stimulant drugs. Therefore, operant behaviour paradigms that measure the effects of drugs in situations of delayed reinforcement, whether in normal rats or selected models, show promise for the future.

  10. Animal models to guide clinical drug development in ADHD: lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Wickens, Jeffery R; Hyland, Brian I; Tripp, Gail

    2011-01-01

    We review strategies for developing animal models for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a behavioural disorder of unknown aetiology and pathophysiology. Current understanding suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the aetiology of ADHD. The involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in the pathophysiology of ADHD is probable. We review the clinical features of ADHD including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity and how these are operationalized for laboratory study. Measures of temporal discounting (but not premature responding) appear to predict known drug effects well (treatment validity). Open-field measures of overactivity commonly used do not have treatment validity in human populations. A number of animal models have been proposed that simulate the symptoms of ADHD. The most commonly used are the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (6-OHDA) animals. To date, however, the SHR lacks treatment validity, and the effects of drugs on symptoms of impulsivity and inattention have not been studied extensively in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. At the present stage of development, there are no in vivo models of proven effectiveness for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in ADHD. However, temporal discounting is an emerging theme in theories of ADHD, and there is good evidence of increased value of delayed reward following treatment with stimulant drugs. Therefore, operant behaviour paradigms that measure the effects of drugs in situations of delayed reinforcement, whether in normal rats or selected models, show promise for the future. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21480864

  11. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  12. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4-Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0364770 Produces Efficacy Alone and in Combination with l-DOPA or an Adenosine 2A Antagonist in Preclinical Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carrie K.; Bubser, Michael; Thompson, Analisa D.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Turle-Lorenzo, Nathalie; Amalric, Marianne; Blobaum, Anna L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Engers, Darren W.; Italiano, Kimberly; Bode, Jacob; Daniels, J. Scott; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder associated with severe motor impairments caused by the loss of dopaminergic innervation of the striatum. Previous studies have demonstrated that positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4), including N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide, can produce antiparkinsonian-like effects in preclinical models of PD. However, these early mGlu4 PAMs exhibited unsuitable physiochemical properties for systemic dosing, requiring intracerebroventricular administration and limiting their broader utility as in vivo tools to further understand the role of mGlu4 in the modulation of basal ganglia function relevant to PD. In the present study, we describe the pharmacologic characterization of a systemically active mGlu4 PAM, N-(3-chlorophenyl)picolinamide (VU0364770), in several rodent PD models. VU0364770 showed efficacy alone or when administered in combination with l-DOPA or an adenosine 2A (A2A) receptor antagonist currently in clinical development (preladenant). When administered alone, VU0364770 exhibited efficacy in reversing haloperidol-induced catalepsy, forelimb asymmetry-induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the median forebrain bundle, and attentional deficits induced by bilateral 6-OHDA nigrostriatal lesions in rats. In addition, VU0364770 enhanced the efficacy of preladenant to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy when given in combination. The effects of VU0364770 to reverse forelimb asymmetry were also potentiated when the compound was coadministered with an inactive dose of l-DOPA, suggesting that mGlu4 PAMs may provide l-DOPA-sparing activity. The present findings provide exciting support for the potential role of selective mGlu4 PAMs as a novel approach for the symptomatic treatment of PD and a possible augmentation strategy with either l-DOPA or A2A antagonists. PMID:22088953

  13. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to dopaminergic neurons in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Noggle, Scott A; Palmarini, Gail M; Weiler, Deb A; Lyons, Ian G; Pensa, Kate A; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Davidson, Bruce P; Lambert, Nevin A; Condie, Brian G

    2004-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease cell therapy will require the development of simple and reliable cell differentiation protocols. The use of cell cocultures, added extracellular signaling factors, or transgenic approaches to drive hESC differentiation could lead to additional regulatory as well as cell production delays for these therapies. Because the neuronal cell lineage seems to require limited or no signaling for its formation, we tested the ability of hESCs to differentiate to form dopamine-producing neurons in a simple serum-free suspension culture system. BG01 and BG03 hESCs were differentiated as suspension aggregates, and neural progenitors and neurons were detectable after 2-4 weeks. Plated neurons responded appropriately to electrophysiological cues. This differentiation was inhibited by early exposure to bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4, but a pulse of BMP-4 from days 5 to 9 caused induction of peripheral neuronal differentiation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of multiple markers of the midbrain dopaminergic phenotype in serum-free differentiations. Neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were killed by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic catecholamine. Upon plating, these cells released dopamine and other catecholamines in response to K+ depolarization. Surviving TH+ neurons, derived from the cells differentiated in serum-free suspension cultures, were detected 8 weeks after transplantation into 6-OHDA-lesioned rat brains. This work suggests that hESCs can differentiate in simple serum-free suspension cultures to produce the large number of cells required for transplantation studies. PMID:15579641

  14. Distribution, level, pharmacology, regulation, and signaling of 5-HT6 receptors in rats and marmosets with special reference to an experimental model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqun; Andren, Per E; Glennon, Richard A; Svenningsson, Per

    2011-06-15

    Serotonin 5-HT(6) receptors have been implicated in the regulation of cognition, locomotion, and mood, but the elucidation of their functions is complicated by conflicting data using various animal models. Here, a systematic evaluation showed that autoradiographic binding with the selective 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist [(125) I]SB-258585 was similar in marmosets and rats. In both species, [(125) I]SB-258585 binding was enriched in the caudate-putamen. Various recently developed agonists and antagonists toward 5-HT(6) receptors exhibited similarities in their abilities to displace [(125) I]SB-258585 binding in marmosets and rats. The rank order of pEC50 values were as follows: (+)EMDT-CR = EMD386088>MS-245 = 5-HT>EMDT>(-)EMDT-CR; and (+)EMDT-CR = EMD386088>5-HT = MS-245 = EMDT>(-)EMDT-CR, in marmosets and rats, respectively. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of dopaminergic axons caused a significant decrease of [(125) I]SB-258585 binding in the caudate-putamen of both marmosets and rats. Nonetheless, acute administration of the 5-HT(6) receptor agonist EMDT to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, caused an induction of egr-1, homer, and enkephalin mRNAs in the dopamine-depleted hemisphere, indicating a supersensitization of 5-HT(6) receptors following dopamine depletion. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for significant similarities in the distribution, level, pharmacology, and regulation of 5-HT(6) receptors between rats and marmosets.

  15. Sulfanilic acid: behavioral change related to azo food dyes in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Goldenring, J R; Batter, D K; Shaywitz, B A

    1982-01-01

    The effects of sulfanilic acid, a major azo food dye metabolite, were studied in normal developing rat pups and pups treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (60HDA). Chronic daily intraperitoneal injection of sulfanilic acid during the first postnatal month elicited hyperactivity and impaired shock escape performance in vehicle pups. No differences were noted in 60HDA treated rat pups receiving sulfanilic acid. These findings, which are similar to the results of our study of chronic administration of a food dye mix, suggest that sulfanilic acid may be one of the causative agents in food dye-induced behavioral changes in developing rats. While our work suggests a significant effect of azo food dyes on the developing rat central nervous system, species differences in parameters such as absorption, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier properties do not permit any extrapolation of these observations to proposed effects in children.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation Exacerbates Hypokinetic Dysarthria in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    King, Nathaniel O.; Anderson, Collin J.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms – tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia – but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. In this work, we propose an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We used the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually-experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions, and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. Interestingly, the individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-hydroxydopamine rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD, while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life. PMID:26498277

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson’s disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  18. Neuronal Regulation of Neuroprotective Microglial Apolipoprotein E Secretion in Rat In Vitro Models of Brain Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Polazzi, Elisabetta; Mengoni, Ilaria; Peña-Altamira, Emiliano; Massenzio, Francesca; Virgili, Marco; Petralla, Sabrina; Monti, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is mainly secreted by glial cells and is involved in many brain functions, including neuronal plasticity, β-amyloid clearance, and neuroprotection. Microglia--the main immune cells of the brain--are one source of ApoE, but little is known about the physiologic regulation of microglial ApoE secretion by neurons and whether this release changes under inflammatory or neurodegenerative conditions. Using rat primary neural cell cultures, we show that microglia release ApoE through a Golgi-mediated secretion pathway and that ApoE progressively accumulates in neuroprotective microglia-conditioned medium. This constitutive ApoE release is negatively affected by microglial activation both with lipopolysaccharide and with ATP. Microglial ApoE release is stimulated by neuron-conditioned media and under coculture conditions. Neuron-stimulated microglial ApoE release is mediated by serine and glutamate through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and is differently regulated by activation states (i.e. lipopolysaccharide vs ATP) and by 6-hydroxydopamine. Microglial ApoE silencing abrogated protection of cerebellar granule neurons against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity in cocultures, indicating that microglial ApoE release is neuroprotective. Our findings shed light on the reciprocal cross-talk between neurons and microglia that is crucial for normal brain functions. They also open the way for the identification of possible pharmacologic targets that can modulate neuroprotective microglial ApoE release under pathologic conditions.

  19. Benzodiazepine receptors in the rat hippocampal formation: action of catecholaminergic, serotoninergic and commissural denervation.

    PubMed

    Novas, M L; Medina, J H; De Robertis, E

    1983-03-01

    The problem of benzodiazepine receptor localization in the rat hippocampal formation has been approached using several methods of selective deafferentation, followed by [3H]flunitrazepam binding studies. The intraventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine reduced, after 14 days, the norepinephrine content of the hippocampal formation by 68.4%, and decreased the number of binding sites by 32%, without change in affinity. The intraventricular injection of 5,6 dihydroxytryptamine reduced the serotonin content by 61.5% but did not alter the [3H]flunitrazepam binding. The intraventricular bilateral injection of 0.5 micrograms kainic acid selectively destroyed the pyramidal neurons in area CA3 of both hippocampi and produced an increase of 28% in [3H]flunitrazepam binding, without change in affinity. These results are discussed in relation to our previous observations about benzodiazepine receptor changes after fimbria-fornix transection. The reduction in [3H]flunitrazepam binding after administration of 6-hydroxydopamine suggests the possible localization of the benzodiazepine receptors on adrenergic presynaptic terminals. The increase in binding sites after destruction of CA3 pyramidal cells, which are the site of origin of commissural fibers, is tentatively interpreted as resulting from the sprouting of mossy fibers that replace the associational-commissural projections.

  20. Effects of 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonists on dopamine turnover in the striatum of rats with experimental parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Megyeri, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Sziray, Nora; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Juranyi, Zsolt; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2007-03-15

    Although levodopa is the current "gold standard" for treatment of Parkinson's disease, there has been disputation on whether AMPA receptor antagonists can be used as adjuvant therapy to improve the effects of levodopa. Systemic administration of levodopa, the precursor of dopamine, increases brain dopamine turnover rate and this elevated turnover is believed to be essential for successful treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term treatment of patients with levodopa often leads to development of dyskinesia. Therefore, drugs that feature potentiation of dopamine turnover rate and are able to reduce daily levodopa dosages might be used as adjuvant in the treatment of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. To investigate such combined treatment, we have examined the effects of two non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, GYKI-52466 and GYKI-53405, alone or in combination with levodopa on dopamine turnover rate in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned striatum of the rat. We found here that repeated administration of levodopa, added with the peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, increased dopamine turnover rate after lesioning the striatum with 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, combination of levodopa with GYKI-52466 or GYKI-53405 further increased dopamine turnover enhanced by levodopa administration while the AMPA receptor antagonists by themselves failed to influence striatal dopamine turnover. We concluded from the present data that potentiation observed between levodopa and AMPA receptor antagonists may reflect levodopa-sparing effects in clinical treatment indicating the therapeutic potential of such combination in the management of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Central action of phenylethylamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Jagiełło-Wójtowicz, E

    1981-01-01

    Phenylethylamine (PEA), 10, 50 and 100 microgram/rat ivc depressed the spontaneous and explorative motor activities, did not affect the body temperature and potentiated the action of hypnotics. The PEA-induced depression of motor activity was antagonized by spiperone, phenoxybenzamine, propranolol and, slightly, by alpha-MT. In rats with total chemical destruction of catecholamine neurons and in rats with selective lesion of dopamine neurons, PEA increased motor activity. Similar effect was observed after administration of reserpine, reserpine together with 6-hydroxydopamine and yohimbine. PEA potentiated the amphetamine and apomorphine stereotypy but inhibited amphetamine hypermotility: in the latter experiment slight periodical stereotyped head movements were observed. PEA did not affect haloperidol and fluphenazine induced catalepsy. It did not change the immobility period in the behavioral despair test. In doses of 0 . 1, 1 and 10 mg/kg iv it potentiated flexor reflex of the hind paw of the spinal rat. Phentolamine (10 mg/kg iv) and propranolol (5 mg/kg iv) slightly potentiated the stimulatory effect of PEA. In doses of 50 and 100 microgram ivc PEA did not affect the level and utilization of noradrenaline, and did not change the level of dopamine but depressed its utilization in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus. PMID:7196039

  2. Neuroprotective Properties of the Standardized Extract from Camellia sinensis (Green Tea) and Its Main Bioactive Components, Epicatechin and Epigallocatechin Gallate, in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bitu Pinto, Natália; da Silva Alexandre, Bruno; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Silva, Aline Holanda; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; Viana, Glauce S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Camellia sinensis (green tea) is largely consumed, mainly in Asia. It possesses several biological effects such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The objectives were to investigate the neuroprotective actions of the standardized extract (CS), epicatechin (EC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on a model of Parkinson's disease. Male Wistar rats were divided into SO (sham-operated controls), untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned and 6-OHDA-lesioned treated for 2 weeks with CS (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg), EC (10 mg/kg), or EGCG (10 mg/kg) groups. One hour after the last administration, animals were submitted to behavioral tests and euthanized and their striata and hippocampi were dissected for neurochemical (DA, DOPAC, and HVA) and antioxidant activity determinations, as well as immunohistochemistry evaluations (TH, COX-2, and iNOS). The results showed that CS and catechins reverted behavioral changes, indicating neuroprotection manifested as decreased rotational behavior, increased locomotor activity, antidepressive effects, and improvement of cognitive dysfunction, as compared to the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned group. Besides, CS, EP, and EGCG reversed the striatal oxidative stress and immunohistochemistry alterations. These results show that the neuroprotective effects of CS and its catechins are probably and in great part due to its powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, pointing out their potential for the prevention and treatment of PD. PMID:26167188

  3. Innervation of the rat thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Kendall, M D; al-Shawaf, A A

    1991-03-01

    Current views from different laboratories on the innervation of the thymus gland are reviewed with particular reference to the rat. Noradrenergic nerve profiles of the sympathetic nervous system have been demonstrated in the subcapsular cortex, at the corticomedullary junction and in the cortex itself, and extremely sparsely in the medulla. By following beta-adrenergic receptor development in postnatal rats, it has been shown that there is a marked increase in density and morphological organization of the receptor in the medulla with the maturation of thymocyte function (monitored by measuring the proliferation response to concanavalin A) and a sexual dimorphism during the ontogeny of the receptor. Chemical sympathectomy of adult rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or guanethidine resulted in a loss of thymus weight, decreased cellularity, and increased apoptosis but a rise in the numbers of proliferating cells in the cortex. By contrast, proliferation of peripheral T cells was reduced after the use of 6-OHDA. Chemical sympathectomy also demonstrated that there were at least three nerve nets in the gland: noradrenergic neural profiles that were destroyed with both 6-OHDA and guanethidine, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-positive profiles that persisted, and AChE- and CGRP-positive profiles and cells that also persisted but had a different distribution to VIP-positive fibers. Some functional correlates of thymic innervation are discussed although the subject now needs to be further researched.

  4. Sympathetic neural control of indoleamine metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. J.; Hsuan, M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the acceleration in rat pineal biosynthetic activity in response to prolonged exposure to darkness or to immobilization were investigated in animals whose pineals were surgically denervated. Some animals were adrenalectomized to remove one potential source of circulating catecholamines, and some were subjected to a partial chemical sympathectomy accomplished by a series of intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. Results suggest that N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity can be enhanced either by release of norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals within the pineal or from sympathetic nerve terminals elsewhere. The stress of immobilization stimulates the pineal by increasing circulating catecholamines. Photic control of pineal function requires intact pineal sympathetic innervation, since the onset of darkness apparently does not cause a sufficient rise in circulating catecholamines to stimulate the pineal. The present studies suggest that nonspecific stress triggers increased biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin; it is possible that this hormone may participate in mechanisms of adaptation.

  5. CCK-8 injected into the nucleus accumbens attenuates the supersensitive locomotor response to apomorphine in 6-OHDA and chronic-neuroleptic treated rats.

    PubMed

    Weiss, F; Ettenberg, A; Koob, G F

    1989-01-01

    Postsynaptic dopamine-cholecystokinin (CCK) interactions in the nucleus accumbens were studied in two behavioral preparations of DA receptor supersensitivity: chronic-neuroleptic treated and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) denervated rats. Subcutaneous (SC) injections of apomorphine (APO; 0.15 mg/kg) in experiment 1 produced marked hyperlocomotion in rats following 12 days of pretreatment with cis-[Z]-flupenthixol (2 mg/kg; twice per day). Bilateral intra-accumbens (N.Acc.) microinjections of CCK-8 (2 ng and 2 micrograms) reliably reduced APO-stimulated hyperlocomotion. An intermediate CCK dose (20 ng) was without effect. No change in APO responsivity following chronic vehicle treatment was observed and the baseline APO response was not altered by CCK at any dose. Denervation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) terminals by intra-N.Acc. injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 8 micrograms/side) in experiment 2 similarly resulted in intense locomotor hyperactivity after APO stimulation (0.1 mg/kg; SC). Bilateral intra-N.Acc. injections of CCK-8 (1, 10, 100 ng, and 1 micrograms) significantly attenuated the supersensitive locomotor response to APO. As in experiment 1, CCK produced "biphasic" dose-response effects with strong attenuation that persisted throughout the entire 60-min test at both high (1 microgram) and low (1 ng) doses. Intermediate CCK doses (10 and 100 ng) produced only short-term reductions in activity. Hypomotility induced by APO in SHAM-lesioned rats was not effectively reversed by CCK treatments. CCK had no effect on unstimulated baseline locomotor activity in either 6-OHDA or SHAM-lesioned rats. These results provide further evidence that CCK-8 modulates mesolimbic DA activity by functionally opposing the postsynaptic effects of DA in the region of the nucleus accumbens. PMID:2574480

  6. Restoring Spinal Noradrenergic Inhibitory Tone Attenuates Pain Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Chen, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether restoring descending noradrenergic inhibitory tone can attenuate pain in a PD rat model, which was established by stereotaxic infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral striatum (CPu). PD rats developed thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity at the 4th week after surgery. HPLC analysis showed that NE content, but not dopamine or 5-HT, significantly decreased in lumbar spinal cord in PD rats. Additional noradrenergic depletion by injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) aggravated pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. At the 5th week after injection of 6-OHDA, systemic treatment with pharmacological norepinephrine (NE) precursor droxidopa (L-DOPS) or α2 adrenoceptor agonist clonidine significantly attenuated thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Furthermore, application of norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors duloxetine, but not 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitors sertraline, significantly inhibited thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Systemic administration of Madopar (L-DOPA) or the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole slightly inhibited the thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity in PD rats. Thus, our study revealed that impairment of descending noradrenergic system may play a key role in PD-associated pain and restoring spinal noradrenergic inhibitory tone may serve as a novel strategy to manage PD-associated pain. PMID:27747105

  7. Modeling fall propensity in Parkinson's disease: deficits in the attentional control of complex movements in rats with cortical-cholinergic and striatal-dopaminergic deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Kucinski, Aaron; Paolone, Giovanna; Bradshaw, Marc; Albin, Roger L; Sarter, Martin

    2013-10-16

    Cognitive symptoms, complex movement deficits, and increased propensity for falls are interrelated and levodopa-unresponsive symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We developed a test system for the assessment of fall propensity in rats and tested the hypothesis that interactions between loss of cortical cholinergic and striatal dopaminergic afferents increase fall propensity. Rats were trained to traverse stationary and rotating rods, placed horizontally or at inclines, and while exposed to distractors. Rats also performed an operant Sustained Attention Task (SAT). Partial cortical cholinergic and/or caudate dopaminergic deafferentation were produced by bilateral infusions of 192 IgG-saporin (SAP) into the basal forebrain and/or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the caudate nucleus, respectively, modeling the lesions seen in early PD. Rats with dual cholinergic-dopaminergic lesions (DL) fell more frequently than SAP or 6-OHDA rats. Falls in DL rats were associated with incomplete rebalancing after slips and low traversal speed. Ladder rung walking and pasta handling performance did not indicate sensorimotor deficits. SAT performance was impaired in DL and SAP rats; however, SAT performance and falls were correlated only in DL rats. Furthermore, in DL rats, but not in rats with only dopaminergic lesions, the placement and size of dopaminergic lesion correlated significantly with fall rates. The results support the hypothesis that after dual cholinergic-dopaminergic lesions, attentional resources can no longer be recruited to compensate for diminished striatal control of complex movement, thereby "unmasking" impaired striatal control of complex movements and yielding falls. PMID:24133257

  8. Investigation of gender differences in the cardiovascular actions of direct and indirect sympathomimetic stimulants including cathinone in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Alsufyani, H A; Docherty, J R

    2016-01-01

    We have studied gender differences in the direct and indirect sympathomimetic cardiovascular effects of the stimulant cathinone (from Khat) (and for comparison methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) and the archetypal indirect sympathomimetic agent tyramine, employing male and female Wistar rats. Animals were sympathectomized by treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine or treated with vehicle. In male and female vehicle-treated pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats, all three agonists (0.001-1 mg/kg) produced significant tachycardia, tyramine produced large pressor, and in high doses small depressor responses, MDMA produced small pressor responses, and cathinone produced only minor pressor effects. In sympathectomized rats, pressor responses, even those to tyramine, were virtually abolished, and depressor responses to tyramine were abolished. In vehicle-treated rats, the tachycardia to tyramine, but not the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA, was significantly greater in male than female rats. This may suggest that the mechanism of the tachycardia to tyramine differs from those of the stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Following sympathectomy, there were no differences between male and female rats in the tachycardia to any agent. Hence, there were gender differences in the tachycardia response for tyramine, but no gender differences in the cardiovascular responses to the widely used recreational stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Cardiac stimulant actions of cathinone and MDMA were similar in male and female rats. PMID:27534387

  9. Noradrenaline depletion blocks behavioral sparing and alters cortical morphogenesis after neonatal frontal cortex damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolb, B; Sutherland, R J

    1992-06-01

    The possibility that cortical noradrenaline (NA) is necessary for sparing of function that occurs after neonatal frontal cortex damage was examined. Spatial localization by rats with frontal cortex damage on postnatal day 7 (P7) was better than that by rats with similar damage sustained as adults. The sparing was abolished in rats depleted of cortical NA by means of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) administration. The blockade of sparing in the P7 frontal operates was associated with a smaller brain, thinner cortex, and reduced cortical dendritic branching relative to saline-treated P7 frontal operates. NA depletion alone in unoperated rats did not affect spatial learning but did reduce brain size and dendritic branching. Rats with frontal lesions on P4 did not show sparing of spatial localization, and 6HDA administration had no additional behavioral effect. Overall, these data are consistent with the notion that NA has some general function in maintaining some forms of plasticity in posterior cortex. PMID:1607943

  10. Direct and indirect cardiovascular actions of cathinone and MDMA in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Alsufyani, Hadeel A; Docherty, James R

    2015-07-01

    The stimulants cathinone (from Khat leaves) and methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA) produce adrenoceptor mediated tachycardia and vasopressor actions that may be the result of direct receptor stimulation, actions on the noradrenaline transporter, and/or displacement of noradrenaline from nerve terminals. Effects of cathinone or MDMA were compared with those of the indirect sympathomimetic tyramine. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized with pentobarbitone for blood pressure and heart rate recording. Some rats were sympathectomised by treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. In the anaesthetised rat, cathinone, MDMA and tyramine (all 0.001-1 mg/kg) produced marked tachycardia, tyramine produced marked pressor responses and MDMA produced small pressor responses. The tachycardia to cathinone and MDMA was almost abolished by propranolol (1mg/kg). Pretreatment with cocaine (1mg/kg) did not significantly affect the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA, but reduced the response to tyramine. However, in sympathectomised rats, the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA was markedly attenuated, but the tachycardia to tyramine was only partially reduced. Blood pressure effects of tyramine and MDMA were also markedly attenuated by sympathectomy. The results demonstrate firstly that cocaine may not be the most suitable agent for assessing direct versus indirect agonism in cardiovascular studies. Secondly, the use of chemical sympathectomy achieved the desired goal of demonstrating that cardiac β-adrenoceptor mediated actions of cathinone and MDMA are probably largely indirect.

  11. Enhanced function in the good forelimb of hemi-parkinson rats: Compensatory adaptation for contralateral postural instability?

    PubMed Central

    Woodlee, Martin T.; Kane, Jacqueline R.; Chang, Jitsen; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present two new assays of rat motor behavior which can be used to assess function linked to postural stability in each forelimb independently. Postural instability is a major deficit in Parkinson's disease that is resistant to levodopa therapy and contributes to the risk of falling. We applied both tests, one forelimb at a time, to normal rats as well as rats extensively depleted of dopamine by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, given in the medial forebrain bundle) to produce a hemi-parkinsonian syndrome. The 6-OHDA rats showed severe postural instability in the impaired forelimb, but unexpectedly showed enhanced function in the non-impaired forelimb. The data suggest that the intact hemisphere may undergo rapid reorganization subsequent to unilateral dopamine depletion, which allows for compensatory function of the “intact” limb. Measurements of amphetamine-induced striatal c-fos expression, as well as behavior results gathered when animals were under the influence of apomorphine or haloperidol, indicate that this potential reorganization may require non-dopaminergic neural plasticity. The relevance of these findings for unilateral rat models of neurological disease is discussed. PMID:18417125

  12. Serotonin7 receptors in the lateral habenular nucleus regulate depressive-like behaviors in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling Na; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi Na; Du, Cheng Xue; Zhang, Yu Ming; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors may regulate depressive-like behaviors. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) involve in the regulation of PD-related depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-LHb injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (1, 2 and 4μg/rat) induced or increased the expression of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated and the lesioned rats. Further, intra-LHb injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6μg/rat) produced antidepressant effects in the two groups of rats. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-LHb injection of AS19 (4μg/rat) decreased dopamine and 5-HT levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, habenula and hippocampus in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6μg/rat) increased dopamine and 5-HT levels in these structures. In addition, noradrenaline levels in these structures were not changed after intra-LHb injection of AS19 or SB269970 in the two groups of rats. These findings suggest that activation or blockade of 5-HT7 receptors in the LHb may change the activity of LHb glutamate neurons, and then decreases or increases dopamine and 5-HT levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions, which are involved in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors.

  13. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease. PMID:26571268

  14. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease. PMID:26571268

  15. Modifications in glutamatergic transmission after dopamine depletion of the nucleus accumbens. A combined in vivo/in vitro electrophysiological study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mulder, A B; Manshanden, I; Vos, P E; Wolterink, G; van Ree, J M; Lopes da Silva, F H

    1996-06-01

    The interaction between the glutamatergic and dopaminergic input in the nucleus accumbens was examined by studying the effects of dopamine depletion of the nucleus accumbens on the local field potentials, and the L-glutamate elicited responses of the nucleus accumbens in anaesthetized rats in vivo. A characteristic field potential in the nucleus accumbens is evoked by electrical stimulation of the fornix/fimbria fibres, with a monosynaptic positive peak at 10 ms (P10). Rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine in the nucleus accumbens. The contralateral accumbens was sham lesioned. The rats were divided into short-term and long-term survival groups of one to two weeks and 24 weeks, respectively. In the short-term group, a striking increase (up to three times) of the amplitude of the P10 components, at the site of the lesion, compared with the sham lesioned contralateral accumbens and untreated rats, was found. The long-term group could still display a slight increase although on average this was not significantly different from controls. In the short-term group, at the centre of the lesion, the paired-pulse facilitation ratio was significantly smaller than at the more ventral, less denervated, border of the accumbens. These differences were no longer visible in the long-term group. Single-unit activity of the accumbens, elicited by the iontophoretical application of L-glutamate showed, in controls, a maximal firing frequency ranging from 5 to 40 Hz (mean 25 Hz), whereas in the short-term group more than 50% of the accumbens neurons fired with higher frequencies, reaching up to 90 Hz (mean 55 Hz). In the long-term group the firing frequency varied from 5 to 60 Hz (mean 41 Hz). No changes in threshold ejection glutamate current were found for both lesioned groups. In control rats the L-glutamate elicited responses of six cells tested could be suppressed by dopamine whereas in lesioned rats three of the six cells tested were unresponsive to dopamine

  16. Use of Rotorod as a Method for the Qualitative Analysis of Walking in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Whishaw, Ian Q.; Li, Katie; Whishaw, Paul A.; Gorny, Bogdan; Metz, Gerlinde A.

    2008-01-01

    The rotorod test, in which animals walk on a rotating drum, is widely used to assess motor status in laboratory rodents. Performance is measured by the duration that an animal stays up on the drum as a function of drum speed. Here we report that the task provides a rich source of information about qualitative aspects of walking movements. Because movements are performed in a fixed location, they can readily be examined using high-speed video recording methods. The present study was undertaken to examine the potential of the rotorod to reveal qualitative changes in the walking movements of hemi-Parkinson analogue rats, produced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the right nigrostriatal bundle to deplete nigrostriatal dopamine (DA). Beginning on the day following surgery and then periodically over the next two months, the rats were filmed from frontal, lateral, and posterior views as they walked on the rotorod. Behavior was analyzed by frame-by-frame replay of the video records. Rating scales of stepping behavior indicated that the hemi-Parkinson rats were chronically impaired in their posture and in the use of the limbs contralateral to the DA-depletion. The contralateral limbs not only displayed postural and movement abnormalities, they participated less in initiating and sustaining propulsion than did the ipsilateral limbs. These findings not only reveal new deficits secondary to unilateral DA-depletion, but also show that the rotorod can provide a robust tool for the qualitative analysis of movement. PMID:19229169

  17. Testis-derived Sertoli cells have a trophic effect on dopamine neurons and alleviate hemiparkinsonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, P R; Borlongan, C V; Othberg, A I; Saporta, S; Freeman, T B; Cameron, D F

    1997-10-01

    Neural tissue transplantation has become an alternative treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The clinical use of neural grafts as a source of dopamine for Parkinson's disease patients, although beneficial, is associated with logistical and ethical issues. Thus, alternative graft sources have been explored including polymer-encapsulated cells and nonneural cells (that is, adrenal chromaffin cells) or genetically modified cells that secrete dopamine and/or trophic factors. Although progress has been made, no current alternative graft source has ideal characteristics for transplantation. Emerging evidence suggests the importance of trophic factors in enhancing survival and regeneration of intrinsic dopaminergic neurons. It would be desirable to transplant cells that are readily available, immunologically accepted by the central nervous system and capable of producing dopamine and/or trophic factors. Sertoli cells have been shown to secrete CD-95 ligand and regulatory proteins, as well as trophic, tropic, and immunosuppressive factors that provide the testis, in part, with its "immunoprivileged" status. The present study demonstrated that transplantation of rat testis-derived Sertoli cells into adult rat brains ameliorated behavioral deficits in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced hemiparkinsonism. This was associated with enhanced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the striatum in the area around the transplanted Sertoli cells. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated enhanced dopaminergic neuronal survival and outgrowth when embryonic neurons were cultured with medium in which rat Sertoli cells had been grown. Transplantation of Sertoli cells may provide a useful alternative treatment for PD and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Using Gelatin Nanoparticle Mediated Intranasal Delivery of Neuropeptide Substance P to Enhance Neuro-Recovery in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qi; Yu, Wen-Ze; Lin, Qian; Tian, Fu-Rong; Mao, Kai-Li; Lv, Chuan-Zhu; Wáng, Yi-Xiáng J.; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intranasal administration of phospholipid-based gelatin nanoparticles (GNP) was prepared to investigate the neuro-recovery effects of neuropeptide Substance P (SP) on hemiparkinsonian rats. Methods The SP-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (SP-GNP) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion method and possessed high stability, encapsulating efficiency and loading capacity. PC-12 cells were used to examine the growth enhancement of SP-GNP in vitro by MTT assays and flow cytometry (FCM). The therapeutic effects of SP-GNP on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced hemiparkinsonian rats were assessed by quantifying rotational behavior and the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated c-Jun protein (p-c-Jun) and Caspase-3 (Cas-3) expressed in substantia nigra (SN) region of hemiparkinsonian rats. Results PC-12 cells under SP-GNP treatment showed better cell viability and lower degree of apoptosis than those under SP solution treatment. Hemiparkinsonian rats under intranasal SP-GNP administration demonstrated better behavioral improvement, higher level of TH in SN along with much lower extent of p-c-Jun and Cas-3 than those under intranasal SP solution administration and intravenous SP-GNP administration. Conclusions With the advantages of GNP and nose-to-brain pathway, SP can be effectively delivered into the damaged SN region and exhibit its neuro-recovery function through the inhibition on JNK pathway and dopaminergic neuron apoptosis. PMID:26894626

  19. Development of a Unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Sherri L.; Warre, Ruth; Nash, Joanne E.

    2012-01-01

    The unilaterally lesioned 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proved to be invaluable in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms, since it recapitulates the changes in basal ganglia circuitry and pharmacology observed in parkinsonian patients1-4. However, the precise cellular and molecular changes occurring at cortico-striatal synapses of the output pathways within the striatum, which is the major input region of the basal ganglia remain elusive, and this is believed to be site where pathological abnormalities underlying parkinsonian symptoms arise3,5. In PD, understanding the mechanisms underlying changes in basal ganglia circuitry following degeneration of the nigro-striatal pathway has been greatly advanced by the development of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mice over-expressing green fluorescent proteins driven by promoters specific for the two striatal output pathways (direct pathway: eGFP-D1; indirect pathway: eGFP-D2 and eGFP-A2a)8, allowing them to be studied in isolation. For example, recent studies have suggested that there are pathological changes in synaptic plasticity in parkinsonian mice9,10. However, these studies utilised juvenile mice and acute models of parkinsonism. It is unclear whether the changes described in adult rats with stable 6-OHDA lesions also occur in these models. Other groups have attempted to generate a stable unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA adult mouse model of PD by lesioning the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), unfortunately, the mortality rate in this study was extremely high, with only 14% surviving the surgery for 21 days or longer11. More recent studies have generated intra-nigral lesions with both a low mortality rate >80% loss of dopaminergic neurons, however expression of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia11,12,13,14 was variable in these studies. Another well established mouse model of PD is the MPTP-lesioned mouse15. Whilst this model has proven

  20. Young and Middle-Aged Rats Exhibit Isometric Forelimb Force Control Deficits in a Model of Early-Stage Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bethel-Brown, Crystal S.; Morris, Jill K.; Stanford, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in manual motor control often accompany the early stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and are often revealed through isometric force tasks. In order to determine whether similar deficits occur in a rat model of early-stage PD, young (8 months) and middle-aged (18 months) rats were trained to produce sustained press-hold-release isometric forelimb responses that allowed for analyses of force output and spectral analysis of forelimb stability and tremor. Rats then received a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) infusion into the striatum contralateral to the trained forelimb and were tested for four weeks post-lesion. The resulting partial striatal dopamine depletions (which at 41 ± 12% and 43 ± 6% in young and middle-aged rats, respectively, did not differ between the two groups) resulted in isometric forelimb deficits. Specifically, rats exhibited significantly diminished force stability and increased high frequency (10–25 Hz) tremor, indicating potential postural disturbances and increased postural tremor respectively. Durations of press-hold-release bouts were also increased post-lesion, suggesting difficulty in task disengagement. Despite pre-lesion differences in some of the force measures, the effects of partial nigrostriatal DA depletion did not differ between the two age groups. These results support the use of the press-while-licking task in preclinical studies modeling isometric force control deficits in PD. PMID:21767573

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide protects dopaminergic neurons and improves behavioral deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Reglodi, Dóra; Lubics, Andrea; Tamás, Andrea; Szalontay, Luca; Lengvári, István

    2004-05-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide, exerting different actions in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Among others, it has neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PACAP in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were given unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. PACAP-treated animals received 0.1 microg PACAP as a pretreatment. Control animals without PACAP treatment displayed severe hypokinesia at 1 and 10 days postlesion when compared to animals receiving saline only. In only 1 day postlesion, by contrast, PACAP-treated rats showed no hypokinesia. Asymmetrical signs, such as turning, rearing and biased thigmotaxic scanning were observed in all lesioned animals 1 day postlesion. PACAP-treated animals, however, showed better recovery as they ceased to display asymmetrical signs 10 days later and showed markedly less apomorphine-induced rotations. Tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry revealed that control animals had more than 95% loss of the dopaminergic cells in the ipsilateral substantia nigra, while PACAP-treated animals had only approximately 50% loss of dopaminergic cells. In summary, the present results show the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in 6-OHDA-induced lesion of substantia nigra, with less severe acute neurological symptoms and a more rapid amelioration of behavioral deficits.

  2. Intrastriatal transplantation of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells improves functional outcome in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Müller, Janine; Ossig, Christiana; Greiner, Johannes F W; Hauser, Stefan; Fauser, Mareike; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Storch, Alexander; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered the second most frequent and one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, with dysfunctions of the motor system and with nonmotor symptoms such as depression and dementia. Compensation for the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons during PD using current pharmacological treatment strategies is limited and remains challenging. Pluripotent stem cell-based regenerative medicine may offer a promising therapeutic alternative, although the medical application of human embryonic tissue and pluripotent stem cells is still a matter of ethical and practical debate. Addressing these challenges, the present study investigated the potential of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells derived from the inferior turbinate (ITSCs) transplanted into a parkinsonian rat model. Emphasizing their capability to give rise to nervous tissue, ITSCs isolated from the adult human nose efficiently differentiated into functional mature neurons in vitro. Additional successful dopaminergic differentiation of ITSCs was subsequently followed by their transplantation into a unilaterally lesioned 6-hydroxydopamine rat PD model. Transplantation of predifferentiated or undifferentiated ITSCs led to robust restoration of rotational behavior, accompanied by significant recovery of DA neurons within the substantia nigra. ITSCs were further shown to migrate extensively in loose streams primarily toward the posterior direction as far as to the midbrain region, at which point they were able to differentiate into DA neurons within the locus ceruleus. We demonstrate, for the first time, that adult human ITSCs are capable of functionally recovering a PD rat model.

  3. NK₃ receptor agonism reinstates temporal order memory in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Chao, Owen Y; Wang, An-Li; Nikolaus, Susanne; de Souza Silva, Maria A

    2015-05-15

    Animals treated with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-ODHA) injections, an animal model of Parkinson's disease, exhibit deficits in memory for temporal order, but show intact novel object recognition. Since senktide, a potent neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3-R) agonist, has been shown to have promnestic effects in the aged rat and to alleviate scopolamine-induced impairment, the present study aimed to assess possible promnestic effects of senktide in the hemiparkinsonian rat model. Animals received unilateral 6-ODHA microinjections into the medial forebrain bundle. Two weeks later, they were randomly assigned to treatment with vehicle, 0.2, or 0.4 mg/kg senktide. Temporal order memory and place recognition tests were conducted, locomotor activity and turning behavior were assessed in the open field and anxiety-related behavior was measured in the light-dark box. Treatments were administered 30 min prior to behavioral testing with an interval of seven days between tests. The animals treated with 0.2 mg/kg senktide exhibited temporal order memory, unlike the vehicle-treated group. No significant treatment effects were found in the open field and light-dark box. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg senktide may influence the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, leading to compensations for deficits in memory for temporal order.

  4. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  5. Mesocortical dopamine depletion and anxiety-related behavior in the rat: sex and hemisphere differences.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R M; Dufresne, M M; Siontas, D; Chehab, S; Townsend, J; Laplante, F

    2014-10-01

    The mesocortical dopamine (DA) system of the rat plays an important role in prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation of stress and emotion and exhibits functional hemispheric asymmetry for such processing. Since few studies examine sex differences in this context, we compared the effects of left vs. right unilateral PFC DA depletion in males and females in several behavioral situations associated with anxiety or aversion. Adult rats received unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or vehicle in the ventromedial (vm) PFC. Behavioral tests included a predator odor burying test, elevated plus maze and sucrose consumption with simple taste aversion. Tissue analysis confirmed that vmPFCs injected with 6-OHDA were depleted of DA (75-85%) compared to controls. Burying behavior and sucrose consumption were affected only by left lesions, similarly in both sexes. However, risk assessment behaviors were affected by right lesions in opposite directions in males and females. Behaviors modified preferentially by the left cortex thus showed less evidence of sex differences than those modulated by the right. While mesocortical DA depletion effects are lateralized, the nature of these effects can vary with sex and specific behavior. Such findings may be clinically significant, given the large gender differences in the incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, which also show many lateralized prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:24819821

  6. Effects of Zhichan powder on signal transduction and apoptosis-associated gene expression in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajun; Ma, Jinshu; Qiu, Yafei; Yi, Shihong; Liu, Yongmao; Zhou, Qingwei; Zhang, Pengguo; Wan, Quan; Kuang, Ye

    2012-09-25

    Previous studies have shown that Zhichan powder elevated immunity and suppressed oxidation in mice. Rat models of Parkinson's disease were induced by stereotaxically injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the substantia nigra. The rat models were intragastrically treated with Zhichan powder, which is composed of milkvetch root, ginseng, bunge swallowwort root, himalayan teasel root, Magnolia officinalis, Ligustrum lucidum Ait. and szechwan lovage rhizome. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 significantly increased, but Bcl-2 expression significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of rats with Parkinson's disease. Following Zhichan powder administration, mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 diminished, but Bcl-2 expression increased in the rat substantia nigra. These results indicate that Zhichan powder regulates signal transduction protein expression, inhibits apoptosis, and exerts therapeutic effects on Parkinson's disease. PMID:25558224

  7. Reduced expression of choline acetyltransferase in vagal motoneurons and gastric motor dysfunction in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Xiao-feng; Song, Jin; Hong, Feng; Lian, Hui; Wang, Qian; Feng, Xiao-Yan; Tang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jin-Xia

    2011-10-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been characterized by dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra (SN) accompanied by pathology of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). PD patients have often experienced gastrointestinal dysfunctions, such as gastroparesis. However, the mechanism underlying these symptoms in PD patients is not clear. In the present study, we investigated alterations of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the DMV and gastric motor function in rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) bilaterally into the SN (referred to as 6-OHDA rats) and explored possible mechanisms. A strain gauge force transducer was used to record gastric motility in vivo. Expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Acetylcholine (Ach) content was measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) analysis. After treatment with 6-OHDA for 6weeks, 6-OHDA rats exhibited decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV and decreased Ach content in the gastric muscular layer. Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility in vivo were observed in 6-OHDA rats. The results of the present study indicated that decreased ChAT and enhanced TH expression in the DMV may be correlated with the development of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric motility, which may be partly due to the decreased Ach release from the vagus. PMID:21955729

  8. Selenite benefits embryonic stem cells therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tian, L-P; Zhang, S; Xu, L; Li, W; Wang, Y; Chen, S-D; Ding, J-Q

    2012-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) transplantation is a potential therapeutic approach for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, one of the main challenges to this therapy is the post-transplantation survival of dopaminergic (DA) neurons. In this study, mouse ESC were differentiated into DA neurons by a modified serum free protocol. These ESC-derived neurons were then transplanted into striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rat. The viability of grafted DA neurons was decreased, accompanied by activated microglia and high levels of proinflammatory factors, such as TNF-α and iNOS, in the graft niche. This suggested that the local neuroinflammation might be involved in the reduced cells viability. Selenite, the source of essential micronutrient selenium, could inhibit NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and subsequently reduce iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α expression in LPS-treated BV2 cells in a dose dependant manner. Before the transplantation of ESC-derived DA neurons, 6-OHDA lesioned rats were intraperitoneally injected with selenite. The expression levels of TNF-α and iNOS were decreased by 30% and 50%, respectively, in selenite treated group. The survival of implanted DA neurons and the rotational behavior of transplanted rats were also remarkably improved by selenite treatment. To sum up, selenite might benefit ESCs transplantation therapy in PD through anti-inflammation effects.

  9. Ranitidine reduced levodopa-induced dyskinesia by remodeling neurochemical changes in hemiparkinsonian model of rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongjuan; Yang, Xinxin; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Shenyang; Zu, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Xia; Cui, Guiyun; Hua, Fang; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-01-01

    Background Levodopa (l-dopa) remains the best drug in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Unfortunately, long-term l-dopa caused motor complications, one of which is l-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). The precise mechanisms of LID are not fully understood. We have previously reported that ranitidine could reduce LID by inhibiting the activity of protein kinase A pathway in a rat model of PD. It is demonstrated that neurotransmitters such as γ-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) are also involved in the expression of LID. But whether ranitidine could reduce LID by remodeling the neurochemical changes is unknown. Methods In the present study, we produced PD rats by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. Then PD rats were treated with vehicle, l-dopa (6 mg/kg, plus benserazide 12 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [ip]) or l-dopa (6 mg/kg, plus benserazide 12 mg/kg, ip) plus ranitidine (10 mg/kg, oral). Abnormal voluntary movements were adopted to measure the antidyskinetic effect of ranitidine in PD rats. Rotarod tests were used to observe whether ranitidine treatment affects the antiparkinsonian effect of l-dopa. In vivo microdialysis was used to measure nigral GABA and striatal Glu in PD rats. Results We found that ranitidine pretreatment reduced abnormal voluntary movements in l-dopa-primed PD rats without affecting the antiparkinsonian effect of l-dopa. In parallel with behavioral improvement, ranitidine pretreatment reduced protein kinase A activity and suppressed the surge of nigral GABA and striatal Glu. Conclusion These data indicated that ranitidine could reduce LID by modeling neurochemical changes induced by l-dopa, suggesting a novel mechanism of ranitidine in the treatment of LID. PMID:26064051

  10. Circling behavior following unilateral kainic acid injections into rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1981-12-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (2.5-25 nmol) into rat anterior caudate putamen induced dose-related circling behaviour. Kainic acid (10 nmol) consistently caused initial weak ipsiversive circling lasting 1 h followed by prolonged strong contraversive rotation lasting in excess of 10 h. Unilateral intrastriatal administration of L-glutamic acid, or of monosodium L-glutamate, to normal rats, or administration of monosodium L-glutamate to rats with extensive decortication, did not induce circling behaviour. The simultaneous unilateral injection of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol) with kainic acid (10 nmol) did not modify circling behaviour induced by kainic acid. However, extensive decortication greatly reduced circling induced by unilateral intrastriatal kainic acid (10 nmol), and effect not reversed by the simultaneous administration of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol). Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the left nigrostriatal pathway abolished the initial ipsiversive rotation and potentiated the subsequent contraversive rotation for up to 4 h after intrastriatal injection of kainic acid (10 nmol). Peripheral administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) also abolished initial ipsiversive rotation and decreased the subsequent contraversive rotation. Electro-coagulation of the ipsilateral strio-nigral pathway prolonged the initial ipsiversive rotation produced by kainic acid, but markedly attenuated contraversive rotation. These findings suggest that circling induced by intrastriatal administration of kainic acid depends on intact corticostriate pathways, but it cannot be reproduced or modified by intrastriatal administration of glutamate. Kainic acid circling appears to be mediated via strio-nigral pathways, and to be modulated by dopaminergic function. PMID:7333356

  11. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  12. Activation of serotonin(2C) receptors in the lateral habenular nucleus increases the expression of depression-related behaviors in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling-Na; Zhang, Li; Li, Li-Bo; Sun, Yi-Na; Wang, Yong; Chen, Li; Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The roles of lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) glutamate neurons and serotonin2C (5-HT2C) receptors in depression are poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we assessed the importance of LHb glutamate neurons and 5-HT2C receptors for depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the substantia nigra. The lesion induced depressive-like responses compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-LHb injection of potent, selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist Ro60-0175 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time in sham-operated rats, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses, and intra-LHb injection of Ro60-0175 further increased the expression of depressive-like behaviors in the lesioned rats. Activation of LHb 5-HT2C receptors by the local administration of Ro60-0175 increased the firing rate of EAAC1 (a neuronal glutamate transporter)-positive neurons and percentage of the neurons with burst-firing pattern in the two groups of rats. Compared to sham-operated rats, the duration of Ro60-0175 action on the firing rate of EAAC1-positive neurons was markedly prolonged in the lesioned rats. Intra-LHb injection of Ro60-0175 decreased dopamine, 5-HT and noradrenaline levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, habenula, hippocampus and amygdala in sham-operated and the lesioned rats. The lesion did not change the percentage of EAAC1/5-HT2C receptor co-expressing neurons in the LHb. These findings indicate that activation of 5-HT2C receptors in the LHb increases firing activity of LHb glutamate neurons and then decreases monoamine levels in several brain regions, which increase the expression of depressive-like behaviors. Further, our results also suggest that the lesion leads to hyperfunctionality of 5-HT2C receptors on glutamate neurons of the LHb.

  13. Dopamine depletion, stimulation or blockade in the rat disrupts spatial navigation and locomotion dependent upon beacon or distal cues.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Dunnett, S B

    1985-01-01

    Rats depleted of dopamine by intraventricular or nigrostriatal bundle 6-hydroxydopamine injection were compared with normal rats on acquisition and retention of place and cue navigation in the Morris swimming pool test and on a battery of sensorimotor tests. Rats with extensive bilateral dopamine depletions were able to swim vigorously, but were unable to acquire either the place or cue task. Rats with unilateral lesions, although impaired in the rate of acquisition were eventually able to learn both tasks to close to normal levels. Animals pretrained on the tasks prior to the lesions displayed retention deficits that were related to the extent of dopamine depletion: after extensive depletions, performance on both tasks deteriorated until successful navigation was abolished, whereas incomplete depletions impaired but did not abolish performance on either task. In separate groups of pretrained animals, both dopamine antagonists (haloperidol, alpha-flupenthixol) and agonists (apomorphine, metamphetamine) blocked performance on both place and cue tasks, although there were individual differences in sensitivity of the rats. Performance on the place task was more sensitive to disruption than the cue task both by the lesions and by haloperidol, alpha-flupenthixol or apormorphine but not by metamphetamine. On the sensorimotor tests dopamine-depleted rats were impaired at visual but not contact placing, they oriented weakly to snout touches and surfaces but not to distal stimuli, and they were akinetic on a number of tests of motor function but when wet they displayed as many grooming movements and groomed as long as did normal rats. The results suggest that dopamine depletion may impair spatial navigation by a disruption of their ability to use distal cues for guidance.

  14. Adrenal Medullary Grafts Restore Olfactory Deficits and Catecholamine Levels of 6-OHDA Amygdala Lesioned Animals

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Guzmán, Rubén; Martínez, María Dolores; Miranda, María Isabel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Drucker-Colín, René

    1993-01-01

    Aside from motor and cognitive deficits, Parkinson patients also manifest a little-studied olfactory deficit. Since in Parkinson's disease there is a dopamine depletion of the amygdala due to mesocorticolimbic system degeneration, we decided to test olfactory and taste performance of 6-OHDA amygdala lesioned rats, as well as the possible restoration of either function with adrenal medullary transplants. Two 6-OHDA lesioned groups and one control group were tested in the potentiation of odor by taste aversion paradigm. On taste aversion none of the groups showed any impairment. In contrast, the 6-OHDA lesioned rats showed a marked impairment in olfactory aversion. At this point, one of the lesioned groups received a bilateral adrenal medullary graft within the lesioned area. After two months, all groups were submitted again to the behavioral paradigm. Taste remained unaffected, but the lesioned only group did not recover either olfactory aversion or normal catecholamine levels. The grafted group, on the other hand, restored olfactory aversion and catecholamine levels. It can be concluded from this study that catecholamine depletion of the amygdala is sufficient to produce a selective olfactory deficit, not accompanied by taste impairments, and that such a deficit can be reversed by adrenal medullary transplants, which in turn restore catecholamine levels. PMID:7948179

  15. Chemical sympathectomy attenuates inflammation, glycocalyx shedding and coagulation disorders in rats with acute traumatic coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Yu, Wen-Kui; Lin, Zhi-Liang; Tan, Shan-Jun; Bai, Xiao-Wu; Ding, Kai; Li, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) may trigger sympathoadrenal activation associated with endothelial damage and coagulation disturbances. Overexcitation of sympathetic nerve in this state would disrupt sympathetic-vagal balance, leading to autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the autonomic function in ATC and its influence on inflammation, endothelial and coagulation activation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham, ATC control (ATCC) and ATC with sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (ATCS) group. Sham animals underwent the same procedure without trauma and bleeding. Following trauma and hemorrhage, rats underwent heart rate variability (HRV) test, which predicts autonomic dysfunction through the analysis of variation in individual R-R intervals. Then, rats were euthanized at baseline, and at 0, 1 and 2 h after shock and blood gas, conventional coagulation test and markers of inflammation, coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage and catecholamine were measured. HRV showed an attenuation of total power and high frequency, along with a rise of low frequency and low frequency : high frequency ratio in the ATC rats, which both were reversed by sympathectomy in the ATCS group. Additionally, sympathetic denervation significantly suppressed the increase of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and the fibrinolysis markers including tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-antiplasmin complex. Serum catecholamine, soluble thrombomodulin and syndecan-1 were also effectively inhibited by sympathectomy. These data indicated that autonomic dysfunction in ATC involves both sympathetic activation and parasympathetic inhibition. Moreover, sympathectomy yielded anti-inflammatory, antifibrinolysis and endothelial protective effects in rats with ATC. The role of autonomic neuropathy in ATC should be explored further.

  16. Reduction of dopamine synaptic activity: degradation of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Ahrens, Allison M; Ma, Sean T; Kane, Jacqueline R; Windham, E Blake; Woodlee, Martin T; Schallert, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    Vocal deficits are prevalent and debilitating in Parkinson's disease. These deficits may be related to the initial pathology of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and resulting dopamine depletion, which contributes to dysfunction of fine motor control in multiple functions. Although vocalization in animals and humans may differ in many respects, we evaluated complex (50-kHz) ultrasonic mate calls in 2 rat models of Parkinson's disease, including unilateral infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine to the medial forebrain bundle and peripheral administration of a nonakinesia dose of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. We examined the effects of these treatments on multiple aspects of the acoustic signal. The number of trill-like (frequency modulated) 50-kHz calls was significantly reduced, and appeared to be replaced by simpler (flat) calls. The bandwidth and maximum intensity of simple and frequency-modulated calls were significantly decreased, but call duration was not. Our findings suggest that the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway is involved to some extent in fine sensorimotor function that includes USV production and complexity.

  17. Chronic intrastriatal dopamine infusions in rats with unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra

    SciTech Connect

    Hargraves, R.; Freed, W.J.

    1987-03-09

    This study examined the effects of continuously supplied dopamine delivered directly into the dopamine-deficient striatum. Rats received unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra by stereotaxic administration of 6-hydroxydopamine and were tested for apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and general activity. Osmotic mini-pumps were filled with dopamine in various concentrations, implanted subcutaneously and connected to a cannula implanted directly into the striatum. The system delivered solution at a rate of .5 ..mu..l/hr for two weeks. Dopamine in a dosage of 0.5 ..mu..g/per hour reduced apomorphine-induced rotational behavior by a mean of 52 +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SEM n=20) with a maximal individual decrease of 99%. There was no change in general activity or increase in stereotype behavior. Infusions of vehicle solutions did not decrease rotational behavior. Spread of the infused dopamine and its metabolites was estimated by adding /sup 3/H-dopamine to the pumps in tracer quantities. Radioactivity was highly concentrated at the infusion site and decreased rapidly within a few mm from the infusion site. Continuous infusion methods may eventually prove to be effective in the treatment of nigro-striatal degenerative disease. 12 references, 4 figures.

  18. Proof of concept studies exploring the safety and functional activity of human parthenogenetic-derived neural stem cells for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Garitaonandia, Ibon; Crain, Andrew; Poustovoitov, Maxim; Abramihina, Tatiana; Noskov, Alexander; Jiang, Chuan; Morey, Robert; Laurent, Louise C; Elsworth, John D; Snyder, Evan Y; Redmond, D Eugene; Semechkin, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that human pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies hold great promise in Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical studies have shown that grafted fetal neural tissue can achieve considerable biochemical and clinical improvements in PD. However, the source of fetal tissue grafts is limited and ethically controversial. Human parthenogenetic stem cells offer a good alternative because they are derived from unfertilized oocytes without destroying viable human embryos and can be used to generate an unlimited supply of neural stem cells for transplantation. Here we evaluate for the first time the safety and engraftment of human parthenogenetic stem cell-derived neural stem cells (hpNSCs) in two animal models: 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rodents and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated nonhuman primates (NHPs). In both rodents and nonhuman primates, we observed successful engraftment and higher dopamine levels in hpNSC-transplanted animals compared to vehicle control animals, without any adverse events. These results indicate that hpNSCs are safe, well tolerated, and could potentially be a source for cell-based therapies in PD.

  19. Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after exercise training in a rat model of bilateral parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Myers, Kalisa G; Guo, Yumei; Ocampo, Marco A; Pang, Raina D; Jakowec, Michael W; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is widely used for neurorehabilitation of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the functional reorganization of the injured brain after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation (bilateral, dorsal striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions). One week after training, cerebral perfusion was mapped during treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF) was analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. In non-exercised rats, lesions resulted in persistent motor deficits. Compared to sham-lesioned rats, lesioned rats showed altered functional brain activation during walking, including: 1. hypoactivation of the striatum and motor cortex; 2. hyperactivation of non-lesioned areas in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit; 3. functional recruitment of the red nucleus, superior colliculus and somatosensory cortex; 4. hyperactivation of the ventrolateral thalamus, cerebellar vermis and deep nuclei, suggesting recruitment of the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit; 5. hyperactivation of limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, septum, raphe, insula). These findings show remarkable similarities to imaging findings reported in PD patients. Exercise progressively improved motor deficits in lesioned rats, while increasing activation in dorsal striatum and rostral secondary motor cortex, attenuating a hyperemia of the zona incerta and eliciting a functional reorganization of regions participating in the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit. Both lesions and exercise increased activation in mesolimbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, laterodorsal tegmental n., ventral pallidum), as well as in related paralimbic regions (septum, raphe, insula). Exercise, but not lesioning, resulted in decreases

  20. Hemiparkinsonian rats rotate toward the side with the weaker dopaminergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Da Cunha, Claudio; Wietzikoski, Evellyn Claudia; Ferro, Marcelo Machado; Martinez, Glaucia Regina; Vital, Maria Aparecida Barbato Frazão; Hipólide, Débora; Tufik, Sergio; Canteras, Newton Sabino

    2008-06-01

    Rats with unilateral lesion of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) have been used as a model of Parkinson's disease. Depending on the lesion protocol and on the drug challenge, these rats rotate in opposite directions. The aim of the present study was to propose a model to explain how critical factors determine the direction of these turns. Unilateral lesion of the SNpc was induced with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Separate analysis showed that neither the type of neurotoxin nor the site of lesion along the nigrostriatal pathway was able to predict the direction of the turns these rats made after they were challenged with apomorphine. However, the combination of these two factors determined the magnitude of the lesion estimated by tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and HPLC-ED measurement of striatal dopamine. Very small lesions did not cause turns, medium-size lesions caused ipsiversive turns, and large lesions caused contraversive turns. Large-size SNpc lesions resulted in an increased binding of [(3)H]raclopride to D2 receptors, while medium-size lesions reduced the binding of [(3)H]SCH-23390 D1 receptors in the ipsilateral striatum. These results are coherent with the model proposing that after challenged with a dopamine receptor agonist, unilaterally SNpc-lesioned rats rotate toward the side with the weaker activation of dopamine receptors. This activation is weaker on the lesioned side in animals with small SNpc lesions due to the loss of dopamine, but stronger in animals with large lesions due to dopamine receptor supersensitivity.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells that located in the electromagnetic fields improves rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jadidi, Majid; Biat, Saeed Moghadas; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Safari, Manouchehr; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Ghahari, Laya

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The main characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is their ability to produce other cell types. Electromagnetic field (EMF) stimulates differentiation of MSCs into other cells. In this study, we investigated whether EMF can effect on the differentiation of MSCs into dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Materials and Methods: An EMF with a frequency of 50 Hz and two intensities of 40 and 400 µT 1hr/day was generated around the cells for a week. Afterwards, these cells were injected into the left ventricle of Parkinsonian rats. The rats survived for 2 weeks, and then sampling was performed. Results: The injected cells differentiated into DA neurons and sporadically settled in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Transplanted rats exhibited significant partial correction apomorphine-induced rotational behavior compared to Parkinsonian rats (5.0±0.1 vs 7.57±0.08). Results demonstrated that endogenous serum and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were altered in all experimental groups. The greatest increase was in group of 400 µT EMF in comparison with Parkinsonian rats (398±15 vs. 312±11.79 pg ⁄ mg). Current study have shown that 6-Hydroxydopamine can cause severe loss of dopaminergic neurons (68±6.58), but injected MSCs that exposed to 40 and 400 µT EMF increased dopaminergic neurons in SNpc (108±2.33 & 126±3.89) (P<0.001). Conclusion: Electromagnetic fields with particular frequencies stimulate MSCs. So, these cells had anti-Parkinsonian properties in our studies.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells that located in the electromagnetic fields improves rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jadidi, Majid; Biat, Saeed Moghadas; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Safari, Manouchehr; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Ghahari, Laya

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The main characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is their ability to produce other cell types. Electromagnetic field (EMF) stimulates differentiation of MSCs into other cells. In this study, we investigated whether EMF can effect on the differentiation of MSCs into dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Materials and Methods: An EMF with a frequency of 50 Hz and two intensities of 40 and 400 µT 1hr/day was generated around the cells for a week. Afterwards, these cells were injected into the left ventricle of Parkinsonian rats. The rats survived for 2 weeks, and then sampling was performed. Results: The injected cells differentiated into DA neurons and sporadically settled in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Transplanted rats exhibited significant partial correction apomorphine-induced rotational behavior compared to Parkinsonian rats (5.0±0.1 vs 7.57±0.08). Results demonstrated that endogenous serum and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were altered in all experimental groups. The greatest increase was in group of 400 µT EMF in comparison with Parkinsonian rats (398±15 vs. 312±11.79 pg ⁄ mg). Current study have shown that 6-Hydroxydopamine can cause severe loss of dopaminergic neurons (68±6.58), but injected MSCs that exposed to 40 and 400 µT EMF increased dopaminergic neurons in SNpc (108±2.33 & 126±3.89) (P<0.001). Conclusion: Electromagnetic fields with particular frequencies stimulate MSCs. So, these cells had anti-Parkinsonian properties in our studies. PMID:27635198

  3. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC. PMID:25486618

  4. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC.

  5. NR2B antagonist CP-101,606 inhibits NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine-1472 and its interactions with Fyn in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat model.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min; Ba, Maowen; Liu, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yanxiang; Zhang, Hongli; Qiu, Haiyan

    2015-04-01

    The augmented tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) dependent on Fyn kinase has been associated with levodopa (l-dopa)-induced dyskinesia (LID). CP-101,606, one selective NR2B subunit antagonist, can improve dyskinesia. Yet, the accurate action mechanism is less well understood. In the present study, the evidences were investigated. Valid 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned parkinsonian rats were treated with l-dopa intraperitoneally for 22 days to induce LID rat model. On day 23, rats received either CP-101,606 (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle with each l-dopa dose. On the day of 1, 8, 15, 22, and 23 during l-dopa treatment, we determined abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in rats. The levels of NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine-1472 (pNR2B-Tyr1472) and interactions of NR2B with Fyn in LID rat model were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results showed that CP-101,606 attenuated l-dopa-induced AIMs. In agreement with behavioral analysis, CP-101,606 reduced the augmented pNR2B-Tyr1472 and its interactions with Fyn triggered during the l-dopa administration in the lesioned striatum of parkinsonian rats. Moreover, CP-101,606 also decreased the level of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at threonine-286 hyperphosphorylation (pCaMKII-Thr286), which was the downstream signaling amplification molecule of NMDAR overactivation and closely associated with LID. However, the protein level of NR2B and Fyn had no difference under the above conditions. These data indicate that the inhibition of the interactions of NR2B with Fyn and NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to the CP-101,606-induced downregulation of NMDAR function and provide benefit for the therapy of LID.

  6. Monoamine transporter contributions to l-DOPA effects in hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Conti, Melissa M; Meadows, Samantha M; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Lindenbach, David; Hallmark, Joy; Werner, David F; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    l-DOPA is the standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but chronic treatment typically leads to abnormal involuntary movement or dyskinesia (LID) development. Although poorly understood, dyskinetic mechanisms involve a complex interaction between the remaining dopamine system and the semi-homologous serotonin and norepinephrine systems. Serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (SERT and NET, respectively) have affinity for dopamine uptake especially when dopamine transporters (DAT) are scant. Monoamine reuptake inhibitors have been reported to modulate l-DOPA's anti-parkinsonian effects, but DAT, SERT, and NET's contribution to dyskinesia has not been well delineated. The current investigation sought to uncover the differential expression and function of DAT, SERT, and NET in the l-DOPA-treated hemi-parkinsonian rat. Protein analysis of striatal monoamine transporters in unilateral sham or 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats treated with l-DOPA (0 or 6 mg/kg) showed lesion-induced DAT loss and l-DOPA-induced gain in SERT:DAT and NET:DAT ratios in lesioned rats which positively correlated with dyskinesia expression, suggesting functional shifts among monoamine transporters in the dyskinetic state. SERT blockade with citalopram (3, 5 mg/kg) reduced LID while DAT and NET blockade with GBR-12909 (5, 10 mg/kg) and nisoxetine (5, 10 mg/kg), respectively, mildly exacerbated dyskinesia expression. Transporter inhibition did not significantly alter l-DOPA's ability to reverse motor deficit. Overall, DA and DAT loss with l-DOPA treatment appear to precipitate gain in SERT and NET function. Strong correlations with LID and direct behavioral comparisons of selective transporter blockade reveal novel implications for SERT, DAT, and NET as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in the hemi-parkinsonian model and dyskinetic PD patients.

  7. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4 weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [14C]-iodoantipyrine 1 week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. PMID:25747184

  8. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-05-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine 1week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function.

  9. Abused inhalants and central reward pathways: electrophysiological and behavioral studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Arthur C; French, Edward D

    2002-06-01

    Inhalant abuse remains a significant health problem among the younger segment of society. In fact, the use of inhalants in this population trails only that of nicotine, alcohol, and marijuana. Toluene is a common ingredient in many of the substances sought out for inhalation abuse, apparently for its euphorigenic and hallucinogenic effects. Because drugs of abuse share the common property of altering the activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons, it is reasonable to suspect that toluene-induced changes in this CNS pathway may underlie its abuse potential. Here we will provide in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological data and behavioral evidence linking toluene exposure in rats to activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. Exposure of rats to 11,000 ppm of inhaled toluene produced time-dependent activation of dopamine neurons within the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA). In the rat brain slice preparation, perfusion with toluene (23-822 microM) also evoked an increase in activity of both dopamine and nondopamine neurons within the VTA. These excitatory effects could not be found in adjacent non-VTA nuclei, nor were they sensitive to the glutamate antagonists CGS19755 or CNQX. In behavioral studies, systemic administration of toluene produced a dose-dependent locomotor hyperactivity that was attenuated by either pretreatment with the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride or by 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nucleus accumbens. These findings show that toluene can activate dopamine neurons within the mesolimbic reward pathway, an effect that may underlie the abuse potential of inhaled substances containing toluene.

  10. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M.; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Houlé, John D.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6–S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)− and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH+ neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH+ neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH+ cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH+ neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. PMID:26655672

  11. Human olfactory bulb neural stem cells mitigate movement disorders in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hany E S; Lashen, Samah; Farag, Amany; Althani, Asmaa; Afifi, Nahla; A, Abd-Elmaksoud; Rezk, Shaymaa; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patrizia; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different neuronal and glial elements. The production of DA neurons from NSCs could potentially alleviate behavioral deficits in Parkinsonian patients; timely intervention with NSCs might provide a therapeutic strategy for PD. We have isolated and generated highly enriched cultures of neural stem/progenitor cells from the human olfactory bulb (OB). If NSCs can be obtained from OB, it would alleviate ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic tissue, and provide an easily accessible cell source that would preclude the need for invasive brain surgery. Following isolation and culture, olfactory bulb neural stem cells (OBNSCs) were genetically engineered to express hNGF and GFP. The hNFG-GFP-OBNSCs were transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamin (6-OHDA) Parkinsonian rats. The grafted cells survived in the lesion environment for more than eight weeks after implantation with no tumor formation. The grafted cells differentiated in vivo into oligodendrocyte-like (25 ± 2.88%), neuron-like (52.63 ± 4.16%), and astrocyte -like (22.36 ± 1.56%) lineages, which we differentiated based on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria. Transplanted rats exhibited a significant partial correction in stepping and placing in non-pharmacological behavioral tests, pole and rotarod tests. Taken together, our data encourage further investigations of the possible use of OBNSCs as a promising cell-based therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

  12. Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in the Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by Unilateral Stereotaxic Injection of 6-Ohda in Rat

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; De Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Araújo, Paulo Victor Pontes; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo de Souza; Sousa Rodrigues, Francisca Taciana; Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Lima, Nicole Brito Cortez; Patrocínio, Manoel Claúdio Azevedo; Aguiar, Lissiana Magna Vasconcelos; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg) alone or associated with L-DOPA using an animal model of Parkinson's disease induced by stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rat striatum. Motor behavior was assessed by monitoring body rotations induced by apomorphine, open field test and cylinder test. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method, concentration of nitrite and evaluation of catalase activity. α-Lipoic acid decreased body rotations induced by apomorphine, as well as caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open field test and use of contralateral paw (in the opposite side of the lesion produced by 6-OHDA) at cylinder test. α-lipoic acid showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and interacting with antioxidant system by decreasing of endogenous catalase activity. Therefore, α-lipoic acid prevented the damage induced by 6-OHDA or by chronic use of L-DOPA in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that α-lipoic could be a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease prevention and treatment. PMID:24023579

  13. Effect of tricyclic antidepressants on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and motor improvement in hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Conti, Melissa M; Goldenberg, Adam A A; Kuberka, Alexandra; Mohamed, Mohamed; Eissa, Satie; Lindenbach, David; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Although dopamine replacement therapy with L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease initially reduces motor symptoms, its chronic use often leads to the development of abnormal involuntary movements known as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Increasingly, research has indicated that non-dopaminergic neurons gain function in the parkinsonian brain, taking up and converting L-DOPA to dopamine and releasing it as a "false neurotransmitter". Although less explored, promiscuity between monoamine transporters may also modulate these processes. Therefore, in order to examine the differential roles of monoamine transporters in L-DOPA's behavioral effects, three tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) with graded affinity for serotonin (SERT) vs. norepinephrine (NET) transporters were tested in hemi-parkinsonian rats: clomipramine (SERT>NET), amitriptyline (SERT=NET), and desipramine (SERTRats received 6-hydroxydopamine lesions and were primed with L-DOPA (12mg/kg, s.c.) to develop stable dyskinesia (N=19 of 26). In a series of studies, rats were administered TCAs (0, 7.5, 15 or 30mg/kg, i.p.) followed by L-DOPA (6mg/kg, s.c.) and were measured for dyskinesia using the abnormal involuntary movements scale as well as motor performance and activity using the forepaw adjusting steps test and locomotor chambers, respectively. Clomipramine, the compound with the highest affinity for SERT was most effective in attenuating L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia without altering L-DOPA's stimulatory effects. In contrast, desipramine, the TCA with the highest NET affinity deferred L-DOPA's effects to later time points in testing. The current results indicate divergent roles for non-dopaminergic neuronal transporters in L-DOPA's mechanisms of action and point to novel targets for improving Parkinson's disease treatment.

  14. Overexpression of GRK6 rescues L-DOPA-induced signaling abnormalities in the dopamine-depleted striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Bychkov, Evgeny; Kook, Seunghyi; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Dalby, Kevin N.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2015-01-01

    L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson’s disease often results in side effects such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Our previous studies demonstrated that defective desensitization of dopamine receptors caused by decreased expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) plays a role. Overexpression of GRK6, the isoform regulating dopamine receptors, in parkinsonian rats and monkeys alleviated LID and reduced LID-associated changes in gene expression. Here we show that 2-fold lentivirus-mediated overexpression of GRK6 in the dopamine-depleted striatum in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine ameliorated supersensitive ERK response to L-DOPA challenge caused by loss of dopamine. A somewhat stronger effect of GRK6 was observed in drug-naïve than in chronically L-DOPA-treated animals. GRK6 reduced the responsiveness of p38 MAP kinase to L-DOPA challenge rendered supersensitive by dopamine depletion. The JNK MAP kinase was unaffected by loss of dopamine, chronic or acute L-DOPA, or GRK6. Overexpressed GRK6 suppressed enhanced activity of Akt in the lesioned striatum by reducing elevated phosphorylation at its major activating residue Thr308. Finally, GRK6 reduced accumulation of ΔFosB in the lesioned striatum, the effect that paralleled a decrease in locomotor sensitization to L-DOPA in GRK6-expressing rats. The results suggest that elevated GRK6 facilitate desensitization of DA receptors, thereby normalizing of the activity of multiple signaling pathways implicated in LID. Thus, improving the regulation of dopamine receptor function via the desensitization mechanism could be an effective way of managing LID. PMID:25687550

  15. Survival and functional restoration of human fetal ventral mesencephalon following transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rath, Anika; Klein, Alexander; Papazoglou, Anna; Pruszak, Jan; Garcia, Joanna; Krause, Martin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Dunnett, Stephen B; Nikkhah, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy by intracerebral transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons has become a promising therapeutic option for patients suffering from Parkinson's disease during the last decades. However, limited availability of human fetal tissue as well as ethical issues, lack of alternative nonfetal donor cells, and the absence of standardized transplantation protocols have prevented neurorestorative therapies from becoming a routine procedure in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Improvement of graft survival, surgery techniques, and identification of the optimal target area are imperative for further optimization of this novel treatment. In the present study, human primary fetal ventral mesencephalon-derived tissue from 7- to 9-week-old human fetuses was transplanted into 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Graft survival, fiber outgrowth, and drug-induced rotational behavior up to 14 weeks posttransplantation were compared between different intrastriatal transplantation techniques (full single cell suspension vs. partial tissue pieces suspension injected by glass capillary or metal cannula) and the intranigral glass capillary injection of a full (single cell) suspension. The results demonstrate a higher survival rate of dopamine neurons, a greater reduction in amphetamine-induced rotations (overcompensation), and more extensive fiber outgrowth for the intrastriatally transplanted partial (tissue pieces) suspension compared to all other groups. Apomorphine-induced rotational bias was significantly reduced in all groups including the intranigral group. The data confirm that human ventral mesencephalon-derived cells serve as a viable cell source, survive in a xenografting paradigm, and functionally integrate into the host tissue. In contrast to rat donor cells, keeping the original (fetal) neuronal network by preparing only a partial suspension containing tissue pieces seems to be beneficial for human cells, although a

  16. Sustained improvement of motor function in hemiparkinsonian rats chronically treated with low doses of caffeine or trihexyphenidyl.

    PubMed

    Bata-García, José L; Villanueva-Toledo, Jairo; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chronic oral treatment with low doses of caffeine (1-3 mg/kg) and trihexyphenidyl (0.1-0.2 mg/kg) were tested on hemiparkinsonian rats, which received the following treatments in a counterbalanced order: vehicle, caffeine, trihexyphenidyl, and caffeine plus trihexyphenidyl. Three preclinical models were used: the stepping test, the cylinder test, and the staircase test. Compared to pre-lesion values, the forepaw contralateral to the dopamine-denervated side showed impaired stepping, fewer wall contacts in the cylinder test, and fewer pellets retrieved in the staircase test. In the stepping test both doses of caffeine produced a complete recovery of motor function (100%), whereas the effect of trihexyphenidyl was less intense (77-80%). In this same test the maximal effect of drugs did not develop tolerance during 2-3 weeks, and was completely reversible after drug cessation. In the cylinder test only the wall contacts performed simultaneously with both forepaws were significantly increased by caffeine (3 mg/kg) and trihexyphenidyl (0.2 mg/kg), and this effect was also reversible. In the staircase test none of the treatments improved food pellet retrieval with the contralateral forepaw. Altogether, these results show that chronic treatment with caffeine, at doses similar to daily human consumption, produces a sustained improvement in the use of the contralateral forelimb in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine denervated rats, without the development of tolerance. Although the combined administration of caffeine plus trihexyphenidyl showed no synergism in these models, the results suggest that low doses of caffeine (1-3 mg/kg/day) could be of therapeutic value for the reversal of motor symptoms in parkinsonian patients.

  17. Epidermal adrenergic signaling contributes to inflammation and pain sensitization in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwu; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wang, Liping; Guo, Tianzhi; Wei, Tzuping; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, J David

    2013-08-01

    In many patients, the sympathetic nervous system supports pain and other features of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Accumulating evidence suggests that interleukin (IL)-6 also plays a role in CRPS, and that catecholamines stimulate production of IL-6 in several tissues. We hypothesized that norepinephrine acting through specific adrenergic receptors expressed on keratinocytes stimulates the production of IL-6 and leads to nociceptive sensitization in a rat tibial fracture/cast model of CRPS. Our approach involved catecholamine depletion using 6-hydroxydopamine or, alternatively, guanethidine, to explore sympathetic contributions. Both agents substantially reduced nociceptive sensitization and selectively reduced the production of IL-6 in skin. Antagonism of IL-6 signaling using TB-2-081 also reduced sensitization in this model. Experiments using a rat keratinocyte cell line demonstrated relatively high levels of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) expression. Stimulation of this receptor greatly enhanced IL-6 expression when compared to the expression of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or nerve growth factor. Stimulation of the cells also promoted phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases P38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. Based on these in vitro results, we returned to animal testing and observed that the selective β2-AR antagonist butoxamine reduced nociceptive sensitization in the CRPS model, and that local injection of the selective β2-AR agonist terbutaline resulted in mechanical allodynia and the production of IL-6 in the cells of the skin. No increases in IL-1β, TNF-α, or nerve growth factor levels were seen, however. These data suggest that in CRPS, norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerve terminals stimulates β2-ARs expressed on epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in local IL-6 production, and ultimately, pain sensitization.

  18. Selective depletion of spinal monoamines changes the rat soleus EMG from a tonic to a more phasic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, O; Erdal, J; Eken, T; Bruhn, T

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of descending monoaminergic pathways for motor activity long-lasting EMG recordings were performed from the adult soleus muscle before and after selective depletion of spinal monoamines. 2. Rats were chronically implanted with an intrathecal catheter placed in the lumbar subarachnoid space and gross-EMG recording electrodes in the soleus muscle. EMG recordings were performed in control conditions and at different times after intrathecal administration of either 40-55 micrograms 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) and 40-55 micrograms 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or 80 micrograms 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) alone. The depletions were evaluated biochemically in brains and spinal cords after recordings. 3. In agreement with previous studies the intrathecal administration of neurotoxins caused a reduction of the noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) content of the lumbar spinal cord to about 2-3% of control, with little or no changes in the monoamine content of the cortex. 4. In non-treated chronically catheterized rats the integrated rectified gross EMG displayed long-lasting EMG episodes composed of phasic high-amplitude events and tonic segments of varying duration and amplitude. 5. After intrathecal administration of neurotoxins the number of long-lasting gross-EMG episodes, the mean episode duration, and the total EMG activity per 24 h, were reduced. These changes were accompanied by a simultaneous increase both in the number of short-lasting EMG episodes and the total number of EMG episodes per 24 h period. The changes were apparent 5-6 days after drug administration and fully developed after 2-3 weeks. 6. No changes in general movement ability were observed, except that the denervated animals had a tendency to a less errect posture. 7. These results indicate that descending monoaminergic pathways are important for the maintained motor output in tonic hindlimb muscles. PMID:8730593

  19. Grafts of fetal locus coeruleus neurons in rat amygdala-piriform cortex suppress seizure development in hippocampal kindling.

    PubMed

    Barry, D I; Wanscher, B; Kragh, J; Bolwig, T G; Kokaia, M; Brundin, P; Björklund, A; Lindvall, O

    1989-11-01

    Hippocampal kindling was investigated in rats with a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of the forebrain catecholamine system after implantation of neural tissue from the fetal locus coeruleus region either bilaterally into the amygdala-piriform cortex (i.e., distant to the kindling site) or unilaterally into the hippocampus (close to the kindling site). Lesioned animals with either sham grafts or control grafts consisting of fetal striatal tissue showed a kindling rate much faster than that of normal controls. In contrast, in rats with bilateral locus coeruleus grafts in the amygdala-piriform cortex (implanted at three sites) the development of seizures was similar to that of controls and significantly slower than that in lesioned animals with sham grafts. All these animals had bilateral surviving grafts with a mean of 125 noradrenergic cells per implantation site. In the animals with locus coeruleus grafts in the stimulated hippocampus the kindling rate did not differ from that in the lesioned animals with control grafts. Most of these animals had large surviving grafts and showed a dense noradrenergic reinnervation of the implanted hippocampus. The present findings indicate that grafting of fetal pontine tissue (rich in noradrenergic neurons) to a site distant to the stimulation focus, but important for the generalization and spread of seizures, can retard the development of seizures in hippocampal kindling. Together with the data of our previous report this study also indicates that noradrenergic reinnervation of both hippocampi is important for the seizure-suppressant action in hippocampal kindling of locus coeruleus grafts implanted in the hippocampus.

  20. Blocking Sympathetic Nervous System Reverses Partially Stroke-Induced Immunosuppression but does not Aggravate Functional Outcome After Experimental Stroke in Rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi-Wen; Yang, Heng; Yan, Fu-Ling; Wang, Huan; Xing, Fang-Lan; Zuo, Lei; Zhang, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Stoke results in activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), inducing systemic immunosuppression. However, the potential mechanisms underlying stroke-induced immunosuppression remain unclear. Here, we determined the SNS effects on functional outcome and explored the interactions among SNS, β-arrestin2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) after experimental stroke in rats. In the current study, stroke was induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats, and SNS activity was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine HBr (6-OHDA). 7.0 T Micro-MRI and Longa score were employed to assess the functional outcome after stroke. Flow cytometry and ELISA assay were used to measure the expression of MHC class II, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Western blot was conducted to analyze β-arrestin2 and NF-κB protein expression levels after experimental stroke. We found significantly increased infarct volumes and functional impairment after MCAO at different post-surgery time points, which were not aggravated by 6-OHDA treatment. SNS blockade partially reversed the expression of MHC class II after stroke over time, as well as TNF-α and IFN-γ levels in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages in vitro. Treatment of MCAO rats with SNS-inhibitor significantly diminished NF-κB activation and enhanced β-arrestin2 expression after stroke. This study suggests that pharmacological SNS inhibition dose not aggravate functional outcome after stroke. Stroke-induced immunosuppression may be involved in the SNS-β-arrestin2-NF-κB pathway. PMID:27059792

  1. Silibinin pretreatment attenuates biochemical and behavioral changes induced by intrastriatal MPP+ injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Geed, Milind; Garabadu, Debapriya; Ahmad, Ausaf; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2014-02-01

    Silymarin commonly known for its hepatoprotective effect is reported to show protection against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity. Silibinin forms the major active constituent of silymarin. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of silibinin (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) was evaluated in the unilaterally injected 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in male rats. A battery of tests such as elevated plus maze (EPM), narrow beam walk, open field, bar catalepsy, grip strength, and foot print analysis was performed to evaluate the behavioral symptoms of striatal dopaminergic toxicity. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of silibinin was investigated by evaluating the mitochondrial complex enzyme activities, mitochondrial integrity and oxidative status. Striatal caspase-3 and NFκB were expressed to evaluate the effect of silibinin on apoptosis and inflammation respectively. Silibinin (100 and 200 mg/kg) protected against MPP(+)-induced dopamine depletion in striatum. Silibinin reversed MPP(+)-induced decrease in transfer latency indicating memory consolidation in the EPM test. Silibinin (100 and 200 mg/kg) attenuated MPP(+)-induced motor deficits, such as fine motor movements and gait. MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of integrity and oxidative stress were attenuated by silibinin. Silibinin decreased striatal caspase-3 and NFκB expression indicating potential anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects respectively. Hence, silibinin exhibited neuroprotective effect in the MPP(+) induced striatal toxicity augmenting dopamine levels. The mechanism of action may be linked to maintenance of mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity apart from anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24345573

  2. The sympathetic nervous system promotes carbon tetrachloride-induced liver cirrhosis in rats by suppressing apoptosis and enhancing the growth kinetics of regenerating hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, K; Nakashima, M; Naito, S; Akiyama, Y; Ohtsuru, A; Hamanaka, Y; Hsu, C T; Ito, M; Sekine, I

    2001-02-01

    Norepinephrine is considered to possess potent anti-apoptotic action in regenerating hepatocytes. To clarify the role of the sympathetic nervous system in apoptosis that occurs in chronic liver damage and following the promotion of liver cirrhosis, we studied a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury model, using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), and chemically sympathectomized WKY. At 24 h after CCl4 administration. acute damage, characterized by vacuolated hepatocytes in the centrilobular zone, was greater in SHR than in WKY. This vacuolated change in WKY hepatocytes was significantly reduced by chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). After 48 h, the acute damage was dramatically improved in each animal, without significant differences between the three groups. In chronic damage after weekly repetition of CCl4 treatment for 4 weeks, fibrosis was evident in SHR, while in the other groups there was only scant fibrosis in the centrilobular zone. After 8 weeks' repetition of CCl4, liver cirrhosis was seen only in SHR. The incidence of apoptotic cells in areas of both acute and chronic damage in WKY, detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling, was significantly increased in comparison with that in SHR, and was further increased by 6-OHDA pretreatment. In contrast, there was significantly greater enhancement of the growth of hepatocytes in SHR than in WKY in both acute and chronic damage. Moreover. hepatocyte growth kinetics in WKY was significantly inhibited after sympathectomy in acute injury, as evidenced by immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro, the amount of hepatocellular apoptosis induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly decreased by incubation with norepinephrine. These findings suggest that the anti-apoptotic effect of the sympathetic nervous system increases cell growth kinetics and promotes liver cirrhosis in this

  3. Serotonergic interaction between medial prefrontal cortex and mesotelencephalic DA system underlies cognitive and affective deficits in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Petri, D; de Souza Silva, M A; Chao, O Y-H; Schnitzler, A; Huston, J P

    2015-10-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients not only exhibit motor impairments, but also characteristic deficits in cognitive and affective functions. Such functions have consistently been associated with the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). To determine whether there is an interaction between the midbrain dopamine system (MDS) and the mPFC underlying the cognitive and emotional deficits seen in rats, we administered a disconnection procedure of these structures by applying lesions to the mPFC (N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA)) and the medial forebrain bundle (6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)) either in the same or opposite hemispheres. The results indicate a functional interaction of the MDS and the mPFC: Disconnection effects on behavior were observed with respect to memory-, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. A disconnection of the mPFC and MDS had promnestic, antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects. In order to determine whether this circuit between the mPFC and MDS involves serotonergic mechanisms, we also utilized serotonin-specific disconnections of the mPFC by applying the 5-HT-specific agent 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the mPFC and 6-OHDA into the medial forebrain bundle, again either in the same or opposite hemispheres. The behavioral effects observed here resembled those incurred by the unspecific disconnection of the mPFC, demonstrating a significant contribution of serotonergic mechanisms to the interplay between the MDS and the mPFC. Taken together, these experiments provide evidence for an interaction of the MDS and the mPFC in the control of cognitive and affective processes known to be impaired in PD and point toward a prominent involvement of the serotonergic system. A disconnection of the mPFC and the MDS had promnestic, antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like behavioral effects. These findings may impact therapeutic approaches in the treatment of cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms seen in PD.

  4. Differential pattern of motor impairments in neurotoxic, environmental and inflammation-driven rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Carol; Moriarty, Niamh; Feehan, Jennifer; O'Toole, Daniel; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-01-01

    One of the reasons proposed for the paucity of drug discovery for Parkinson's disease is the lack of relevant animal models of the condition. Parkinson's disease has been modelled extensively using the selective neurotoxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). However, as this model bears little etiological resemblance to the human condition, there has been a drive to develop models with improved etiological validity. Two such models are those induced by the pesticide, rotenone, and the inflammagen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, to date, these models have been poorly characterised in terms of their motor profiles and have never been directly compared to the more established models. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterise the behavioural profile of the rotenone and LPS models, and to compare them with the 6-OHDA model. Animals underwent baseline testing on the Stepping, Whisker, Corridor and Cylinder Tests of motor function. They were then grouped for unilateral intra-striatal infusion of 6-OHDA, rotenone or LPS. Motor testing continued for ten weeks after which the rats were processed for immunohistochemical analysis of nigrostriatal integrity. We found that, although all neurotoxins induced a similar level of nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, neither the rotenone nor LPS models were associated with amphetamine-induced rotation, and they were associated with significantly less pronounced and stable impairments in the spontaneous tasks than the 6-OHDA model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates key differences in the pattern of motor dysfunction induced by Parkinsonian neurotoxins which should be taken into consideration when selecting the most appropriate model for Parkinson's disease preclinical studies.

  5. Differential visualization of dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)mazindol autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Javitch, J.A.; Strittmatter, S.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1985-06-01

    Mazindol is a potent inhibitor of neuronal dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) uptake. DA and NE uptake sites in rat brain have been differentially visualized using (/sup 3/H)mazindol autoradiography. At appropriate concentrations, desipramine (DMI) selectively inhibits (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to NE uptake sites without significantly affecting binding to DA uptake sites. The localization of DMI-insensitive specific (/sup 3/H) mazindol binding, reflecting DA uptake sites, is densest in the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the olfactory tubercle, the subthalamic nucleus, the ventral tegmental area, the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta, and the anterior olfactory nuclei. In contrast, the localization of DMI-sensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding, representing NE uptake sites, is densest in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, and the anteroventral thalamus. The distribution of DMI-insensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding closely parallels that of dopaminergic terminal and somatodendritic regions, while the distribution of DMI-sensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding correlates well with the regional localization of noradrenergic terminals and cell bodies. Injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, ibotenic acid, or colchicine into the SN decreases (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to DA uptake sites in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 85%. In contrast, ibotenic acid lesions of the caudate-putamen do not reduce (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to either the ipsilateral or contralateral caudate-putamen.

  6. Adult neurogenesis restores dopaminergic neuronal loss in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, Françoise; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; Moigneu, Carine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-22

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis continuously provides new GABA- and dopamine (DA)-containing interneurons for the olfactory bulb (OB) in most adult mammals. DAergic interneurons are located in the glomerular layer (GL) where they participate in the processing of sensory inputs. To examine whether adult neurogenesis might contribute to regeneration after circuit injury in mice, we induce DAergic neuronal loss by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal GL or in the right substantia nigra pars compacta. We found that a 6-OHDA treatment of the OB produces olfactory deficits and local inflammation and partially decreases the number of neurons expressing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) near the injected site. Blockade of inflammation by minocycline treatment immediately after the 6-OHDA administration rescued neither TH(+) interneuron number nor the olfactory deficits, suggesting that the olfactory impairments are most likely linked to TH(+) cell death and not to microglial activation. TH(+) interneuron number was restored 1 month later. This rescue resulted at least in part from enhanced recruitment of immature neurons targeting the lesioned GL area. Seven days after 6-OHDA lesion in the OB, we found that the integration of lentivirus-labeled adult-born neurons was biased: newly formed neurons were preferentially incorporated into glomerular circuits of the lesioned area. Behavioral rehabilitation occurs 2 months after lesion. This study establishes a new model into which loss of DAergic cells could be compensated by recruiting newly formed neurons. We propose that adult neurogenesis not only replenishes the population of DAergic bulbar neurons but that it also restores olfactory sensory processing. PMID:25339754

  7. A mouse model of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: focus on pharmacological interventions targeting affective dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Masini, Débora; Fisone, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, are increasingly recognized as a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). These ailments, which often appear in the early stage of the disease, affect a large number of patients and are only partly resolved by conventional antiparkinsonian medications, such as L-DOPA. Here, we investigated non-motor symptoms of PD in a mouse model based on bilateral injection of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal striatum. This model presented only subtle gait modifications, which did not affect horizontal motor activity in the open-field test. Bilateral 6-OHDA lesion also impaired olfactory discrimination, in line with the anosmia typically observed in early stage parkinsonism. The effect of 6-OHDA was then examined for mood-related dysfunctions. Lesioned mice showed increased immobility in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, two behavioral paradigms of depression. Moreover, the lesion exerted anxiogenic effects, as shown by reduced time spent in the open arms, in the elevated plus maze test, and by increased thigmotaxis in the open-field test. L-DOPA did not modify depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, which were instead counteracted by the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole. Reboxetine, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, was also able to revert the depressive and anxiogenic effects produced by the lesion with 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pre-treatment with desipramine prior to injection of 6-OHDA, which is commonly used to preserve noradrenaline neurons, did not modify the effect of the lesion on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, in the present model, mood-related conditions are independent of the reduction of noradrenaline caused by 6-OHDA. Based on these findings we propose that the anti-depressive and anxiolytic action of reboxetine is mediated by promoting dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine uptake from residual noradrenergic terminals. PMID

  8. Reversal of dopaminergic degeneration in a parkinsonian rat following micrografting of human bone marrow-derived neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Virag, Tamas; Chang, Qin A; West, Neva C; Mangatu, Thomas A; McGrogan, Michael P; Dugich-Djordjevic, Millicent; Bohn, Martha C

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. Various types of stem cells that have potential to differentiate into DA neurons are being investigated as cellular therapies for PD. Stem cells also secrete growth factors and therefore also may have therapeutic effects in promoting the health of diseased DA neurons in the PD brain. To address this possibility in an experimental model of PD, bone marrow-derived neuroprogenitor-like cells were generated from bone marrow procured from healthy human adult volunteers and their potential to elicit recovery of damaged DA axons was studied in a partial lesion rat model of PD. Following collection of bone marrow, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were isolated and then genetically modified to create SB623 cells by transient transfection with the intracellular domain of the Notch1 gene (NICD), a modification that upregulates expression of certain neuroprogenitor markers. Ten deposits of 0.5 microl of SB623 cell suspension adjusted from 6,000 to 21,000 cells/microl in PBS or PBS alone were stereotaxically placed in the striatum 1 week after the nigrostriatal projection had been partially lesioned in adult F344 rats by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum. At 3 weeks, a small number of grafted SB623 cells survived in the lesioned striatum as visualized by expression of the human specific nuclear matrix protein (hNuMA). In rats that received SB623 cells, but not in control rats, dense tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) fibers were observed around the grafts. These fibers appeared to be rejuvenated host DA axons because no TH-ir in soma of surviving SB623 cells or coexpression of TH and hNuMA-ir were observed. In addition, dense serotonin immunoreactive (5-HT-ir) fibers were observed around grafted SB623 cells and these fibers also appeared to be of the host origin. Also, in some SB623 grafted rats that were

  9. Postsynaptic density protein 95-regulated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat models

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Maowen; Kong, Min; Ma, Guozhao

    2015-01-01

    Context Abnormality in interactions between N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and its signaling molecules occurs in the lesioned striatum in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). It was reported that Fyn-mediated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation, can enhance NMDA receptor function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), one of the synapse-associated proteins, regulates interactions between receptor and downstream-signaling molecules. In light of the relationship between PSD-95, NR2B, and Fyn kinases, does PSD-95 contribute to the overactivity of NMDA receptor function induced by dopaminergic treatment? To further prove the possibility, the effects of regulating the PSD-95 expression on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and on the interactions of Fyn and NR2B in LID rat models were evaluated. Methods In the present study, parkinsonian rat models were established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, valid PD rats were treated with levodopa (50 mg/kg/day with benserazide 12.5 mg/kg/day, twice daily) intraperitoneally for 22 days to create LID rat models. Then, the effect of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of the PSD-95mRNA antisense oligonucleotides (PSD-95 ASO) on the rotational response to levodopa challenge was assessed. The effects of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of PSD-95 ASO on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in the LID rat models were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results Levodopa administration twice daily for 22 days to parkinsonian rats shortened the rotational duration and increased the peak turning responses. The altered rotational responses were attenuated by PSD-95 ASO pretreatment. Meanwhile, PSD-95 ASO pretreatment decreased the level of PSD-95 protein expression and reduced both the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B triggered during the levodopa administration in the

  10. Pharmacologically distinct pramipexole-mediated akinesia vs. risk-taking in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Tedford, Stephanie E; Persons, Amanda L; Grasso, Salvatore A; Napier, T Celeste

    2016-10-01

    Pramipexole and ropinirole are dopamine agonists that are efficacious in treating motor disturbances of neuropathologies, e.g., Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome. A significant portion of treated patients develop impulsive/compulsive behaviors. Current treatment is dose reduction or switching to an alternative dopamine replacement, both of which can undermine the motor benefits. Needed is a preclinical model that can assist in identifying adjunct treatments to dopamine agonist therapy that reduce impulsive/compulsive behaviors without interfering with motor benefits of the dopamine agonist. Toward that objective, the current study implemented a rat model of Parkinson's disease to behaviorally profile chronically administered pramipexole. This was accomplished with male Sprague-Dawley rats wherein (i) 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the dorsolateral striatum produced Parkinson's disease-like akinesia, measured in the forelimbs, (ii) intracranial self-stimulation-mediated probability discounting indicated impulsivity/risk-taking, and (iii) two doses of pramipexole were continuously administered for 14-28days via osmotic minipumps to mirror the chronic, stable exposure achieved with extended release formulations. The atypical antidepressant, mirtazapine, is known to reduce behaviors associated with drug addiction in rats; thus, we demonstrated model utility here by determining the effects of mirtazapine on pramipexole-induced motor improvements versus probability discounting. We observed that forelimb akinesia subsequent to striatal lesions was attenuated by both pramipexole doses tested (0.3 and 1.2mg/kg/day) within 4h of pump implant dispensing 0.3mg/kg/day and 1h by 1.2mg/kg/day. By contrast, 12-14days of infusion with 0.3mg/kg/day did not alter discounting, but increases were obtained with 1.2mg/kg/day pramipexole, with 67% of 1.2mg/kg/day-treated rats meeting categorical criteria for 'high risk-taking'. Insertion of a second minipump delivering

  11. Contrasting mechanisms of action and sensitivity to antipsychotics of phencyclidine versus amphetamine: importance of nucleus accumbens 5-HT2A sites for PCP-induced locomotion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Millan, M J; Brocco, M; Gobert, A; Joly, F; Bervoets, K; Rivet, J; Newman-Tancredi, A; Audinot, V; Maurel, S

    1999-12-01

    In the present study, the comparative mechanisms of action of phencyclidine (PCP) and amphetamine were addressed employing the parameter of locomotion in rats. PCP-induced locomotion (PLOC) was potently blocked by the selective serotonin (5-HT)2A vs. D2 antagonists, SR46349, MDL100,907, ritanserin and fananserin, which barely affected amphetamine-induced locomotion (ALOC). In contrast, the selective D2 vs. 5-HT2A antagonists, eticlopride, raclopride and amisulpride, preferentially inhibited ALOC vs. PLOC. The potency of these drugs and 12 multireceptorial antipsychotics in inhibiting PLOC vs. ALOC correlated significantly with affinities at 5-HT2A vs. D2 receptors, respectively. Amphetamine and PCP both dose dependently increased dialysate levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and frontal cortex (FCX) of freely moving rats, but PCP was proportionally more effective than amphetamine in elevating levels of 5-HT vs. DA in the accumbens. Further, whereas microinjection of PCP into the accumbens elicited locomotion, its introduction into the striatum or FCX was ineffective. The action of intra-accumbens PCP, but not intra-accumbens amphetamine, was abolished by SR46349 and clozapine. Parachloroamphetamine, which depleted accumbens pools of 5-HT but not DA, likewise abolished PLOC without affecting ALOC. In contrast, intra-accumbens 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which depleted DA but not 5-HT, abolished ALOC but only partially attenuated PLOC. In conclusion, PLOC involves (indirect) activation of accumbens-localized 5-HT2A receptors by 5-HT. PLOC is, correspondingly, more potently blocked than ALOC by antipsychotics displaying marked affinity at 5-HT2A receptors.

  12. Signaling of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor GFRα1 induce Nurr1 and Pitx3 to promote survival of grafted midbrain-derived neural stem cells in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhinian; Jiang, Yu; Li, Tao; Zhu, Jianbao; Zeng, Shuilin

    2011-09-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its receptor GFRα1 have been implicated in the survival of ventral midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, but the molecular mechanisms bywhich GDNF generates DA neurons in grafted midbrain-derived neural stem cells (mNSCs) are not understood. Midbrain-derived neural stem cells isolated from rat embryonic mesencephalon (embryonic day 12) were treated with GDNF or in combination with GFRα1 small interfering RNA. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry were used totest the expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 and thetranscription factor Pitx3 and newborn tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells. Treatment of mNSCs with GDNF increased mNSCs' sphere diameter, reduced expression of caspase 3, and increased expression of Bcl-2. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-treated mNSCs enhanced Nurr1 and Pitx3 expression and the fraction of TH-, TH/Pitx3-, and TH/Nurr1-positive cells in culture. Grafted GDNF-treated mNSCs significantly decreased apomorphine-induced rotation behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Glialcell line-derived neurotrophic factor-treated mNSCs showed increased numbers of TH/Pitx3- and TH/Nurr1-postivie cells. The effect elicited by GDNF was inhibited by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of GFRα1. Our data demonstrate the contribution of GDNF to DA neuron development and may also elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in Parkinson disease and contribute to the development of novel therapies for the disorder.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of sigma receptor binding sites in guinea pig and rat central nervous system with (+)3H-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, A.L.; Largent, B.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-06-01

    (+)3H-3-PPP ((+)3H-3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)-piperidine) binds with high affinity to brain membranes with a pharmacological profile consistent with that of sigma receptors. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites in brain and spinal cord of both guinea pig and rat has been determined by in vitro autoradiography with binding densities quantitated by computer-assisted densitometry. (+)3H-3-PPP binding to slide-mounted brain sections is saturable and displays high affinity and a pharmacological specificity very similar to sites labeled in homogenates. (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites are heterogeneously distributed. Highest concentrations of binding sites occur in spinal cord, particularly the ventral horn and dorsal root ganglia; the pons-medulla, associated with the cranial nerve and pontine nuclei and throughout the brain stem reticular formation; the cerebellum, over the Purkinje cell layer; the midbrain, particularly the central gray and red nucleus; and hippocampus, over the pyramidal cell layer. Lowest levels are seen in the basal ganglia and parts of the thalamus, while all other areas, including hypothalamus and cerebral cortex, exhibit moderate grain densities. Quinolinic acid-induced lesions of the hippocampus indicate that (+)3H-3-PPP labels hippocampal pyramidal cells and granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Intrastriatal injection of ibotenic acid dramatically reduces (+)3H-3-PPP binding in this area, while injection of 6-hydroxydopamine produces a relatively slight decrease. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites does not correlate with the receptor distribution of any recognized neurotransmitter or neuropeptide, including dopamine. However, there is a notable similarity between the distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP sites and high-affinity binding sites for psychotomimetic opioids, such as the benzomorphan (+)SKF 10,047.

  14. NMDA receptors mediate an early up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in substantia nigra in a rat model of presymptomatic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Gonzalo; Abarca, Jorge; Bustos, Victor; Riquelme, Eduardo; Noriega, Viviana; Moya, Catherine; Campusano, Jorge

    2009-08-01

    The clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) appear late and only when the degenerative process at the level of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) pathway is quite advanced. An increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression may be one of the molecular signals associated to compensatory and plastic responses occurring in basal ganglia during presymptomatic PD. In the present study, we used in vivo microdialysis, semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry to study N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor regulation of BDNF expression in substantia nigra (SN) of adult rats after partial lesioning of the nigrostriatal DA pathway with unilateral striatal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A time-dependent partial decrease of striatal DA tissue content as well as parallel and gradual increases in extracellular glutamate and aspartate levels in SN were found 1 to 7 days after unilateral 6-OHDA intrastriatal injection. Instead, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the ipsilateral SN pars compacta remained statistically unchanged after neurotoxin injection. Intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA also produced an early and transient augmentation of pan-BDNF, exon II-BDNF, and exon III-BDNF transcripts in the ipsilateral SN. The pan-BDNF and exon II-BDNF transcript increases were completely abolished by the prior systemic administration of MK-801, a selective antagonist of NMDA receptors. MK-801 also blocked the increase in BDNF-IR cells in SN observed 7 days after unilateral 6-OHDA intrastriatal injections. Our findings suggest that a coupling between glutamate release, NMDA receptor activation, and BDNF expression may exist in the adult SN and represent an important signal in this midbrain nucleus triggered in response to partial DA loss occurring in striatal nerve endings during presymptomatic PD.

  15. Caffeine has greater potency and efficacy than theophylline to reverse the motor impairment caused by chronic but not acute interruption of striatal dopaminergic transmission in rats.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Lizama, Miguel M; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2013-07-01

    In order to assess whether caffeine and theophylline have the same potency and efficacy to reverse the impairment of motor function caused by acute or chronic interruption of striatal dopamine transmission, a comparison of their dose-response relationship was made in the acute model of haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and the chronic model of unilateral lesion of the dopamine nigrostriatal pathway with 6-hydroxydopamine. At equimolar doses, both drugs reduced catalepsy intensity and increased its onset latency in a dose-dependent fashion, showing comparable potencies and attaining the maximal effect at similar doses. Catalepsy intensity: caffeine ED₅₀ = 24.1 μmol/kg [95% CI, 18.4-31.5]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 22.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 17.0-28.4]. Catalepsy latency: caffeine ED₅₀ = 27.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 21.1-34.6]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 28.8 μmol/kg [95% CI, 22.5-36.7]. In one group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 5), caffeine caused a dose-dependent recovery of the contralateral forepaw stepping: ED₅₀ = 2.4 μmol/kg/day [95% CI, 1.9-3.1]), reaching its maximum at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. When the treatment of these same rats was switched to 5.15 μmol/kg/day of theophylline, the stepping recovery was only 51 ± 12% of that induced by caffeine. Assessing the dose-response relationship of theophylline in another group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 7) revealed that it caused stepping recovery in an all-or-none fashion. Thus, the three lower doses had no effect, but at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day theophylline suddenly increased the stepping to 56 ± 5% of the maximal effect observed when the treatment of these same rats was switched to an equimolar dose of caffeine. Increasing the dose of theophylline up to 15.45 μmol/kg/day caused no further stepping improvement since it was only 41 ± 6% of the maximal effect produced by caffeine at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. Given that theophylline showed less potency and efficacy than caffeine to reverse the

  16. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  17. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid promotes dopaminergic differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells and inhibits teratoma formation in rats with Parkinson-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Shih-Jen; Kao, Chung-Lan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ku, Hung-Hai; Lin, Chin-Po; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Liang-Kung; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have shown potential for differentiation and may become a resource of functional neurons for the treatment of PD. However, teratoma formation is a major concern for transplantation-based therapies. This study examined whether functional neurons could be efficiently generated from iPS cells using a five-step induction procedure combined with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) treatment. We demonstrated that DHA, a ligand for the RXR/Nurr1 heterodimer, significantly activated expression of the Nurr1 gene and the Nurr1-related pathway in iPS cells. DHA treatment facilitated iPS differentiation into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in vitro and in vivo and functionally increased dopamine release in transplanted grafts in PD-like animals. Furthermore, DHA dramatically upregulated the endogenous expression levels of neuroprotective genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) and protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced apoptosis in iPS-derived neuronal precursor cells. DHA-treated iPS cells significantly improved the behavior of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PD-like rats compared to control or eicosapentaenoic acid-treated group. Importantly, the in vivo experiment suggests that DHA induces the differentiation of functional dopaminergic precursors and improves the abnormal behavior of 6-OHDA-treated PD-like rats by 4 months after transplantation. Furthermore, we found that DHA treatment in iPS cell-grafted rats significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of embryonic stem cell-specific genes (Oct-4 and c-Myc) in the graft and effectively blocked teratoma formation. Importantly, 3 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo green fluorescence protein imaging revealed that no teratomas were present

  19. Running wheel exercise enhances recovery from nigrostriatal dopamine injury without inducing neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S J; Gross, N B; Fricks, A N; Casiano, B D; Nguyen, T B; Marshall, J F

    2007-02-01

    Forced use of the forelimb contralateral to a unilateral injection of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine can promote recovery of motor function in that limb and can significantly decrease damage to dopamine terminals. The present study was conducted to determine (1) whether a form of voluntary exercise, wheel running, would improve motor performance in rats with such lesions, and (2) whether any beneficial effects of wheel running are attributable to ameliorating the dopaminergic damage. In experiment 1, rats were allowed to run in exercise wheels or kept in home cages for 2 1/2 weeks, then given stereotaxic infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left striatum. The rats were replaced into their original environments (wheels or home cages) for four additional weeks, and asymmetries in forelimb use were quantified at 3, 10, 17, and 24 days postoperatively. After killing, dopaminergic damage was assessed by both quantifying 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) binding to striatal dopamine transporters and counting tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Exercised 6-hydroxydopamine-infused rats showed improved motor outcomes relative to sedentary lesioned controls, effects that were most apparent at postoperative days 17 and 24. Despite this behavioral improvement, 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of striatal dopamine transporters and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells in exercised and sedentary groups did not differ. Since prior studies suggested that forced limb use improves motor performance by sparing nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine damage, experiment 2 used a combined regimen of forced plus voluntary wheel running. Again, we found that the motor performance of exercised rats improved more rapidly than that of sedentary controls, but that there were no differences between these groups in the damage produced by 6-hydroxydopamine. It appears that voluntary

  20. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. VI. Characterization of a novel cocaine binding site, identified with [125I]RTI-55, in membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R B; Silverthorn, M L; Baumann, M H; Goodman, C B; Cadet, J L; Matecka, D; Rice, K C; Carroll, F I; Wang, J B; Uhl, G R

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies showed that the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55 labels dopamine and serotonergic (5-HT) biogenic amine transporters (BATs) with high affinity. Here we characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus the caudate nuclei. Paroxetine (50 nM) was used to block [125I]RTI-55 binding to 5-HT transporter sites. Initial experiments identified drugs that displaced [125I]RTI-55 binding with moderately low slope factors. Binding surface analysis of the interaction of 3 beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid phenyl ester hydrochloride (RTI-113) and 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid phenyl ester hydrochloride (RTI-122) with [125I]RTI-55 binding sites readily resolved two binding sites for [125I]RTI-55 with Kd values of 0.44 nM and 17 nM and Bmax values of 31 and 245 fmol/mg protein. Potent 5-HT and noradrenergic uptake inhibitors had low affinity for both sites. Whereas cocaine, CFT and WIN35,065-2 were 6.0-, 25- and 14-fold selective for the first site, benztropine, PCP and the novel pyrrole, (+-)-(2RS,3aSR,8bRS)-1,2,3,3a,4,8b-hexahydro- 2-benzyl-1-methylindeno-[1,2-b]pyrrole resorcylate [(+-)-HBMP, formerly called (+-)-RTI-4793-14], were moderately selective for the second site. A single binding site with the characteristics of site 1 was resolved using COS cells transiently expressing the cloned rat dopamine transporter. Lesion studies with 6-hydroxydopamine and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine were conducted to test the hypothesis that site 1 and site 2 are physically distinct. The data showed that these neurotoxins differentially decreased [125I]RTI-55 binding to sites 1 and 2. The differential distribution of sites 1 and 2 in rat brain provides further support for this hypothesis. Viewed collectively, these data show that [125I]RTI-55 labels a novel binding site in rat brain membranes, termed DATsite2, which is not associated with the classic dopamine, serotonin or norepinephrine transporters.

  1. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  2. The influence of hormonal and neuronal factors on rat heart adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, George; Mucci, Lucia; O'Regan, Seana

    1980-01-01

    1 The influence of hormonal and neuronal factors on adrenoceptors mediating increased cardiac force and rate of contraction were studied in rat isolated atria. The pharmacological properties of these receptors were deduced from the relative potencies of agonists and from the effects of selective α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists. The numbers and affinities of α- and β-adrenoceptors were also determined by radioligand binding to ventricular membrane fragments. 2 Hypophysectomy reduced the inotropic potency of isoprenaline and increased the potency of phenylephrine and methoxamine in left atria. The effect of phenylephrine was inhibited by propranolol less effectively and by phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine more effectively in hypophysectomized than in control rats. The difference in block was smaller at low than at high antagonist concentrations. Similar but smaller changes were observed for chronotropic responses of right atria. 3 The decreased β- and increased α-receptor response after hypophysectomy was similar to that observed earlier in thyroidectomized rats (Kunos, 1977). These changes developed slowly after hypophysectomy (>2 weeks), they were both reversed within 2 days of thyroxine treatment (0.2 mg/kg daily), but were not affected by cortisone treatment (50 mg/kg every 12 h for 4 days). 4 Treatment of hypophysectomized rats for 2 days with thyroxine increased the density of [3H]-dihydroalprenolol ([3H]-DHA) binding sites from 27.5 ± 2.7 to 45.5 ± 5.7 fmol/mg protein and decreased the density of [3H]-WB-4101 binding sites from 38.7 ± 3.1 to 18.7 ± 2.5 fmol/mg protein. The affinity of either type of binding site for agonists or antagonist was not significantly altered by thyroxine treatment and the sum total of α1- and β-receptors remained the same. 5 Sympathetic denervation of thyroidectomized rats by 6-hydroxydopamine increased the inotropic potency of isoprenaline and noradrenaline and the blocking effect of propranolol, and decreased the

  3. The novel delta opioid receptor agonist UFP-512 dually modulates motor activity in hemiparkinsonian rats via control of the nigro-thalamic pathway.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, O S; Marti, M; Salvadori, S; Morari, M

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the ability of the novel delta opioid peptide (DOP) receptor agonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(CH2-COOH)-Bid (UFP-512) to attenuate motor deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) hemilesioned rats. Lower doses (0.1-10 microg/kg) of UFP-512 administered systemically (i.p.) stimulated stepping activity in the drag test and overall gait abilities in the rotarod test whereas higher doses (100-1000 microg/kg) were ineffective or even worsened Parkinsonism. Microdialysis coupled to an akinesia test (bar test) was then used to determine the circuitry involved in the motor actions of UFP-512. An antiakinetic dose of UFP-512 (10 microg/kg) decreased GABA in globus pallidus (GP) as well as GABA and glutamate (GLU) release in substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). On the other hand, a pro-akinetic dose (1000 microg/kg) of UFP-512 increased pallidal GABA, simultaneously producing a decrease in GABA and an increase in nigral GLU release. Moreover, to test the hypothesis that changes in motor behavior were associated with changes in nigro-thalamic transmission, amino acid release in ventromedial thalamus (VMTh, a target of nigro-thalamic GABAergic projections) was also measured. The anti-akinetic dose of UFP-512 reduced GABA and increased thalamic GLU release while the pro-akinetic dose increased GABA without affecting thalamic GLU release. Finally, regional microinjections were performed to investigate the brain areas involved in motor actions of UFP-512. UFP-512 microinjections into GP increased akinesia whereas UFP-512 microinjections into SNr reduced akinesia. Furthermore, the selective DOP receptor antagonist naltrindole (NTD) increased akinesia when injected into either area, GP being more sensitive. We conclude that UFP-512, depending on dose, improves or worsens motor activity in hemiparkinsonian rats by acting differentially as a DOP receptor agonist in SNr and a DOP receptor antagonist in GP, ultimately decreasing or increasing the activity of

  4. α4β2 nicotinic receptors play a role in the nAChR-mediated decline in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Quik, Maryka; Campos, Carla; Bordia, Tanuja; Strachan, Jon-Paul; Zhang, Jenny; McIntosh, J. Michael; Letchworth, Sharon; Jordan, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias are a serious long-term side effect of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease for which there are few treatment options. Our previous studies showed that nicotine decreased L-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). Subsequent work with knockout mice demonstrated that α6β2* nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) play a key role. The present experiments were done to determine if α4β2* nAChRs are also involved in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias. To approach this, we took advantage of the finding that α6β2* nAChRs are predominantly present on striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals, while a significant population of α4β2* nAChRs are located on other neurons. Thus, a severe dopaminergic lesion would cause a major loss in α6β2*, but not α4β2* nAChRs. Experiments were therefore done in which rats were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine, at a dose that lead to severe nigrostriatal damage. The dopamine transporter, a dopamine nerve terminal marker, was decreased by >99%. This lesion also decreased striatal α6β2* nAChRs by 97%, while α4β2* nAChRs were reduced by only 12% compared to control. A series of β2* nAChR compounds, including TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831, TC-10600 and sazetidine reduced L-dopa-induced AIMs in these rats by 23–32%. TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831 were also tested for parkinsonism, with no effect on this behavior. Tolerance did not develop with up to 3 months of treatment. Since α4a5β2 nAChRs are also predominantly on striatal dopamine terminals, these data suggest that drugs targeting α4β2 nAChRs may reduce L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in late stage Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23583932

  5. Release properties and functional integration of noradrenergic-rich tissue grafted to the denervated spinal cord of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Leanza, G; Cataudella, T; Dimauro, R; Monaco, S; Stanzani, S

    1999-05-01

    Noradrenaline- (NA-) containing grafts of central (embryonic locus coeruleus, LC) or peripheral (juvenile adrenal medullary, AM, autologous superior cervical ganglionic, SCG) tissue were implanted unilaterally into rat lumbar spinal cord previously depleted of its NA content by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) intraventricularly. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the spinal cord 3-4 months after transplantation, and extracellular levels of noradrenaline were monitored in freely moving animals during basal conditions and following administration of pharmacological or behavioural stimuli. Age-matched normal and lesioned animals both served as controls. Morphometric analyses were carried out on horizontal spinal sections processed for dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunocitochemistry, in order to assess lesion- or graft-induced changes in the density of spinal noradrenergic innervation, relative to the normal patterns. In lesioned animals, the entire spinal cord was virtually devoid of DBH-positive fibers, resulting in a dramatic 88% reduction in baseline NA, compared with that in controls, which did not change in response to the various stimuli. LC and SCG grafts reinstated approximately 80% and 50% of normal innervation density, respectively, but they differed strikingly in their release ability. Thus, LC grafts restored baseline NA levels up to 60% of those in controls, and responded with significantly increased NA release to KCl-induced depolarization, neuronal uptake blockade and handling. In contrast, very low NA levels and only poor and inconsistent responses to the various stimuli were observed in the SCG-grafted animals. In AM-grafted animals, spinal extracellular NA levels were restored up to 45% of those in controls, probably as a result of nonsynaptic, endocrine-like release, as grafted AM cells retained the chromaffine phenotype, showed no detectable fibre outgrowth and did not respond to any of the pharmacological or behavioural challenges. Thus, both a

  6. A Translational Approach to Vocalization Deficits and Neural Recovery after Behavioral Treatment in Parkinson Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciucci, Michelle R.; Vinney, Lisa; Wahoske, Emerald J.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease is characterized by a complex neuropathological profile that primarily affects dopaminergic neural pathways in the basal ganglia, including pathways that modulate cranial sensorimotor functions such as swallowing, voice and speech. Prior work from our lab has shown that the rat model of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine infusion to…

  7. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. V. Demonstration of two binding sites for the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55 associated with the 5-HT transporter in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, M L; Dersch, C M; Baumann, M H; Cadet, J L; Partilla, J S; Rice, K C; Carroll, F I; Becketts, K M; Brockington, A; Rothman, R B

    1995-04-01

    Earlier work characterized the binding of the high-affinity cocaine analog 3 beta-(4-125iodophenyl)-tropane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) to membranes prepared from rat caudate. That investigation demonstrated that [125I]RTI-55-labeled serotonin (5-HT) transporters in addition to dopamine (DA) transporters and resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to 5-HT transporters into two distinct components. In the present study, we characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate. The first series of experiments established that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters and that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM 1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)homopiperazine (LR1111) or 500 nM (RTI-120) could be used to block [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT and DA transporters, thereby generating selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively. Selective lesioning of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons with intracerebroventricular 6-hydroxydopamine and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine selectively decreased [125I]RTI-55 binding to DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, thereby confirming the selectivity of the assay conditions. The ligand-selectivity pattern of the whole brain minus caudate 5-HT transporter correlated significantly with that of the caudate 5-HT transporter, although there were some striking differences for selected test agents. Additional experiments resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT transporter into two components. A ligand-selectivity analysis of the two components failed to identify a highly selective test agent. In summary, the major findings of the present study are that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters in membranes prepared from whole brain minus caudate, that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM LR1111 or 500 nM RTI-120 can be used as a blocking agent to generate selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, and that [125

  8. β-asarone increases MEF2D and TH levels and reduces α-synuclein level in 6-OHDA-induced rats via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway: Chaperone-mediated autophagy activation, macroautophagy inhibition and HSP70 up-expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Liu, Shu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-10-15

    Inactive myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation will cause neuronal death. MEF2D or α-syn degradation is also associated with macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). We found that β-asarone had positive effects on treating 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rats, but mechanisms of β-asarone affecting on MEF2D and α-syn via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway remain unclear. Unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle was used to create PD rats, which were divided into four groups and administered for 30days: 6-OHDA model group, MEF2D inhibitor-treated group (SB203580, 0.5mg/kg, i.p.), MEF2D activator-treated group (LiCl, 100mg/kg, i.p.), β-asarone-treated group (15mg/kg, p.o.). Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α-syn, heat-shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A), MEF2D, HSP70, Beclin-1, light chain 3B (LC3B) and p62 in the mesencephalon were measured after 30-day administration. α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B levels were higher in the 6-OHDA model group, while TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A, p62 levels were lower compared to the sham-operated group. Our results also showed thatβ-asarone treatment reduced protein and mRNA levels of α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B, but increased HSP70, TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A and p62 levels compared to the 6-OHDA model group. Additionally, certain correlations among α-syn, TH, Beclin-1, LC3B, p62, HSP70, LAMP-2A and MEF2D were also discovered in this study. These findings suggested that β-asarone treatment could increase MEF2D and TH as well as reduce α-syn to protect against 6-OHDA induced damage in PD rat mesencephalon via modulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway.

  9. Intranasal Delivery of pGDNF Nanoparticles for Parkinson's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Brendan Trevor

    -of-principle study with pCG, a new plasmid was created by Copernicus Therapeutics, Inc. to better mimic their long-lasting pGDNF plasmid while providing both GDNF as well as the reporter function of eGFP. This eGFP-GDNF plasmid was used to monitor expression and cell-types transfected. This expression plasmid, called pUGG, was first characterized in vitro to verify protein expression. Transfection experiments in SHEP-1 neuroblastoma cells, ventral midbrain cultures, and N27 dopaminergic cells all demonstrated that pUGG expressed bioactive eGFP and GDNF. However, cleavage of the two proteins did not occur and the expressed protein emerged as a fusion construct which was not detectable by GDNF-ELISA, although it was detected by GFP-ELISA. The next goal was to determine if pUGG was able to transfect cells in vivo in rat brain. Direct striatal injection of pUGG nanoparticles showed significant eGFP expression at the site of injection both 7 and 14 days post-administration with no difference in eGFP expression between the two time-points. GFP-immunohistochemistry at the striatal injection site revealed expression of eGFP-positive cells as well as evidence of GDNF's bioactivity as indicated by neurite outgrowth. Moving forward, we administered pUGG nanoparticles intranasally to rats and found significant expression seven days later throughout the brain, with highest levels in the forebrain areas (olfactory bulb and frontal cortex). Significant expression was also seen along the rostral-caudal axis of the brain compared with naked pUGG plasmid. The final goal of this work was to examine whether intranasal pGDNF pre-treatment could generate sufficient GDNF to protect SN dopamine neurons after a unilateral 6-hydroxydopmaine (6-OHDA) lesion, a common animal model for PD. Copernicus' pGDNF plasmid was utilized for the neuroprotection experiments to avoid possible confounds due to the GFP fusion produced by pUGG. Tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostaining density was used as a marker for dopamine

  10. The safety and efficacy of safinamide mesylate for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Rascol, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Safinamide (brand name Xadago®, Zambon S.p.A) is a third-generation reversible MAO-B inhibitor, which also blocks sodium voltage-sensitive channels and modulates stimulated release of glutamate. Safinamide was recently licensed by EMA for the treatment of PD as add-on therapy to a stable dose of levodopa alone or in combination with other PD medicinal products in mid-to advanced-stage fluctuating patients. It is also under review by the US FDA. Studies in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys and 6OHDA-lesioned rats suggest antiparkinsonian efficacy and antidyskinesic effects. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have shown efficacy for the treatment of motor symptoms in stable PD patients on dopamine agonists and in fluctuating PD patients on levodopa. Significant improvement in daily ON time was also observed in the latter. This effect was maintained for at least 2 years in double-blind conditions and, interestingly, without significant worsening of dyskinesia. Clinical studies have not detected any specific safety issue other than those already known with MAO-B inhibitors. PMID:26849427

  11. Purification of functional human ES and iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic progenitors using LRTM1

    PubMed Central

    Samata, Bumpei; Doi, Daisuke; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Kikuchi, Tetsuhiro; Watanabe, Akira; Sakamoto, Yoshimasa; Kakuta, Jungo; Ono, Yuichi; Takahashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can provide a promising source of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons for cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, iPSC-derived donor cells inevitably contain tumorigenic or inappropriate cells. To eliminate these unwanted cells, cell sorting using antibodies for specific markers such as CORIN or ALCAM has been developed, but neither marker is specific for ventral midbrain. Here we employ a double selection strategy for cells expressing both CORIN and LMX1A::GFP, and report a cell surface marker to enrich mDA progenitors, LRTM1. When transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, human iPSC-derived LRTM1+ cells survive and differentiate into mDA neurons in vivo, resulting in a significant improvement in motor behaviour without tumour formation. In addition, there was marked survival of mDA neurons following transplantation of LRTM1+ cells into the brain of an MPTP-treated monkey. Thus, LRTM1 may provide a tool for efficient and safe cell therapy for PD patients. PMID:27739432

  12. Untangling Cortico-Striatal Connectivity and Cross-Frequency Coupling in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Belić, Jovana J.; Halje, Pär; Richter, Ulrike; Petersson, Per; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    We simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs) in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analyzed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80-Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the control state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz) across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz. PMID:27065818

  13. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of primary motor cortex activity produced by ventral tegmental area stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kunori, Nobuo; Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2014-06-25

    The primary motor cortex (M1) receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the mesocortical dopamine pathway. However, few studies have focused on changes in M1 neuronal activity caused by VTA activation. To address this issue, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of M1 activity induced by single-pulse stimulation of VTA in anesthetized rats. VSD imaging showed that brief electrical stimulation of unilateral VTA elicited a short-latency excitatory-inhibitory sequence of neuronal activity not only in the ipsilateral but also in the contralateral M1. The contralateral M1 response was not affected by pharmacological blockade of ipsilateral M1 activity, but it was completely abolished by corpus callosum transection. Although the VTA-evoked neuronal activity extended throughout the entire M1, we found the most prominent activity in the forelimb area of M1. The 6-OHDA-lesioned VTA failed to evoke M1 activity. Furthermore, both excitatory and inhibitory intact VTA-induced activity was entirely extinguished by blocking glutamate receptors in the target M1. When intracortical microstimulation of M1 was paired with VTA stimulation, the evoked forelimb muscle activity was facilitated or inhibited, depending on the interval between the two stimuli. These findings suggest that VTA neurons directly modulate the excitability of M1 neurons via fast glutamate signaling and, consequently, may control the last cortical stage of motor command processing. PMID:24966388

  14. Hippocampal type I and type II corticosteroid receptors are modulated by central noradrenergic systems.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Mormède, P; Piazza, P V; Simon, H; Angelucci, L; Le Moal, M

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticosteroids on various brain functions, including the negative feedback control of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, are mediated by two types of receptors (type I, or mineralocorticoid, and type II, or glucocorticoid) in the central nervous system. Although receptor numbers are thought to be regulated by circulating levels of corticosterone, there may be a direct neural control of corticosteroid receptors. In the present experiments, we demonstrate that 6-OHDA lesioning of noradrenergic (NA) ascending pathways in the pedunculus cerebellaris superior (PCS) reduces corticosterone secretion in response to novelty and increases the number of hippocampal type I corticosteroid receptors in rats 24 hr after adrenalectomy. The same lesion in adrenalectomized animals in which corticosterone levels were maintained within normal limits by corticosterone replacement implants also led to an increase in the number of type I corticosterone receptors and a decrease in the apparent affinity (Kd) of type II receptors in the hippocampus. These results suggest that the NA system may regulate HPA axis activity via a direct control of the number of type I receptors and the apparent affinity of type II receptors in the hippocampus. The possibility that there is a neural control of corticosteroid receptors may throw light on mechanisms controlling HPA axis activity and may suggest other approaches to the treatment of dysregulation of the HPA axis observed during stress and in certain psychopathological conditions. PMID:1332096

  15. Symptom-relieving and neuroprotective effects of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-THCV in animal models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    García, C; Palomo-Garo, C; García-Arencibia, M; Ramos, JA; Pertwee, RG; Fernández-Ruiz, J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Previous findings have indicated that a cannabinoid, such as Δ9-THCV, which has antioxidant properties and the ability to activate CB2 receptors but to block CB1, might be a promising therapy for alleviating symptoms and delaying neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The ability of Δ9-THCV to reduce motor inhibition and provide neuroprotection was investigated in rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine and in mice lesioned with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). KEY RESULTS Acute administration of Δ9-THCV attenuated the motor inhibition caused by 6-hydroxydopamine, presumably through changes in glutamatergic transmission. Moreover, chronic administration of Δ9-THCV attenuated the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase–positive neurones caused by 6-hydroxydopamine in the substantia nigra, through an effect related to its antioxidant properties (it was reproduced by cannabidiol -enriched botanical extract). In addition, CB2 receptor–deficient mice responded to 6-hydroxydopamine in a similar manner to wild-type animals, and CB2 receptors were poorly up-regulated in the rat substantia nigra in response to 6-hydroxydopamine. By contrast, the substantia nigra of mice that had been injected with LPS exhibited a greater up-regulation of CB2 receptors. In these animals, Δ9-THCV also caused preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase–positive neurones. This effect probably involved CB2 receptors as it was also elicited by the selective CB2 receptor agonist, HU-308, and CB2 receptor–deficient mice were more vulnerable to LPS lesions. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Given its antioxidant properties and its ability to activate CB2 but to block CB1 receptors, Δ9-THCV has a promising pharmacological profile for delaying disease progression in PD and also for ameliorating parkinsonian symptoms. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http

  16. Pharmacological profile of the abeorphine 201-678, a potent orally active and long lasting dopamine agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaton, A.L.; Giger, R.K.A.; Vigouret, J.M.; Enz, A.; Frick, W.; Closse, A.; Markstein, R.

    1986-01-13

    The central dopaminergic effects of an abeorphine derivative 201-678 were compared to those of apomorphine and bromocriptine in different model systems. After oral administration, this compound induced contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced nigral lesions and exhibited strong anti-akinetic properties in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced hypothalamic lesions. It decreased dopamine metabolism in striatum and cortex, but did not modify noradrenaline and serotonin metabolism in the rat brain. 201-678 counteracted the in vivo increase of tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by ..gamma..-butyrolactone. In vitro it stimulated DA-sensitive adenylate cyclase and inhibited acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices. This compound had high affinity for /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-clonidine binding sites. These results indicate that 201-678 is a potent, orally active dopamine agonist with a long duration of action. Furthermore it appears more selective than other dopaminergic drugs. 29 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  18. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and ...

  19. Different Corticostriatal Integration in Spiny Projection Neurons from Direct and Indirect Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Barrera, Edén; Vizcarra-Chacón, Bianca J.; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    The striatum is the principal input structure of the basal ganglia. Major glutamatergic afferents to the striatum come from the cerebral cortex and make monosynaptic contacts with medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) and interneurons. Also: glutamatergic afferents to the striatum come from the thalamus. Despite differences in axonal projections, dopamine (DA) receptors expression and differences in excitability between MSNs from “direct” and “indirect” basal ganglia pathways, these neuronal classes have been thought as electrophysiologically very similar. Based on work with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice, here it is shown that corticostriatal responses in D1- and D2-receptor expressing MSNs (D1- and D2-MSNs) are radically different so as to establish an electrophysiological footprint that readily differentiates between them. Experiments in BAC mice allowed us to predict, with high probability (P > 0.9), in rats or non-BAC mice, whether a recorded neuron, from rat or mouse, was going to be substance P or enkephalin (ENK) immunoreactive. Responses are more prolonged and evoke more action potentials in D1-MSNs, while they are briefer and exhibit intrinsic autoregenerative responses in D2-MSNs. A main cause for these differences was the interaction of intrinsic properties with the inhibitory contribution in each response. Inhibition always depressed corticostriatal depolarization in D2-MSNs, while it helped in sustaining prolonged depolarizations in D1-MSNs, in spite of depressing early discharge. Corticostriatal responses changed dramatically after striatal DA depletion in 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned animals: a response reduction was seen in substance P (SP)+ MSNs whereas an enhanced response was seen in ENK+ MSNs. The end result was that differences in the responses were greatly diminished after DA depletion. PMID:20589098

  20. Beyond knockout rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guanyi; Tong, Chang; Kumbhani, Dhruv S; Ashton, Charles; Yan, Hexin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to “knockout” specific genes in mice via embryonic stem (ES) cell-based gene-targeting technology has significantly enriched our understanding of gene function in normal and disease phenotypes. Improvements on this original strategy have been developed to enable the manipulation of genomes in a more sophisticated fashion with unprecedented precision. The rat is the model of choice in many areas of scientific investigation despite the lack of rat genetic toolboxes. Most recent advances of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and rat ES cells are diminishing the gap between rat and mouse with respect to reverse genetic approaches. Importantly, the establishment of rat ES cell-based gene targeting technology, in combination with the unique advantages of using rats, provides new, exciting opportunities to create animal models that mimic human diseases more faithfully. We hereby report our recent results concerning finer genetic modifications in the rat, and propose their potential applications in addressing biological questions. PMID:21383544

  1. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson’s disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  2. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Eing-Mei; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson's disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  3. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Roy, Partha Deb; Kannan, Elango; Antony, A. Shanish; Kumar, M. N. Satish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE) was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg). Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative control, positive control (levodopa 6 mg/kg) and two experimental groups (n = 6/group). Experimental groups received 200 and 400 mg/kg of TCEE once daily for 30 days by oral gavage. Biochemical parameters including dopamine level, oxidative stress, complex I activity and brain iron asymmetry ratio and locomotor activity including skeletal muscle co-ordination and degree of catatonia were assessed. Results: TCEE exhibited significant neuroprotection by increasing the dopamine levels (1.96 ± 0.20 and 2.45 ± 0.40 ng/mg of protein) and complex I activity (77.14 ± 0.89 and 78.50 ± 0.96 nmol/min/mg of protein) at 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively when compared with negative control group. Iron asymmetry ratio was also significantly attenuated by TCEE at 200 (1.57 ± 0.18) and 400 mg/kg (1.11 ± 0.15) when compared with negative control group. Neuroprotection by TCEE was further supported by reduced oxidative stress and restored locomotor activity in treatment groups. Conclusion: Results show that TCEE possess significant neuroprotection in 6-OHDA induced PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons and reducing the iron accumulation. PMID:24741189

  4. What is Desert RATS?

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mission manager and test coordinators for the 2011 mission explain why Desert RATS was started 14 years ago, questions being studied in this year's activities, technologies being tested and the...

  5. Anhedonia in postpartum rats.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Brittany M; Laggart, Jillian D; Craft, Rebecca M

    2010-01-12

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a debilitating illness, yet little is known about its causes. The purpose of this study was to examine a major symptom of depression during the postpartum period, anhedonia, by comparing sucrose preference in female rats that had undergone actual pregnancy or hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP) to their respective controls. Whereas HSP rats showed significantly less preference than vehicle control rats for 1% sucrose solution during the first three weeks of the "postpartum" period, previously pregnant females showed only slightly depressed sucrose preference for the first 1-2 days postpartum, compared to non-pregnant controls. Habituation to 1% sucrose during the pregnancy period, which increased preference upon later testing in previously pregnant rats tested on postpartum day 2, did not significantly increase preference in HSP rats, suggesting that depressed preference in the latter group was not due to neophobia. Pre-treatment with desipramine did not prevent suppressed sucrose preference in HSP rats, and preference was even further suppressed following chronic sertraline treatment. These results suggest that estradiol withdrawal following HSP may cause anhedonia during the early "postpartum" period. In contrast, females that have undergone actual pregnancy are less likely to show this effect, suggesting that postpartum hormonal changes other than the dramatic decline in estradiol may buffer its negative mood effects.

  6. Adrenarche in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Duarte; Xiao, Fang; Gouveia, Alexandra M; Ferreira, Jorge G; Vinson, Gavin P

    2006-10-01

    Normal pubertal development in humans involves two distinct processes: maturation of adrenal androgen secretion (adrenarche) and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (gonadarche). One factor thought to contribute to the adrenarche in man is increased adrenal 17-hydroxylase (CYP17) activity. In the rat, there is evidence for adrenal involvement in the initiation of puberty, but the adrenal glands of this species are generally thought to express CYP17 only very poorly at best. To further examine the nature of postnatal adrenal development in rat, plasma samples and adrenal tissues were taken from animals aged 2-90 days, circulating adrenal steroids assayed, and adrenal zones assessed quantitatively. A relative increase in zona reticularis, and peaks of circulating cortisol, androstenedione, and 17-OH-progesterone were observed around postnatal days 16-20, clearly before the development of the gonads, which begins at 30-35 days. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR confirmed a peak in mRNA coding for CYP17 in adrenal tissue from rats of similar age. The results suggest that the rat adrenal has the capacity to secrete steroids arising from 17-hydroxylation, and that this may contribute to a process similar to human adrenarche.

  7. Rat on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  8. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups. PMID:26414400

  9. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups.

  10. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  11. Erythrocytosis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Subha; Hoffman, George C.; Stowe, Nicholas T.; Smeby, Robert R.; Bumpus, F. Merlin

    1972-01-01

    During the study of an inbred strain of Wistar rats which spontaneously develop hypertension when they reach a weight of approximately 150 g, it was found that these animals also develop an erythrocytosis. A significant increase in red cell count was observed in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats (8-11 × 106 RBC/mm3) when compared with normotensive rats (6-7 × 106 RBC/mm3) of the same strain. This increase in red cell count paralleled the increase in body weight and the rise in blood pressure. Since the plasma volume, as measured with labeled albumin was normal, there was an absolute increase in red cells. The hematocrit and hemoglobin content of the blood measured in SH rats were only slightly greater than those found in normotensive rats. However, the mean cell volume (MCV) of the red cells in the SH rats was 45-47 μ3 as compared with 51-53 μ3 in normotensive rats. A fourfold increase in 24 hr 59Fe incorporation into the red cells was found in the SH rats when compared with normotensive controls. The bone marrow of the SH rats showed erythroid hyperplasia. When the SH rats were treated with α-methyldopa (Aldomet 200 mg/kg daily, i.p.) the red cell count fell in parallel with the drop in blood pressure. No change in red cell count or blood pressure was observed in normotensive rats treated in the same manner. The erythropoietin titer was high in SH rats, and was undetectable in normotensive rats. These observations suggest a direct relationship between the hypertension and the erythrocytosis mediated by erythropoietin; both are genetically controlled. PMID:5011107

  12. Visualization of multiple opioid-receptor types in rat striatum after specific mesencephalic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, M.; Santoro, C.; Paredes, W.; Gardner, E.L.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-09-01

    In order to gain insight into a possible modulatory role for ..mu.., delta, and kappa opioid receptors of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, the authors investigated the topographical organization of the receptors with respect to pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Dopaminergic terminals projecting from the substantia nigra to the corpus striatum were destroyed by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the susbstantia nigra. Quantitative receptor assays using highly specific radioligands were used to measure the density of striatal ..mu.., delta, and kappa receptors before and after denervation. Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical pattern of receptors on lesioned and nonlesioned sides of the brain under the light microscope. Loss of ..mu.. receptors in striatal patches was striking in the ventro-lateral areas of the striatum, whereas the most notable loss of delta receptors was found in the central striatum. Other brain areas did not differ significantly in ..mu.. receptor density between the lesioned and nonlesioned sides, as determined by autoradiography. These findings suggest that a high percentage of ..mu.. and delta receptors in the striatum are located on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals and support the concept of a modulatory role for ..mu.. and delta opioid peptides in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway.

  13. Acute stress regulates nociception and inflammatory response induced by bee venom in rats: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; Li, Feng-Peng; Li, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Bao-Jun; Qu, Fang; Wen, Wei-Wei; Wang, Yang; Lin, Qing

    2013-09-01

    Restraint stress modulates pain and inflammation. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of acute restraint stress on inflammatory pain induced by subcutaneous injection of bee venom (BV). First, we investigated the effect of 1 h restraint on the spontaneous paw-flinching reflex (SPFR), decrease in paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) and increase in paw volume (PV) of the injected paw induced by BV. SPFR was measured immediately after BV injection, and PWMT and PV were measured 2 h before BV and 2-8 h after BV. The results showed that acute restraint inhibited significantly the SPFR but failed to affect mechanical hyperalgesia. In contrast, stress enhanced significantly inflammatory swelling of the injected paw. In a second series of experiments, the effects of pretreatment with capsaicin locally applied to the sciatic nerve, systemic 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), and systemic naloxone were examined on the antinociception and proinflammation produced by acute restraint stress. Local capsaicin pretreatment inhibited BV-induced nociception and inflammatory edema, and had additive effects with stress on nociception but reduced stress enhancement of edema. Systemic 6-OHDA treatment attenuated the proinflammatory effect of stress, but did not affect the antinociceptive effect. Systemic naloxone pretreatment eliminated the antinociceptive effect of stress, but did not affect proinflammation. Taken together, our data indicate that acute restraint stress contributes to antinociception via activating an endogenous opioid system, while sympathetic postganglionic fibers may contribute to enhanced inflammation in the BV pain model.

  14. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  15. URINARY CALCULI IN GERMFREE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Bengt E.; Norman, Arne

    1962-01-01

    In a colony of germfree rats 50 per cent of the males had urinary calculi composed of calcium citrate and calcium oxalate. Genetically closely related conventional animals on the same sterilized diet did not present a single case of stone formation. The tendency to calculus formation disappeared when germfree animals were contaminated with the intestinal flora from conventional rats. The calculus formation can readily be explained by the high calcium, high citrate, and high pH of the urine. This pattern was changed to that of conventional rats when the germfree rats were infected with intestinal microorganisms. PMID:13903130

  16. Interaction of Xylamine with peripheral sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, R.W.; Waggaman, L.A.; Cho, A.K.

    1985-09-30

    Xylamine (XYL) administered to intact rats caused a 70-80% reduction in norepinephrine (NE) uptake by the vas deferens but had little or no effect on NE content in that tissue. The vas deferens accumulates /sup 3/H-XYL in vitro by a desmethylimipramine (DMI)-sensitive mechanism. Vasa deferentia from 6-hydroxydopamine (60HDA) pretreated animals exhibited a 80% reduction in both NE content and XYL uptake activity. These results indicate that XYL is taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals and can reduce NE uptake activity without depleting terminals of neurotransmitter. 9 references, 4 tables.

  17. Laughing rats are optimistic.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Pluta, Helena; Popik, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Emotions can bias human decisions- for example depressed or anxious people tend to make pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Several studies have reported that affect contingent judgement biases can also be produced in animals. The animals, however, cannot self-report; therefore, the valence of their emotions, to date, could only be assumed. Here we present the results of an experiment where the affect-contingent judgement bias has been produced by objectively measured positive emotions. We trained rats in operant Skinner boxes to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a food reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment by electric foot shock. After attaining a stable level of discrimination performance, the animals were subjected to either handling or playful, experimenter-administered manual stimulation - tickling. This procedure has been confirmed to induce a positive affective state in rats, and the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (rat laughter) emitted by animals in response to tickling have been postulated to index positive emotions akin to human joy. During the tickling and handling sessions, the numbers of emitted high-frequency 50-kHz calls were scored. Immediately after tickling or handling, the animals were tested for their responses to a tone of intermediate frequency, and the pattern of their responses to this ambiguous cue was taken as an indicator of the animals' optimism. Our findings indicate that tickling induced positive emotions which are directly indexed in rats by laughter, can make animals more optimistic. We demonstrate for the first time a link between the directly measured positive affective state and decision making under uncertainty in an animal model. We also introduce innovative tandem-approach for studying emotional-cognitive interplay in animals, which may be of great value for understanding the emotional-cognitive changes

  18. Prospective cognition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to develop animal models of memory are critical for understanding the neural substrate of memory. Memory is essential for daily life and enables information to be stored and retrieved after seconds to years. The ability to remember episodes from the past is thought to be related to the ability to plan for the future. Here we focus on a particular aspect of prospective cognition, namely the ability to remember to take action when a future scenario occurs. This review focuses on a recently developed method to evaluate prospective memory in the rat. Available evidence suggests that rats remember to take action in the future, but little is known about the temporal specificity of such memories or about the flexibility and limitations of prospective memories. Recent studies that suggest that rats remember a specific past episode are reviewed to underscore potential approaches that may be used to explore the range and limits of prospective cognition. The review highlights some directions to explore, including the temporal specificity of prospective cognition, the range of flexibility or creativity within prospective cognition, and the constraints imposed by multiple motivational systems. PMID:23180886

  19. [Cereal grain preference of rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, P Y

    1990-07-01

    Cereal grains are usually used as the main material for preparing rodenticide baits. However, the preferences for different grains varies according to species and habitats of rats, and locations. A formula accepted at one location may not be suitable in other places, where rats are accustomed to different types of food. It is therefore important to understand the feeding habits of local rat species before implementing a control program. Seven kinds of grains, including hulled rice, corn, barley, wheat, sorghum, pranuts, and sweet potatoes were tested to study the preferences of rats in the laboratory. The results revealed that Bandicota nemorivaga, Rattus losea and R. norvegicus prefer hulled rice; Apodemus agrarius and Mus musculus prefer peanuts, and R. rattus prefers corn. The influence of quality and nutrient contents of baits on the consumption of the rats is also discussed. PMID:2402029

  20. [Cereal grain preference of rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, P Y

    1990-07-01

    Cereal grains are usually used as the main material for preparing rodenticide baits. However, the preferences for different grains varies according to species and habitats of rats, and locations. A formula accepted at one location may not be suitable in other places, where rats are accustomed to different types of food. It is therefore important to understand the feeding habits of local rat species before implementing a control program. Seven kinds of grains, including hulled rice, corn, barley, wheat, sorghum, pranuts, and sweet potatoes were tested to study the preferences of rats in the laboratory. The results revealed that Bandicota nemorivaga, Rattus losea and R. norvegicus prefer hulled rice; Apodemus agrarius and Mus musculus prefer peanuts, and R. rattus prefers corn. The influence of quality and nutrient contents of baits on the consumption of the rats is also discussed.

  1. Nephrotoxicity of ifosfamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Springate, J E; Van Liew, J B

    1995-01-01

    Renal proximal tubule cell injury is an important side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide in humans. We investigated the effect of this medication on kidney function in rats. Animals received either 40 or 80 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide intraperitoneally daily for 3 days every 3 weeks for a total of four treatment courses. Ifosfamide-treated rats had significantly lower body weight and hematocrit than sterile water-treated control rats. Animals receiving 40 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide developed isolated phosphaturia after their fourth and final treatment course. Rats receiving 80 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide had low-grade glucosuria, phosphaturia and proteinuria throughout the study. Urine flow rate, creatinine clearance, urinary sodium and potassium excretion and kidney glutathione and malondialdehyde content were not affected by ifosfamide at either dose. These findings indicate that ifosfamide produces abnormalities in rat renal function resembling subclinical Fanconi syndrome.

  2. War on Rats, 1972 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Dept. of Environmental Services, Washington, DC.

    The City of Washington, D.C., with federal funding, declared war on one of the city's most pressing problems--rats. The War on Rats Program, in conjunction with Operation Clean Sweep, made a city-wide survey of rat infestations and recorded the areas of heavy rat infestation. After the problem areas had been identified, community organizations…

  3. Radiation induced heart disease in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Trott, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive Wistar rats were given single doses of X rays to their heart. Irradiation decreased the blood pressure before any myocardial radiation damage was apparent. Male rats, which were more hypertensive than female rats, had a shorter survival time after local heart irradiation than female rats. Antihypertensive treatment with hydralazine did not increase the survival time. It is considered that myocardial hypertrophy is the cause of the increased susceptibility of spontaneously hypertensive rats to local heart irradiation.

  4. Habituation of the responsiveness of mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine transmission to taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The presentation of novel, remarkable, and unpredictable tastes increases dopamine (DA) transmission in different DA terminal areas such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as estimated by in vivo microdialysis studies in rats. This effect undergoes adaptive regulation, as there is a decrease in DA responsiveness after a single pre-exposure to the same taste. This phenomenon termed habituation has been described as peculiar to NAc shell but not to NAc core and mPFC DA transmission. On this basis, it has been proposed that mPFC DA codes for generic motivational stimulus value and, together with the NAc core DA, is more consistent with a role in the expression of motivation. Conversely, NAc shell DA is specifically activated by unfamiliar or novel taste stimuli and rewards, and might serve to associate the sensory properties of the rewarding stimulus with its biological effect (Bassareo etal., 2002; Di Chiara etal., 2004). Notably, habituation of the DA response to intraoral sweet or bitter tastes is not associated with a reduction in hedonic or aversive taste reactions, thus indicating that habituation is unrelated to satiety-induced hedonic devaluation and that it is not influenced by DA alteration or depletion. This mini-review describes specific circumstances of disruption of the habituation of NAc shell DA responsiveness (De Luca etal., 2011; Bimpisidis etal., 2013). In particular, we observed an abolishment of NAc shell DA habituation to chocolate (sweet taste) by morphine sensitization and mPFC 6-hydroxy-dopamine hydrochloride (6-OHDA) lesion. Moreover, morphine sensitization was associated with the appearance of the habituation in the mPFC, and with an increased and delayed response of NAc core DA to taste in naive rats, but not in pre-exposed animals. The results here described shed light on the mechanism of the habituation phenomenon of mesolimbic and mesocortical DA transmission, and its putative role as a

  5. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  6. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  7. Stress-reactive rats (high-avoidance female rats) have a shorter lifespan than stress-nonreactive rats (low-avoidance female rats)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Marumo, Hideki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Although Hatano high-avoidance and low-avoidance rats (HAA and LAA, respectively) have been selectively bred for good versus poor avoidance learning, HAA rats are known to be more reactive to stress than LAA rats. In this study, HAA and LAA female rats were compared during reproductive aging by observing estrous cycles from 8 to 11 months of age. Furthermore, these rats were allowed to live out their natural lifespans, that is, until 24 months of age, in order to compare their survival and to clarify the relationship between reproductive aging and tumor development. At eight months of age, 2 of 35 HAA rats and 20 of 35 LAA rats had abnormal estrous cycles. The median lifespan of the HAA rats (673 days) was shorter than that of the LAA rats (733 days). The incidence of pituitary neoplasia was higher in the HAA rats than in the LAA rats. These results suggest that HAA female rats (i.e., stress-reactive rats) have a shorter lifespan than LAA female rats (i.e., stress-nonreactive rats) and develop pituitary neoplasia, which was one of the causal factors in their accelerated mortality. However, the onset of an age-matched abnormal cycle did not correspond with their lifespan. PMID:27182111

  8. Beta-endorphin in genetically hypoprolactinemic rat: IPL nude rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, H.; Sabbagh, I.; Abou-Samra, A.B.; Bertrand, J.

    1986-01-20

    Beta-endorphin has been reported to regulate not only stress- and suckling-induced but also basal prolactin secretion. In the aim to better evaluate the endogenous beta-endorphin-prolactin interrelation, the authors measured beta-endorphin levels in a new rat strain, genetically hypoprolactinemic and characterized by a total lack of lactation: IPL nude rat. Beta-endorphin was measured using a specific anti-h-..beta.. endorphin in plasma and extracts of anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary, hypothalamus and brain. Pituitary extracts were also chromatographed on Sephadex G50 column. Results obtained showed that in IPL nude females on diestrus and males, the beta-endorphin contents of the neurointermediate lobe was significantly lower than in normal rats, while the values found in the other organs and plasma were similar. However, elution pattern of the anterior pituitary extracts from male rats showed greater immunoactivity eluting as I/sup 125/ h-beta-endorphin than in normal rat; this was not the case for the female rat. These results are consistent with a differential regulation of beta-endorphin levels of anterior and neurointermediate lobe by catecholamines. Moreover they suggest that PRL secretion was more related to neurointermediate beta-endorphin. 40 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  10. Autoshaping in micrencephalic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.H.; Oakley, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    An autoshaping procedure in which the illumination of a lever was predictive of food reinforcement was used to compare learning in rats with micrencephaly induced by irradiation on the 16th day of gestation and in sham-irradiated controls. Both groups showed equivalent levels of lever-directed activity, and the micrencephalic animals differentiated as well as the control animals between the predictive lever and a nonpredictive lever. The micrencephalic animals were able to redistribute their lever-directed activity when the significance of the levers was reversed and did so more readily than the control animals. Results support the claim that association learning survives either traumatic or developmental neocortical damage and have implications for remedial procedures following both head injury and developmental cerebral pathology in humans.

  11. Do infant rats cry?

    PubMed

    Blumberg, M S; Sokoloff, G

    2001-01-01

    In the current revival of interest in the emotional and mental lives of animals, many investigators have focused attention on mammalian infants that emit distress vocalizations when separated from the home environment. Perhaps the most intensively studied distress vocalization is the ultrasonic vocalization of infant rats. Since its discovery, this vocalization has been interpreted both as a communicatory signal for the elicitation of maternal retrieval and as the manifestation of emotional distress. In contrast, the authors examined the cardiovascular causes and consequences of the vocalization, and on the basis of this work, they hypothesized that the vocalization is the acoustic by-product of the abdominal compression reaction (ACR), a maneuver that results in increased venous return to the heart. Therefore, the vocalization may be analogous to a sneeze, serving a physiological function while incidentally producing sound. PMID:11212634

  12. Signal detection in the rat.

    PubMed

    HACK, M H

    1963-02-22

    An auditory detection experiment was performed with rats as subjects, and the data were analyzed with a signal detection model. Rats were run at fixed sound pressure levels, and their responses were partitioned so that operating characteristics could be constructed. Measures of detectability, (d(e))((1/2)), were calculated from the operating characteristics, and show that (d(e))((1/2)) is a function of sound pressure levels, rising as these levels rise.

  13. Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats

    PubMed Central

    Stefanova, Natalia A; Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S; Vitovtov, Anton O; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi; Logvinov, Sergey V; Rudnitskaya, Ekaterina A; Korbolina, Elena E; Muraleva, Natalia A; Kolosova, Nataliya G

    2014-01-01

    Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats are an experimental model of accelerated aging that was established from Wistar stock via selection for susceptibility to cataractogenic effects of a galactose-rich diet and via subsequent inbreeding of highly susceptible rats. Currently, we have the 102nd generation of OXYS rats with spontaneously developing cataract and accelerated senescence syndrome, which means early development of a phenotype similar to human geriatric disorders, including accelerated brain aging. In recent years, our group found strong evidence that OXYS rats are a promising model for studies of the mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegenerative processes similar to those seen in Alzheimer disease (AD). The manifestation of behavioral alterations and learning and memory deficits develop since the fourth week of age, i.e., simultaneously with first signs of neurodegeneration detectable on magnetic resonance imaging and under a light microscope. In addition, impaired long-term potentiation has been demonstrated in OXYS rats by the age of 3 months. With age, neurodegenerative changes in the brain of OXYS rats become amplified. We have shown that this deterioration happens against the background of overproduction of amyloid precursor protein (AβPP), accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), and hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein in the hippocampus and cortex. The development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is also accompanied by increased accumulation of Aβ in the retina. These published data suggest that the OXYS strain may serve as a spontaneous rat model of AD-like pathology and could help to decipher the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24552807

  14. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Cecatto, Vanessa; Biazim, Samia Khalil; Ferreira, José Henrique Fermino; Danielli, Caroline; Genske, Rodrigo Daniel; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Franco, Marcello Fabiano de

    2015-12-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS

    PubMed Central

    LOTH, Eduardo Alexandre; CECATTO, Vanessa; BIAZIM, Samia Khalil; FERREIRA, José Henrique Fermino; DANIELLI, Caroline; GENSKE, Rodrigo Daniel; GANDRA, Rinaldo Ferreira; de FRANCO, Marcello Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring. PMID:27049707

  16. Ketamine induces dopamine-dependent depression of evoked hippocampal activity in the nucleus accumbens in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Mark J; Kessal, Karima; Garcia, Rene

    2005-01-12

    Noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists, such as ketamine, induce a transient schizophrenia-like state in healthy individuals and exacerbate psychosis in schizophrenic patients. In rodents, noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists induce a behavioral syndrome that represents an experimentally valid model of schizophrenia. Current experimental evidence has implicated the nucleus accumbens in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the psychomimetic actions of ketamine. In this study, we have demonstrated that acute systemic administration of ketamine, at a dose known to produce hyperlocomotion and stereotypy, depressed the amplitude of the monosynaptic component of fimbria-evoked field potentials recorded in the nucleus accumbens. A similar effect was observed using the more selective antagonist dizocilpine maleate, indicating the depression was NMDA receptor dependent. Paired-pulse facilitation was enhanced concomitantly with, and in proportion to, ketamine-induced depressed synaptic efficacy, indicative of a presynaptic mechanism of action. Notably, the depression of field potentials recorded in the nucleus accumbens was markedly reduced after a focal 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning procedure in the nucleus accumbens. More specifically, pretreatment with the D2/D4 antagonist haloperidol, but not the D1 antagonist SCH23390 blocked ketamine-induced depression of nucleus accumbens responses. Our findings provide supporting evidence for the contemporary theory of schizophrenia as aberrant excitatory neurotransmission at the level of the nucleus accumbens.

  17. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-03-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors.

  18. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  19. Does rat fetal DNA induce preeclampsia in pregnant rats?

    PubMed

    Konečná, B; Borbélyová, V; Celec, P; Vlková, B

    2015-02-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation is higher during preeclampsia. It is unclear whether it is the cause or the consequence of the disease. The aim of this study was to prove whether injected rat fetal DNA induces preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant Wistar rats. They received daily i.p. injections of water or rat fetal DNA (400 μg) from gestation day 14 to 18. Blood pressure, proteinuria, placental and fetal weight were measured at gestation day 19. Plasma DNase activity, proteinuria and creatinine clearance were assessed. There was no significant difference in any of the measured parameters. The results of this study do not confirm the hypothesis that fetal DNA might induce preeclampsia. This is in contrast to others using human fetal DNA in mice. Further studies should be focused on the effects of fetal DNA from the same species protected from DNase activity.

  20. Prospective memory in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. George; Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2011-01-01

    The content of prospective memory is comprised of representations of an action to perform in the future. When people form prospective memories, they temporarily put the memory representation in an inactive state while engaging in other activities, and then activate the representation in the future. Ultimately, successful activation of the memory representation yields an action at an appropriate, but temporally distant, time. A hallmark of prospective memory is that activation of the memory representation has a deleterious effect on current ongoing activity. Recent evidence suggests that scrub jays and non-human primates, but not other species, are capable of future planning. We hypothesized that prospective memory produces a selective deficit in performance at the time when rats access a memory representation but not when the memory representation is inactive. Rats were trained in a temporal bisection task (90 min/day). Immediately after the bisection task, half of the rats received an 8-g meal (meal group) and the other rats received no additional food (no-meal group). Sensitivity to time in the bisection task was reduced as the 90-min interval elapsed for the meal group but not for the no-meal group. This time-based prospective-memory effect was not based on response competition, an attentional limit, anticipatory contrast, or fatigue. Our results suggest that rats form prospective memories, which produces a negative side effect on ongoing activity. PMID:21922257

  1. Source memory in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Alford, Wesley T.; Zhou, Wenyi; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Source memory is a representation of the origin (source) of information. When source information is bound together, it makes a memory episodic, allowing us to differentiate one event from another [1, 2]. Here we asked if rats remember the source of encoded information. Rats foraged for distinctive flavors of food that replenished (or failed to replenish) at its recently encountered location according to a source-information rule. To predict replenishment, rats needed to remember where they had encountered a preferred food type (chocolate) with self-generated (walking along a runway encountering chocolate) or experimenter-generated (placement of the rat at the chocolate site by an experimenter) cues. Three lines of evidence implicate the presence of source memory. First, rats selectively adjusted revisits to the chocolate location based on source information, under conditions in which familiarity of events could not produce successful performance. Second, source memory was dissociated from location memory by different decay rates. Third, temporary inactivation of the CA3 region of the hippocampus with lidocaine selectively eliminated source memory, suggesting that source memory is dependent upon an intact hippocampus. Development of an animal model of source memory may be valuable to probe the biological underpinnings of memory disorders marked by impairments in source memory. PMID:23394830

  2. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  3. Using rats for vision research.

    PubMed

    Reinagel, P

    2015-06-18

    A wide variety of species are used for the study of visual neuroscience. This is beneficial because fundamental mechanisms and theoretical principles of vision are likely to be highly conserved, while different species exhibit different visual capacities and present different technical advantages for experiments. Eight years ago my laboratory adopted the hooded rat as our primary preparation for vision research. To some this may be surprising, as nocturnal rodents have often been presumed to have poor vision and weak visual behavior. This commentary will provide my personal perspective on how I came to work with rats; discuss an example research project for which rats have been advantageous; and comment on the opportunities and challenges of the preparation.

  4. Rats are sensitive to ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Fast, Cynthia D; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated response decisions made under conditions of incomplete information in rats. In Experiment 1, rats were trained on either a positive patterning (PP; A-, B-, AB+) or a negative patterning (NP; A+, B+, AB-) instrumental lever-press discrimination. Subjects that had learned an NP discrimination responded less to Cue A when Cue B was covered at test. The cover did not, however, affect test responses to Cue A in the PP condition. In Experiment 2, rats received concurrent training on both PP and NP discriminations. After concurrent training, responses to Cue A were different with B covered versus uncovered for both NP and PP discriminations. We discuss possible accounts for why exposure to a nonlinearly soluble discrimination (NP) may have affected sensitivity to cue ambiguity produced by the cover. These results have interesting implications for representational processes engaged in problem solving.

  5. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  6. Hematopoiesis in antiorthostatic, hypokinesic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinesia showed the following effects which are comparable to those seen in man during or after space flight: weight loss, reduced food and water consumption, transient increases in peripheral hematocrit and RBC count, decreasing MCV and reduced reticulocyte count. In addition, the hemoglobin P50 was shifted to the right. A significant shortening of RBC t1/2 was only seen after suspension. Changes in leukocyte and platelet numbers in suspended rats were also comparable to those in man during space flight, but leukocyte PHA sensitivity in rats showed no consistent alteration. The results demonstrate that this model reproduces many of the hematological effects of space flight and has potential as a tool in understanding the hematopoietic response to zero gravity.

  7. Teratology studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Mariline; Allais, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the rodent species of choice for the regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics, such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. Many decades of experience and extensive data have accumulated for both general and developmental toxicology investigations in this species. The high fertility and large litter size of the rat are advantages for teratogenicity testing. The study designs are well defined in the regulatory guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world. Teratology studies address maternal- and embryo-toxicity following exposure during the period of organogenesis. This chapter describes the design and conduct of a teratology study in the rat in compliance with the regulatory guidelines. The procedures for the handling and housing of the pregnant animals, the caesarean examinations and the sampling of fetuses for morphological examinations are described. The utility and design of preliminary studies and the inclusion of satellite animals in the main study for toxicokinetic sampling are discussed.

  8. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats. PMID:27370361

  9. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route.

  10. Slc:Wistar outbred rats show close genetic similarity with F344 inbred rats.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Satoshi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Although Slc:Wistar rats are used widely in biomedical research as outbred rats, close similarities in growth curves, survival rates, and immunological and biochemical phenotypes have been reported between Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. We reported previously that nine genetic variations that were fixed in Slc:Wistar rats had identical genotypes in F344 rats. Here, we examined the genetic characteristics of Slc:Wistar rats using 27 simple-sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers and compared them with other Wistar stocks available in Japan and with some F344 strains. Among 27 SSLP loci, 23 (85%) were fixed in the Slc:Wistar rats, which was the highest among the other Wistar stocks. The 23 fixed loci shared identical genotypes with corresponding loci in F344 rats. Further, the predominant allele types in the unfixed loci had allele frequencies as high as 80%, and these alleles were identical in the F344 rats. When the nine genetic variations reported previously are added, a total of 32 (89%) out of the 36 loci examined were fixed and identical in the Slc:Wistar and F344 rat genomes. These findings indicate the low genetic variation in Slc:Wistar rats and the high genetic similarity between the Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. This study demonstrates the importance of characterizing outbred rats and the need to pay ample attention to the genetic characteristics the Slc:Wistar rats for their proper use.

  11. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long-Evans Rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola M A; Fox, James G

    2015-12-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  12. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long–Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola MA; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  13. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan S W; Graff, Matthew M; Bresee, Chris S; Man, Yan B; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-08-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  14. Isolating Lysosomes from Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a fraction enriched in lysosomes from rat liver. The lysosomes are rapidly isolated using density-gradient centrifugation with gradient media that retain the osmolarity of the lysosomes such that they are functional and can be used in in vitro assays.

  15. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan S. W.; Graff, Matthew M.; Bresee, Chris S.; Man, Yan B.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  16. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan S W; Graff, Matthew M; Bresee, Chris S; Man, Yan B; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-08-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents.

  17. Transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hully, J. R.; Su, Y.; Lohse, J. K.; Griep, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Haas, M. J.; Dragan, Y.; Peterson, J.; Neveu, M.; Pitot, H. C.

    1994-01-01

    Although transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis has been accomplished in the mouse with a number of genetic constructs targeting the oncogene to expression primarily in the liver, no example of this process has yet been developed in the rat. Because our understanding of the multistage nature of hepatocarcinogenesis is most advanced in the rat, we have developed a strain of transgenic rats carrying the promoter-enhancer sequences of the mouse albumin gene linked 5' to the simian virus-40 T antigen gene. A line of transgenic rats bearing this transgene has been developed from a single founder female. Five to six copies of the transgene, possibly in tandem, occur within the genome of the transgenic animals, which are maintained by heterozygous matings. Livers of transgenic animals are histologically normal after weaning; at 2 months of age, small foci of vacuolated cells appear in this organ. By 4 months of age, all animals exhibit focal lesions and nodules consisting primarily of small basophilic cells, many of which exhibit considerable cytoplasmic vacuolization. Mating of animals each bearing the transgene results in rats with a demyelinating condition that develops acutely in pregnant females and more chronically in males. Ultrastructural studies of these cells indicate that the vacuoles contain substantial amounts of glycogen, with the cells resembling hepatoblasts. Malignant neoplasms with both a glandular and a hepatoblastoma/hepatocellular carcinoma pattern arise from the nodules. Enzyme and immunohistochemical studies of all lesions reveal many similarities in gene expression to comparable lesions in rats subjected to chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, with certain exceptions. The placental form of glutathione-S-transferase is absent from all lesions in the transgenic animal, as is the expression of connexin 32. A significant number of lesions express serum albumin, and many, but not all, exhibit the T antigen. Lesions expressing the T antigen also contain

  18. Comparison of the pharmacological actions of desmethylclomipramine and clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Maj, J; Stala, L; Górka, Z; Adamus, A

    1982-01-01

    This research compares the effects, in mice and rats, of desmethylclomipramine (DCLOM) and clomipramine (CLOM). DCLOM antagonized the hypothermia induced in mice by reserpine or apomorphine to a much greater extent than CLOM. Reserpine ptosis in mice was depressed by DCLOM only. Similarly, only DCLOM was effective in the behavioral despair test in rats. DCLOM increased the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) pressor effect in pithed rats, but to a lesser extent than CLOM by several factors. Only DCLOM increased the noradrenaline (NA) pressor effect. The depletion of NA induced by 6-hydroxydopamine was depressed by DCLOM only. The 5-HT depletion induced by p-chloromethamphetamine was antagonized only by CLOM. The results obtained show that the noradrenergic mechanism is of prime importance in the action of DCLOM and of much more importance than in the action of CLOM.

  19. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  20. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise.

    PubMed

    Muths, E; Reichman, O J

    1996-08-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly "stronger" bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  1. Generalized absence epilepsy and catalepsy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, G D; Petrova, E V; Coenen, A M; Van Luijtelaar, E L

    1996-10-01

    Adult WAG/Rij rats are considered adequate genetic models for human generalized absence epilepsy. Rats of this strain of 8, 12, and 18 weeks old and age-matched control Wistar rats were exposed to sound stimulation. After offset of stimulation, all WAG/Rij rats showed cataleptic or even cataplexic reactions, which could persist for up to 20 min. Age effects could be demonstrated. None of the Wistar rats showed cataleptic reactions. Electroencephalographic studies in WAG/Rij rats of 21 weeks showed that spike-wave discharges were abundantly present in the background electroencephalogram prior to sound stimulation. Age-matched Wistar rats had almost no spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges in WAG/Rij rats disappeared during sound stimulation and were then increased compared to the prestimulation and stimulation periods. The electroencephalogram during the cataleptic state was also characterized by the presence of large amplitude 2 Hz waves, interspersed with spike-wave discharges. The data suggest that the cataleptic state can be elicited in genetically epilepsy-prone rats. The youngest WAG/Rij rats showed no spike-wave discharges during the cataleptic state. In all, the data suggest that epilepsy-prone animals are sensitive for catalepsy at an age at which the EEG signs of generalized absence epilepsy are not yet manifest. PMID:8884948

  2. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  3. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  4. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  5. Differential Susceptibility of SD and CD Rats to a Novel Rat Theilovirus

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Michael T; Riley, Lela K; Livingston, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies to rat theilovirus (RTV) have been detected in rats for many years because of their serologic crossreactivity with strains of Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) of mice. Little information exists regarding this pathogen, yet it is among the most common viruses detected in serologic surveys of rats used in research. In the study reported here, a novel isolate of RTV, designated RTV1, was cultured from the feces of infected rats. The RTV1 genome contained 8094 nucleotides and had approximately 95% identity with another rat theilovirus, NSG910, and 73% identity with TMEV strains. In addition, the genome size of RTV1 was similar to those of TMEV strains but larger than that reported for NSG910. Oral inoculation of Sprague–Dawley (SD) and CD male rats (n = 10 each group) with RTV1 revealed that SD rats were more susceptible than CD rats to RTV1 infection. At 14 d postinoculation, 100% of SD rats shed virus in the feces, and 70% were positive for RTV serum antibodies. By 56 d postinoculation 30% of SD rats continued to have detectable virus in the feces, and 90% had seroconverted. In contrast, in inoculated CD rats RTV was detected only in the feces at 14 d postinoculation, at which time 40% of CD rats were fecal positive. By 56 d postinoculation only 20% of CD rats had detectable RTV serum antibodies. Our data provide additional sequence information regarding a rat-specific Cardiovirus and indicate that SD rats are more susceptible than CD rats to RTV1 infection. PMID:19004372

  6. Genome Editing in Rats Using TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Ménoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thinard, Reynald; Savignard, Chloé; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important animal model to understand gene function and model human diseases. Since recent years, the development of gene-specific nucleases has become important for generating new rat models of human diseases, to analyze the role of genes and to generate human antibodies. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases efficiently create gene-specific knockout rats and lead to the possibility of gene targeting by homology-directed recombination (HDR) and generating knock-in rats. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout and knock-in rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  7. Histomorphometric analysis of rat skeleton following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Doty, S. B.; Maese, A. C.; Walsh, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in orbit for 7 days aboard the space shuttle. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae of flight rats and compared with data derived from ground-based control rats. Trabecular bone mass was not altered during the 1st wk of weightlessness. Strong trends were observed in flight rats for decreased periosteal bone formation in the tibial diaphysis, reduced osteoblast size in the proximal tibia, and decreased osteoblast surface and number in the lumbar vertebra. For the most part, histological indexes of bone resorption were normal in flight rats. The results indicate that 7 days of weightlessness are not of sufficient duration to induce histologically detectable loss of trabecular bone in rats. However, cortical and trabecular bone formation appear to be diminished during the 1st wk of spaceflight.

  8. An enteric nervous system progenitor cell implant promotes a behavioral and neurochemical improvement in rats with a 6-OHDA-induced lesion.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cid, Carmen; García-López, Julieta; García, Esperanza; Ibarra, Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of mammals is derived from neural crest (NC) cells during embryogenesis and at the beginning of postnatal life. However, neural progenitor cells from the ENS (or ENSPC) are also found in the adult intestine and can be used for neuronal regeneration in diseases that lead to a loss of cell population, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which there is a decrease of dopaminergic neurons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of ENSPC to restore damaged nervous tissue and to show that they are functional for a behavioral and neurochemical recovery. We found that animals with ENSPC implants exhibited a motor recovery of 35% vs. the lesion group. In addition, DA levels were partially restored in 34%, while Homovanillic acid (HVA) levels remained at 21% vs. the group with a 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion, suggesting that ENSPC represent a possible alternative in the study of cell transplants and the preservation of functional dopaminergic neurons in PD.

  9. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  10. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs. PMID:27436999

  11. Toxicity and repellency to rats of actidione

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Traub, R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Newman, D.

    1950-01-01

    The antibiotic actidione was found to be highly repellent to laboratory rats and to significantly reduce gnawing attacks upon treated paperboards. Rats refused to accept food or water containing this material even under conditions of acute starvation and died of starvation and thirst,rather than accept water containing l.0 mg. of actidione per liter. The compound is highly toxic to .rats with the minimum .lethal dose by oral administration being approximately l.0 mg./Kg body weight. Paperboard treated with the compound resisted gnawing attacks by specially trained and motivated rats for periods of two hundred hours, although similar .untreated boards were pierced within thirty-to sixty minutes.

  12. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats. PMID:2401350

  13. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs. PMID:27436999

  14. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats.

  15. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.T.; Cao, L.; Nelson, J.L.; Foley-Nelson, T.; Fischer, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  16. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Mee Ree

    2016-08-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD.

  17. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Mee Ree

    2016-08-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  18. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung

    2016-01-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD. PMID:27574484

  19. Modulation of rat behaviour by using a rat-like robot.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Shinichi; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Iida, Naritoshi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we study the response of a rat to a rat-like robot capable of generating different types of behaviour (stressful, friendly, neutral). Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a rat-like robot called WR-4 is put together with live rats. The activity level of each rat subject is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing (rising up on its hind limbs) and body grooming (body cuddling and head curling) actions, whereas the degree of preference of that is indicated by the robot-rat distance and the frequency of contacting WR-4. The moving speed and behaviour of WR-4 are controlled in real-time based on the feedback from rat motion. The activity level and degree of preference of rats for each experimental condition are analysed and compared to understand the influence of robot behaviour. The results of this study show that the activity level and degree of preference of the rat decrease when exposed to a stressful robot, and increase when the robot exhibit friendly behaviour, suggesting that a rat-like robot can modulate rat behaviour in a controllable, predictable way.

  20. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  1. PBPK MODELING OF DELTAMETHRIN IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin is cleared nearly twice as rapidly in human liver microsomes compared to rat liver microsomes. A species difference such as this could influence the toxic potency of deltamethrin between rats and humans. PBPK modeling is a tool that can be ut...

  2. Eating pattern of morphine dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Yanaura, S; Suzuki, T

    1979-10-01

    To analyze the drug ingestion patterns of rats in the course of dependence development while on the drug-admixed food (DAF) method, an automatic food intake measuring apparatus was developed. Rats were put on morphine-admixed food, and the food ingestion patterns were recorded with the apparatus in the course of dependence development, during drug withdrawal and at the time of challenge with levallorphan. The naive rats ate the regular diet intermittently at night, and the eating time of morphine-treated rats was longer than that of naive rats. The treated rats also exhibited a frequent eating behavior after 4--5 days on the morphine treatment. During morphine withdrawal, the animal gradually ate the regular diet at about 1-hour intervals, even after evolvement of abstinence signs. When the morphine-dependent rats were given levallorphan, they neither ate nor approached to the food for the first 2--3 hours, but after this time, showed abrupt increases in these activities. Thus, the drug intake pattern of rats in the course of morphine dependence development suggests a correlation between the stage of development of physical dependence and the stage when the animals frequently eat the drug-admixed food.

  3. Same-Different Categorization in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Castro, Leyre; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Same-different categorization is a fundamental feat of human cognition. Although birds and nonhuman primates readily learn same-different discriminations and successfully transfer them to novel stimuli, no such demonstration exists for rats. Using a spatial discrimination learning task, we show that rats can both learn to discriminate arrays of…

  4. Hypoglycaemic activity of Ocimum gratissimum in rats.

    PubMed

    Aguiyi, J C; Obi, C I; Gang, S S; Igweh, A C

    2000-08-01

    The hypoglycaemic effect of the methanolic extract of Ocimum gratissimum leaves was evaluated in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Intraperitoneal injection of the extract (400 mg/kg) significantly reduced plasma levels both in normal and diabetic rats by 56 and 68%, respectively. PMID:10925022

  5. Spatial Memory in Rats after 25 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Babb, Stephanie J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the time course of spatial-memory decay in rats using an eight-arm radial maze. It is well established that performance remains high with retention intervals as long as 4 h, but declines to chance with a 24-h retention interval (Beatty, W. W., & Shavalia, D. A. (1980b). Spatial memory in rats: time course of working memory and…

  6. Stimulus Over-Selectivity in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Evelyn; Reed, Phil

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored whether a similar phenomenon to stimulus over-selectivity occurred in rats, in the hope of establishing a non-human model for the autism. Rats were serially presented with two-15 seconds, two-element compound stimuli prior to the delivery of food, in an appetitive classical conditioning procedure. Each compound stimulus…

  7. Effects of mafoprazine, a phenylpiperazine derivative, on the central dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, M; Nakagawa, H; Maeda, K; Kinoshita, K; Ishida, R

    1989-07-01

    The effects of mafoprazine, a new phenylpiperazine derivative, on the central dopaminergic system were studied. Mafoprazine, like chlorpromazine and haloperidol, reduced the apomorphine-induced cage-climbing behavior in mice, emesis in dogs and stereotyped behavior in monkeys; methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and group toxicity in mice; and agitation in rats. Mafoprazine inhibited the unilateral circling behavior induced by methamphetamine and apomorphine in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions in the unilateral nigrostriatal neuronal tract. The potency of mafoprazine in these experiments was almost equal to that of chlorpromazine and about one-tenth that of haloperidol. The cataleptogenic activity of mafoprazine was lower than those of chlorpromazine and haloperidol. Mafoprazine potentiated clonidine-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that mafoprazine has a relatively selective postsynaptic dopamine D2-receptor blocking action in the nucleus accumbens compared with chlorpromazine and haloperidol and suggest that mafoprazine also has alpha 2-adrenoceptor-stimulating actions.

  8. Theories of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Mason, S T; Iversen, S D

    1979-07-01

    Selective destruction of the noradrenaline systems in the rat brain using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine has been found to cause resistance to extinction in a number of behavioural situations. Several theories concerning the behavioural mechanism altered by the lesion, and hence about the role of noradrenaline in normal brain functioning, are proposed and evaluated. Theories suggesting a role for noradrenaline in activity, perseveration, internal inhibition, frustrative non-reward, motivation, or secondary reinforcement, fail to explain all the available evidence and direct tests of each theory fails to support its predictions. A model which suggests that noreadrenaline is involved in attentional behaviour, specifically in filtering out or learning to ignore irrelevant environmental stimuli, is successful in explaining all available data and direct tests of the lesioned rats' attentional capacity serve to confirm many of the predictions of an attentional theory of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

  9. Is fructose sweeter than glucose for rats?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, I

    1996-11-01

    Because it is generally thought that the intensity of the taste of fructose is greater than that of glucose for rats, it seemed surprising when sham-fed rats drank substantially less of a mixture of 6% fructose plus saccharin than of a mixture of 6% glucose plus saccharin. At least 3 different factors contribute to this effect. First, the taste of fructose is less attractive to rats than is the taste of glucose; sham-fed rats strongly preferred glucose over fructose (no saccharin was used in this experiment). The second factor is experience. Rats having substantial previous experience with glucose, but not with fructose, consistently preferred glucose over fructose. Conversely, rats having substantial previous experience with fructose, but not with glucose, initially showed no consistent preference but subsequently tended to prefer glucose. The third factor is an interaction between saccharin and the type of sugar. Rats given only one solution at a time drink approximately as much fructose as glucose when the solutions contain no saccharin. The addition of 0.25% saccharin to 6% glucose stimulated intake, whereas the addition of the same amount of saccharin to 6% fructose did not stimulate intake. As a result, rats ingested substantially more of a mixture of 0.25% saccharin plus 6% glucose than they did of a comparable mixture of saccharin and fructose, even though rats ingest similar amounts of fructose and glucose without saccharin in single-bottle tests. Because the differential effect of saccharin on intake appeared within 2 h in naive rats, and did not greatly change over a 3-day period, it is probably not attributable to conditioning. These results suggest that these sugars have qualitatively different tastes. PMID:8916185

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  11. Social exclusion intensifies anxiety-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunchan; Noh, Jihyun

    2015-05-01

    Social connection reduces the physiological reactivity to stressors, while social exclusion causes emotional distress. Stressful experiences in rats result in the facilitation of aversive memory and induction of anxiety. To determine the effect of social interaction, such as social connection, social exclusion and equality or inequality, on emotional change in adolescent distressed rats, the emotional alteration induced by restraint stress in individual rats following exposure to various social interaction circumstances was examined. Rats were assigned to one of the following groups: all freely moving rats, all rats restrained, rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats and freely moving rats with a restrained rat. No significant difference in fear-memory and sucrose consumption between all groups was found. Change in body weight significantly increased in freely moving rats with a restrained rat, suggesting that those rats seems to share the stressful experience of the restrained rat. Interestingly, examination of the anxiety-like behavior revealed only rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats to have a significant increase, suggesting that emotional distress intensifies in positions of social exclusion. These results demonstrate that unequally excluded social interaction circumstances could cause the amplification of distressed status and anxiety-related emotional alteration.

  12. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  13. [Nosema sp. in white rats].

    PubMed

    Grobov, O F; Karakuiumchiani, M K; Orlova-Sokol'skaia, I A

    1975-01-01

    In 14 days after the intraperitoneal infection of mice with 30% brain emulsion of white mice or of newly-born rats in the peritoneal liquid there were found spores of Nosema sp. 5.37 plus or minus 0.88 x 3.04 plus or minus 0.07 in size. The subsequent attempts to passage this organism on the mice by adminestering into them the suspension from the brain and internal organs of infected animals yielded ho results. The material for diagnosing on microsporidians of mammals is being discussed.

  14. Anxiolytic Treatment Impairs Helping Behavior in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami Bartal, Inbal; Shan, Haozhe; Molasky, Nora M R; Murray, Teresa M; Williams, Jasper Z; Decety, Jean; Mason, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research with humans, the biological mechanisms that motivate an individual to help others remain poorly understood. In order to investigate the roots of pro-sociality in mammals, we established the helping behavior test, a paradigm in which rats are faced with a conspecific trapped in a restrainer that can only be opened from the outside. Over the course of repeated test sessions, rats exposed to a trapped cagemate learn to open the door to the restrainer, thereby helping the trapped rat to escape (Ben-Ami Bartal et al., 2011). The discovery of this natural behavior provides a unique opportunity to probe the motivation of rodent helping behavior, leading to a deeper understanding of biological influences on human pro-sociality. To determine if an affective response motivates door-opening, rats receiving midazolam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic, were tested in the helping behavior test. Midazolam-treated rats showed less helping behavior than saline-treated rats or rats receiving no injection. Yet, midazolam-treated rats opened a restrainer containing chocolate, highlighting the socially specific effects of the anxiolytic. To determine if midazolam interferes with helping through a sympatholytic effect, the peripherally restricted beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist nadolol was administered; nadolol did not interfere with helping. The corticosterone response of rats exposed to a trapped cagemate was measured and compared to the rats' subsequent helping behavior. Rats with the greatest corticosterone responses showed the least helping behavior and those with the smallest responses showed the most consistent helping at the shortest latency. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the interaction between stress and pro-social behavior. Finally, we observed that door-opening appeared to be reinforcing. A novel analytical tool was designed to interrogate the pattern of door-opening for signs that a rat's behavior on one session

  15. Electroencephalographic changes in albino rats subjected to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercier, J.; Assouline, G.; Fondarai, J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty one albino Wistar rats were subjected to stress for 7 hours. There was a significant difference in the slopes of regression lines for 7 nonulcerous rats and those for 14 ulcerous rats. Nonulcerous rats subjected to stress showed greater EEG curve synchronization than did ulcerous rats. If curve synchronization can be equated to a relaxed state, it may therefore be possible to explain the protective action of hypnotics, tranquilizers and analgesics on ulcers.

  16. Persistent Seoul virus infection in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Compton, S R; Jacoby, R O; Paturzo, F X; Smith, A L

    2004-07-01

    Mechanistic studies of hantavirus persistence in rodent reservoirs have been limited by the lack of a versatile animal model. This report describes findings from experimental infection of inbred Lewis rats with Seoul virus strain 80-39. Rats inoculated with virus intraperitoneally at 6 days of age became persistently infected without clinical signs. Tissues from Seoul virus-inoculated 6-day-old rats were assessed at 6, 9, and 12 weeks post-inoculation for viral RNA by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) and for infectious virus by inoculation of Vero E6 cells. Virus was isolated from lung and kidney of infected rats at 6 weeks and viral RNA was detected in lung, kidney, pancreas, salivary gland, brain, spleen, liver and skin at 6, 9 and 12 weeks. Rats inoculated with Seoul virus intraperitoneally at 10 or 21 days of age became infected without clinical signs but had low to undetectable levels of viral RNA in tissues at 6 weeks post-inoculation. ISH identified vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells as common sites of persistent infection. Cultured rat smooth muscle cells and to a lesser extent cultured endothelial cells also were susceptible to Seoul virus infection. Pancreatic infection resulted in insulitis with associated hyperglycemia. These studies demonstrate that infant Lewis rats are uniformly susceptible to asymptomatic persistent Seoul virus infection. Additionally, they offer opportunities for correlative in vivo and in vitro study of Seoul virus interactions in host cell types that support persistent infection.

  17. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  18. Altered proportions of RCS-rat eyes.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, M; Eichhorn, M; Gottanka, J; Döbig, C; Lütjen-Drecoll, E

    1994-10-01

    The growth pattern of RCS-rat eyes with hereditary retinal degeneration was analysed morphometrically, evaluating midsagittal sections of the entire globe and sections of the chamber angle region. No changes of the axial diameter of RCS-rat eyes were found if compared with eyes of age-matched controls. There were, however, characteristic proportional changes in the anterior eye segment of RCS rats. The distance between the peripheral end of Descemet's membrane (DM) and both the posterior end of Schlemm's canal and the ora serrata were significantly elongated indicating that this region might be most susceptible to growth factors. The length of the posterior globe up to the level of the ora serrata was shorter in RCS rats than in control rats. In addition, in RCS-rat eyes the pars plana was significantly elongated and the pars plicata shortened. Ultrastructural changes of ciliary epithelium were not seen before 7 months of age in RCS rats. They were only present in those parts of the circumference in which the stromal capillaries also revealed structural changes. The ciliary epithelial alterations were therefore considered secondary to narrowing or rarefication in the adjacent blood vessels.

  19. Embryolethality of butyl benzyl phthalate in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, N.; Itami, T.; Kawasaki, H. )

    1991-03-15

    The developmental toxicity of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) was studied in Wistar rats. Pregnant rats were given BBP at a dosage of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0% in the diet from day 0 to day 20 of pregnancy. Morphological examinations of the fetuses revealed no evidence of teratogenesis. In the 2.0% group, all dams exhibited complete resorption of all the implanted embryos, and their food consumption, body weight gain and adjusted weight gain during pregnancy were markedly lowered. To determine whether the embryolethality was the result of reduced food consumption during pregnancy, a pair-feeding study was performed in which the pregnant rats received the same amount of diet consumed by the 2.0% BBP-treated pregnant rats. The pair-fed and 2.0 % BBP-treated pregnant rats showed significant and comparable reductions in the adjusted weight gain. The number of live fetuses was lowered in the pair-fed group. However, the complete resorption of all the implanted embryos was not found in any of the pair-fed pregnant rats. The data suggest that the embryolethality observed in the 2.0 % BBP-treated pregnant rats is attributable to the effects o dietary BBP.

  20. Wood rats and kangaroo rats: potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete in California.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Brown, R N

    1991-05-01

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner, was isolated repeatedly from dusky-footed wood rats, Neotoma fuscipes Baird, and California kangaroo rats, Dipodomys californicus Merriam, in northern California. All animals were collected in a region endemic for Lyme disease but for which the natural reservoir of B. burgdorferi was unknown. Similar attempts to isolate spirochetes from lizards, other species of rodents, jack rabbits, and deer between 1987 and 1991 were unsuccessful. Spirochetes isolated from wood rats and kangaroo rats were antigenically similar to strains of B. burgdorferi that had been isolated previously from the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, in California. Similar enzootic cycles involving wood rats or kangaroo rats should be sought in other regions of the United States where the reservoirs of this spirochete are unknown.

  1. Methaqualone metabolism by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Manowitz, P; Shull, C M

    1976-01-01

    A rat hepatic microsomal system has been established which metabolizes methaqualone. The microsomes are obtained from livers of rats treated with phenobarbital. The methaqualone is dissolved in polyethylene glycol-200 prior to addition to the incubation mixture. A comparison is made between the metabolites obtained in this in vitro system and metabolites obtained from urines of phenobarbital treated rats injected with methaqualone. The same two and sometimes three metabolites, as determined by thin layer and gas liquid chromatography, were found in both the complete microsomal incubation system and the urines.

  2. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  3. Establishment of a novel dwarf rat strain: cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masami; Watanabe, Minoru; Yokomi, Izuru; Matsumoto, Naoki; Sudo, Katsuko; Satoh, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Tsuneo; Seki, Azusa; Amano, Hitoshi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Ryu, Kakei; Shibata, Shunichi; Nagayama, Motohiko; Tanuma, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Rats with dwarfism accompanied by skeletal abnormalities, such as shortness of the limbs, tail, and body (dwarf rats), emerged in a Jcl-derived Sprague-Dawley rat colony maintained at the Institute for Animal Experimentation, St. Marianna University Graduate School of Medicine. Since the dwarfism was assumed to be due to a genetic mutation based on its frequency, we bred the dwarf rats and investigated their characteristics in order to identify the causative factors of their phenotypes and whether they could be used as a human disease model. One male and female that produced dwarf progeny were selected, and reproduction was initiated by mating the pair. The incidence of dwarfism was 25.8% among the resultant litter, and dwarfism occurred in both genders, suggesting that it was inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. At 12 weeks of age, the body weights of the male and female dwarf rats were 40% and 57% of those of the normal rats, respectively. In soft X-ray radiographic and histological examinations, shortening and hypoplasia of the long bones, such as the tibia and femur, were observed, which were suggestive of endochondral ossification abnormalities. An immunohistochemical examination detected an aggrecan synthesis disorder, which might have led to delayed calcification and increased growth plate thickening in the dwarf rats. We hypothesized that the principal characteristics of the dwarf rats were systemically induced by insufficient cartilage calcification in their long bones; thus, we named them cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

  4. Rats are the smart choice: Rationale for a renewed focus on rats in behavioral genetics.

    PubMed

    Parker, Clarissa C; Chen, Hao; Flagel, Shelly B; Geurts, Aron M; Richards, Jerry B; Robinson, Terry E; Solberg Woods, Leah C; Palmer, Abraham A

    2014-01-01

    Due in part to their rich behavioral repertoire rats have been widely used in behavioral studies of drug abuse-related traits for decades. However, the mouse became the model of choice for researchers exploring the genetic underpinnings of addiction after the first mouse study was published demonstrating the capability of engineering the mouse genome through embryonic stem cell technology. The sequencing of the mouse genome and more recent re-sequencing of numerous inbred mouse strains have further cemented the status of mice as the premier mammalian organism for genetic studies. As a result, many of the behavioral paradigms initially developed and optimized for rats have been adapted to mice. However, numerous complex and interesting drug abuse-related behaviors that can be studied in rats are very difficult or impossible to adapt for use in mice, impeding the genetic dissection of those traits. Now, technological advances have removed many of the historical limitations of genetic studies in rats. For instance, the rat genome has been sequenced and many inbred rat strains are now being re-sequenced and outbred rat stocks are being used to fine-map QTLs. In addition, it is now possible to create "knockout" rats using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and related techniques. Thus, rats can now be used to perform quantitative genetic studies of sophisticated behaviors that have been difficult or impossible to study in mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  5. Both acute and chronic buspirone treatments have different effects on regional 5-HT synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats (a rat model of depression) than in control rats

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Kyoko; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Shu; Watanabe, Arata; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of buspirone, a 5-HT1A agonist with some partial agonist properties and also an antidepressant, on regional 5-HT synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats (“depressed”), and to compare the effects to the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats (not “depressed”). In addition results were compared to those previously reported in normal Sprague-Dawley (SPD) rats (normal control). Serotonin synthesis in both FSL and FRL rats was measured following acute and chronic treatments with buspirone. Both of these strains were derived from the SPD rats. No direct comparison was done between the FSL saline and FRL saline groups, or the FSL buspirone and FRL buspirone groups, because the objective of the studies was to evaluate effects of buspirone in these two strains. The results show that acute treatment with buspirone elevates 5-HT synthesis throughout the brain in the FRL rats. In the FSL rats, there were reductions in some brain regions (e.g., dorsal and median raphe, amygdala, anterior olfactory nucleus, substantia nigra reticulate), while in other regions, there were increases in the synthesis observed (e.g., frontal, parietal, visual and somatosensory cortices, ventral hippocampus). In twenty out of the thirty brain regions investigated in the FSL rats, there was no significant change in the synthesis following acute buspirone treatment. During the chronic treatment, buspirone produced a significant reduction of 5-HT synthesis in fifteen out of thirty brain regions in the FRL rats. In the FSL rats, buspirone produced a significant elevation of the synthesis in ten out of thirty brain regions. In both the FSL and FRL rats, buspirone produced rather different effects than those reported previously for SPD (normal) rats. The acute effect in the FSL rats was somewhat similar to the effect reported previously for the SPD rats, while in the FRL rats, the acute buspirone treatment produced an

  6. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  7. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  8. 2011 Desert RATS Sights and Sounds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Watch scenes from the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test, as NASA scientists and engineers drive the Space Exploration Vehicle, assemble equipment in the Habitat D...

  9. Hypergravity induced prolactin surge in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megory, E.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Acute initial exposure to hypergravity (HG) was previously found to induce prolonged diestrous in rats, which was followed by return to normal estrous cycling upon more prolonged exposure to continuous HG. Bromergocryptine was found to prevent this prolonged diestrous. In this study it is found that in female rats 20 h of 3.14 G exposure (D-1 1200 h until D-2 0800 h) can induce prolactin surge at D-2 1600 h. Shorter exposure time (8 h), or exposure during a different part of the estrous cycle (19 h: from D-1 0700 h until D-2 0200 h) could not elicit this prolactin surge. Similar exposure of male rats of HG did not alter significantly their prolactin levels. It is possible that the hypothalamus of male and female rats responds differently to stimulation by HG.

  10. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  11. Phylogenetics of the laboratory rat Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Canzian, F

    1997-03-01

    A genealogic tree was constructed for inbred strains of the laboratory rat, including 63 strains and 214 of their substrains. Information on genetic and biochemical marker typings of these lines was collected from the literature and from the World Wide Web. Data on 995 polymorphisms were processed into a phylogenetic distance matrix, and a tree was obtained by the Fitch-Margoliash distance matrix method. The inbred strains of the laboratory rat showed an average polymorphism for pairwise comparison of 53%. Strain BN showed the highest genetic divergence from all the other ones. Comparison with the mouse phylogenetic tree indicated that laboratory rats possess a higher diversity than inbred strains of mice not derived from wild species. These results provide a phylogenetic basis in the choice of rat strains for genetic linkage experiments.

  12. Rat sperm motility analysis: methodologic considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample c...

  13. Eating behavior reveals rats' preference for morphine.

    PubMed

    Yanaura, S; Suzuki, T; Kawai, T

    1980-04-01

    Using an automatic food intake measuring apparatus ("food intakometer"), we recorded the approach behavior to food, eating behavior and food intake of morphine dependent rats and examined the relationship among these factors and morphine dependence. Morphine dependent rats were produced by the drug-admixed food (DAF) method. In the choice trial of free feeding group, morphine dependent rats showed only the approach behavior both to drug-free diet and to morphine-admixed food, then ate the morphine-admixed food and approached the drug-free diet at the same period. Eating behavior in the case of morphine-admixed food was observed not only at night but also during thee feeding group, morphine dependent rats showed only the approach behavior both to drug-free diet and to morphine-admixed food, then ate the morphine-admixed food and approached the drug-free diet at the same period. Eating behavior in the case of morphine-admixed food was observed not only at night but also during the day time in the morphine dependent rats. In the choice trial of the limited feeding group, preference for morphine rapidly increased in every choice trial of each session and the preference rate became stable at about 60%. Eating patterns of these rats were similar to these in the free feeding group. When these rats were given morphine prior to the choice trial, eating behavior of those on the morphine-admixed food was inhibited dose-dependently, while eating behavior of these on the drug-free diet was enhanced dose-dependently. When these rats were allowed free access to drug-free diet for 1 hour previously to the choice trial, eating behavior of the rats on the morphine-admixed food in the choice trial was markedly enhanced. Thus, the rats clearly showed drug-seeking behavior and seemed to be able to distinguish between the need for morphine and satisfaction without it. Morphine dependent rats apparently can control their required maintenance dose.

  14. Methamphetamine enhances sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Winland, Carissa; Haycox, Charles; Bolton, Jessica L; Jampana, Sumith; Oakley, Benjamin J; Ford, Brittany; Ornelas, Laura; Burbey, Alexandra; Marquette, Amber; Frohardt, Russell J; Guarraci, Fay A

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of methamphetamine (MA) on sexual behavior in female rats. In Experiment 1, ovariectomized, hormone-primed rats were injected with MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline prior to a test for mate choice wherein females could mate with two males simultaneously. Female rats treated with saline returned to their preferred mate faster after receiving intromissions and visited their preferred mate at a higher rate than their non-preferred mate. In contrast, MA-treated female rats spent a similar amount of time with their preferred and non-preferred mate and failed to return to their preferred mate faster than to their non-preferred mate following intromissions. Two weeks later, the females received the same drug treatment but were tested for partner preference wherein females could spend time near a male or female stimulus rat. All subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus. However, the MA-treated rats visited the male stimulus more frequently and spent less time near the female stimulus than the saline-treated rats. Similar to Experiment 1, female rats in Experiment 2 were tested for mate choice and then two weeks later tested for partner preference; however, females received three daily injections of MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Females treated chronically with MA returned to both males faster following intromissions than females treated with saline, independent of preference (i.e., preferred mate and non-preferred mate). Furthermore, MA-treated rats were more likely to leave either male (i.e., preferred or non-preferred mate) than saline-treated rats after receiving sexual stimulation. Although MA-treated subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus, they spent less time near either when compared to saline-treated subjects. The present results demonstrate that MA affects sexual behavior in female rats partly by increasing locomotion and partly by directly affecting sexual

  15. Anxiolytic Treatment Impairs Helping Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami Bartal, Inbal; Shan, Haozhe; Molasky, Nora M. R.; Murray, Teresa M.; Williams, Jasper Z.; Decety, Jean; Mason, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research with humans, the biological mechanisms that motivate an individual to help others remain poorly understood. In order to investigate the roots of pro-sociality in mammals, we established the helping behavior test, a paradigm in which rats are faced with a conspecific trapped in a restrainer that can only be opened from the outside. Over the course of repeated test sessions, rats exposed to a trapped cagemate learn to open the door to the restrainer, thereby helping the trapped rat to escape (Ben-Ami Bartal et al., 2011). The discovery of this natural behavior provides a unique opportunity to probe the motivation of rodent helping behavior, leading to a deeper understanding of biological influences on human pro-sociality. To determine if an affective response motivates door-opening, rats receiving midazolam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic, were tested in the helping behavior test. Midazolam-treated rats showed less helping behavior than saline-treated rats or rats receiving no injection. Yet, midazolam-treated rats opened a restrainer containing chocolate, highlighting the socially specific effects of the anxiolytic. To determine if midazolam interferes with helping through a sympatholytic effect, the peripherally restricted beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist nadolol was administered; nadolol did not interfere with helping. The corticosterone response of rats exposed to a trapped cagemate was measured and compared to the rats’ subsequent helping behavior. Rats with the greatest corticosterone responses showed the least helping behavior and those with the smallest responses showed the most consistent helping at the shortest latency. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the interaction between stress and pro-social behavior. Finally, we observed that door-opening appeared to be reinforcing. A novel analytical tool was designed to interrogate the pattern of door-opening for signs that a rat’s behavior on one

  16. How rats combine temporal cues.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Keen, Richard; MacInnis, Mika L M; Church, Russell M

    2005-05-31

    The procedures for classical and operant conditioning, and for many timing procedures, involve the delivery of reinforcers that may be related to the time of previous reinforcers and responses, and to the time of onsets and terminations of stimuli. The behavior resulting from such procedures can be described as bouts of responding that occur in some pattern at some rate. A packet theory of timing and conditioning is described that accounts for such behavior under a wide range of procedures. Applications include the food searching by rats in Skinner boxes under conditions of fixed and random reinforcement, brief and sustained stimuli, and several response-food contingencies. The approach is used to describe how multiple cues from reinforcers and stimuli combine to determine the rate and pattern of response bouts.

  17. Percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Horhota, S T; Fung, H L

    1979-05-01

    Percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption was studied in shaved rats by monitoring unchanged plasma drug concentrations for up to 4 hr. Drug absorption from the neat liquid state or from an alcoholic solution was considerably poorer than that from a commercial ointment. This observation was unanticipated since the driving force for percutaneous drug absorption was assumed to be drug thermodynamics. Potential artifacts such as drug volatilization from the skin, reduction of surface area through droplet formation, and vehicle occlusion were investigated, but they did not appear to be responsible for the observed results. Two experimental aqueous nitroglycerin gels were prepared with polyethylene glycol 400. One gel contained just sufficient polyethylene glycol to solubilize the nitroglycerin; the other had excess polyethylene glycol to solubilize nitroglycerin far below saturation. Both gels gave extremely low plasma nitroglycerin levels. The composite data suggested that percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption is highly vehicle dependent and that this dependency cannot be explained by simple consideration of drug thermodynamic activity.

  18. Sleep Homeostasis in Infant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Mark S.; Middlemis-Brown, Jessica E.; Johnson, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation is a defining characteristic of sleep but has rarely been examined in infants. This study presents an automated method of sleep deprivation in which 5-day-old rats were shocked whenever the nuchal muscle became atonic. The intensity of shock was always set at the minimal level required to maintain arousal. Deprived pups exhibited rapid increases in sleep pressure, as evidenced by increased attempts to enter sleep and subsequent increases in sensory threshold; this increased sensory threshold was not due to sensory adaptation of peripheral receptors. In addition, myoclonic twitching was suppressed during the 30-min deprivation period, leading to rebound twitching during recovery sleep. These results provide the earliest demonstration of the homeostatic regulation of sleep in an altricial mammal. PMID:15598134

  19. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  20. Thyroid function in hemidecorticate rats.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, C O; Tosello, D O; Fernandez, G A; Merzel, J

    1988-01-01

    1. Thyroid function was evaluated in hemidecorticate (HD) and control (C) rats by determining serum T3 and T4 levels and the development of incisors and mandibles and through analysis of various histological features of the thyroid such as follicle size, colloid droplet content and [3H]-glycine uptake by follicular cells. 2. HD animals presented normal levels of circulating T3 but significantly lower T4 levels. 3. There was slight atrophy of the gland in HD animals and fewer colloid droplets were present in the cytoplasm of the follicular cells in this group, indicating a reduction in the breakdown of thyroglobulin. [3H]-glycine uptake by HD indicated that the rate of thyroglobulin biosynthesis was not altered in the experimental animals. 4. The growth of mandibles (weight) and incisors (weight and length) was reduced in HD compared to the control animals. 5. These results suggest that hemidecortication causes mild hypothyroidism (trophoprivic type) probably by affecting hypothalamic function.

  1. Quantity Discrimination in Domestic Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura; Montrose, V. Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Quantity discrimination involves distinguishing which of two quantities is greater. This discrimination between larger and smaller quantities has only been demonstrated in rats post extensive training. We tested whether domestic rats could perform quantity discrimination without explicit training. We found that rats could distinguish the greater amount in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. Rats could not distinguish between 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. We also found that as the ratio between quantities became finer the choice of the larger quantity decreased. We conclude that rats can perform quantity discrimination without extensive training and that their quantity discrimination ability is influenced by the ratio between quantities. Abstract Quantity discrimination is a basic form of numerical competence where an animal distinguishes which of two amounts is greater in size. Whilst quantity discrimination in rats has been investigated via training paradigms, rats’ natural quantity discrimination abilities without explicit training for a desired response have not been explored. This study investigated domestic rats’ ability to perform quantity discrimination. Domestic rats (n = 12) were examined for their ability to distinguish the larger amount under nine quantity comparisons. One-sample t-tests identified a significant preference for the larger quantity in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. No preference between quantities was found for comparisons of 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. Overall, this study drew two key conclusions. Firstly, that domestic rats are capable of performing quantity discrimination without extensive training. Secondly, as subjects adhered to Weber’s law, it was concluded that the approximate number system underpins domestic rats’ ability to perform spontaneous quantity discrimination. PMID:27527223

  2. Can You Find the Rat Holes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Using its rock abrasion tool, otherwise known as 'Rat,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity dotted the slope of 'Endurance Crater' with dimples that give scientists a glimpse into its layered geologic history. This image from the rover's navigation camera, taken on sol 169 (July 15, 2004), highlights the prolific work of the robotic 'rodent.' How many Rat holes can you identify? You will be able to check your answer against an image to be posted soon with all the holes identified.

  3. Collagenous skeleton of the rat mystacial pad.

    PubMed

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Simony, Erez; Golomb, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2011-05-01

    Anatomical and functional integrity of the rat mystacial pad (MP) is dependent on the intrinsic organization of its extracellular matrix. By using collagen autofluorescence, in the rat MP, we revealed a collagenous skeleton that interconnects whisker follicles, corium, and deep collagen layers. We suggest that this skeleton supports MP tissues, mediates force transmission from muscles to whiskers, facilitates whisker retraction after protraction, and limits MP extensibility.

  4. A digital rat atlas of sectional anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Liu, Qian; Bai, Xueling; Liao, Yinping; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a digital rat alias of sectional anatomy made by milling. Two healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat weighing 160-180 g were used for the generation of this atlas. The rats were depilated completely, then euthanized by Co II. One was via vascular perfusion, the other was directly frozen at -85 °C over 24 hour. After that, the frozen specimens were transferred into iron molds for embedding. A 3% gelatin solution colored blue was used to fill the molds and then frozen at -85 °C for one or two days. The frozen specimen-blocks were subsequently sectioned on the cryosection-milling machine in a plane oriented approximately transverse to the long axis of the body. The surface of specimen-blocks were imaged by a scanner and digitalized into 4,600 x2,580 x 24 bit array through a computer. Finally 9,475 sectional images (arterial vessel were not perfused) and 1,646 sectional images (arterial vessel were perfused) were captured, which made the volume of the digital atlas up to 369.35 Gbyte. This digital rat atlas is aimed at the whole rat and the rat arterial vessels are also presented. We have reconstructed this atlas. The information from the two-dimensional (2-D) images of serial sections and three-dimensional (3-D) surface model all shows that the digital rat atlas we constructed is high quality. This work lays the foundation for a deeper study of digital rat.

  5. Thermoregulation in hypergravity-acclimated rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Conrad B.; Patterson, Susan L.; Horowitz, John M.; Oyama, Jiro

    1989-01-01

    The effect of acclimation to hypergravity on thermoregulatory responses of rats was determined by comparing data on core temperature, T(c), tail temperature, and O2 consumption in rats raised at 1 G (C) and at 2.1 G. It was found that, when C rats were exposed to an ambient temperature of 9 C concurrently with exposure to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell by about 6 C, while in rats acclimated to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell only by 1 C. Results of O2 consumption measurements showed that C rats exposed simultaneously to cold and hypergravity were not activating their thermogenic mechanism sufficiently to prevent a fall in T(c). In other experiments, rats acclimated to either 1 or 2.1 G were found to lack the ability to maintain their T(c) when exposed to a 5.8-G field or when cold-stressed at 1 G for extended times.

  6. Hematological Characteristics of the BB Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Wright, J R; Yates, A J; Shah, N T; Neff, J C; Covey, D W; Thibert, P

    1983-01-01

    Complete blood counts, differential white blood cell and platelet counts were performed on male and female BB Wistar diabetic rats (BBWd), their nondiabetic siblings (BBWnd) and outbred Wistar rats of the line from which the BB Wistar rats were derived. Most of the observed changes were strain-related (those present in both BBWd and BBWnd but not in control rats) rather than diabetes-related (those in BBWd but neither BBWnd nor control rats) and therefore probably due to the inbreeding process. The BBW strain had significantly lower numbers of white cells and platelets, as well as markedly changed differential white cell counts. Differential counts showed a pattern of lymphopenia, neutrophilia, monocytosis and eosinophilia. It is possible that these white blood cell changes contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection reported for the BBW strain. No significant difference in serum immunoglobulin concentrations was found in any of these three groups of rats. There- fore, hypogammaglobutinemia cannot account for the increased susceptibility to infections, but it is not possible to rule out an abnormality in the distribution of immunoglobulin fractions as an etiological factor. PMID:15311399

  7. Sham intake of ethanol in "P" rats.

    PubMed

    Rowland, N E; Morian, K R

    1994-01-01

    Alcohol-preferring (P) rats were surgically fitted with gastric fistulas, and intakes of 10% ethanol solution were measured in 1-h sessions either with the fistula closed (normal drinking) or open (sham drinking). In water-replete P