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Sample records for 6-kda early secreted

  1. Comparative analysis of the secretion capability of early and late flagellar type III secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A remarkable feature of the flagellar-specific type III secretion system (T3SS) is the selective recognition of a few substrate proteins among the many thousand cytoplasmic proteins. Secretion substrates are divided into two specificity classes: early substrates secreted for hook-basal body (HBB) construction and late substrates secreted after HBB completion. Secretion was reported to require a disordered N-terminal secretion signal, mRNA secretion signals within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) and for late substrates, piloting proteins known as the T3S chaperones. Here, we utilized translational β-lactamase fusions to probe the secretion efficacy of the N-terminal secretion signal of fourteen secreted flagellar substrates in Salmonella enterica. We observed a surprising variety in secretion capability between flagellar proteins of the same secretory class. The peptide secretion signals of the early-type substrates FlgD, FlgF, FlgE and the late-type substrate FlgL were analysed in detail. Analysing the role of the 5′-UTR in secretion of flgB and flgE revealed that the native 5′-UTR substantially enhanced protein translation and secretion. Based on our data, we propose a multicomponent signal that drives secretion via the flagellar T3SS. Both mRNA and peptide signals are recognized by the export apparatus and together with substrate-specific chaperones allowing for targeted secretion of flagellar substrates. PMID:24946091

  2. Trading secrets: Jews and the early modern quest for clandestine knowledge.

    PubMed

    Jütte, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    This essay explores the significance and function of secrecy and secret sciences in Jewish-Christian relations and in Jewish culture in the early modern period. It shows how the trade in clandestine knowledge and the practice of secret sciences became a complex, sometimes hazardous space for contact between Jews and Christians. By examining this trade, the essay clarifies the role of secrecy in the early modern marketplace of knowledge. The attribution of secretiveness to Jews was a widespread topos in early modern European thought. However, relatively little is known about the implications of such beliefs in science or in daily life. The essay pays special attention to the fact that trade in secret knowledge frequently offered Jews a path to the center of power, especially at court. Furthermore, it becomes clear that the practice of secret sciences, the trade in clandestine knowledge, and a mercantile agenda were often inextricably interwoven. Special attention is paid to the Italian-Jewish alchemist, engineer, and entrepreneur Abramo Colorni (ca. 1544-1599), whose career illustrates the opportunities provided by the marketplace of secrets at that time. Much scholarly (and less scholarly) attention has been devoted to whether and what Jews "contributed" to what is commonly called the "Scientific Revolution." This essay argues that the question is misdirected and that, instead, we should pay more attention to the distinctive opportunities offered by the early modern economy of secrecy. PMID:23488236

  3. Mesothelial cells promote early ovarian cancer metastasis through fibronectin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Hilary A.; Chiang, Chun-Yi; White, Erin A.; Schryver, Elizabeth M.; Habis, Mohammed; Romero, Iris L.; Ladanyi, Andras; Penicka, Carla V.; George, Joshy; Matlin, Karl; Montag, Anthony; Wroblewski, Kristen; Yamada, S. Diane; Mazar, Andrew P.; Bowtell, David; Lengyel, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) metastasizes to organs in the abdominal cavity, such as the omentum, which are covered by a single layer of mesothelial cells. Mesothelial cells are generally thought to be “bystanders” to the metastatic process and simply displaced by OvCa cells to access the submesothelial extracellular matrix. Here, using organotypic 3D cultures, we found that primary human mesothelial cells secrete fibronectin in the presence of OvCa cells. Moreover, we evaluated the tumor stroma of 108 human omental metastases and determined that fibronectin was consistently overexpressed in these patients. Blocking fibronectin production in primary mesothelial cells in vitro or in murine models, either genetically (fibronectin 1 floxed mouse model) or via siRNA, decreased adhesion, invasion, proliferation, and metastasis of OvCa cells. Using a coculture model, we determined that OvCa cells secrete TGF-β1, which in turn activates a TGF-β receptor/RAC1/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway in the mesothelial cells that promotes a mesenchymal phenotype and transcriptional upregulation of fibronectin. Additionally, blocking α5 or β1 integrin function with antibodies reduced metastasis in an orthotopic preclinical model of OvCa metastasis. These findings indicate that cancer-associated mesothelial cells promote colonization during the initial steps of OvCa metastasis and suggest that mesothelial cells actively contribute to metastasis. PMID:25202979

  4. Parietal endoderm secreted S100A4 promotes early cardiomyogenesis in embryoid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stary, Martina; Schneider, Mikael; Sheikh, Soren P.; Weitzer, Georg . E-mail: georg.weitzer@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-05-05

    Cardiomyogenesis is influenced by factors secreted by anterior-lateral and extra-embryonic endoderm. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells in embryoid bodies allows to study the influence of growth factors on cardiomyogenesis. By these means SPARC was identified as a new factor enhancing cardiomyogenesis [M. Stary, W. Pasteiner, A. Summer, A. Hrdina, A. Eger, G. Weitzer, Parietal endoderm secreted SPARC promotes early cardiomyogenesis in vitro, Exp. Cell Res. 310 (2005) 331-341]. Here we report a similar and new function for S100A4, a calcium-binding protein of the EF-hand type. S100A4 is secreted by parietal endoderm and promotes early differentiation and proliferation of cardiomyocytes. Oligomeric S100A4 supports cardiomyogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas inhibition of autocrine S100A4 severely attenuates cardiomyogenesis. S100A4 specifically influences transcription in differentiating cardiomyocytes, as evident from increased expression of cardiac transcription factor genes nkx2.5 and mef2C. These data suggest that S100A4, like SPARC, plays a supportive role in early in vitro cardiomyogenesis.

  5. Foetal programming and cortisol secretion in early childhood: A meta-analysis of different programming variables.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jessica; Tarabulsy, George M; Bussières, Eve-Line

    2015-08-01

    It is widely recognized that different events may take place in the intrauterine environment that may influence later developmental outcome. Scholars have long postulated that maternal prenatal stress, alcohol or drug use, and cigarette smoking may impact foetal formation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may later influence different aspects of early childhood socioemotional and cognitive development. However, results linking each of these factors with child cortisol secretion have been mixed. The current meta-analysis examined the relation between each of these programming variables and child cortisol secretion in studies conducted up to December 31st, 2012. Studies were included if they were conducted prior to child age 60 months, and if they reported an index of effect size linking either maternal prenatal stress, alcohol or drug use, or cigarette smoking with an index of child cortisol secretion. In total, 19 studies (N=2260) revealed an average effect size of d=.36 (p<.001). Moderator analyses revealed that greater effect sizes could be traced to maternal alcohol use, to the use of retrospective research methodology, where mothers are questioned after childbirth regarding programming variables, and to the use of baseline measures of cortisol secretion, as opposed to recovery measures. Discussion focuses on processes that link the environment to foetal development and how both are linked to later adaptation.

  6. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve intestina...

  7. Cortisol Secretion and Change in Sleep Problems in Early Childhood: Moderation by Maternal Overcontrol

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Hummel, Alexandra C.; Luebbe, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood sleep problems are prevalent and relate to a wide range of negative psychological outcomes. However, it remains unclear how biological processes, such as HPA activity, may predict sleep problems over time in childhood in the context of certain parenting environments. Fifty-one mothers and their 18–20 month-old toddlers participated in a short-term longitudinal study assessing how shared variance among morning levels, diurnal change, and nocturnal change in toddlers’ cortisol secretion predicted change in sleep problems in the context of maternal overprotection and critical control. A composite characterized by low variability in, and, to a lesser extent, high morning values of cortisol, predicted increasing sleep problems from age 2 to age 3 when mothers reported high critical control. Results suggest value in assessing shared variance among different indices of cortisol secretion patterns and the interaction between cortisol and the environment in predicting sleep problems in early childhood. PMID:25766262

  8. Identification of a type IV secretion substrate of Brucella abortus that participates in the early stages of intracellular survival

    PubMed Central

    Döhmer, Peter H.; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Czibener, Cecilia; Ugalde, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Brucella abortus, the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, is an intracellular pathogen whose virulence is completely dependent on a type IV secretion system. This secretion system translocates effector proteins into the host cell to modulate the intracellular fate of the bacterium in order to establish a secure niche were it actively replicates. Although much has been done in understanding how this secretion system participates in the virulence process, few effector proteins have been identified to date. We describe here the identification of a type IV secretion substrate (SepA) that is only present in Brucella spp. and has no detectable homology to known proteins. This protein is secreted in a virB dependent manner in a two-step process involving a periplasmic intermediate and secretion is necessary for its function. The deletion mutant showed a defect in the early stages of intracellular replication in professional and non-professional phagocytes although it invades the cells more efficiently than the wild type parental strain. Our results indicate that, even though the mutant was more invasive, it had a defect in excluding the lysosomal marker Lamp-1 and was inactivated more efficiently during the early phases of the intracellular life cycle. PMID:24119283

  9. Endometrial oxytocin receptor and uterine prostaglandin secretion in mares during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, G R; Stout, T A; Lamming, G E; Allen, W R; Flint, A P

    1998-07-01

    Circulating concentrations of 13,14-dihydro-15-ketoprostaglandin F2 alpha (PGFM) were measured before and after administration of oxytocin and after endometrial biopsy, with or without uterine flushing performed per vaginam, on days 10, 14 and 18 after ovulation in nine pregnant and nine cyclic mares. Concentrations of oxytocin receptor were measured in endometrial biopsy samples. Neither pregnancy status nor time after ovulation affected basal PGFM concentrations. PGFM concentrations were increased after oxytocin administration on each of the days studied in cyclic mares; on day 14 the mean response was 4.5 times higher than the mean response on days 10 and 18. In contrast, during pregnancy, responses to oxytocin administration occurred only on days 10 and 18. Marked increases in PGFM concentrations in response to endometrial biopsy occurred only on day 14 in cyclic mares and on day 18 in pregnant mares. Mean concentrations of oxytocin receptor were between 200 and 300 fmol mg-1 protein on day 10 in both pregnant and cyclic mares; in cyclic mares oxytocin receptor concentrations were increased approximately threefold on day 14 compared with days 10 and 18, but no such increase was evident during pregnancy. Total amounts of PGFM secreted after oxytocin treatment correlated with endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations in cyclic (P < 0.001) but not in pregnant (P > 0.5) mares, and the same was true for PGFM release induced by endometrial biopsy (cyclic: P = 0.0025; pregnant: P > 0.5). The data support the hypothesis that endometrial concentrations of oxytocin receptor determine uterine prostaglandin F2 alpha secretion in cyclic mares and that endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations are reduced in early pregnancy by a product of the conceptus. The increase in response of the pregnant uterus to oxytocin treatment or biopsy-flushing between days 14 and 18 was not due to an increase in the concentration of oxytocin receptors but presumably reflected increased

  10. Hormone secretion by euthyroid and hypothyroid rat ovaries during the early stages of hCG-induced ovarian cyst development.

    PubMed

    Bruot, B C

    1987-02-01

    This study was undertaken to examine ovarian steroid production during the early stages of hCG-induced ovarian cyst formation in the hypothyroid rat. Rats were placed into two groups with one group made hypothyroid by adding thiouracil to their diet. After 10 days, each group was divided into two subgroups with one subgroup receiving daily injections of hCG for 2 days and the other subgroup receiving saline. On the morning of Day 13, ovaries were removed and incubated for 2 hr. No significant difference in progesterone secretion was observed. However, ovaries from hypothyroid, hCG-treated rats secreted significantly more testosterone and estradiol than ovaries from vehicle-treated, hypothyroid rats and euthyroid, hCG-treated rats. In a second experiment, ovaries from euthyroid and hypothyroid rats treated with hCG were incubated in medium supplemented with 100 nM androstenedione and 0 or 100 ng FSH/ml. FSH failed to affect progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol secretions by ovaries from euthyroid, hCG-treated rats. In contrast, FSH significantly enhanced testosterone and estradiol secretion by ovaries from hypothyroid, hCG-treated rats. These results support the hypothesis that increased levels of testosterone and estradiol secretion have a central role in the induction of polycystic ovaries by hCG in the hypothyroid rat. PMID:3101068

  11. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. PMID:26617163

  12. Stiffening and unfolding of early deposited-fibronectin increase proangiogenic factor secretion by breast cancer-associated stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Karin; Andresen Eguiluz, Roberto C.; Wu, Fei; Seo, Bo Ri; Fischbach, Claudia; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) forms a fibrillar network that controls cell behavior in both physiological and diseased conditions including cancer. Indeed, breast cancer-associated stromal cells not only increase the quantity of deposited Fn but also modify its conformation. However, (i) the interplay between mechanical and conformational properties of early tumor-associated Fn networks and (ii) its effect on tumor vascularization remain unclear. Here, we first used the Surface Forces Apparatus to reveal that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes exposed to tumor-secreted factors generate a stiffer Fn matrix relative to control cells. We then show that this early matrix stiffening correlates with increased molecular unfolding in Fn fibers, as determined by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. Finally, we assessed the resulting changes in adhesion and proangiogenic factor (VEGF) secretion of newly seeded 3T3-L1s, and we examined altered integrin specificity as a potential mechanism of modified cell–matrix interactions through integrin blockers. Our data indicate that tumor-conditioned Fn decreases adhesion while enhancing VEGF secretion by preadipocytes, and that an integrin switch is responsible for such changes. Collectively, our findings suggest that simultaneous stiffening and unfolding of initially deposited tumor-conditioned Fn alters both adhesion and proangiogenic behavior of surrounding stromal cells, likely promoting vascularization and growth of the breast tumor. This work enhances our knowledge of cell – Fn matrix interactions that may be exploited for other biomaterials-based applications, including advanced tissue engineering approaches. PMID:25907040

  13. Protein deficiency and nutritional recovery modulate insulin secretion and the early steps of insulin action in rats.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, M Q; Reis, M A; Carneiro, E M; Mello, M A; Velloso, L A; Saad, M J; Boschero, A C

    1998-10-01

    Maternal malnutrition was shown to affect early growth and leads to permanent alterations in insulin secretion and sensitivity of offspring. In addition, epidemiological studies showed an association between low birth weight and glucose intolerance in adult life. To understand these interactions better, we investigated the insulin secretion by isolated islets and the early events related to insulin action in the hind-limb muscle of adult rats fed a diet of 17% protein (control) or 6% protein [low (LP) protein] during fetal life, suckling and after weaning, and in rats receiving 6% protein during fetal life and suckling followed by a 17% protein diet after weaning (recovered). The basal and maximal insulin secretion by islets from rats fed LP diet and the basal release by islets from recovered rats were significantly lower than that of control rats. The dose-response curves to glucose of islets from LP and recovered groups were shifted to the right compared to control islets, with the half-maximal response (EC50) occurring at 16.9 +/- 1.3, 12.4 +/- 0.5 and 8.4 +/- 0.1 mmol/L, respectively. The levels of insulin receptor, as well as insulin receptor substrate-1 and phosphorylation and the association between insulin receptor substrate-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase were greater in rats fed a LP diet than in control rats. In recovered rats, these variables were not significantly different from those of the other two groups. These results suggest that glucose homeostasis is maintained in LP and recovered rats by an increased sensitivity to insulin as a result of alterations in the early steps of the insulin signal transduction pathway. PMID:9772130

  14. Recombinant porcine epidermal growth factor-secreting Lactococcus lactis promotes the growth performance of early-weaned piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important growth factor in regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. Studies showed that food-grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) and NICE expression system have superior performance in exogenous protein expression. This study aimed to construct and express porcine EGF (pEGF), and use L. lactis as vehicle for producing and delivering pEGF. Furthermore, investigating biological activity of pEGF and exploring applications feasibility of combination effects of L. lactis and pEGF on early weaned piglets’ production. Results A recombinant Lactococcus lactis which produced and secreted pEGF at 1000 ng/ml in culture supernatant was generated. Secreted pEGF was a fully biologically active protein, as demonstrated by its capacity to stimulate L929 mouse fibroblast cell line proliferation in vitro. For in vivo study, forty piglets were randomly allocated to control, antibiotic control, empty vector-expressing L. lactis (LL-EV) and pEGF-secreting L. lactis (LL-pEGF). After 14 d of rearing, final body weight and average daily gain in LL-pEGF were greater (P < 0.05, 8.95 vs. 8.37 kg, 206.1 vs. 157.7 g/day, respectively) than those in control, but no significant differences between LL-pEGF, LL-EV and antibiotic control. Overall period average daily feed intake was higher in LL-pEGF, LL-EV and antibiotic control than in control (P < 0.05, 252.9, 255.6, 250.0, 207.3 g/day, respectively). No significant difference was observed on ADFI/ADG. LL-pEGF increased villous height in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum than in control and LL-EV (P < 0.05). Sucrase in the 3 intestinal segments, aminopeptidase A in the duodenum and Jejunum, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidase IV in the duodenum in LL-pEGF were higher than those in control (P < 0.05). Furthermore, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus counts decreased in the ileum and Lactobacillus increased in the ileum and cecum digesta in LL-pEGF compare with the

  15. Root Secreted Metabolites and Proteins Are Involved in the Early Events of Plant-Plant Recognition Prior to Competition

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Dayakar V.; De-la-Peña, Clelia; Lei, Zhentian; Manter, Daniel K.; Chaparro, Jacqueline M.; Guimarães, Rejane L.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Vivanco, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism whereby organisms interact and differentiate between others has been at the forefront of scientific inquiry, particularly in humans and certain animals. It is widely accepted that plants also interact, but the degree of this interaction has been constricted to competition for space, nutrients, water and light. Here, we analyzed the root secreted metabolites and proteins involved in early plant neighbor recognition by using Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 ecotype (Col) as our focal plant co-cultured in vitro with different neighbors [A. thaliana Ler ecotype (Ler) or Capsella rubella (Cap)]. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed that both root secreted secondary metabolites and proteins clustered separately between the plants grown individually (Col-0, Ler and Cap grown alone) and the plants co-cultured with two homozygous individuals (Col-Col, Ler-Ler and Cap-Cap) or with different individuals (Col-Ler and Col-Cap). In particularly, we observed that a greater number of defense- and stress- related proteins were secreted when our control plant, Col, was grown alone as compared to when it was co-cultured with another homozygous individual (Col-Col) or with a different individual (Col-Ler and Col-Cap). However, the total amount of defense proteins in the exudates of the co-cultures was higher than in the plant alone. The opposite pattern of expression was identified for stress-related proteins. These data suggest that plants can sense and respond to the presence of different plant neighbors and that the level of relatedness is perceived upon initial interaction. Furthermore, the role of secondary metabolites and defense- and stress-related proteins widely involved in plant-microbe associations and abiotic responses warrants reassessment for plant-plant interactions. PMID:23056382

  16. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Type 3 Secretion System Suppresses Early Defense Responses to Effectively Nodulate Soybean.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Monreal, José Antonio; Preston, Gail M; Fones, Helen; Vioque, Blanca; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    Plants that interact with pathogenic bacteria in their natural environments have developed barriers to block or contain the infection. Phytopathogenic bacteria have evolved mechanisms to subvert these defenses and promote infection. Thus, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) delivers bacterial effectors directly into the plant cells to alter host signaling and suppress defenses, providing an appropriate environment for bacterial multiplication. Some rhizobial strains possess a symbiotic T3SS that seems to be involved in the suppression of host defenses to promote nodulation and determine the host range. In this work, we show that the inactivation of the Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 T3SS negatively affects soybean nodulation in the early stages of the symbiotic process, which is associated with a reduction of the expression of early nodulation genes. This symbiotic phenotype could be the consequence of the bacterial triggering of soybean defense responses associated with the production of salicylic acid (SA) and the impairment of the T3SS mutant to suppress these responses. Interestingly, the early induction of the transcription of GmMPK4, which negatively regulates SA accumulation and defense responses in soybean via WRKY33, could be associated with the differential defense responses induced by the parental and the T3SS mutant strain.

  17. The United States and biological warfare: secrets from the early cold war and Korea.

    PubMed

    Bruwer, A

    2001-01-01

    The United States and Biological Warfare is about accusations that the United States resorted to bacteriological warfare at a time of great military stress during the Korean War. In December 1951, the then US Secretary of Defense ordered early readiness for offensive use of biological weapons. Soon afterwards, the North Korean and Chinese armies accused the United States of starting a large-scale biological warfare experiment in Korea. The US State Department denied the accusation. Both parties to the dispute maintain their positions today. The authors spent 20 years researching the accusations in North America, Europe and Japan. They were the first foreigners to be given access to Chinese classified documents. The reader is also introduced to the concept of 'plausible denial', an official US policy which allowed responsible governmental representatives to deny knowledge of certain events. The authors hope that their work will contribute to the understanding of a time when modern war expanded into a new type of violence.

  18. [Oxytocin and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic neonatal hormone. Case report of early severe hyponatremia and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aldana-Valenzuela, Carlos; Prieto-Pantoja, José Alfredo; Hernández-Acevedo, Angélica

    2010-12-01

    This is a clinical case presentation of a full term newborn infant who suffered severe hyponatremia and early seizures, associated with maternal fluid overload with electrolyte free solutions and high doses of oxytocin for labor augmentation. Although this condition has been recognized since the 1960's with isolated reports, this particular case has features that needs further investigation, not only for the unsually severe hyponatremia, but most importantly we think, for the prominent signs of fluid retention, the infant had, that suggest excessive antidiuretic activity probably due to oxytocin. These findings are consistent with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Although until now there is no proof that oxytocin by itself produces this syndrome. We think the association is possible in certain clinical circumstances, such as those found in this case. We also, briefly discussed the pathophysiology of perinatal hyponatremia, the neonatal treatment of this condition and the current guidelines for the women in labor. Hyponatremia should not be considered a benign condition, since in the neonate, it may affect brain function. PMID:21961376

  19. The type III secretion effector NleF of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli activates NF-κB early during infection.

    PubMed

    Pallett, Mitchell A; Berger, Cedric N; Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Frankel, Gad

    2014-11-01

    The enteric pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli employ a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to manipulate the host inflammatory response during infection. Previously, it has been reported that EPEC, in a T3SS-dependent manner, induces an early proinflammatory response through activation of NF-κB via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). However, the activation of NF-κB during infection has not yet been attributed to an effector. At later time points postinfection, NF-κB signaling is inhibited through the translocation of multiple effectors, including NleE and NleC. Here we report that the highly conserved non-LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement)-encoded effector F (NleF) shows both diffuse and mitochondrial localization during ectopic expression. Moreover, NleF induces the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) following ectopic expression and during EPEC infection. Furthermore, the proinflammatory activity and localization of NleF were dependent on the C-terminal amino acids LQCG. While the C-terminal domain of NleF has previously been shown to be essential for interaction with caspase-4, caspase-8, and caspase-9, the proinflammatory activity of NleF was independent of interaction with caspase-4, -8, or -9. In conclusion, EPEC, through the T3SS-dependent translocation of NleF, induces a proinflammatory response in an NF-κB-dependent manner in the early stages of infection.

  20. The Type III Secretion Effector NleF of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Activates NF-κB Early during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pallett, Mitchell A.; Berger, Cedric N.; Pearson, Jaclyn S.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.

    2014-01-01

    The enteric pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli employ a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to manipulate the host inflammatory response during infection. Previously, it has been reported that EPEC, in a T3SS-dependent manner, induces an early proinflammatory response through activation of NF-κB via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). However, the activation of NF-κB during infection has not yet been attributed to an effector. At later time points postinfection, NF-κB signaling is inhibited through the translocation of multiple effectors, including NleE and NleC. Here we report that the highly conserved non-LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement)-encoded effector F (NleF) shows both diffuse and mitochondrial localization during ectopic expression. Moreover, NleF induces the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) following ectopic expression and during EPEC infection. Furthermore, the proinflammatory activity and localization of NleF were dependent on the C-terminal amino acids LQCG. While the C-terminal domain of NleF has previously been shown to be essential for interaction with caspase-4, caspase-8, and caspase-9, the proinflammatory activity of NleF was independent of interaction with caspase-4, -8, or -9. In conclusion, EPEC, through the T3SS-dependent translocation of NleF, induces a proinflammatory response in an NF-κB-dependent manner in the early stages of infection. PMID:25183730

  1. The suppressive effect of immune stress on LH secretion is absent in the early neonatal period in rats.

    PubMed

    Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Iwasa, Takeshi; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Kawami, Takako; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Irahara, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Some physiological functions display weak responses to stress in the early neonatal period; i.e., they exhibit stress hyporesponse periods. In this study, we evaluated whether gonadotropin regulatory factors exhibit stress hyporesponsive periods in male and female rats. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (100μg/kg) (LPS group) or saline (control group) on postnatal day (PND) 5, 10, 15, or 25. Then, their serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations and hypothalamic mRNA levels of gonadotropin regulatory factors; i.e., kisspeptin (Kiss1), the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), were measured at 2h after the injection. The hypothalamic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were also measured because they suppress gonadotropin secretion. The serum LH concentration of the LPS group was lower than that of the control group at PND25 in both sexes, but no such difference was seen at PND5, 10, or 15 in either sex. In both sexes, the hypothalamic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression levels of the LPS group were higher than those of the control group at PND25, but not at PND5 or 10. The hypothalamic IL-1β mRNA expression level of the LPS group was higher than that of the control group at all time points. The hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r, and GnRH mRNA expression levels of the LPS and control groups did not differ at any time point in either sex. These findings suggest that gonadotropin regulatory factors exhibit stress hyporesponse periods. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG) might become responsive to immune stress between PND15 and 25, which could be related to enhanced hypothalamic cytokine expression. The avoidance of infectious stress during the early neonatal period might be important for normal development of the HPG axis.

  2. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A.; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M.; Uthlaut, Adam B.; Smith, Derek T.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic “thriftiness” of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  3. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M; Uthlaut, Adam B; Smith, Derek T; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic "thriftiness" of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  4. Two distinct conformational states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulent factor early secreted antigenic target 6 kDa are behind the discrepancy around its biological functions.

    PubMed

    Refai, Amira; Haoues, Meriam; Othman, Houcemeddine; Barbouche, Mohamed Ridha; Moua, Philippe; Bondon, Arnaud; Mouret, Liza; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Essafi, Makram

    2015-11-01

    Early secreted antigenic target 6 kDa (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein 10 kDa (CFP-10) are complex proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis that play a major role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. However, studies focusing on the biological functions of ESAT-6 led to discordant results and the role of ESAT-6 remains controversial. In the present study, we aim to address a potential explanation for this discrepancy and to highlight the physiological impact of two conformational states of ESAT-6. Analysis of a recombinant form of ESAT-6 by native gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography and CD spectroscopy revealed that ESAT-6 forms dimers/multimers with higher molecular weight, which disappeared under the action of the detergent amidosulfobetaine-14 (ASB), giving rise to another conformational state of the protein. NMR has further indicated that ASB-treated versus nontreated ESAT-6 adopted distinct structural forms but with no well defined tertiary structure. However, protein-protein docking analysis favored a dimeric state of ESAT-6. Interestingly, the two preparations presented opposing effects on mycobacterial infectivity, as well as macrophage survival, interferon-γ secretion and membrane pore formation. Thereafter, we generated a recombinant form of the physiological heterodimer ESAT-6/CFP-10 that ASB was also able to dissociate and which showed functions similar to those of ESAT-6 dimers/multimers. Our data suggest that, in the absence of CFP-10, the hydrophobic regions of the ESAT-6 can form dimers/multimers, mimicking the ESAT-6/CFP-10 heterodimer, whereas their dissociation generates a protein presenting entirely different activities. Overall, the present study clarifies the intriguing divergences between reports that could be attributed to the ESAT-6 oligomeric state and sheds light on its importance for a better comprehension of the physiopathology of tuberculosis.

  5. A novel phage element of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis P125109 contributes to accelerated type III secretion system 2-dependent early inflammation kinetics in a mouse colitis model.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Bhusan Pati, Niladri; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis exhibits type III secretion system 2 (TTSS2)-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetics faster than those of closely related S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. To investigate the accelerated TTSS-2-dependent pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis, we focused on its genome. Results of a previously published comparative genomic study revealed the presence of mutually exclusive genes in both serovars. In this study, we investigated the roles of six S. Enteritidis-specific genes in vivo by using differential fluorescence induction (DFI) through putative gene-specific promoters. The promoter construct associated with the gene locus SEN1140 induced green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the gut lumen, lamina propria, mesenteric lymph nodes, and related systemic organs. To further investigate the potential role of SEN1140, we compared a SEN1140 deletion mutant with S. Typhimurium in a TTSS1-deficient background. Interestingly, the S. Enteritidis mutant lacking SEN1140 did not show the unique TTSS-2-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetic phenotype of S. Typhimurium. Consistent with this result, complementation of SEN1140 restored the TTSS-2-dependent accelerated inflammatory potential of S. Enteritidis. This report presents a suitable screening strategy that uses a combination of DFI, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, and wild-type isogenic tagged-strain techniques to explore the unique roles of S. Enteritidis-specific genes in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:22753379

  6. Proteolytic enzyme production by strains of the insect pathogen xenorhabdus and characterization of an early-log-phase-secreted protease as a potential virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Massaoud, Mustafa K; Marokházi, Judit; Fodor, András; Venekei, István

    2010-10-01

    As a comparison to a similar study on Photorhabdus strains, 15 Xenorhabdus bacterial strains and secondary phenotypic variants of two strains were screened for proteolytic activity by five detection methods. Although the number and intensity of proteolytic activities were different, every strain was positive for proteolytic activity by several tests. Zymography following native PAGE detected two groups of activities with different substrate affinities and a higher and lower electrophoretic mobility that were distinguished as activity 1 and 2, respectively. Zymography following SDS-PAGE resolved three activities, which were provisionally named proteases A, B, and C. Only protease B, an ∼55-kDa enzyme, was produced by every strain. This enzyme exhibited higher affinity to the gelatin substrate than to the casein substrate. Of the chromogenic substrates used, three were hydrolyzed: furylacryloyl-Ala-Leu-Val-Tyr (Fua-ALVY), Fua-LGPA (LGPA is Leu-Gly-Pro-Ala) (a substrate for collagen peptidases), and succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-thiobenzyl (Succ-AAPF-SBzl). All but the Fua-LGPA-ase activity seemed to be from secreted enzymes. According to their substrate preference profiles and inhibitor sensitivities, at least six such proteolytic enzymes could be distinguished in the culture medium of Xenorhabdus strains. The proteolytic enzyme that was secreted the earliest, protease B and the Succ-AAPF-SBzl-hydrolyzing enzyme, appeared from the early logarithmic phase of growth. Protease B could also be detected in the hemolymph of Xenorhabdus-infected Galleria mellonella larvae from 15 h postinfection. The purified protease B hydrolyzed in vitro seven proteins in the hemolymph of Manduca sexta that were also cleaved by PrtA peptidase from Photorhabdus. The N-terminal sequence of protease B showed similarity to a 55-kDa serralysin type metalloprotease in Xenorhabdus nematophila, which had been identified as an orthologue of Photorhabdus PrtA peptidase.

  7. DNA methylation analysis of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 gene for the early detection of colorectal cancer in fecal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Hadi; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Background: The early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) with high sensitivity screening is essential for the reduction of cancer-specific mortality. Abnormally methylated genes that are responsible for the pathogenesis of cancers can be used as biomarkers for the detection of CRC. The methylation status of the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) gene was evaluated for their use as a marker in the noninvasive detection of CRC. Materials and Methods: Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the promoter CpG methylation of SFRP2 in the fecal DNA of 25 patients with CRC and 25 individuals exhibiting normal colonoscopy results. Results: Promoter methylation levels of SFRP2 in CRC patients and in healthy controls were 60% and 8%, respectively. Methylation of the SFRP2 promoter in fecal DNA is associated with the presence of colorectal tumors. Conclusion: Hence, the detection of aberrantly methylated DNA in fecal samples may present a promising, noninvasive screening method for CRC. PMID:27630389

  8. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in intestinal stromal cells controls KC/ CXCL1 secretion, which correlates with recruitment of IL-22- secreting neutrophils at early stages of Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Soo; Yang, Hyungjun; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Yeji; Lee, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ji Heui; Jang, Yong Ju; Vallance, Bruce A; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2015-08-01

    Attaching and effacing pathogens, including enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in humans and Citrobacter rodentium in mice, raise serious public health concerns. Here we demonstrate that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is indispensable for protection against C. rodentium infection in mice. Four days after infection with C. rodentium, there were significantly fewer neutrophils (CD11b+ Ly6C+ Ly6G+) in the colons of IL-1R−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Levels of mRNA and protein of KC/CXCL1 were also significantly reduced in colon homogenates of infected IL-1R−/− mice relative to wild-type mice. Of note, infiltrated CD11b+ Ly6C+ Ly6G+ neutrophils were the main source of IL-22 secretion after C. rodentium infection. Interestingly, intestinal stromal cells isolated from IL-1R−/− mice secreted lower levels of KC/CXCL1 than stromal cells from wild-type mice during C. rodentium infection. Similar effects were found when mouse intestinal stromal cells and human nasal polyp stromal cells were treated with IL-1R antagonists (i.e., anakinra) in vitro. These results suggest that IL-1 signaling plays a pivotal role in activating mucosal stromal cells to secrete KC/CXCL1, which is essential for infiltration of IL-22-secreting neutrophils upon bacterial infection.

  9. Effective expansion of forkhead box P3⁺ regulatory T cells via early secreted antigenic target 6 and antigen 85 complex B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-E; Du, Zhong-Ren; Cai, Ying-Mu; Peng, Wen-Guang; Zheng, Gao-Zhe; Zheng, Geng-Long; Wu, Li-Biao; Li, Ke

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of CD4+ CD25+ forkhead box (FOX)P3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells has been observed in patients with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis; however, the mechanism of expansion remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the early secreted antigenic target 6(ESAT‑6) and antigen 85 complex B (Ag85B) from M. tuberculosis on Treg cell expansion. To investigate the sensitivity of peripheral blood cultures to the M. tuberculosis ESAT‑6 and Ag85B antigens, the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells was determined using flow cytometry and the levels of FOXP3 mRNA were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of FOXP3 and the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells were increased in multiplicitous drug‑resistant tuberculosis patients compared with those in healthy controls and patients with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) (P<0.001). The mycobacterial antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B increased the expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells and the mRNA levels of FOXP3 in healthy controls and LTBI patients compared with the effect of Bacillus Calmette‑Guerin (P<0.05). Additionally, the mRNA levels of FOXP3 were elevated in the LTBI patients following stimulations with the mycobacterial antigens (P=0.012). Therefore, the M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B induced CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg‑cell expansion, particularly in patients with LTBI. These findings indicated that CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells may have a primary role in the failure of the host immune system to eradicate M. tuberculosis.

  10. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. The control of progesterone secretion during the estrous cycle and early pseudopregnancy in the rat: prolactin, gonadotropin and steroid levels associated with rescue of the corpus luteum of pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, M S; Freeman, M E; Neill, J D

    1975-01-01

    The hormonal factors associated with converting a corpus luteum of estrous cycle into a corpus luteum of pseudopregnancy were studied by measuring LH and FSH prolactin, estradiol and progesterone levels in decapitated rats during the 4-day estrous cycle and a comparable time of pseudopregnancy (lights on 0600-0800 hr.). During the estrous cycle, prolactin, LH and FSH remained low and unchanging except on the afternoon of proestrus, when typical proestrous surges were observed. In contrast, estradiol levels began to increase on D-1, from baseline values of 7 pg/ml to approximately 15-20 pg/ml. These levels were maintained until the afternoon of D-2 when estradiol further increased to reach peak levels of 40-50 pg/ml by 0900 hr on proestrus. Estradiol then declined in relation to the increase in LH secreation and had returned to baseline by estrus. Progesterone secretion by the corpora lutea of the cycle also increased on the afternoon of D-1 and reached a maximum value of 25-30 ng/ml early on the morning of D-2. At this time, a precipitious fall in progesterone occurred, returning to baseline values of 5-1- ng/ml by 0700 on D-2 signifying the regression of the corpora lutea of the cycle. Progesterone remained low thereafter until the afternoon of proestrus when levels increased in response to the proestrus when levels increased in response to the proestrous surge of LH. Following cervical stimulation at 1900 hr on proestrus, no differences were noted, with respect to the estrous cycle, in LH, FSH or estradiol secreation through the afternoon of D-2. Surprisingly, progesterone levels did not differ in the cycle and pseudopregnancy until the early morning of D-29 instead of progesterone levels falling to baseline as they had during the cycle, the corpora lutea of pseudopregnancy were rescused, progesterone increasing dramatically to reach levels of 45-50 ng/ml by 1700 hr on that same day. The only difference in hormone secretion that was noted which could account for

  12. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  13. Cytokines associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease brain stimulate human glial and neuronal cell cultures to secrete early complement proteins, but not C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; De Groot, C J; Van Muiswinkel, F L; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1999-11-01

    Complement activation products C1q, C4c/d, and C3c/d in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease probably result from direct binding and activation of C1 by amyloid beta peptides. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization studies have shown that several complement factors are produced in the brain parenchyma. In the present study, cytokines that can be detected in amyloid plaques (i.e., interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were found to differentially stimulate the expression of C1 subcomponents, C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh), C4, and C3, by astrocyte and microglial cell cultures derived from postmortem adult, human brain specimens and by neuroblastoma cell lines in culture. C1r and C1s were secreted at low levels by astrocytes and neuroblastoma cell lines. Exposure of cells to IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha and to a far lesser extent IL-6, markedly upregulated C1r, C1s, and C3 production. C4 synthesis increased in response to interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-6, whereas that of C1-Inh could be stimulated only by IFN-gamma. Thus, C1-Inh production is refractory to stimulation by plaque-associated cytokines, whereas these cytokines do stimulate C1r, C1s, and also C4 and C3 secretion by astrocytes and neuronal cells in culture. In contrast to the amyloid plaque associated cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-1 alpha, and TNF-alpha, the amyloid peptide A beta 1-42 itself did not stimulate C1r and C1s synthesis by astrocytes, microglial cells, or neuroblastoma cell lines. Microglial cells were the only cell type that constitutively expressed C1q. The ability of C1q to reassociate with newly formed C1r and C1s upon activation of C1 and subsequent inactivation by C1-Inh, may enable ongoing complement activation at sites of amyloid deposition, especially when C1-Inh is consumed and not replaced.

  14. The product of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus immediate early gene K4.2 regulates immunoglobulin secretion and calcium homeostasis by interacting with and inhibiting pERP1.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai-Yee; Brulois, Kevin; Toth, Zsolt; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Sun-Hwa; O'Brien, Kathryn; Lee, Hyera; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Cesarman, Ethel; Ensser, Armin; Jung, Jae U

    2013-11-01

    Chaperones are proteins that assist the noncovalent folding and assembly of macromolecular polypeptide chains, ultimately preventing the formation of nonfunctional or potentially toxic protein aggregates. Plasma cell-induced-endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein 1 (pERP1) is a cellular chaperone that is preferentially expressed in marginal-zone B cells and is highly upregulated during plasma cell differentiation. While initially identified as a dedicated factor for the assembly of secreted IgM, pERP1 has since been implicated in suppressing calcium mobilization, and its expression is misregulated in multiple tumors. A number of herpesvirus immediate early gene products play important roles in the regulation of viral gene expression and/or evasion of host immune responses. Here, we report that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) immediate early viral gene K4.2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-localized protein that interacts with and inhibits pERP1. Consequently, K4.2 expression interfered with immunoglobulin secretion by delaying the kinetics of immunoglobulin assembly and also led to increased responsiveness of B-cell receptor signal transduction by enhancing phosphotyrosine signals and intracellular calcium fluxes. Furthermore, K4.2 expression also appeared to contribute to maximal lytic replication by enhancing viral glycoprotein expression levels and ultimately promoting infectious-virus production. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that pERP1 expression was readily detected in KSHV-positive cells from multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions, suggesting that pERP1 may have potential roles in the KSHV life cycle and malignancy. In conclusion, our data suggest that K4.2 participates in lytic replication by enhancing calcium flux and viral glycoprotein expression, but also by interfering with immunoglobulin assembly to potentially dampen the adaptive immune response. PMID:23986581

  15. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D

    2007-10-01

    Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient includes routine methods for maintaining mucociliary function, as well as techniques for secretion removal. Humidification, mobilization of the patient, and airway suctioning are all routine procedures for managing secretions in the ventilated patient. Early ambulation of the post-surgical patient and routine turning of the ventilated patient are common secretion-management techniques that have little supporting evidence of efficacy. Humidification is a standard of care and a requisite for secretion management. Both active and passive humidification can be used. The humidifier selected and the level of humidification required depend on the patient's condition and the expected duration of intubation. In patients with thick, copious secretions, heated humidification is superior to a heat and moisture exchanger. Airway suctioning is the most important secretion removal technique. Open-circuit and closed-circuit suctioning have similar efficacy. Instilling saline prior to suctioning, to thin the secretions or stimulate a cough, is not supported by the literature. Adequate humidification and as-needed suctioning are the foundation of secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient. Intermittent therapy for secretion removal includes techniques either to simulate a cough, to mechanically loosen secretions, or both. Patient positioning for secretion drainage is also widely used. Percussion and postural drainage have been widely employed for mechanically ventilated patients but have not been shown to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia or atelectasis. Manual hyperinflation and insufflation-exsufflation, which attempt to improve secretion removal by simulating a cough, have been described in mechanically ventilated patients, but neither has been studied sufficiently to support routine use. Continuous lateral rotation with a specialized bed reduces atelectasis in some patients, but has not been shown

  16. Presentation of noise during acute restraint stress attenuates expression of immediate early genes and arginine vasopressin in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus but not corticosterone secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Koji; Ohmomo, Hideki; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Nogami, Haruo; Hisano, Setsuji

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of acoustic stimulation on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats submitted to acute restraint stress, through semi-quantitative histochemical analysis of expression of immediate early gene products (c-Fos, JunB and phosphorylated c-Jun) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) hnRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Simultaneous presentation of white or pink noise with restraint resulted in a significant attenuation of stress-induced c-Fos and JunB expression in the dorsal body of dorsal medial parvicellular subdivision (mpdd) of the PVN, as compared with restraint without noise. However, this presentation did not change phosphorylation of c-Jun and the plasma corticosterone level. Moreover, white noise presentation during restraint led to a reduction in the number of c-Fos- or JunB-expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons and the number of neurons expressing AVP hnRNA in the mpdd. Dual-histochemical labeling revealed co-expression of c-Fos and JunB, as well as JunB and AVP hnRNA in mpdd neurons. These data suggest that acoustic stimuli have an attenuation effect on the restraint-induced activation of neuroendocrine CRH neurons, resulting in the reduction in AVP production as an adaptation of HPA axis to repeated stress.

  17. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  18. Prostaglandin F2α Stimulates the Expression and Secretion of Transforming Growth Factor B1 Via Induction of the Early Growth Response 1 Gene (EGR1) in the Bovine Corpus Luteum

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaoying; Arvisais, Edward W.; Jiang, Chao; Chen, Dong-bao; Roy, Shyamal K.; Pate, Joy L.; Hansen, Thomas R.; Rueda, Bo R.; Davis, John S.

    2008-01-01

    In most mammals, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) is believed to be a trigger that induces the regression of the corpus luteum (CL), whereby progesterone synthesis is inhibited, the luteal structure involutes, and the reproductive cycle resumes. Studies have shown that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) protein can induce the expression of proapoptotic proteins, suggesting that EGR1 may play a role in luteal regression. Our hypothesis is that EGR1 mediates the actions of PGF2α by inducing the expression of TGF β1 (TGFB1), a key tissue remodeling protein. The levels of EGR1 mRNA and protein were up-regulated in the bovine CL during PGF2α-induced luteolysis in vivo and in PGF2α-treated luteal cells in vitro. Using chemical and genetic approaches, the RAF/MAPK kinase (MEK) 1/ERK pathway was identified as a proximal signaling event required for the induction of EGR1 in PGF2α-treated cells. Treatment with PGF2α increased the expression of TGFB1 mRNA and protein as well as the binding of EGR1 protein to TGFB1 promoter in bovine luteal cells. The effect of PGF2α on TGFB1 expression was mimicked by a protein kinase C (PKC)/RAF/MEK1/ERK activator or adenoviral-mediated expression of EGR1. The stimulatory effect of PGF2α on TGFB1 mRNA and TGFB1 protein secretion was inhibited by blockade of MEK1/ERK signaling and by adenoviral-mediated expression of NAB2, an EGR1 binding protein that inhibits EGR1 transcriptional activity. Treatment of luteal cells with TGFB1 reduced progesterone secretion, implicating TGFB1 in luteal regression. These studies demonstrate that PGF2α stimulates the expression of EGR1 and TGFB1 in the CL. We suggest that EGR1 plays a role in the expression of genes whose cognate proteins coordinate luteal regression. PMID:17916653

  19. The type III secreted effector DspE is required early in Solanum tuberosum leaf infection by Pectobacterium carotovorum to elicit cell death, and requires Wx(3-6)D/E motifs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogens that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Unlike hemi-biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (P. carotovorum) appears to secrete only one effect...

  20. Mechanisms of bicarbonate secretion: lessons from the airways.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Early studies showed that airway cells secrete HCO(3)(-) in response to cAMP-mediated agonists and HCO(3)(-) secretion was impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF). Studies with Calu-3 cells, an airway serous model with high expression of CFTR, also show the secretion of HCO(3)(-) when cells are stimulated with cAMP-mediated agonists. Activation of basolateral membrane hIK-1 K(+) channels inhibits HCO(3)(-) secretion and stimulates Cl(-) secretion. CFTR mediates the exit of both HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-) across the apical membrane. Entry of HCO(3)(-) on a basolateral membrane NBC or Cl(-) on the NKCC determines which anion is secreted. Switching between these two secreted anions is determined by the activity of hIK-1 K(+) channels.

  1. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  2. Secrets in "The Day of Ahmed's Secret."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckett, Peter; Knox, Marjorie

    2001-01-01

    Examines images and the written text in the picture book, "The Day of Ahmed's Secret," by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland. Examines the book in greater detail by looking for issues of authenticity as well as social issues within the book's pictures and written texts. (SG)

  3. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  4. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'. PMID:27581908

  5. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  6. Dynamics of protein secretion during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Muroya, Susumu; Nishimura, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    The major functions of adipocytes include both lipid storage and the production of secretory factors. However, the type of proteins released from mouse 3T3-L1 cells during adipocyte differentiation remains poorly understood. We examined the dynamics of secreted proteins during adipocyte differentiation using mass spectrometry (MS) combined with an iTRAQ (®) labeling method that enables the simultaneous analysis of relative protein expression levels. A total of 215 proteins were identified and quantified from approximately 10 000 MS/MS spectra. Of these, approximately 38% were categorized as secreted proteins based on gene ontology classification. Adipokine secretion levels were increased with the progression of differentiation. By contrast, levels of fibril collagen components, such as subunits of type I and III collagens, were decreased during differentiation. Basement membrane components attained their peak levels at day 4 when small lipid droplets accumulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Simultaneously, peak levels of collagen microfibril components that comprise type V and VI collagen subunits were also observed. Our data demonstrated that extracellular matrix components were predominantly released during the early and middle stages of adipocyte differentiation, with a subsequent increase in the secretion of adipokines. This suggests that 3T3-L1 cells secrete adipokines after their ECM is constructed during adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27516960

  7. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  8. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  9. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2.

    PubMed

    Ho, Melissa E; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-03-29

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  10. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  11. Secret neutrino interactions: a pseudoscalar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth Hansen, Rasmus; Tram, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments point towards the existence of additional mostly sterile neutrino mass eigenstates in the eV mass range. At the same time, such sterile neutrinos are disfavoured by cosmology (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure), unless they can be prevented from being thermalised in the early Universe. To this aim, we introduce a model of sterile neutrino secret interactions mediated by a new light pseudoscalar: The new interactions can accomodate sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, providing a good fit to all the up to date cosmological data.

  12. Blockade by NNC 55-0396, mibefradil, and nickel of calcium and exocytotic signals in chromaffin cells: implications for the regulation of hypoxia-induced secretion at early life.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Morales, José C; Fernando Padín, J; Vestring, Stefan; Musial, Diego C; de Diego, Antonio-Miguel G; García, Antonio G

    2015-03-15

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (CCs) express high-voltage activated calcium channels (high-VACCs) of the L, N and PQ subtypes; in addition, T-type low-VACCs are also expressed during embryo and neonatal life. Effects of the more frequently used T channel blockers NNC 55-0396 (NNC), mibefradil, and Ni2+ on the whole-cell Ba2+ current (IBa), the K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and catecholamine secretion have been studied in adult bovine CCs (BCCs) and rat embryo CCs (RECCs). NNC, mibefradil, and Ni2+ blocked BCC IBa with IC50 of 1.8, 4.9 and 70 μM, while IC50 to block IBa in RECCs were 2.1, 4.4 and 41 μM. Pronounced blockade of K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and secretion was also elicited by the three agents. However, the hypoxia-induced secretion (HIS) of catecholamine in RECCs was blocked substantially (75%) with thresholds concentrations of NCC (IC20 to block IBa); this was not the case for mibefradil and Ni2+ that required higher concentrations to block the HIS response. Thus, out of the three compounds, NNC seemed to be an adequate pharmacological tool to discern the contribution of T channels to the HIS response, without a contamination with high-VACC blockade.

  13. A Secret Support Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Hanover College's Early Alert Team, an early-alert program that seeks to identify students' academic, social, or personal troubles as soon as they surface. The team's five members gather information about students from all corners of the campus and then devise strategies to help them. The early-alert system has not only…

  14. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  15. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  16. Cell secretion: an update.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, A

    2008-08-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed 'porosome' and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article.

  17. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  18. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  19. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shail

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the “novel weapons hypothesis (NWH).” Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1–3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin. PMID:21057643

  20. Pharmacological regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, E F

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the key endocrine factor regulating systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis. Elevated levels of circulating PTH increase bone turnover and, depending on the duration of elevation, will result in net anabolic or catabolic effects on the skeleton. Secretion of PTH from the parathyroid glands is regulated by small changes in circulating levels of Ca(2+) which are detected by a Ca(2+) receptor on the surface of parathyroid cells. This G protein-coupled receptor is the primary molecular entity used by parathyroid cells to regulate secretion of PTH. As such, the Ca(2+) receptor is a unique molecular target for new drugs capable of increasing or decreasing circulating levels of PTH. Compounds which activate the Ca(2+) receptor are termed calcimimetics and they inhibit the secretion of PTH; a calcimimetic compound is in late stage clinical trials for the treatment of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Conversely, calcilytic compounds, which are Ca(2+) receptor antagonists, stimulate secretion of PTH; a calcilytic compound is in early clinical development for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:12171519

  1. Proprotein Convertases Process Pmel17 during Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that traffics to melanosomes where it forms a fibrillar matrix on which melanin gets deposited. Before being cleaved into smaller fibrillogenic fragments the protein undergoes processing by proprotein convertases, a class of serine proteases that typically recognize the canonical motif RX(R/K)R↓. The current model of Pmel17 maturation states that this processing step occurs in melanosomes, but in light of recent reports this issue has become controversial. We therefore addressed this question by thoroughly assessing the processing kinetics of either wild-type Pmel17 or a secreted soluble Pmel17 derivative. Our results demonstrate clearly that processing of Pmel17 occurs during secretion and that it does not require entry of the protein into the endocytic system. Strikingly, processing proceeds even in the presence of the secretion inhibitor monensin, suggesting that Pmel17 is an exceptionally good substrate. In line with this, we find that newly synthesized surface Pmel17 is already quantitatively cleaved. Moreover, we demonstrate that Pmel17 function is independent of the sequence identity of its unconventional proprotein convertase-cleavage motif that lacks arginine in P4 position. The data alter the current view of Pmel17 maturation and suggest that the multistep processing of Pmel17 begins with an early cleavage during secretion that primes the protein for later functional processing. PMID:21247888

  2. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  3. Modeling mechanisms of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Tabak, Joël; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2010-12-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cellular process involving the regulated release of intracellular products from cells. Physiological functions such as neurotransmission, or the release of hormones and digestive enzymes, are all governed by cell secretion. Anomalies in the processes involved in secretion contribute to the development and progression of diseases such as diabetes and other hormonal disorders. To unravel the mechanisms that govern such diseases, it is essential to understand how hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters are synthesized and processed, and how their signals are recognized, amplified and transmitted by intracellular signaling pathways in the target cells. Here, we discuss diverse aspects of the detailed mechanisms involved in secretion based on mathematical models. The models range from stochastic ones describing the trafficking of secretory vesicles to deterministic ones investigating the regulation of cellular processes that underlie hormonal secretion. In all cases, the models are closely related to experimental results and suggest theoretical predictions for the secretion mechanisms.

  4. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  5. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  6. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  7. Solubility and secretability.

    PubMed

    Schein, C H

    1993-08-01

    The solubility and secretability of proteins can often be affected by extremely small changes in their primary structure. Attempts to determine empirical rules for the alteration of protein structure to improve either of these characteristics have met with only partial success. Those (mostly serendipitous) improvements in solubility that have been obtained via mutagenesis cannot be considered to be 'protein engineering'. The most successful examples where directed mutagenesis has been used to alter protein solubility, hemoglobin and insulin, have relied on established crystal structures and a wealth of data about the relationship between sequence and structure of the targeted protein. Currently, optimizing culture growth conditions by trial and error remains the fastest way to improve expression.

  8. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  9. Bacterial Secretion Systems: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin R; Mecsas, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection.

  10. Exemption 4: Trade Secrets under the Freedom of Information Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Holly E.

    Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) protects from disclosure by government agencies privileged and confidential trade secrets and commercial or financial information. Based on early Exemption 4 litigation, courts have devised a "substantial competitive harm test" to decide whether requested information should be covered by the…

  11. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Destiny J; Kang, Byung-Ho; Heringer, Angelo S; Wilkop, Thomas E; Drakakaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) describes secretion pathways that bypass one or several of the canonical secretion pit-stops on the way to the plasma membrane, and/or involve the secretion of leaderless proteins. So far, alternatives to conventional secretion were primarily observed and studied in yeast and animal cells. The sessile lifestyle of plants brings with it unique restraints on how they adapt to adverse conditions and environmental challenges. Recently, attention towards unconventional secretion pathways in plant cells has substantially increased, with the large number of leaderless proteins identified through proteomic studies. While UPS pathways in plants are certainly not yet exhaustively researched, an emerging notion is that induction of UPS pathways is correlated with pathogenesis and stress responses. Given the multitude UPS events observed, comprehensively organizing the routes proteins take to the apoplast in defined UPS categories is challenging. With the establishment of a larger collection of studied plant proteins taking these UPS pathways, a clearer picture of endomembrane trafficking as a whole will emerge. There are several novel enabling technologies, such as vesicle proteomics and chemical genomics, with great potential for dissecting secretion pathways, providing information about the cargo that travels along them and the conditions that induce them. PMID:27665550

  12. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  13. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  14. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  15. Plant secretome: unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2010-02-01

    Plant secretomics is a newly emerging area of the plant proteomics field. It basically describes the global study of secreted proteins into the extracellular space of plant cell or tissue at any given time and under certain conditions through various secretory mechanisms. A combination of biochemical, proteomics and bioinformatics approaches has been developed to isolate, identify and profile secreted proteins using complementary in vitro suspension-cultured cells and in planta systems. Developed inventories of secreted proteins under normal, biotic and abiotic conditions revealed several different types of novel secreted proteins, including the leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs). On average, LSPs can account for more than 50% of the total identified secretome, supporting, as in other eukaryotes, the existence of novel secretory mechanisms independent of the classical endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway, and suggesting that this non-classical mechanism of protein expression is, for as yet unknown reasons, more massively used than in other eukaryotic systems. Plants LSPs, which seem to be potentially involved in the defense/stress responses, might have dual (extracellular and/or intracellular) roles as most of them have established intracellular functions, yet presently unknown extracellular functions. Evidence is emerging on the role of glycosylation in the apical sorting and trafficking of secretory proteins. These initial secretome studies in plants have considerably advanced our understanding on secretion of different types of proteins and their underlying mechanisms, and opened a door for comparative analyses of plant secretomes with those of other organisms. In this first review on plant secretomics, we summarize and discuss the secretome definition, the applied approaches for unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins in the extracellular fluid, the possible functional significance and secretory mechanisms of LSPs, as well as glycosylation of

  16. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  17. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  18. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  19. Pulling Secrets from Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, Mary T.

    2008-06-06

    Haystack. Needle. Imagine having a machine into which you feed batches of hay. Each piece of hay zooms past a gadget that studies its characteristics -- golden, flexible, musty -- and identifies it as "hay". And then that odd piece hits the spotlight -- silver, shiny, pointy. "Needle." An interdisciplinary group of award-winning researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., wants to make searching for that needle in the haystack simple and fast. Their haystack is our blood or tissues. In them reside proteins that can serve as early signs of our diseases—if researchers can find the disease-related proteins among the thousands of normal ones. The team of physicists, biochemists, engineers and computer scientists is building instruments to find those signs.

  20. Cell secretion and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-07-01

    Secretion occurs in all cells of multicellular organisms and involves the delivery of secretory products packaged in membrane-bound vesicles to the cell exterior. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. Secretory vesicles are transported to specific sites at the plasma membrane, where they dock and fuse to release their contents. Similar to other cellular processes, cell secretion is found to be highly regulated and a precisely orchestrated event. It has been demonstrated that membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse at porosomes, which are specialized supramolecular structures at the cell plasma membrane. Swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of pressure, allowing expulsion of intravesicular contents. The extent of secretory vesicle swelling dictates the amount of intravesicular contents expelled during secretion. The discovery of the porosome, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle fusion at the base of porosomes, and vesicle swelling, has also been resolved. These findings reveal the molecular mechanism of cell secretion.

  1. Second messengers in renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C

    1985-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a central role in electrolyte homeostasis and in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. The level of activity of this system is determined primarily by the rate at which the kidneys secrete renin into the blood. Although many factors affect renin secretion in vivo, it is certain that all extracellular first messengers affect the activity of the renin-secreting cell by altering its intracellular concentrations of only a few second messengers. The thesis of this review is that free ionic calcium (Ca2+) and cAMP are inhibitory and stimulatory second messengers in renin secretion and that Ca2+ is preeminent. In general, intracellular Ca2+ is controlled by two mechanisms of Ca2+ efflux (Na-Ca exchange; primary active Ca2+ transport) and two mechanisms of Ca2+ influx and/or mobilization (voltage-sensitive Ca channels; receptor-operated channels). There is evidence to suggest that first messengers affect intracellular Ca2+, and therefore renin secretion, by affecting these efflux, influx, and mobilization pathways.

  2. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  3. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  4. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making.

  5. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  6. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  7. Optical method for quantifying rates of mucus secretion from single submucosal glands.

    PubMed

    Joo, N S; Wu, J V; Krouse, M E; Saenz, Y; Wine, J J

    2001-08-01

    We describe an optical method to quantify single- gland secretion. Isolated tracheal mucosa were mounted at the air-Krebs interface and coated with oil. Gland secretions formed spherical bubbles that were digitally imaged at intervals, allowing rates of secretion to be calculated. We monitored 340 glands in 54 experiments with 12 sheep. Glands secreted basally at low rates (0.57 +/- 0.04 nl x min(-1) x gland(-1), 123 glands) in tissues up to 9 h postharvest and at lower rates for up to 3 days. Carbachol (10 microM) stimulated secretion with an early transient and a sustained or oscillating phase. Peak secretion was 15.7 +/- 1.2 nl x min(-1) x gland(-1) (60 glands); sustained secretion was 4.5 +/- 0.5 nl x min(-1) x gland(-1) (10 glands). Isoproterenol and phenylephrine (10 microM each) stimulated only small, transient responses. We confirmed that cats have a large secretory response to phenylephrine (11.6 +/- 3.7 nl x min(-1) x gland(-1), 12 glands), but pigs, sheep, and humans all have small responses (<2 nl x min(-1)m x gland(-1)). Carbachol-stimulated peak secretion was inhibited 56% by bumetanide, 67% by HCO replacement with HEPES, and 92% by both. The distribution of secretion rates was nonnormal, suggesting the existence of subpopulations of glands. PMID:11435221

  8. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Gonzalo P.; Lüchtenborg, Anne-Marie; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i) reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii) lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455472

  9. Tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheated secret keys and shared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Chong-An

    2013-01-01

    A (t,n) secret image-sharing scheme shares a secret image to n participants, and the t users recover the image. During the recovery procedure of a conventional secret image-sharing scheme, cheaters may use counterfeit secret keys or modified shared images to cheat other users' secret keys and shared images. A cheated secret key or shared image leads to an incorrect secret image. Unfortunately, the cheater cannot be identified. We present an exponent and modulus-based scheme to provide a tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheaters on secret keys or shared images. The proposed scheme allows users to securely select their secret key. This assignment can be performed over networks. Modulus results of each shared image is calculated to recognize cheaters of a shared image. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is excellent at identifying cheated secret keys and shared images.

  10. Mucins in cat airway secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J R; Gallagher, J T; Richardson, P S; Sheehan, J K; Carlstedt, I

    1991-01-01

    Mucous secretions were obtained from cat tracheas that had received [3H]glucose and [35S]sulphate to radiolabel mucus glycoproteins biosynthetically. Samples were collected under resting ('basal') conditions as well as after pilocarpine stimulation and were separated into gel and sol phases by centrifugation. Macromolecules were partially purified by using gel chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B, and the species that were eluted with the void volume were then separated into two major populations with isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl. The major component from the gel phase of pilocarpine-induced secretions had a buoyant density typical of mucins and was observed as linear and apparently flexible chains by electron microscopy. Reduction of disulphide bonds gave subunits that could be further cleaved by trypsin digestion into components of approximately the same size as the high-Mr glycopeptides obtained from other mucins after this treatment. In contrast, the dominant species in the gel phase of the 'basal' secretion had a significantly higher buoyant density than expected for mucins and was largely unaffected by reduction, as studied by gel chromatography. The macromolecules were fragmented by trypsin, suggesting that they contain a polypeptide backbone. This more dense component also predominated in the sol phase both from the 'basal' secretions and from the pilocarpine-released secretions. Digestion with DNAase, chondroitin ABC lyase or heparan sulphate lyase had no effect, which shows that this component is not DNA, a dermatan sulphate/chondroitin sulphate or a heparan sulphate proteoglycan. In contrast, endo-beta-galactosidase and keratanase caused some fragmentation, suggesting that the molecules contain some linkages of the poly-(N-acetyl-lactosamine) type, although the degradation was not as extensive as expected for keratan sulphate. Treatment with alkaline borohydride resulted in extensive fragmentation of the high-Mr glycopeptides from both

  11. Sec-mediated secretion by Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates within a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of macrophages. PV formation requires delivery of effector proteins directly into the host cell cytoplasm by a type IVB secretion system. However, additional secretion systems are likely responsible for modification of the PV lumen microenvironment that promote pathogen replication. Results To assess the potential of C. burnetii to secrete proteins into the PV, we analyzed the protein content of modified acidified citrate cysteine medium for the presence of C. burnetii proteins following axenic (host cell-free) growth. Mass spectrometry generated a list of 105 C. burnetii proteins that could be secreted. Based on bioinformatic analysis, 55 proteins were selected for further study by expressing them in C. burnetii with a C-terminal 3xFLAG-tag. Secretion of 27 proteins by C. burnetii transformants was confirmed by immunoblotting culture supernatants. Tagged proteins expressed by C. burnetii transformants were also found in the soluble fraction of infected Vero cells, indicating secretion occurs ex vivo. All secreted proteins contained a signal sequence, and deletion of this sequence from selected proteins abolished secretion. These data indicate protein secretion initially requires translocation across the inner-membrane into the periplasm via the activity of the Sec translocase. Conclusions C. burnetii secretes multiple proteins, in vitro and ex vivo, in a Sec-dependent manner. Possible roles for secreted proteins and secretion mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24093460

  12. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  13. Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mary C.; Schriock, Eldon D.; Jaffe, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma is a common cause of gynecologic problems that include oligomenorrhea, infertility, amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Diagnosis requires a combination of endocrine testing and radiologic evaluation. The diagnosis of macroadenomas is usually straightforward and these large tumors may be associated with mass effects such as severe headache, nerve palsies or visual changes. Microadenomas may be more subtle in presentation, and the diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia without radiologic evidence of a tumor frequently is problematic. The management of prolactin-secreting adenoma remains controversial, with no clear consensus or indication for surgical versus medical treatment. Surgical intervention is a realistic option for those patients who have access to an experienced neurosurgeon and who have tumor characteristics that offer a reasonable hope for cure. Many questions remain to be answered, including the cause, natural history of development and the optimum treatment for individual cases. Images PMID:6659490

  14. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  15. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion.

  16. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  17. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  18. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  19. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance. PMID:23613592

  20. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  1. A universal nanoparticle cell secretion capture assay.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Secreted proteins play an important role in intercellular interactions, especially between cells of the immune system. Currently, there is no universal assay that allows a simple noninvasive identification and isolation of cells based on their secretion of various products. We have developed such a method. Our method is based on the targeting, to the cell surface, of heterofunctional nanoparticles coupled to a cell surface-specific antibody and to a secreted protein-specific antibody, which captures the secreted protein on the surface of the producing cell. Importantly, this method does not compromise cellviability and is compatible with further culture and expansion of the secreting cells.

  2. Altered waveform of plasma nocturnal melatonin secretion in premenstrual depression.

    PubMed

    Parry, B L; Berga, S L; Kripke, D F; Klauber, M R; Laughlin, G A; Yen, S S; Gillin, J C

    1990-12-01

    The nocturnal secretion of plasma melatonin was determined under dim to dark conditions in eight patients with prospectively confirmed premenstrual syndrome and in eight age- and menstrual cycle phase-matched normal control subjects. Plasma samples for melatonin were collected every 30 minutes from 6 PM to 9 AM during the early follicular, late follicular, midluteal and late luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Compared with normal controls, patients with premenstrual syndrome had an earlier (phase-advanced) offset of melatonin secretion, which contributed to a shorter secretion duration and a decreased area under the curve. No statistically significant differences were found between women with premenstrual syndrome and normal controls for melatonin onset or peak concentration, or for estradiol or progesterone levels. The data demonstrate that women with premenstrual syndrome have chronobiological abnormalities of melatonin secretion. The fact that these patients respond to treatments that affect circadian physiology, such as sleep deprivation and phototherapy, suggests that circadian abnormalities may contribute to the pathogenesis of premenstrual syndrome.

  3. Prkar1a in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Stratakis, C; Kirschner, L

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing worldwide with significant consequences on individual quality of life as well as economic burden on states' healthcare costs. While origins of the pathogenesis of T2DM are poorly understood, an early defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells is considered a hallmark of T2DM. Upon a glucose stimulus, insulin is secreted in a biphasic manner with an early first-phase burst of insulin, which is followed by a second, more sustained phase of insulin output. First phase insulin secretion is diminished early in T2DM as well is in subjects who are at risk of developing T2DM. An effective treatment of T2DM with incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its long acting peptide analogue exendin-4 (E4), restores first-phase and augments second-phase glucose stimulated insulin secretion. This effect of incretin action occurs within minutes of GLP-1/E4 infusion in T2DM humans. An additional important consideration is that incretin hormones augment GSIS only above a certain glucose threshold, which is slightly above the normal glucose range. This ensures that incretin hormones stimulate GSIS only when glucose levels are high, while they are ineffective when insulin levels are below a certain threshold. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor, which is highly expressed on pancreatic β-cells, stimulates 2 -distinct intracellular signaling pathways: a) the cAMP-protein kinase A branch and b) the cAMP-EPAC2 (EPAC=exchange protein activated by cAMP) branch. While the EPAC2 branch is considered to mediate GLP-1 effects on first-phase GSIS, the PKA branch is necessary for the former branch to be active. However, how these 2 branches interplay and converge and how their effects on insulin secretion and insulin vesicle exocytosis are coordinated is poorly understood.Thus, at the outset of our studies we have a poorly understood intracellular interplay of cAMP-dependent signaling

  4. Studies into secretions of Tetrahymena: enzymes secreted into inorganic medium.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Karsa, J; Csaba, G

    1992-01-01

    The peptides secreted by Tetrahymena cells into inorganic medium were chromatographed. Six fractions showing a marked enzyme-like activity were examined for influence on certain physiological parameters of Tetrahymena. The enzymatically active fractions increased the phagocytic activity of Tetrahymena and decreased its binding capacity for lectins and hormone (insulin), but enhanced insulin imprinting at primary interaction. It remains to be clarified whether these effects were due to the enzymatic or other components of the fractions investigated, or to lack of the compensatory influence of the fractions not studied.

  5. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M.

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  6. Oxytocin: an emerging regulator of prolactin secretion in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kennett, J E; McKee, D T

    2012-03-01

    In the female rat, a complex interplay of both stimulatory and inhibitory hypothalamic factors controls the secretion of prolactin. Prolactin regulates a large number of physiological processes from immunity to stress. Here, we have chosen to focus on the control of prolactin secretion in the female rat in response to suckling, mating and ovarian steroids. In all three of these states, dopamine, released from neurones in the mediobasal hypothalamus, is a potent inhibitory signal regulating prolactin secretion. Early research has determined that the relief of dopaminergic tone is not sufficent to account for the full surge of prolactin secretion observed in response to the suckling stimulus, launching a search for possible prolactin-releasing factors. This research has subsequently broadened to include searching for prolactin-releasing factors controlling prolactin secretion after mating or ovarian steroids. A great deal of literature has suggested that this prolactin-releasing factor may include oxytocin. Oxytocin receptors are present on lactotrophs. These oxytocin receptors respond to exogenous oxytocin and antagonism of endogenous oxytocin inhibits lactotroph activity. In addition, the pattern of oxytocin neuronal activity and oxytocin release correlate with the release of prolactin. Here, we suggest not only that oxytocin is stimulating prolactin secretion, but also that prolactin secretion is controlled by a complex network of positive (oxytocin) and negative (dopamine) feedback loops. We discuss the available literature and attempt to describe the circuitry we believe may be responsible for controlling prolactin secretion.

  7. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  8. Oxytocin: An emerging regulator of prolactin secretion in the female rat

    PubMed Central

    McKee, De’Nise T.

    2012-01-01

    In the female rat, a complex interplay of both stimulatory and inhibitory hypothalamic factors controls the secretion of prolactin. Prolactin regulates a large number of physiological processes from immunity to stress. In the following review, we have chosen to focus on the control of prolactin secretion in the female rat in response to suckling, mating and ovarian steroids. In all three of these states, dopamine, released from neurones in the mediobasal hypothalamus, is a potent inhibitory signal regulating prolactin secretion. Early research has determined that the relief of dopaminergic tone is not enough to account for the full surge of prolactin secretion observed in response to the suckling stimulus, launching a search for possible prolactin-releasing factors. This research has since broadened to include searching for prolactin-releasing factors controlling prolactin secretion following mating or ovarian steroids. A great deal of literature has suggested that this prolactin-releasing factor may include oxytocin. Oxytocin receptors are present on lactotrophs. These oxytocin receptors respond to exogenous oxytocin and antagonism of endogenous oxytocin inhibits lactotroph activity. In addition, the pattern of oxytocin neuronal activity and oxytocin release correlate with the release of prolactin. Here we suggest that not only is oxytocin stimulating prolactin secretion, but we also hypothesize that prolactin secretion is controlled by a complex network of positive (oxytocin) and negative (dopamine) feedback loops. In the present review, we will discuss this literature and attempt to describe the circuitry we believe may be responsible for controlling prolactin secretion. PMID:22129099

  9. Semiquantum secret sharing using entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Chan, W. H.; Long Dongyang

    2010-08-15

    Secret sharing is a procedure for sharing a secret among a number of participants such that only the qualified subsets of participants have the ability to reconstruct the secret. Even in the presence of eavesdropping, secret sharing can be achieved when all the members are quantum. So what happens if not all the members are quantum? In this paper, we propose two semiquantum secret sharing protocols by using maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type states in which quantum Alice shares a secret with two classical parties, Bob and Charlie, in a way that both parties are sufficient to obtain the secret, but one of them cannot. The presented protocols are also shown to be secure against eavesdropping.

  10. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    As long ago as 1970, it was proposed that Ca2+ can act as a 'second messenger' like cAMP (Rasmussen & Nagata, 1979). The recognition that calmodulin is a major Ca2+ binding protein in non-muscle cells has prompted the suggestion that calmodulin may serve an analogous role for Ca2+ to that served by protein kinase for cAMP (Wang & Waisman, 1979), or at least to the regulatory subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases. It is becoming clear that calmodulin probably does play a role in stimulus secretion coupling in endocrine cells. Nevertheless, some of the experimental approaches which have led to this rather tentative conclusion do induce some doubts, as we have attempted to indicate. Many of the pharmacological agents used in the studies cited in this review are not specific in their interaction with calmodulin. For example, the phenothiazines also inhibit phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase. The introduction of more specific drugs, such as the naphthalene sulphonamides, may lead to a clearer picture of the role of calmodulin in hormone secretion. Relationships probably exist between cyclic nucleotides, calcium, calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover and phospholipids in the overall control of the secretory process (see Fig. 1). There is considerable evidence that calcium is the primary internal signal initiating exocytosis of hormone from many glands. However, it appears that cyclic nucleotides can modulate the calcium signal either positively or negatively and it is possible that cAMP and calcium can separately activate secretion. The presence of both calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the same tissue would appear to suggest either spatial or temporal control mechanisms or that (diagram; see text) the calcium requirement for calmodulin activation differs between the two enzymes. The true explanation is probably far more complex and involves perhaps as yet unknown factors that can differentially

  11. Controlling secretion to limit chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Georgilis, Athena; Gil, Jesús

    2016-08-15

    The tumor microenvironment influences cancer progression and therapy outcome by mechanisms not yet fully understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Bent and colleagues (pp. 1811-1821) show how chemotherapy causes endothelial senescence. Interestingly, senescent endothelial cells do not mount a typical senescence-associated secretory phenotype but instead acutely secrete IL-6, promoting chemoresistance. This study unveils a physiological switch involving PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling that restrains the senescence secretory responses to limit the detrimental consequences of persistent inflammation. PMID:27601527

  12. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  13. Matroids and quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Raussendorf, Robert

    2010-05-15

    A secret-sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol to distribute a secret state in an encoded form among a group of players such that only authorized subsets of the players can reconstruct the secret. Classically, efficient secret-sharing schemes have been shown to be induced by matroids. Furthermore, access structures of such schemes can be characterized by an excluded minor relation. No such relations are known for quantum secret-sharing schemes. In this paper we take the first steps toward a matroidal characterization of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. In addition to providing a new perspective on quantum-secret-sharing schemes, this characterization has important benefits. While previous work has shown how to construct quantum-secret-sharing schemes for general access structures, these schemes are not claimed to be efficient. In this context the present results prove to be useful; they enable us to construct efficient quantum-secret-sharing schemes for many general access structures. More precisely, we show that an identically self-dual matroid that is representable over a finite field induces a pure-state quantum-secret-sharing scheme with information rate 1.

  14. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS. PMID:25429903

  15. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  16. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    PubMed

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussis toxin from B. pertussis may be more generally valid than previously anticipated. Secretion and modification of toxins from H. pylori and L. pneumophila profoundly affect host cell metabolism, thus entering the discipline of cellular microbiology. Finally, results from genome sequencing projects revealed the presence of up to three TFSS in a single organism, and the analysis of their interplay and adaptation to different functions will be a future challenge. TFSS-carrying plasmids were discovered in different ecosystems, suggesting that genetic exchange may speed up their evolution and adaptation to different cell-cell interactions. PMID:11918819

  17. Calcium signaling and secretion in cholangiocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Mateus T; Nathanson, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis affects up to one-third of individuals who abuse alcohol and can be associated with high mortality. Although this disorder is characterized by hepatocellular damage, steatosis and neutrophil infiltration, recent evidence suggests that cholestasis or impaired bile secretion may be a frequent occurrence as well. Bile secretion results from the concerted activity of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. Hepatocytes secrete bile acids and conjugated products into the bile canaliculi, which then are modified by cholangiocytes through secretion of bicarbonate and water to give rise to the final secreted bile. Here the molecular mechanisms regulating bile secretion in cholangiocytes are reviewed. Moreover, we discuss how the expression of intracellular Ca(2+) channels might be regulated in cholangiocytes, plus evidence that components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery are altered in a range of cholestatic diseases of the bile ducts. PMID:26100660

  18. Motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Chayon; Tanaka, Toru; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Motilin and ghrelin are gastrointestinal hormones that stimulate the migrating motor complex (MMC) of gastrointestinal motility during the fasting state. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on pepsinogen secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. By using a gastric lumen-perfusion system, we found that the intravenous administration of carbachol and motilin stimulated pepsinogen secretion, the latter in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ghrelin had no effect. We then investigated the pathways of motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion using acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Treatment with atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, completely inhibited both carbachol and motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion. Motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion was observed in the vagotomized suncus. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion, and suggest that this effect occurs through a cholinergic pathway in suncus. PMID:25957475

  19. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  20. Type V Secretion Systems in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fan, Enguo; Chauhan, Nandini; Udatha, D B R K Gupta; Leo, Jack C; Linke, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Type V secretion denotes a variety of secretion systems that cross the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria but that depend on the Sec machinery for transport through the inner membrane. They are possibly the simplest bacterial secretion systems, because they consist only of a single polypeptide chain (or two chains in the case of two-partner secretion). Their seemingly autonomous transport through the outer membrane has led to the term "autotransporters" for various subclasses of type V secretion. In this chapter, we review the structure and function of these transporters and review recent findings on additional factors involved in the secretion process, which have put the term "autotransporter" to debate. PMID:26999388

  1. Neonaticides following "secret" pregnancies: seven case reports.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, E

    1989-01-01

    Seven neonaticides were reported during a 14-month period in the State of Iowa. This is an alarming number considering that only one such case was reported in the previous year. The majority of cases involved the birth of a live infant to an adolescent who had reportedly kept her pregnancy secret from family and friends. The death of the infants resulted from exposure or drowning. Efforts were made by the mother to hide or dispose of her infant's body. Basic information about each of the reported cases is presented, as well as the sentences given the adult mothers charged with the crime of child endangerment. The dynamics of these cases are reviewed in the context of earlier studies dealing with the phenomenon of neonaticide. Infanticide has deep roots in several cultures. It was practiced in some primitive societies and was decreed a capital offense as early as 1643. Its occurrence recently prompts suggestions for activities by professionals to prevent these tragedies. More research and further attention to this problem is warranted. PMID:2502808

  2. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epithelial anion and fluid secretion, their regulation, and how these processes are altered in CF disease to account for organ-specific secretory phenotypes. PMID:22675668

  3. Stimulation of leptin secretion by insulin

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Minglun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Inui, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Leptin has a crucial role in regulating food intake and maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Although little is known about the process of leptin secretion, insulin, which has an important role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids, is believed to regulate leptin secretion through a posttranscriptional mechanism in the short term, and via glucose metabolism in the long term. The gastric mucosa secretes leptin, but this mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Understanding the mechanism of insulin-regulated leptin secretion could lead to the development of new treatment methods for obesity and its comorbidities, which are serious public health concerns. PMID:23565488

  4. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  5. Gonadotropin secretion in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M; Laessle, R G; Fichter, M M

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-two normal weight women with bulimia nervosa (BN) were studied (mean age, 25 +/- 5 yr; body mass index, 20.2 +/- 2.6 kg/m2). Sixteen of them reported menstrual cycles in the range of 21-42 days, and 6 had experienced absence of menstruation for at least 3 months. Twenty-one healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (mean age, 23 +/- 2 yr; body mass index, 20.7 +/- 1.4) served as the control subjects. Frequent morning blood samples for estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) determinations were obtained for the duration of 1 menstrual cycle or for 6 weeks in the case of amenorrhea. LH, FSH, cortisol, and insulin secretion were studied on day 3, 4, or 5 after the onset of a menstrual cycle or on a random day in the 6 BN women with amenorrhea. Blood samples were collected at 15-min intervals from 1800-0600 h for LH and FSH and at 30-min intervals from 2400-0600 h for cortisol and insulin. Nineteen of the 21 controls, but only 10 of the 22 BN women, fulfilled the following standard criteria: maximum E2 above 440 pmol/L, maximum P4 above 19 nmol/L, and luteal phase length of 9 days or more. The 10 BN women with normal menstrual cycles had lower mean insulin concentrations than the controls (70 +/- 20 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.01), but gonadotropin secretion, cortisol, and T3 concentrations were similar. The 8 BN women with amenorrhea or ovulatory dysfunction (maximum E2, less than 440 pmol/L; maximum P4, less than 6 nmol/L) displayed decreased mean LH pulse frequency (2.6 +/- 2.4 vs. 5.7 +/- 2.0 pulses/12 h; P less than 0.01), increased mean cortisol (120 +/- 40 vs. 80 +/- 20 nmol/L; P less than 0.01), decreased mean insulin (90 +/- 40 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.05), and decreased mean T3 concentrations (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2 nmol/L; P less than 0.01). The data suggest that BN in normal weight women is associated with an increased rate of ovarian dysfunction; decreased pulsatile LH secretion seems to be an important mechanism. Increased

  6. Genomic analysis of the protein secretion systems in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Desvaux, Mickaël; Khan, Arshad; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Pallen, Mark J; Henderson, Ian R

    2005-09-10

    Consistent information about protein secretion in Gram-positive bacteria is essentially restricted to the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Among genome-sequenced clostridia, Clostridium acetobutylicum has been the most extensively studied from a physiological point of view and is the organism for which the largest variety of molecular biology tools have been developed. Following in silico analyses, both secreted proteins and protein secretion systems were identified. The Tat (Twin arginine translocation; TC #2.A.64) pathway and ABC (ATP binding cassette) protein exporters (TC #3.A.1.) could not be identified, but the Sec (secretion) pathway (TC #3.A.5) appears to be used prevalently. Similarly, a flagella export apparatus (FEA; TC #3.A.6.), holins (TC #1.E.), and an ESAT-6/WXG100 (early secreted antigen target of 6 kDa/proteins with a WXG motif of approximately 100 residues) secretion system were identified. Here, we report for the first time the identification of a fimbrilin protein exporter (FPE; TC #3.A.14) and a Tad (tight adherence) export apparatus in C. acetobutylicum. This investigation highlights the potential use of this saprophytic bacterium in biotechnological and biomedical applications as well as a model organism for studying protein secretion in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Mechanisms of insulin secretion in malnutrition: modulation by amino acids in rodent models.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2011-04-01

    Protein restriction at early stages of life reduces β-cell volume, number of insulin-containing granules, insulin content and release by pancreatic islets in response to glucose and other secretagogues, abnormalities similar to those seen in type 2 diabetes. Amino acids are capable to directly modulate insulin secretion and/or contribute to the maintenance of β-cell function, resulting in an improvement of insulin release. Animal models of protein malnutrition have provided important insights into the adaptive mechanisms involved in insulin secretion in malnutrition. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on the modulation of insulin secretion by amino acids, specially leucine and taurine, in rodent models of protein malnutrition. Leucine supplementation increases insulin secretion by pancreatic islets in malnourished mice. This effect is at least in part due to increase in the expression of proteins involved in the secretion process, and the activation of the PI3K/PKB/mTOR pathway seems also to contribute. Mice supplemented with taurine have increased insulin content and secretion as well as increased expression of genes essential for β-cell functionality. The knowledge of the mechanisms through which amino acids act on pancreatic β-cells to stimulate insulin secretion is of interest for clinical medicine. It can reveal new targets for the development of drugs toward the treatment of endocrine diseases, in special type 2 diabetes. PMID:20711845

  8. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    PubMed

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  9. The type III secretion injectisome.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guy R

    2006-11-01

    The type III secretion injectisome is a complex nanomachine that allows bacteria to deliver protein effectors across eukaryotic cellular membranes. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of its structure, assembly and mode of operation. The principal structural components of the injectisome, from the base located in the bacterial cytosol to the tip of the needle protruding from the cell surface, have been investigated in detail. The structures of several constituent proteins were solved at the atomic level and important insights into the assembly process have been gained. However, despite the ongoing concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, the role of many of the constituent components of this nanomachine remain unknown. PMID:17041629

  10. Influence of secretagogues on asynchronous secretion of newly synthesized pancreatic proteins in the conscious rat

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, V.; Rohr, G.

    1987-01-01

    The secretion of newly synthesized pancreatic enzymes was studied in pancreatic duct cannulated rats after intravenous injection of 100 microCi of (/sup 35/S)methionine. Secretion rate was stimulated by intravenous infusion of either cerulein (0.2 microgram/kg h) or carbachol (10 nmol/kg h) starting simultaneously with or 180 min before the injection of the labeled methionine. Secretory proteins were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis or by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis followed by determination of the radioactivity associated with the individual proteins. Similar to unstimulated controls in all experiments, an early secretion of newly synthesized trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen was found, whereas amylase and lipase were secreted only after a certain lag period. The results suggest that the intracellular transit of endoproteases is faster than that of other enzymes, irrespective of whether or not secretagogues were applied.

  11. Modulation of Cytokine Secretion Allows CD4 T Cells Secreting IL-10 and IL-17 to Simultaneously Participate in Maintaining Tolerance and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kanako; Pignon, Pascale; Ayyoub, Maha; Valmori, Danila

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T cells secreting IL-10 or IL-17 are frequent at mucosal sites, where their equilibrium is important for simultaneously maintaining tolerance and immunity to the resident microbiota. The mode of action of these cells, however, is as yet incompletely understood. In this study, we have combined ex vivo analysis of CD4 T cells producing IL-10 or/and IL-17 with assessment of clonal populations isolated ex vivo using a cytokine catch assay. We found that circulating CD4 T cells secreting IL-10 or/and IL-17 ex vivo include both conventional FOXP3- CD4 T cells and FOXP3+ Helios- Treg. Upon assessment of clonal populations derived from single ex vivo isolated cytokine secreting cells, we found that IL-10 or/and IL-17 secreting cells prevalently secrete one or the other cytokine depending on the type of stimulation, the time after stimulation and the presence of microbial products. Namely, IL-10 secretion by clonal cells was prevalent at early time points after TCR mediated stimulation, was independent of co-stimulation and was increased in the presence of the microbial fermentation product butyrate. In contrast, IL-17 secretion was higher at later time points after TCR mediated stimulation and in the presence of co-stimulatory signals. Taken together, these results provide insights into the mechanisms that, through modulation of cytokine secretion depending on conditions, allow IL-10 and IL-17 producing CD4 T cells to contribute to maintain tolerance to microbes locally, while retaining the ability to participate in protective immune responses at distant sites.

  12. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas for stimulating…

  13. Family Secrets: The Bioethics of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Dina G.; DuPre, Michael J.; Holt, Susan; Chen, Shaw-Ree; Wischnowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses "Family Secrets," a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum module that focuses on the bioethical implications of genetic testing. In high school biology classrooms throughout New York State, students are using "Family Secrets" to learn about DNA testing; Huntington's disease (HD); and the ethical, legal, and social…

  14. [Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe secreted proteins].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ling; Liu, Yun-Fan; Xie, Jian-Ping

    2007-02-01

    Secreted proteins play a vital physiological role. Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for cell cycle study and a potential useful drug screen model. Secreted proteins also initiate the mating. However, few global studies concerning the secreted proteins of S. pombe was reported. To address this issue, bioinformatics were used to reveal the global secreted proteins of S. pombe. The 4997 proteins deduced from the S. pombe genome were analyzed by combined several programs. One hundred and sixty proteins were identified carrying an NH2-terminal secretory signal peptide by signalP3.0. Among them, 117 proteins are integral membrane proteins (TMpred), 13 proteins are lipoproteins (PrositeS-can), and 66 proteins are secreted proteins. The location of the secreted proteins was also predicted by Target P. Some of the secreted proteins are involved in the nutrition, reproduction, as well as the communication between cells and environment. The global information of the secreted proteins of S. pombe will benefit further studies in drug screening model and host searching for heterologous gene expression.

  15. Bacterial Secretion Systems – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin R.; Mecsas, Joan

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into different classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection. PMID:26999395

  16. Type VI secretion system: secretion by a contractile nanomachine

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are present in about a quarter of all Gram-negative bacteria. Several key components of T6SS are evolutionarily related to components of contractile nanomachines such as phages and R-type pyocins. The T6SS assembly is initiated by formation of a membrane complex that binds a phage-like baseplate with a sharp spike, and this is followed by polymerization of a long rigid inner tube and an outer contractile sheath. Effectors are preloaded onto the spike or into the tube during the assembly by various mechanisms. Contraction of the sheath releases an unprecedented amount of energy, which is used to thrust the spike and tube with the associated effectors out of the effector cell and across membranes of both bacterial and eukaryotic target cells. Subunits of the contracted sheath are recycled by T6SS-specific unfoldase to allow for a new round of assembly. Live-cell imaging has shown that the assembly is highly dynamic and its subcellular localization is in certain bacteria regulated with a remarkable precision. Through the action of effectors, T6SS has mainly been shown to contribute to pathogenicity and competition between bacteria. This review summarizes the knowledge that has contributed to our current understanding of T6SS mode of action. PMID:26370934

  17. Glucagon Regulates Hepatic Kisspeptin1 to Impair Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jin; Mondal, Prosenjit; Wolfe, Andrew; Alonso, Laura C.; Stamateris, Rachel; Ong, Benny W. T.; Lim, Owen C.; Yang, Kil S.; Radovick, Sally; Novaira, Horacio F.; Farber, Emily A.; Farber, Charles R.; Turner, Stephen D.; Hussain, Mehboob A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Early in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dysregulated glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells occurs prior to impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from β-cells. However, whether hyperglucagonemia is causally linked to β-cell dysfunction remains unclear. Here we show that glucagon stimulates via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling hepatic production of the neuropeptide kisspeptin1, which acts on β-cells to suppress GSIS. Synthetic kisspeptin suppresses GSIS in vivo in mice and from isolated islets in a kisspeptin1 receptor-dependent manner. Kisspeptin1 is increased in livers and in serum from humans with T2DM and from mouse models of diabetes mellitus. Importantly, liver Kiss1 knockdown in hyperglucagonemic, glucose intolerant high fat diet fed and Leprdb/db mice augments GSIS and improves glucose tolerance. These observations indicate a hormonal circuit between the liver and the endocrine pancreas in glycemia regulation and suggest in T2DM a sequential link between hyperglucagonemia via hepatic kisspeptin1 to impaired insulin secretion. PMID:24703698

  18. Insulin secretion after injuries of differing severity in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Frayn, K. N.

    1976-01-01

    The effects on insulin secretion of injuries of differing severity have been studied in the rat. The injuries used were dorsal scalds to 20% and 40% of the body surface area, and a 4-h period of bilateral hind-limb ischaemia. These injuries resulted in 48 h mortality rates of 0/10, 7/10 and 5/10 respectively. Rats were studied 1-5-2 h after scalding or removal of tourniquets. The blood glucose concentration was markedly raised after all these injuries, and the plasma insulin concentration was also raised, so that the insulin to glucose ratio in any group did not differ significantly from that in non-injured controls. Injection of glucose (0-5 g/kg i.v.) induced a rise in insulin concentration in all groups, although the insulin to glucose ratio after the lethal 40% scald was lower than in control rats. It was concluded that in the rat normal insulin secretion is maintained even after lethal injuries, although some suppression of the insulin response to exogenous glucose may occur. Insulin resistance is more important in the rat than impairment of insulin secretion even at an early stage after injury. PMID:782499

  19. Identification of secreted and cytosolic gelsolin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the gene for Drosophila gelsolin. Two mRNAs are produced from this gene by differential splicing. The protein encoded by the longer mRNA has a signal peptide and its electrophoretic mobility when translated in vitro in the presence of microsomes is higher than when it is translated without microsomes. The protein translated from the shorter mRNA does not show this difference. This indicates that Drosophila like vertebrates has two forms of gelsolin, one secreted, the other cytoplasmic. The mRNA for both is present ubiquitously in the early embryo. Later, the cytoplasmic form is expressed in parts of the gut. The RNA for the secreted form is expressed in the fat body, and the secreted protein is abundant in extracellular fluid (hemolymph). The cytoplasmic form of gelsolin co-localizes with F-actin in the cortex of the cells in the embryo and in larval epithelia. However, during cellularization of the blastoderm it is reduced at the base of the cleavage furrow, a structure similar to the contractile ring in dividing cells. PMID:8175883

  20. Identification of secreted and cytosolic gelsolin in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Stella, M C; Schauerte, H; Straub, K L; Leptin, M

    1994-05-01

    We have cloned the gene for Drosophila gelsolin. Two mRNAs are produced from this gene by differential splicing. The protein encoded by the longer mRNA has a signal peptide and its electrophoretic mobility when translated in vitro in the presence of microsomes is higher than when it is translated without microsomes. The protein translated from the shorter mRNA does not show this difference. This indicates that Drosophila like vertebrates has two forms of gelsolin, one secreted, the other cytoplasmic. The mRNA for both is present ubiquitously in the early embryo. Later, the cytoplasmic form is expressed in parts of the gut. The RNA for the secreted form is expressed in the fat body, and the secreted protein is abundant in extracellular fluid (hemolymph). The cytoplasmic form of gelsolin co-localizes with F-actin in the cortex of the cells in the embryo and in larval epithelia. However, during cellularization of the blastoderm it is reduced at the base of the cleavage furrow, a structure similar to the contractile ring in dividing cells. PMID:8175883

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system effectors using hypersecreting mutants.

    PubMed

    Vander Broek, Charles W; Chalmers, Kevin J; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. One of the virulence factors critical for early stages of infection is the Burkholderia secretion apparatus (Bsa) Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS), a molecular syringe that injects bacterial proteins, called effectors, into eukaryotic cells where they subvert cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Although the Bsa T3SS itself is known to be important for invasion, intracellular replication, and virulence, only a few genuine effector proteins have been identified and the complete repertoire of proteins secreted by the system has not yet been fully characterized. We constructed a mutant lacking bsaP, a homolog of the T3SS "gatekeeper" family of proteins that exert control over the timing and magnitude of effector protein secretion. Mutants lacking BsaP, or the T3SS translocon protein BipD, were observed to hypersecrete the known Bsa effector protein BopE, providing evidence of their role in post-translational control of the Bsa T3SS and representing key reagents for the identification of its secreted substrates. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ), a gel-free quantitative proteomics technique, was used to compare the secreted protein profiles of the Bsa T3SS hypersecreting mutants of B. pseudomallei with the isogenic parent strain and a bsaZ mutant incapable of effector protein secretion. Our study provides one of the most comprehensive core secretomes of B. pseudomallei described to date and identified 26 putative Bsa-dependent secreted proteins that may be considered candidate effectors. Two of these proteins, BprD and BapA, were validated as novel effector proteins secreted by the Bsa T3SS of B. pseudomallei.

  2. Characteristics of Secretion of Penicillinase, Alkaline Phosphatase, and Nuclease by Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Chesbro, William R.; Lampen, J. O.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of alkaline phosphatase and nuclease activity between cells and medium was examined in one strain of Bacillus licheniformis and four strains of B. subtilis. Over 95% of both activities was found in the medium of the B. licheniformis culture, but in the B. subtilis cultures the amount of enzyme activity found in the medium varied with the strain and the enzyme considered. B. licheniformis 749 and its penicillinase magnoconstitutive mutant 749/C were grown in continuous culture with phosphorous as the growth-limiting factor, and the kinetics of penicillinase formation and secretion were examined. Nutrient arrest halted secretion (usually after a lag of about 30 min) in both the inducible and constitutive strains. Chloramphenicol did not eliminate secretion, but under certain circumstances reduced its rate. In the inducible strain treated with a low level of inducer, the rate of secretion was more affected by the rate of synthesis than by the level of cell-bound enzyme. During induction, the onset of accretion of cell-bound penicillinase and secretion of the exoenzyme were nearly simultaneous. It seems unlikely that a long-lived, membrane- or cell-bound intermediate is mandatory in the secretion of the three enzymes by Bacillus species. In the case of penicillinase secretion, there are at least two different phases. When penicillinase synthesis is proceeding rapidly, the rate of secretion is five to six times greater at equivalent concentrations of membrane-bound penicillinase than it is when penicillinase synthesis is reduced. The data require that any membrane-bound intermediate in the formation of exoenzyme be much shorter-lived in cells with a high rate of synthesis than in cells with a low rate. Either there are two separate routes for the secretion of penicillinase or the characteristics of the process vary substantially between the early stages and the declining phase of induction. PMID:4970649

  3. Secrets of the Wabar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Shoemaker, Eugene M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the existence of craters in the Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia created by the impact of meteors in early times. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor's encounter with impact craters; Elimination of craters in the Earth's surface by the action of natural elements; Impact sites' demand for careful scientific inspections; Location of the impact sites.

  4. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  5. Episodic leptin release is independent of luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Sir-Petermann, T; Maliqueo, M; Palomino, A; Vantman, D; Recabarren, S E; Wildt, L

    1999-11-01

    Several studies suggest that leptin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functions. Leptin may stimulate release of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus and of gonadotrophins from the pituitary. A synchronicity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and leptin pulses has been described in healthy women and in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome, suggesting that leptin may modulate the episodic secretion of LH. However, it has not been established whether LH regulates the episodic secretion of leptin. To further examine LH-leptin interactions, we studied the episodic fluctuations of circulating LH and leptin in two patients with Kallmann's syndrome (KS) before and on day 7 of pulsatile GnRH administration, and compared these with those observed in the early follicular phase of 10 regularly menstruating women divided into two control groups according to the body mass index of each patient. To assess episodic hormone secretion, blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 6 h, before and on day 7 of GnRH administration in KS patients, and during days 3-7 of the follicular phase in normally cycling women. LH and leptin concentrations were measured in all samples. For pulse analysis, the cluster algorithm was used. Before treatment, an apulsatile pattern with no endogenous LH pulsations was observed in both KS patients. However, leptin pulses were assessed in both women. During GnRH administration, pulsatile LH activity was achieved in both patients with pulse characteristics similar to those of the respective control group. Serum leptin concentrations and leptin pulsatile patterns were not modified. These results suggest that circulating leptin is probably not modulated by pulsatile GnRH-LH secretion.

  6. The effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophage growth factor secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor (MDGF) activity by alveolar macrophages obtained from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism by which bleomycin promotes this increase in MDGF secretion is not clear, however. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophages. Normal rat alveolar macrophages obtained by lavage were cultured in the presence or absence of bleomycin; conditioned media from these cultures were dialyzed to remove bleomycin and then assayed in vitro for MDGF activity. Alveolar macrophages incubated with 0.01 microgram to 1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 18 hours secreted significantly more MDGF than macrophages incubated without bleomycin. Viability of macrophages as determined by exclusion of trypan blue and release of LDH was unaffected by any dose tested. Maximal MDGF production was seen with bleomycin doses of greater than or equal to 0.1 microgram/ml. When alveolar macrophages were incubated with 0.1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 0.5-18 hours, MDGF activity was detected as early as 1 hour, with peak responses found at 4-8 hours. Macrophages stimulated with bleomycin continued to produce significant amounts of MDGF even after bleomycin was removed and replaced with fresh (bleomycin-free) media. MDGF secretion by bleomycin-stimulated alveolar macrophages was inhibited by cycloheximide, and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA (nordihydroguairetic acid) and BW755c, indicating not only a requirement for protein synthesis but also for metabolites of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism for full expression of activity(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2464942

  7. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    PubMed Central

    Krehenbrink, Martin; Downie, J Allan

    2008-01-01

    Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP), a twin-arginine translocase (TAT) secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP) were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I) and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V) is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I) system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to the genes encoding the

  8. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  9. Extracellular Enzyme Secretion by Pseudomonas lemoignei

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M. W.; Merrick, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of succinate to repress the secretion of Pseudomonas lemoignei poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase was a function of pH. Repression only occurred when the pH of the medium was 7.0 or less. At a higher pH, lack of sensitivity to succinate concentration may have been due to a limited ability to transport succinate. Actively secreting cultures (at pH 7.4) continued to secrete enzyme for approximately 30 min after the pH was rapidly decreased to pH 6.8, even though sufficient succinate was present to repress enzyme synthesis. Similarly, after the addition of rifampin to secreting cultures, there was a 30-min delay before secretion was inhibited. Evidence is presented which suggests that continued secretion may be the result of depolymerase messenger ribonucleic acid accumulation within the cells. Studies with chloramphenicol indicated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the secretion of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase and that exoenzyme is not released from a preformed pool. Studies with various inhibitors of protein synthesis indicated that synthesis of exoenzyme is 5 to 10 times more susceptible to inhibition than is the synthesis of cell-associated proteins. PMID:4152045

  10. Glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford; Salehi, Albert; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves a ménage à trois of impaired glucose regulation of pancreatic hormone release: in addition to impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the release of the hyperglycaemic hormone glucagon becomes dysregulated; these last-mentioned defects exacerbate the metabolic consequences of hypoinsulinaemia and are compounded further by hypersecretion of somatostatin (which inhibits both insulin and glucagon secretion). Glucagon secretion has been proposed to be regulated by either intrinsic or paracrine mechanisms, but their relative significance and the conditions under which they operate are debated. Importantly, the paracrine and intrinsic modes of regulation are not mutually exclusive; they could operate in parallel to control glucagon secretion. Here we have applied mathematical modelling of α-cell electrical activity as a novel means of dissecting the processes that underlie metabolic regulation of glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that basal hypersecretion of somatostatin and/or increased activity of somatostatin receptors may explain the loss of adequate counter-regulation under hypoglycaemic conditions, as well as the physiologically inappropriate stimulation of glucagon secretion during hyperglycaemia seen in diabetic patients. We therefore advocate studying the interaction of the paracrine and intrinsic mechanisms; unifying these processes may give a more complete picture of the regulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells than studying the individual parts. PMID:27044683

  11. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  12. Digestive Secretion of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's Flytrap).

    PubMed

    Scala, J; Iott, K; Schwab, D W; Semersky, F E

    1969-03-01

    The digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula has been studied with respect to its protein content as a function of time after entrapment of protein material and some enzymes of the secretion. Maximum secretion of enzyme occurs within the first 3 days of the digestive cycle and protein reaches its maximum at 4 days. Phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase have been observed in the secretion. The enzymes have acid pH optima and the proteinase has a molecular weight of about 40,000.

  13. Islet Insulin Secretion Measurements in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hugill, Alison; Shimomura, Kenju; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes detailed protocols for in vitro measurements of insulin function and secretion in isolated mouse islets for the analysis of glucose homeostasis. We specify a method of enzyme digestion and hand picking to isolate and release the greatest number of high quality islets from the pancreas of the mouse. We describe an effective method for generating dynamic measurements of insulin secretion using a perifusion assay including a detailed protocol for constructing a peristaltic pump and tubing assembly. In addition we describe an alternative and simple technique for measuring insulin secretion using static incubation of isolated islets. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584553

  14. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  15. Graph states for quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Damian; Sanders, Barry C.

    2008-10-01

    We consider three broad classes of quantum secret sharing with and without eavesdropping and show how a graph state formalism unifies otherwise disparate quantum secret sharing models. In addition to the elegant unification provided by graph states, our approach provides a generalization of threshold classical secret sharing via insecure quantum channels beyond the current requirement of 100% collaboration by players to just a simple majority in the case of five players. Another innovation here is the introduction of embedded protocols within a larger graph state that serves as a one-way quantum-information processing system.

  16. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  17. Decreased follicular phase gonadotropin secretion is associated with impaired estradiol and progesterone secretion during the follicular and luteal phases in normally menstruating women.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Laessle, R G; Tuschl, R J; Broocks, A; Krusche, T; Pirke, K M

    1989-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that disturbed follicular development and disturbed luteal progesterone (P4) secretion are associated with reduced gonadotropin secretion in the early follicular phase by measuring pulsatile LH and FSH secretion at that time in 53 normally menstruating women. Three groups of women were identified on the basis of serum sex steroid concentrations (measured daily throughout the cycle) and luteal phase length. Group A (n = 27) had normal ovarian hormone secretion with peak serum estradiol (E2) concentrations of 440 pmol/L or more, peak serum P4 concentrations of 19 nmol/L or more, and luteal phase length of 9 days or more. Group B (n = 16) had normal peak serum E2 values, but peak serum P4 values less than 19 nmol/L and/or luteal phase length less than 9 days. Group C (n = 10) had peak serum E2 values below 440 pmol/L. Risk factors for the disturbances found in groups B and C were exercise and/or intermittent dieting. Compared to group A, both groups B and C had reduced mean serum LH concentrations (3.1 +/- 1.5 vs. 2.3 +/- 1.4 and 2.0 +/- 1.0 IU/L; P less than 0.05) and reduced LH pulse frequencies (5.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.8 and 3.3 +/- 2.3 pulses/12 h; P less than 0.02). LH amplitude was similar in all 3 groups. Mean serum FSH concentrations were slightly but not significantly lower in group C. We conclude that reduced gonadotropin secretion during the follicular phase may indeed affect E2 and P4 secretion at later stages of the menstrual cycle. The patterns of alteration associated with disturbed E2 and P4 secretion in normally menstruating women are similar to those that occur in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  18. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  19. Modulating the expression level of secreted Wnt3 influences cerebellum development in zebrafish transgenics.

    PubMed

    Teh, Cathleen; Sun, Guangyu; Shen, Hongyuan; Korzh, Vladimir; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    The boundaries of brain regions are associated with the tissue-specific secretion of ligands from different signaling pathways. The dynamics of these ligands in vivo and the impact of its disruption remain largely unknown. Using light and fluorescence microscopy for the overall imaging of the specimen and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to determine Wnt3 dynamics, we demonstrated that Wnt3 regulates cerebellum development during embryogenesis using zebrafish wnt3 transgenics with either tissue-specific expression of an EGFP reporter or a functionally active fusion protein, Wnt3EGFP. The results suggest a state of dynamic equilibrium of Wnt3EGFP mobility in polarized neuroepithelial-like progenitors in the dorsal midline and cerebellar progenitors on the lateral side. Wnt3EGFP is secreted from the cerebellum as shown by measurements of its mobility in the ventricular cavity. The importance of Wnt secretion in brain patterning was validated with the Porcn inhibitor Wnt-C59 (C59), which, when applied early, reduced membrane-bound and secreted fractions of Wnt3EGFP and led to a malformed brain characterized by the absence of epithalamus, optic tectum and cerebellum. Likewise, interference with Wnt secretion later on during cerebellar development negatively impacted cerebellar growth and patterning. Our work, supported by quantitative analysis of protein dynamics in vivo, highlights the importance of membrane-localized and secreted Wnt3 during cerebellum development.

  20. Modulating the expression level of secreted Wnt3 influences cerebellum development in zebrafish transgenics.

    PubMed

    Teh, Cathleen; Sun, Guangyu; Shen, Hongyuan; Korzh, Vladimir; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    The boundaries of brain regions are associated with the tissue-specific secretion of ligands from different signaling pathways. The dynamics of these ligands in vivo and the impact of its disruption remain largely unknown. Using light and fluorescence microscopy for the overall imaging of the specimen and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to determine Wnt3 dynamics, we demonstrated that Wnt3 regulates cerebellum development during embryogenesis using zebrafish wnt3 transgenics with either tissue-specific expression of an EGFP reporter or a functionally active fusion protein, Wnt3EGFP. The results suggest a state of dynamic equilibrium of Wnt3EGFP mobility in polarized neuroepithelial-like progenitors in the dorsal midline and cerebellar progenitors on the lateral side. Wnt3EGFP is secreted from the cerebellum as shown by measurements of its mobility in the ventricular cavity. The importance of Wnt secretion in brain patterning was validated with the Porcn inhibitor Wnt-C59 (C59), which, when applied early, reduced membrane-bound and secreted fractions of Wnt3EGFP and led to a malformed brain characterized by the absence of epithalamus, optic tectum and cerebellum. Likewise, interference with Wnt secretion later on during cerebellar development negatively impacted cerebellar growth and patterning. Our work, supported by quantitative analysis of protein dynamics in vivo, highlights the importance of membrane-localized and secreted Wnt3 during cerebellum development. PMID:26395493

  1. Cell secretion: current structural and biochemical insights.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Saurabh; Lee, Elizabeth C; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2010-10-12

    Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent) secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12 nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  2. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready. PMID:24110653

  3. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready.

  4. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  5. How to Share a Quantum Secret

    SciTech Connect

    Cleve, R.; Gottesman, D.; Lo, H.

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the concept of quantum secret sharing. In a (k,thinspn) threshold scheme, a secret quantum state is divided into n shares such that any k of those shares can be used to reconstruct the secret, but any set of k{minus}1 or fewer shares contains absolutely no information about the secret. We show that the only constraint on the existence of threshold schemes comes from the quantum {open_quotes}no-cloning theorem,{close_quotes} which requires that n{lt}2k , and we give efficient constructions of all threshold schemes. We also show that, for k{le}n{lt}2k{minus}1 , then any (k,thinspn) threshold scheme {ital must} distribute information that is globally in a mixed state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  6. Secreting Glandular Trichomes: More than Just Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Secreting glandular plant trichome types which accumulate large quantities of metabolic products in the space between their gland cell walls and cuticle permit the plant to amass secretions in a compartment that is virtually outside the plant body. These structures not only accumulate and store what are often phytotoxic oils but they position these compounds as an apparent first line of defense at the surface of the plant. Recent advances in methods for isolation and study of trichome glands have allowed more precise analysis of gland cell metabolism and enzymology. Isolation of mutants with altered trichome phenotypes provides new systems for probing the genetic basis of trichome development. These advances and their continuation can pave the way for future attempts at modification of trichome secretion. The biochemical capability of glandular secreting trichomes and the potential for its future manipulation to exploit this external storage compartment is the focus of this review. PMID:16668241

  7. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  8. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  9. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Leverrier, Anthony; Garcia-Patron, Raul

    2011-09-15

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  10. The ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system of Mycobacterium marinum modulates phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy; Lee, Warren L; Alexander, David C; Grinstein, Sergio; Liu, Jun

    2006-09-01

    Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related pathogenic mycobacteria requires the secretion of early secretory antigenic 6 kDa (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), two small proteins that lack traditional signal sequences and are exported through an alternative secretion pathway encoded primarily by the RD1 genetic locus. Mutations affecting the synthesis or secretion of ESAT-6 or CFP-10 attenuate the virulence of M. tuberculosis in murine models of infection. However, the specific functions of these proteins and of their secretion system are currently unclear. In this study, we isolated a mutant of Mycobacterium marinum defective in the secretion of ESAT-6 and CFP-10. The mutation was localized within MM5446, which is orthologous to Rv3871 of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and encodes an ATPase that is a component of the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system. The mutant bacteria were unable to replicate within J774 macrophages although their growth in 7H9 medium was equivalent to the parental strain. Phagosome maturation and acidification were analysed in infected macrophages by confocal and electron microscopy using the late endosome/lysosome marker LAMP-1, along with various fluid-phase markers such as rhodamine-dextran and ferritin and the acidotropic dye LysoTracker Red. These studies demonstrated that while the wild-type parental strain of M. marinum primarily resides in a poorly acidified, non-lysosomal compartment, a significantly higher percentage of the MM5446 mutant organisms are in acidified compartments. These results suggest that the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system plays a role in preventing phagolysosomal fusion, a novel function that accounts for the ability of bacteria to survive inside host cells. This finding provides a mechanism by which the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system potentiates the virulence of pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:16922861

  11. Autoproteolysis and Intramolecular Dissociation of Yersinia YscU Precedes Secretion of Its C-Terminal Polypeptide YscUCC

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Stefan; Ho, Oanh; Login, Frédéric H.; Weise, Christoph F.; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Type III secretion system mediated secretion and translocation of Yop-effector proteins across the eukaryotic target cell membrane by pathogenic Yersinia is highly organized and is dependent on a switching event from secretion of early structural substrates to late effector substrates (Yops). Substrate switching can be mimicked in vitro by modulating the calcium levels in the growth medium. YscU that is essential for regulation of this switch undergoes autoproteolysis at a conserved N↑PTH motif, resulting in a 10 kDa C-terminal polypeptide fragment denoted YscUCC. Here we show that depletion of calcium induces intramolecular dissociation of YscUCC from YscU followed by secretion of the YscUCC polypeptide. Thus, YscUCC behaved in vivo as a Yop protein with respect to secretion properties. Further, destabilized yscU mutants displayed increased rates of dissociation of YscUCC in vitro resulting in enhanced Yop secretion in vivo at 30°C relative to the wild-type strain.These findings provide strong support to the relevance of YscUCC dissociation for Yop secretion. We propose that YscUCC orchestrates a block in the secretion channel that is eliminated by calcium depletion. Further, the striking homology between different members of the YscU/FlhB family suggests that this protein family possess regulatory functions also in other bacteria using comparable mechanisms. PMID:23185318

  12. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  13. Molecular machinery and mechanism of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-05-01

    Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures, called porosomes, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release use a highly regulated secretory process. Similar to other fundamental cellular processes, cell secretion is precisely regulated. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nanometer resolution and in real time, and its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and the fusion of opposing bilayers, that is, the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, have also been resolved. These findings reveal, for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells.

  14. Structure of a type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Low, Harry H; Gubellini, Francesca; Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Braun, Nathalie; Connery, Sarah; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lu, Fang; Redzej, Adam; Fronzes, Rémi; Orlova, Elena V; Waksman, Gabriel

    2014-04-24

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems translocate virulence factors into eukaryotic cells, distribute genetic material between bacteria and have shown potential as a tool for the genetic modification of human cells. Given the complex choreography of the substrate through the secretion apparatus, the molecular mechanism of the type IV secretion system has proved difficult to dissect in the absence of structural data for the entire machinery. Here we use electron microscopy to reconstruct the type IV secretion system encoded by the Escherichia coli R388 conjugative plasmid. We show that eight proteins assemble in an intricate stoichiometric relationship to form an approximately 3 megadalton nanomachine that spans the entire cell envelope. The structure comprises an outer membrane-associated core complex connected by a central stalk to a substantial inner membrane complex that is dominated by a battery of 12 VirB4 ATPase subunits organized as side-by-side hexameric barrels. Our results show a secretion system with markedly different architecture, and consequently mechanism, to other known bacterial secretion systems. PMID:24670658

  15. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  16. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  17. The evolution of milk secretion and its ancient origins.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, O T

    2012-03-01

    Lactation represents an important element of the life history strategies of all mammals, whether monotreme, marsupial, or eutherian. Milk originated as a glandular skin secretion in synapsids (the lineage ancestral to mammals), perhaps as early as the Pennsylvanian period, that is, approximately 310 million years ago (mya). Early synapsids laid eggs with parchment-like shells intolerant of desiccation and apparently dependent on glandular skin secretions for moisture. Mammary glands probably evolved from apocrine-like glands that combined multiple modes of secretion and developed in association with hair follicles. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary origin of milk constituents support a scenario in which these secretions evolved into a nutrient-rich milk long before mammals arose. A variety of antimicrobial and secretory constituents were co-opted into novel roles related to nutrition of the young. Secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins may originally have had a role in calcium delivery to eggs; however, by evolving into large, complex casein micelles, they took on an important role in transport of amino acids, calcium and phosphorus. Several proteins involved in immunity, including an ancestral butyrophilin and xanthine oxidoreductase, were incorporated into a novel membrane-bound lipid droplet (the milk fat globule) that became a primary mode of energy transfer. An ancestral c-lysozyme lost its lytic functions in favor of a role as α-lactalbumin, which modifies a galactosyltransferase to recognize glucose as an acceptor, leading to the synthesis of novel milk sugars, of which free oligosaccharides may have predated free lactose. An ancestral lipocalin and an ancestral whey acidic protein four-disulphide core protein apparently lost their original transport and antimicrobial functions when they became the whey proteins β-lactoglobulin and whey acidic protein, which with α-lactalbumin provide limiting sulfur amino acids to the young. By the late

  18. The evolution of milk secretion and its ancient origins.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, O T

    2012-03-01

    Lactation represents an important element of the life history strategies of all mammals, whether monotreme, marsupial, or eutherian. Milk originated as a glandular skin secretion in synapsids (the lineage ancestral to mammals), perhaps as early as the Pennsylvanian period, that is, approximately 310 million years ago (mya). Early synapsids laid eggs with parchment-like shells intolerant of desiccation and apparently dependent on glandular skin secretions for moisture. Mammary glands probably evolved from apocrine-like glands that combined multiple modes of secretion and developed in association with hair follicles. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary origin of milk constituents support a scenario in which these secretions evolved into a nutrient-rich milk long before mammals arose. A variety of antimicrobial and secretory constituents were co-opted into novel roles related to nutrition of the young. Secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins may originally have had a role in calcium delivery to eggs; however, by evolving into large, complex casein micelles, they took on an important role in transport of amino acids, calcium and phosphorus. Several proteins involved in immunity, including an ancestral butyrophilin and xanthine oxidoreductase, were incorporated into a novel membrane-bound lipid droplet (the milk fat globule) that became a primary mode of energy transfer. An ancestral c-lysozyme lost its lytic functions in favor of a role as α-lactalbumin, which modifies a galactosyltransferase to recognize glucose as an acceptor, leading to the synthesis of novel milk sugars, of which free oligosaccharides may have predated free lactose. An ancestral lipocalin and an ancestral whey acidic protein four-disulphide core protein apparently lost their original transport and antimicrobial functions when they became the whey proteins β-lactoglobulin and whey acidic protein, which with α-lactalbumin provide limiting sulfur amino acids to the young. By the late

  19. Regulation of aldosterone secretion during altered sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1983-07-01

    The interactions of the renin-angiotensin system with other factors in the regulation of aldosterone secretion were analyzed during altered sodium in the rat. During sodium restriction, the rise in aldosterone one secretion was accompanied by trophic changes in the adrenal glomerulosa zone including increased angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of early and late steps in the aldosterone biosynthetic pathway. All these effects of sodium restriction were reproduced by infusion of angiotensin II, and could be prevented by administration of the converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 14,225. These findings indicate that the adrenal secretory and trophic responses to sodium restriction are mediated by angiotensin II. In hypophysectomized rats, the basal activities of the enzymes of the early aldosterone biosynthetic pathway were reduced, contributing to the blunted aldosterone responsiveness to sodium deficiency. However, sodium restriction for 6 days significantly increased adrenal glomerulosa angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of the early and late aldosterone biosynthetic pathway, indicating that the pituitary gland is not necessary for the adrenal effects of angiotensin II. In contrast to the prominent glomerulotropic actions of angiotensin II in rats on normal or low sodium intake, infusion of angiotensin II during high sodium intake did not increase blood aldosterone, angiotensin II receptors, or 18-hydroxylase activity, indicating that the trophic actions of the octapeptide are determined by the state of sodium balance. In recent studies, other factors including potassium, dopamine and somatostatin have been shown to potentiate or inhibit the actions of angiotensin II on the adrenal gland. The ability of such factors to influence the effects of angiotensin II could serve as a protective mechanism to modulate aldosterone responses to angiotensin II when elevations in the circulating level of the peptide occur in the absence of sodium deficiency.

  20. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  1. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  2. Quantum Ramp Secret Sharing Scheme and Quantum Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heling; Wang, Huifeng; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of quantum secret sharing, quantum ramp secret sharing schemes were proposed (Ogawa et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032318 [2005]), which had a trade-off between security and coding efficiency. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an intermediate set, which cannot fully reconstruct the secret. This paper revisits the size of a share in the quantum ramp secret scheme based on a relation between the quantum operations and the coherent information. We also propose an optimal quantum ramp secret sharing scheme.

  3. Effects of endothelin family on ANP secretion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kuichang; Park, Byung Mun; Choi, Young Tae; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2016-08-01

    The endothelins (ET) peptide family consists of ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and sarafotoxin (s6C, a snake venom) and their actions appears to be different among isoforms. The aim of this study was to compare the secretagogue effect of ET-1 on atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion with ET-3 and evaluate its physiological meaning. Isolated nonbeating atria from male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to evaluate stretch-activated ANP secretion in response to ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and s6C. Changes in mean blood pressure (MAP) were measured during acute injection of ET-1 and ET-3 with and without natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist (A71915) in anesthetized rats. Changes in atrial volume induced by increased atrial pressure from o to 1, 2, 4, or 6cm H2O caused proportional increases in mechanically-stimulated extracellular fluid (ECF) translocation and stretch-activated ANP secretion. ET-1 (10nM) augmented basal and stretch-activated ANP secretion in terms of ECF translocation, which was blocked by the pretreatment with ETA receptor antagonist (BQ123, 1μM) but not by ETB receptor antagonist (BQ788, 1μM). ETA receptor antagonist itself suppressed stretch-activated ANP secretion. As compared to ET-1- induced ANP secretion (3.2-fold by 10nM), the secretagogue effects of ANP secretion by ET-2 was similar (2.8-fold by 10nM) and ET-3 and s6C were less potent (1.7-fold and 1.5-fold by 100nM, respectively). Acute injection of ET-1 or ET-3 increased mean blood pressure (MAP), which was augmented in the presence of natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist. Therefore, we suggest that the order of secretagogue effect of ET family on ANP secretion was ET-1≥ET-2>ET-3>s6C and ET-1-induced ANP secretion negatively regulates the pressor effect of ET-1. PMID:27208702

  4. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  5. Cancer-secreted miR-105 destroys vascular endothelial barriers to promote metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiying; Fong, Miranda Y.; Min, Yongfen; Somlo, George; Liu, Liang; Palomares, Melanie R.; Yu, Yang; Chow, Amy; O’Connor, Sean Timothy Francis; Chin, Andrew R.; Yen, Yun; Wang, Yafan; Marcusson, Eric G.; Chu, Peiguo; Wu, Jun; Wu, Xiwei; Li, Arthur Xuejun; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Hanlin; Ren, Xiubao; Boldin, Mark P.; Lin, Pengnian Charles; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer-secreted miRNAs are emerging mediators of cancer–host crosstalk. Here we show that miR-105, which is characteristically expressed and secreted by metastatic breast cancer cells, is a potent regulator of migration through targeting the tight junction protein ZO-1. In endothelial monolayers, exosome-mediated transfer of cancer-secreted miR-105 efficiently destroys tight junctions and the integrity of these natural barriers against metastasis. Overexpression of miR-105 in non-metastatic cancer cells induces metastasis and vascular permeability in distant organs, whereas inhibition of miR-105 in highly metastatic tumors alleviates these effects. MiR-105 can be detected in the circulation at the pre-metastatic stage, and its levels in the blood and tumor are associated with ZO-1 expression and metastatic progression in early-stage breast cancer. PMID:24735924

  6. Macrophage-secreted granulin supports pancreatic cancer metastasis by inducing liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sebastian R; Quaranta, Valeria; Linford, Andrea; Emeagi, Perpetua; Rainer, Carolyn; Santos, Almudena; Ireland, Lucy; Sakai, Takao; Sakai, Keiko; Kim, Yong-Sam; Engle, Dannielle; Campbell, Fiona; Palmer, Daniel; Ko, Jeong Heon; Tuveson, David A.; Hirsch, Emilio; Mielgo, Ainhoa; Schmid, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating metastatic disease for which better therapies are urgently needed. Macrophages enhance metastasis in many cancer types, however, the role of macrophages in PDAC liver metastasis remains poorly understood. Here we found that PDAC liver metastasis critically depends on the early recruitment of granulin secreting inflammatory monocytes to the liver. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that granulin secretion by metastasis associated macrophages (MAMs) activates resident hepatic stellate cells (hStCs) into myofibroblasts that secrete periostin, resulting in a fibrotic microenvironment that sustains metastatic tumour growth. Disruption of MAM recruitment or genetic depletion of granulin reduced hStCs activation and liver metastasis. Interestingly, we found that circulating monocytes and hepatic MAMs in PDAC patients express high levels of granulin. These findings suggest that recruitment of granulin expressing inflammatory monocytes plays a key role in PDAC metastasis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for PDAC liver metastasis. PMID:27088855

  7. Calcium secretion in canine tracheal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bazzaz, F.J.; Jayaram, T.

    1985-10-01

    Calcium (Ca) affects many cellular functions of the respiratory tract mucosa and might alter the viscoelastic properties of mucus. To evaluate Ca homeostasis in a respiratory epithelium we investigated transport of Ca by the canine tracheal mucosa. Mucosal tissues were mounted in Ussing-type chambers and bathed with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C. Unidirectional fluxes of 45Ca were determined in tissues that were matched by conductance and short-circuit current (SCC). Under short-circuit conditions there was a significant net Ca secretion of 1.82 +/- 0.36 neq . cm-2 . h-1 (mean +/- SE). Under open-circuit conditions, where the spontaneous transepithelial potential difference could attract Ca toward the lumen, net Ca secretion increased significantly to 4.40 +/- 1.14 compared with 1.54 +/- 1.17 neq . cm-2 . h-1 when the preparation was short-circuited. Addition of a metabolic inhibitor, 2,4-dinitrophenol (2 mM in the mucosal bath), decreased tissue conductance and SCC and slightly decreased the unidirectional movement of Ca from submucosa to lumen. Submucosal epinephrine (10 microM) significantly enhanced Ca secretion by 2.0 +/- 0.63 neq . cm-2 . h-1. Submucosal ouabain (0.1 mM) failed to inhibit Ca secretion. The data suggest that canine tracheal mucosa secretes Ca; this secretory process is augmented by epinephrine or by the presence of a transepithelial potential difference as found under in vivo conditions.

  8. Cell secretion machinery: studies using the AFM.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    A new field in biology, 'nano-cell biology', has emerged from the successful use of force microscopy in understanding the structure and dynamics of cells and biomolecules, at nm resolution and in real time. Atomic force microscopy, in combination with conventional tools and approaches (electron microscopy, electrophysiology, X-ray diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology), has revealed for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells. Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them, dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures called Porosome, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling, and the fusion of opposing bilayers, i.e., the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, has also been resolved.

  9. Fast-weighted secret image sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sian-Jheng; Chen, Lee Shu-Teng; Lin, Ja-Chen

    2009-07-01

    Thien and Lin [Comput. and Graphics 26(5), 765-770 (2002)] proposed a threshold scheme to share a secret image among n shadows: any t of the n shadows can recover the secret, whereas t-1 or fewer shadows cannot. However, in real life, certain managers probably play key roles to run a company and thus need special authority to recover the secret in managers' meeting. (Each manager's shadow should be more powerful than an ordinary employee's shadow.) In Thien and Lin's scheme, if a company has less than t managers, then manager's meeting cannot recover the secret, unless some managers were given multiple shadows in advance. But this compromise causes managers inconvenience because too many shadows were to be kept daily and carried to the meeting. To solve this dilemma, a weighted sharing method is proposed: each of the shadows has a weight. The secret is recovered if and only if the total weights (rather than the number) of received shadows is at least t. The properties of GF(2r) are utilized to accelerate sharing speed. Besides, the method is also a more general approach to polynomial-based sharing. Moreover, for convenience, each person keeps only one shadow and only one shadow index.

  10. Biochemical Methods to Analyze Wnt Protein Secretion.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Kathrin; Boutros, Michael; Gross, Julia Christina

    2016-01-01

    Wnt proteins act as potent morphogens in various aspects of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. However, in addition to its physiological importance, aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to the onset and progression of different types of cancer. On the cellular level, the secretion of Wnt proteins involves trafficking of lipid-modified Wnts from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi and further compartments via the Wnt cargo receptor evenness interrupted. Others and we have recently shown that Wnt proteins are secreted on extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as microvesicles and exosomes. Although more details about specific regulation of Wnt secretion steps are emerging, it remains largely unknown how Wnt proteins are channeled into different release pathways such as lipoprotein particles, EVs and cytonemes. Here, we describe protocols to purify and quantify Wnts from the supernatant of cells by either assessing total Wnt proteins in the supernatant or monitoring Wnt proteins on EVs. Purified Wnts from the supernatant as well as total cellular protein content can be investigated by immunoblotting. Additionally, the relative activity of canonical Wnts in the supernatant can be assessed by a dual-luciferase Wnt reporter assay. Quantifying the amount of secreted Wnt proteins and their activity in the supernatant of cells allows the investigation of intracellular trafficking events that regulate Wnt secretion and the role of extracellular modulators of Wnt spreading. PMID:27590148

  11. Targeted Secretion Inhibitors—Innovative Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Keith; Chaddock, John

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are highly effective therapeutic products. Their therapeutic success results from highly specific and potent inhibition of neurotransmitter release with a duration of action measured in months. These same properties, however, make the botulinum neurotoxins the most potent acute lethal toxins known. Their toxicity and restricted target cell activity severely limits their clinical utility. Understanding the structure-function relationship of the neurotoxins has enabled the development of recombinant proteins selectively incorporating specific aspects of their pharmacology. The resulting proteins are not neurotoxins, but a new class of biopharmaceuticals, Targeted Secretion Inhibitors (TSI), suitable for the treatment of a wide range of diseases where secretion plays a major role. TSI proteins inhibit secretion for a prolonged period following a single application, making them particularly suited to the treatment of chronic diseases. A TSI for the treatment of chronic pain is in clinical development. PMID:22069575

  12. Essential secret image sharing with increasable shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shang-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Li et al. and Yang et al. proposed (t,s,k,n)-essential secret image sharing methods to share a secret image into essential shadows and nonessential shadows. However, if the shadows have been distributed to the holders and extra shadows are required, the processes of regenerating and retransmitting shadows are necessary. In the proposed method, when receiving t essential shadows and k-t nonessential shadows, the total size of the adopted shadow is the same as the size of the secret image. Most importantly, the proposed method achieves less size of total required shadows (when using the minimal essential shadows) than what was proposed by Li et al. and achieves less size of essential shadow than the method contended by Yang et al. Moreover, we can have the additional shadows relate to other existing shadows without regenerating.

  13. A light-triggered protein secretion system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Gibson, Emily S; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-05-13

    Optical control of protein interactions has emerged as a powerful experimental paradigm for manipulating and studying various cellular processes. Tools are now available for controlling a number of cellular functions, but some fundamental processes, such as protein secretion, have been difficult to engineer using current optical tools. Here we use UVR8, a plant photoreceptor protein that forms photolabile homodimers, to engineer the first light-triggered protein secretion system. UVR8 fusion proteins were conditionally sequestered in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a brief pulse of light triggered robust forward trafficking through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. UVR8 was not responsive to excitation light used to image cyan, green, or red fluorescent protein variants, allowing multicolor visualization of cellular markers and secreted protein cargo as it traverses the cellular secretory pathway. We implemented this novel tool in neurons to demonstrate restricted, local trafficking of secretory cargo near dendritic branch points.

  14. Type III secretion systems and pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, C; Hart, C A

    2001-02-01

    Some bacterial pathogens have evolved by acquiring pathogenicity islands (PIs), which are clusters of genes encoding virulence traits. PIs encoding the secretion of effector molecules via type III secretion (TTS) systems have been discovered in several gram-negative pathogens. TTS systems are involved in contact-dependent secretion of virulence factors and can facilitate delivery of toxins directly into target cells. The expanding list of bacteria found to contain clusters of TTS genes includes members of the genera Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Bordetella, Burkholderia, Chlamydia and a number of plant pathogens or symbionts. This review discusses the current knowledge of the role of TTS PIs in pathogenicity, the genetic organisation and evolution of such systems,and the potential for using TTS systems as targets for novel treatments.

  15. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    PubMed

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored. PMID:21500624

  16. Milk lipid secretion: recent biomolecular aspects

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Neonates of most species depend on milk lipids for calories, fat-soluble vitamins, and bioactive lipid components for growth and development during the postnatal period. To meet neonatal nutrition and development needs, the mammary gland has evolved efficient mechanisms for synthesizing and secreting large quantities of lipid during lactation. Although the biochemical steps involved in milk lipid synthesis are understood, the identities of the genes mediating these steps and the molecular physiology of milk lipid production and secretion have only recently begun to be understood in detail through advances in mouse genetics, gene expression analysis, protein structural properties, and the cell biology of lipid metabolism. This review discusses emerging data about the molecular, cellular, and structural determinants of milk lipid synthesis and secretion within the context of physiological functions. PMID:24605173

  17. Approaches for the identification of potential excreted/secreted proteins of Leishmania major parasites.

    PubMed

    Chenik, M; Lakhal, S; Ben Khalef, N; Zribi, L; Louzir, H; Dellagi, K

    2006-04-01

    Leishmania parasites are able to survive in host macrophages despite the harsh phagolysosomal vacuoles conditions. This could reflect, in part, their capacity to secrete proteins that may play an essential role in the establishment of infection and serve as targets for cellular immune responses. To characterize Leishmania major proteins excreted/secreted early after promastigote entry into the host macrophage, we have generated antibodies against culture supernatants of stationary-phase promastigotes collected 6 h after incubation in conditions that partially reproduce those prevailing in the parasitophorous vacuole. The screening of an L. major cDNA library with these antibodies led us to isolate 33 different cDNA clones that we report here. Sequence analysis revealed that the corresponding proteins could be classified in 3 groups: 9 proteins have been previously described as excreted/secreted in Leishmania and/or other species; 11 correspond to known proteins already characterized in Leishmania and/or other species although it is unknown whether they are excreted/secreted and 13 code for unknown proteins. Interestingly, the latter are transcribed as shown by RT-PCR and some of them are stage regulated. The L. major excreted/secreted proteins may constitute putative virulence factors, vaccine candidates and/or new drug targets.

  18. Control of prolactin secretion in mammals.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J A; Shaar, C J

    1980-06-01

    Evidence describing the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin secretion in mammals is reviewed, with focus on catecholamines, serotonin, and polypeptides. Dopamine may be a physiological prolactin inhibiting factor (PIF), while norepinephrine and possibly epinephrine regulate prolactin release at the level of the hypothalamus. Serotonin may participate in the regulation of prolactin secretion by stimulating the release of prolactin releasing factor (PRF). The identity of PRF is not known, but two polypeptides--thyrotropin releasing hormone and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide--can act directly on the adenohypophysis to stimulate prolactin release.

  19. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  20. THE VERSATILE BACTERIAL TYPE IV SECRETION SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Cascales, Eric; Christie, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use type IV secretion systems for two fundamental objectives related to pathogenesis — genetic exchange and the delivery of effector molecules to eukaryotic target cells. Whereas gene acquisition is an important adaptive mechanism that enables pathogens to cope with a changing environment during invasion of the host, interactions between effector and host molecules can suppress defence mechanisms, facilitate intracellular growth and even induce the synthesis of nutrients that are beneficial to bacterial colonization. Rapid progress has been made towards defining the structures and functions of type IV secretion machines, identifying the effector molecules, and elucidating the mechanisms by which the translocated effectors subvert eukaryotic cellular processes during infection. PMID:15035043

  1. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  2. Functional insights into the Shigella type III needle tip IpaD in secretion control and cell contact.

    PubMed

    Schiavolin, Lionel; Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Cherradi, Youness; Biskri, Latéfa; Botteaux, Anne; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2013-04-01

    Type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) are complex nanomachines that insert a translocation pore into the host cell membrane through which effector proteins are injected into the cytosol. In Shigella, the pore is inserted by a needle tip complex that also controls secretion. IpaD is the key protein that rules the composition of the tip complex before and upon cell contact or Congo red (CR) induction. However, how IpaD is involved in secretion control and translocon insertion remains not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of 20 10-amino acids deletion variants all along the coiled-coil and the central domains of IpaD (residues 131-332). Our results highlight three classes of T3S phenotype; (i) wild-type secretion, (ii) constitutive secretion of all classes of effectors, and (iii) constitutive secretion of translocators and early effectors, but not of late effectors. Our data also suggest that the composition of the tip complex defines both the T3SA inducibility state and late effectors secretion. Finally, we shed light on a new aspect regarding the contact of the needle tip with cell membrane by uncoupling the Shigella abilities to escape macrophage vacuole, and to insert the translocation pore or to invade non-phagocytic cells.

  3. Human Parainfluenza Virus Serotypes Differ in Their Kinetics of Replication and Cytokine Secretion in Human Tracheobronchial Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Liesman, Rachael; Bartlett, Emmalene J.; Scull, Margaret A.; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) cause acute respiratory illness in children, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. PIV3 is a common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia, whereas PIV1 and 2 are frequent causes of upper respiratory tract illness and croup. To assess how PIV1, 2, and 3 differ with regard to replication and induction of type I interferons, interleukin-6, and relevant chemokines, we infected primary human airway epithelium (HAE) cultures from the same tissue donors and examined replication kinetics and cytokine secretion. PIV1 replicated to high titer yet did not induce cytokine secretion until late in infection, while PIV2 replicated less efficiently but induced an early cytokine peak. PIV3 replicated to high titer but induced a slower rise in cytokine secretion. The T cell chemoattractants CXCL10 and CXCL11 were the most abundant chemokines induced. Differences in replication and cytokine secretion might explain some of the differences in PIV serotype-specific pathogenesis and epidemiology. PMID:22959894

  4. The Best Kept Secret in Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvino, James

    2004-01-01

    It is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in educating gifted high school youth, and yet for 45 years, Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) has been going strong, "Motivating Tomorrow's Leaders Today." After spending nine inspirational days in 1958 with Albert Schweitzer (Nobel Prize physician and philosopher) at his clinic in the African jungle,…

  5. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with (3H)choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day.

  6. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  7. The Best-Kept Secret in Town

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he has toured many impressive schools over the years and has heard one familiar statement that amazes him: "We are the best-kept secret in town." How can a school exist for any significant period of time and be virtually unknown to the community it serves? The truth is that if one considers his school to…

  8. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    PubMed

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  9. Secrets of Mlearning Failures: Confronting Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Having implemented and evaluated over 35 mlearning projects in a variety of contexts in higher education over the past 6 years the researcher is ready to share the untold secret: not all mlearning projects succeed! This article critiques three of the researcher's mlearning projects that can be classed as "failures" and compares them to successful…

  10. 29 CFR 1903.9 - Trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concerns or relates to the trade secrets, processes, operations, style of work, or apparatus, or to the... thereof or any book containing any abstract or particulars thereof to be seen or examined by any person..., the Compliance Safety and Health Officer shall consult with a reasonable number of employees who...

  11. Eccrine sweat gland development and sweat secretion.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Schlessinger, David

    2015-09-01

    Eccrine sweat glands help to maintain homoeostasis, primarily by stabilizing body temperature. Derived from embryonic ectoderm, millions of eccrine glands are distributed across human skin and secrete litres of sweat per day. Their easy accessibility has facilitated the start of analyses of their development and function. Mouse genetic models find sweat gland development regulated sequentially by Wnt, Eda and Shh pathways, although precise subpathways and additional regulators require further elucidation. Mature glands have two secretory cell types, clear and dark cells, whose comparative development and functional interactions remain largely unknown. Clear cells have long been known as the major secretory cells, but recent studies suggest that dark cells are also indispensable for sweat secretion. Dark cell-specific Foxa1 expression was shown to regulate a Ca(2+) -dependent Best2 anion channel that is the candidate driver for the required ion currents. Overall, it was shown that cholinergic impulses trigger sweat secretion in mature glands through second messengers - for example InsP3 and Ca(2+) - and downstream ion channels/transporters in the framework of a Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter model. Notably, the microenvironment surrounding secretory cells, including acid-base balance, was implicated to be important for proper sweat secretion, which requires further clarification. Furthermore, multiple ion channels have been shown to be expressed in clear and dark cells, but the degree to which various ion channels function redundantly or indispensably also remains to be determined.

  12. Kinins as mediators of intestinal secretion.

    PubMed

    Gaginella, T S; Kachur, J F

    1989-01-01

    Kinins are small peptides that have diverse biological actions. Concentrations of kinins in the nanomolar or subnanomolar range induce intestinal smooth muscle contraction and evoke mucosal electrolyte secretion. Hyperkininemia is associated with effects on gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Bradykinin and kallidin are the predominant kinins with effects on the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Bradykinin stimulates chloride ion secretion by the guinea pig and rabbit ileum, rabbit colon, rat colon and monolayers of human HCA-7 cells. Kinins directly or indirectly stimulate phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. Cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (e.g., fibroblasts, mast cells, leukocytes), by liberating cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the kinin response; direct effects on epithelial cells cannot be ruled out, however. Antagonists now exist for kinin receptors. Based on studies with these antagonists in smooth muscle preparations, two subgroups of kinin receptor have been identified. The B2-type receptor appears to be responsible for both the contraction of ileal muscle and ileal secretion. Kinins are probably more important as pathophysiological rather than as physiological mediators. They may amplify the effect of inflammatory products that induce intestinal secretion. The precise involvement of kinins in clinical mucosal secretory states and diarrhea will require quantitative assessment of their levels during each phase of mucosal inflammation. Additional studies on the mechanism of action of kinins will be essential in designing therapy to mitigate the symptoms associated with mucosal inflammation.

  13. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  14. Identification of Glycosaminoglycans in Human Airway Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Maria E.; Casalino-Matsuda, Susana M.; Forteza, Rosanna M.

    2006-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), known to be present in airway mucus, are macromolecules with a variety of structural and biological functions. In the present work, we used fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) to identify and relatively quantify GAGs in human tracheal aspirates (HTA) obtained from healthy volunteers. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and submucosal gland (SMG) cells were used to assess their differential contribution to GAGs in mucus. Distribution was further assessed by immunofluorescence in human trachea tissue sections and in cell cultures. HTA samples contained keratan sulfate (KS), chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS), and hyaluronan (HA), whereas heparan sulfate (HS) was not detected. SMG cultures secreted CS/DS and HA, CS/DS being the most abundant GAGs in these cultures. NHBE cells synthesized KS, HA, and CS/DS. Confocal microscopy showed that KS was exclusively found at the apical border of NHBE cells and on the apical surface of ciliated epithelial cells in tracheal tissues. CS/DS and HA were present in both NHBE and SMG cells. HS was only found in the extracellular matrix in trachea tissue sections. In summary, HTA samples contain KS, CS/DS, and HA, mirroring a mixture of secretions originated in surface epithelial cells and SMGs. We conclude that surface epithelium is responsible for most HA and all KS present in secretions, whereas glands secrete most of CS/DS. These data suggest that, in diseases where the contribution to secretions of glands versus epithelial cells is altered, the relative concentration of individual GAGs, and therefore their biological activities, will also be affected. PMID:16195536

  15. Monosodium urate activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 kinase and cathepsin dependent unconventional protein secretion from human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2013-03-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  16. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  17. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. SecReT4: a web-based bacterial type IV secretion system resource

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Dexi; Liu, Linmeng; Tai, Cui; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    SecReT4 (http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/SecReT4/) is an integrated database providing comprehensive information of type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) in bacteria. T4SSs are versatile assemblages that promote genetic exchange and/or effector translocation with consequent impacts on pathogenesis and genome plasticity. T4SSs have been implicated in conjugation, DNA uptake and release and effector translocation. The effectors injected into eukaryotic target cells can lead to alteration of host cellular processes during infection. SecReT4 offers a unique, highly organized, readily exploreable archive of known and putative T4SSs and cognate effectors in bacteria. It currently contains details of 10 752 core components mapping to 808 T4SSs and 1884 T4SS effectors found in representatives of 289 bacterial species, as well as a collection of more than 900 directly related references. A broad range of similarity search, sequence alignment, phylogenetic, primer design and other functional analysis tools are readily accessible via SecReT4. We propose that SecReT4 will facilitate efficient investigation of large numbers of these systems, recognition of diverse patterns of sequence-, gene- and/or functional conservation and an improved understanding of the biological roles and significance of these versatile molecular machines. SecReT4 will be regularly updated to ensure its ongoing maximum utility to the research community. PMID:23193298

  19. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  20. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  1. Sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that hormone secretion from endocrine glands is regulated by hierarchical feedback mechanisms. However, although Cannon revealed in the 1920s that sympathoadrenal medullary function increased during emergency situations, no studies on the autonomic nervous regulation of hormone secretion have been undertaken for many years. In the past 40 years, the autonomic nervous regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreas, gastrin secretion from the stomach, glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex, etc., has been demonstrated. Estradiol secretion from the ovary is strongly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and its possible regulation by autonomic nerves has been largely unnoticed. Some histological studies have revealed rich adrenergic sympathetic innervation in the ovary. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the activation of the sympathetic nerves to the ovary directly reduces estradiol secretion from the ovary. This article reviews physiological and morphological studies, primarily in rats, on the sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  3. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Sang-Jik; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Yeam, Inhwa; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. • A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. • The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. • Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  4. Type 3 secretion system effector genotype and secretion phenotype of longitudinally collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from young children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis following newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Harmer, C; Anuj, S; Wainwright, C E; Manos, J; Cheney, J; Harbour, C; Zablotska, I; Turnbull, L; Whitchurch, C B; Grimwood, K; Rose, B

    2013-03-01

    Studies of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from chronically infected older children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) show a predominantly exoS+/exoU- (exoS+) genotype and loss of T3SS effector secretion over time. Relatively little is known about the role of the T3SS in the pathogenesis of early P. aeruginosa infection in the CF airway. In this longitudinal study, 168 P. aeruginosa isolates from 58 children diagnosed with CF following newborn screening and 47 isolates from homes of families with or without children with CF were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and T3SS genotype and phenotype determined using multiplex PCR and western blotting. Associations were sought between T3SS data and clinical variables and comparisons made between T3SS data of clinical and environmental PFGE genotypes. Seventy-seven of the 92 clinical strains were exoS+ (71% secretors (ExoS+)) and 15 were exoU+ (93% secretors (ExoU+)). Initial exoS+ strains were five times more likely to secrete ExoS than subsequent exoS+ strains at first isolation. The proportion of ExoS+ strains declined with increasing age at acquisition. No associations were found between T3SS characteristics and gender, site of isolation, exacerbation, a persistent strain or pulmonary outcomes. Fourteen of the 23 environmental strains were exoS+ (79% ExoS+) and nine were exoU+ (33% ExoU+). The exoU+ environmental strains were significantly less likely to secrete ExoU than clinical strains. This study provides new insight into the T3SS characteristics of P. aeruginosa isolated from the CF airway early in life. PMID:22329595

  5. Secretion of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 oncoprotein from latently infected B cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes two oncogenes, LMP1(Latent Membrane Protein-1) and BARF1 (BamH1-A Reading Frame-1). LMP1 belongs to latent gene family and BARF1 is considered so far as one of early gene family. However BARF1 oncogene was expressed highly in Nasopharyngeal (NPC) and gastric (GC) carcinoma as a type II latency, and in EBV-positive Akata cell and primary epithelial cell infected in vitro by EBV as type I latency. Its expression was also reported in Burkitt's lymphoma's biopsy frequent in Malawi in Africa as well as in nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. We recently observed a massive secretion of BARF1 protein in serum and saliva of NPC patients. NPC-derived c666-1 epithelial cells also expressed and secreted BARF1 protein without other lytic genes expression. We asked whether this oncogene belongs to latent gene family. To investigate, we examined its transcriptional and translational expression in IB4 and Akata B cells where both cell lines belong to latent cell family. Transcriptional expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. As BARF1 protein is one of secreted proteins, its translational expression was analyzed by immunoblot after concentration of culture medium. Secreted BARF1 protein was futher purified by concanavalin A affinity column. BARF1 was transcribed in both EBV-positive AKATA and IB4 cells, and BARF1 protein was secreted from these latently infected human B cells. Its secretion does not depend EBV genome form in infected cells. Both episomal and integrated form of EBV genome were capable of expressing BARF1 gene. These results suggests that BARF1 is expressed in latent stage and increases its expression during lytic stage.

  6. Trade secrets in life science and pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M; Cai, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through "improper means" is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today's interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees' careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft. PMID:25414378

  7. Hoopoes color their eggs with antimicrobial uropygial secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Juan J.; Martín-Vivaldi, M.; Peralta-Sánchez, J. M.; Arco, L.; Juárez-García-Pelayo, N.

    2014-09-01

    Uropygial gland secretions are used as cosmetics by some species of birds to color and enhance properties of feathers and teguments, which may signal individual quality. Uropygial secretions also reach eggshells during incubation and, therefore, may influence the coloration of birds' eggs, a trait that has attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists for more than one century. The color of hoopoe eggs typically changes along incubation, from bluish-gray to greenish-brown. Here, we test experimentally the hypothesis that dark uropygial secretion of females is responsible for such drastic color change. Moreover, since uropygial secretion of hoopoes has antimicrobial properties, we also explore the association between color and antimicrobial activity of the uropygial secretion of females. We found that eggs stayed bluish-gray in nests where female access to the uropygial secretion was experimentally blocked. Furthermore, experimental eggs that were maintained in incubators and manually smeared with uropygial secretion experienced similar color changes that naturally incubated eggs did, while control eggs that were not in contact with the secretions did not experience such color changes. All these results strongly support the hypothesis that female hoopoes use their uropygial gland secretion to color the eggs. Moreover, saturation of the uropygial secretion was associated with antimicrobial activity against Bacillus licheniformis. Given the known antimicrobial potential of uropygial secretions of birds, this finding opens the possibility that in scenarios of sexual selection, hoopoes in particular and birds in general signal antimicrobial properties of their uropygial secretion by mean of changes in egg coloration along incubation.

  8. Information Theoretic Secret Key Generation: Structured Codes and Tree Packing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitinawarat, Sirin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation deals with a multiterminal source model for secret key generation by multiple network terminals with prior and privileged access to a set of correlated signals complemented by public discussion among themselves. Emphasis is placed on a characterization of secret key capacity, i.e., the largest rate of an achievable secret key,…

  9. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  10. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  11. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  12. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  13. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  14. Trade secrets in life science and pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M; Cai, Yu

    2014-11-20

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through "improper means" is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today's interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees' careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft.

  15. Hedgehog Secretion and Signal Transduction in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kaitlyn E.; Chiang, Chin

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins is essential for proper embryonic patterning and development. Dysregulation of Hh signaling is associated with a variety of human diseases ranging from developmental disorders such as holoprosencephaly to certain forms of cancer, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. Genetic studies in flies and mice have shaped our understanding of Hh signaling and revealed that nearly all core components of the pathway are highly conserved. Although many aspects of the Drosophila Hh pathway are conserved in vertebrates, mechanistic differences between the two species have begun to emerge. Perhaps the most striking divergence in vertebrate Hh signaling is its dependence on the primary cilium, a vestigial organelle that is largely absent in flies. This minireview will provide an overview of Hh signaling and present recent insights into vertebrate Hh secretion, receptor binding, and signal transduction. PMID:22474285

  16. Active Wnt proteins are secreted on exosomes.

    PubMed

    Gross, Julia Christina; Chaudhary, Varun; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Wnt signalling has important roles during development and in many diseases. As morphogens, hydrophobic Wnt proteins exert their function over a distance to induce patterning and cell differentiation decisions. Recent studies have identified several factors that are required for the secretion of Wnt proteins; however, how Wnts travel in the extracellular space remains a largely unresolved question. Here we show that Wnts are secreted on exosomes both during Drosophila development and in human cells. We demonstrate that exosomes carry Wnts on their surface to induce Wnt signalling activity in target cells. Together with the cargo receptor Evi/WIs, Wnts are transported through endosomal compartments onto exosomes, a process that requires the R-SNARE Ykt6. Our study demonstrates an evolutionarily conserved functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of Wnt proteins.

  17. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators - stored in granules - as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Schistosoma mansoni Egg Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Califf, Lindsay L.; Xu, Tao; Hernandez, Hector J.; Stadecker, Miguel J.; Yates, John R.; Williams, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a largely neglected, global health problem. The morbid pathology of the disease stems from the host's inflammatory response to parasite eggs trapped in host tissues. Long term host/parasite survival is dependent upon the successful modulation of the acute pathological response, which is induced by egg antigens. In this study, using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology, we identified the Schistosoma mansoni egg secretome consisting of 188 proteins. Notably we identified proteins involved in redox balance, molecular chaperoning and protein folding, development and signaling, scavenging and metabolic pathways, immune response modulation, and 32 novel, previously uncharacterized schistosome proteins. We localized a subset of previously-characterized schistosome proteins identified in egg secretions in this study, to the surface of live S. mansoni eggs using the circumoval precipitin reaction. The identification of proteins actively secreted by live schistosome eggs provides important new information for understanding immune modulation and the pathology of schistosomiasis. PMID:17644200

  19. Regulation of renal potassium secretion: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Welling, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    A new understanding of renal potassium balance has emerged as the molecular underpinnings of potassium secretion have become illuminated, highlighting the key roles of apical potassium channels, renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) and Big Potassium (BK), in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron and collecting duct. These channels act as the final-regulated components of the renal potassium secretory machinery. Their activity, number, and driving forces are precisely modulated to ensure potassium excretion matches dietary potassium intake. Recent identification of the underlying regulatory mechanisms at the molecular level provides a new appreciation of the physiology and reveals a molecular insight to explain the paradoxic actions of aldosterone on potassium secretion. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field.

  20. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with {sup 3}H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers.

  1. [The symbolic power of bodily secretions].

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2002-01-10

    Are ethical and political questions discussed more in aesthetic than in social terms? Political debates in contemporary art are often expressed through the use of symbolic power structures that are related to bodily secretions and products. By visualizing the less delicate parts of the organic body, contemporary artists focus on the vulnerability of the human body and its illness and pain. If human suffering is aestheticized: is this a question of form or a question of creating a cultural cover-up? Bodily secretions are associated with a range of complex social and cultural meanings and symbols. Metaphors related to body products may function as markers of ethnic, religious, social and sexual differences. In postmodern cultural criticism, the symbolic power of body metaphors is of great importance.

  2. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion. PMID:22679448

  3. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  4. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  5. Floral and vegetative cues in oil-secreting and non-oil-secreting Lysimachia species

    PubMed Central

    Schäffler, I.; Balao, F.; Dötterl, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Unrelated plants pollinated by the same group or guild of animals typically evolve similar floral cues due to pollinator-mediated selection. Related plant species, however, may possess similar cues either as a result of pollinator-mediated selection or as a result of sharing a common ancestor that possessed the same cues or traits. In this study, visual and olfactory floral cues in Lysimachia species exhibiting different pollination strategies were analysed and compared, and the importance of pollinators and phylogeny on the evolution of these floral cues was determined. For comparison, cues of vegetative material were examined where pollinator selection would not be expected. Methods Floral and vegetative scents and colours in floral oil- and non-floral oil-secreting Lysimachia species were studied by chemical and spectrophotometric analyses, respectively, compared between oil- and non-oil-secreting species, and analysed by phylogenetically controlled methods. Key Results Vegetative and floral scent was species specific, and variability in floral but not vegetative scent was lower in oil compared with non-oil species. Overall, oil species did not differ in their floral or vegetative scent from non-oil species. However, a correlation was found between oil secretion and six floral scent constituents specific to oil species, whereas the presence of four other floral compounds can be explained by phylogeny. Four of the five analysed oil species had bee-green flowers and the pattern of occurrence of this colour correlated with oil secretion. Non-oil species had different floral colours. The colour of leaves was similar among all species studied. Conclusions Evidence was found for correlated evolution between secretion of floral oils and floral but not vegetative visual and olfactory cues. The cues correlating with oil secretion were probably selected by Macropis bees, the specialized pollinators of oil-secreting Lysimachia species, and may have

  6. Type II secretion and Legionella virulence.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Type II secretion (T2S) is one of six systems that can occur in Gram-negative bacteria for the purpose of secreting proteins into the extracellular milieu and/or into host cells. This chapter will describe the T2S system of Legionella pneumophila. Topics to be covered include the genetic basis of T2S in L. pneumophila, the numbers (>25), types, and novelties of Legionella proteins that are secreted via T2S, and the many ways in which T2S and its substrates promote L. pneumophila physiology, ecology, and virulence. Within the aquatic environment, T2S plays a major role in L. pneumophila intracellular infection of multiple types of (Acanthamoeba, Hartmannella, and Naegleria) amoebae. Within the mammalian host, T2S promotes bacterial persistence in lungs, intracellular infection of both macrophages and epithelial cells, and a dampening of the host innate immune response. In this context, T2S may represent a potential target for both industrial and biomedical application. PMID:23900831

  7. Preconditioning stimuli that augment chromaffin cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Laura; García-Eguiagaray, Josefina; García, Antonio G; Gandía, Luis

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated here whether a preconditioned stimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors augmented the catecholamine release responses elicited by supramaximal 3-s pulses of 100 muM acetylcholine (100ACh) or 100 mM K(+) (100K(+)) applied to fast-perifused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Threshold concentrations of nicotine (1-3 muM) that caused only a tiny secretion did, however, augment the responses elicited by 100ACh or 100K(+) by 2- to 3.5-fold. This effect was suppressed by mecamylamine and by Ca(2+) deprivation, was developed with a half-time (t(1/2)) of 1 min, and was reversible. The nicotine effect was mimicked by threshold concentrations of ACh, choline, epibatidine, and oxotremorine-M but not by methacholine. Threshold concentrations of K(+) caused lesser potentiation of secretion compared with that of threshold nicotine. The data are compatible with an hypothesis implying 1) that continuous low-frequency sympathetic discharge places chromaffin cells at the adrenal gland in a permanent "hypersensitive" state; and 2) this allows an explosive secretion of catecholamines by high-frequency sympathetic discharge during stress.

  8. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-15

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors. PMID:27472103

  9. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors.

  10. A Trade Secret Model for Genomic Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Conley, John M.; Kenan, William Rand; Mitchell, Robert; Cadigan, R. Jean; Davis, Arlene M.; Dobson, Allison W.; Gladden, Ryan Q.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic biobanks present ethical challenges that are qualitatively unique and quantitatively unprecedented. Many critics have questioned whether the current system of informed consent can be meaningfully applied to genomic biobanking. Proposals for reform have come from many directions, but have tended to involve incremental change in current informed consent practice. This paper reports on our efforts to seek new ideas and approaches from those whom informed consent is designed to protect: research subjects. Our model emerged from semi-structured interviews with healthy volunteers who had been recruited to join either of two biobanks (some joined, some did not), and whom we encouraged to explain their concerns and how they understood the relationship between specimen contributors and biobanks. These subjects spoke about their DNA and the information it contains in ways that were strikingly evocative of the legal concept of the trade secret. They then described the terms and conditions under which they might let others study their DNA, and there was a compelling analogy to the commonplace practice of trade secret licensing. We propose a novel biobanking model based on this trade secret concept, and argue that it would be a practical, legal, and ethical improvement on the status quo. PMID:23061589

  11. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-15

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors.

  12. Activated microglia enhance neurogenesis via trypsinogen secretion.

    PubMed

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Dutta, Ranjan; Chen, Zhihong; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2013-05-21

    White matter neurons in multiple sclerosis brains are destroyed during demyelination and then replaced in some chronic multiple sclerosis lesions that exhibit a morphologically distinct population of activated microglia [Chang A, et al. (2008) Brain 131(Pt 9):2366-2375]. Here we investigated whether activated microglia secrete factors that promote the generation of neurons from white matter cells. Adult rat brain microglia (resting or activated with lipopolysaccharide) were isolated by flow cytometry and cocultured with neonatal rat optic nerve cells in separate but media-connected chambers. Optic nerve cells cocultured with activated microglia showed a significant increase in the number of cells of neuronal phenotype, identified by neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin (TUJ-1) labeling, compared with cultures with resting microglia. To investigate the possible source of the TUJ-1-positive cells, A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and A2B5-negative cells were isolated and cocultured with resting and activated microglia. Significantly more TUJ-1-positive cells were generated from A2B5-negative cells (∼70%) than from A2B5-positive cells (~30%). Mass spectrometry analysis of microglia culture media identified protease serine 2 (PRSS2) as a factor secreted by activated, but not resting, microglia. When added to optic nerve cultures, PRSS2 significantly increased neurogenesis, whereas the serine protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, decreased activated microglia-induced neurogenesis. Collectively our data provide evidence that activated microglia increase neurogenesis through secretion of PRSS2.

  13. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells. PMID:27665549

  14. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity: Fact not fiction.

    PubMed

    Bais, Harsh P; Kaushik, Shail

    2010-09-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the "novel weapons hypothesis (NWH)." Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1-3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin.

  15. Nilotinib exacerbates diabetes mellitus by decreasing secretion of endogenous insulin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikiyo; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Chong, Yong; Maki, Toshinobu; Akashi, Koichi; Kamimura, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in accelerated phase with pre-existing severe type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hemorrhagic gastric ulcers who was successfully treated with nilotinib. We first considered second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of this patient, as they elicit a superior response compared with imatinib. We next selected nilotinib, rather than dasatinib, since the increased risk of bleeding associated with dasatinib represented a greater risk of fatality than aggravation of T2D with nilotinib. After improvement of hemorrhagic gastric ulcers and T2D with exogenous insulin therapy, we began nilotinib administration; insulin dose was increased to maintain her glucose levels whereas urine C-peptide level decreased. Conversely, when nilotinib was discontinued due to liver dysfunction, the dosage of injected insulin was decreased and urine C-peptide levels increased. After re-starting nilotinib, the required dose of insulin gradually increased again, and urine C-peptide level decreased, indicating that nilotinib may have impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient obtained a complete cytogenetic response after 3 months of nilotinib treatment. Her T2D has since been well controlled by insulin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that nilotinib treatment for patients with severe T2D may induce a reversible decrease in endogenous insulin secretion, although the precise underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We highly recommend sufficient screening and early intervention with exogenous insulin therapy for diabetic CML patients who receive nilotinib.

  16. Adopting Frank Warren's PostSecret Art Project to Illustrate the Role of Secrets in Interpersonal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxman, Christina G.

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of secrets summons the adage that ''what someone doesn't know won't hurt them.'' While this phrase implies that keeping secrets can be advantageous, it also foreshadows another consideration: secrets have the propensity to hurt others (Caughlin, Scott, Miller, & Hefner, 2009). Despite this, the act…

  17. Verifiable Quantum ( k, n)-threshold Secret Key Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Teng, Yi-Wei; Chai, Hai-Ping; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2011-03-01

    Based on Lagrange interpolation formula and the post-verification mechanism, we show how to construct a verifiable quantum ( k, n) threshold secret key sharing scheme. Compared with the previous secret sharing protocols, ours has the merits: (i) it can resist the fraud of the dealer who generates and distributes fake shares among the participants during the secret distribution phase; Most importantly, (ii) It can check the cheating of the dishonest participant who provides a false share during the secret reconstruction phase such that the authorized group cannot recover the correct secret.

  18. High passage MIN6 cells have impaired insulin secretion with impaired glucose and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kim; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Nolan, Christopher J; Turner, Nigel; Hallahan, Nicole; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Gunton, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by the inability of beta-cells to secrete enough insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. MIN6 cells secrete insulin in response to glucose and other secretagogues, but high passage (HP) MIN6 cells lose their ability to secrete insulin in response to glucose. We hypothesized that metabolism of glucose and lipids were defective in HP MIN6 cells causing impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). HP MIN6 cells had no first phase and impaired second phase GSIS indicative of global functional impairment. This was coupled with a markedly reduced ATP content at basal and glucose stimulated states. Glucose uptake and oxidation were higher at basal glucose but ATP content failed to increase with glucose. HP MIN6 cells had decreased basal lipid oxidation. This was accompanied by reduced expressions of Glut1, Gck, Pfk, Srebp1c, Ucp2, Sirt3, Nampt. MIN6 cells represent an important model of beta cells which, as passage numbers increased lost first phase but retained partial second phase GSIS, similar to patients early in type 2 diabetes onset. We believe a number of gene expression changes occurred to produce this defect, with emphasis on Sirt3 and Nampt, two genes that have been implicated in maintenance of glucose homeostasis.

  19. Live attenuated Salmonella vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with antigen delivery via the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Arteaga-Cortés, Lourdes T; Kader, Rebin; Curtiss, Roy; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health threat, and there is dire need to develop a vaccine that is safe and efficacious and confers long-lasting protection. In this study, we constructed recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with plasmids expressing fusion proteins consisting of the 80 amino-terminal amino acids of the type 3 secretion system effector SopE of Salmonella and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa (ESAT-6) protein and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10). We demonstrated that the SopE-mycobacterial antigen fusion proteins were translocated into the cytoplasm of INT-407 cells in cell culture assays. Oral immunization of mice with RASV strains synthesizing SopE-ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion proteins resulted in significant protection of the mice against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv that was similar to the protection afforded by immunization with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) administered subcutaneously. In addition, oral immunization with the RASV strains specifying these mycobacterial antigens elicited production of significant antibody titers to ESAT-6 and production of ESAT-6- or CFP-10-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-secreting splenocytes. PMID:22144486

  20. In vivo quantification of the secretion rates of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Michael H H; Beer, Tobias; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria secrete a broad range of substrates into the extracellular space. Common to all substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence and nonapeptide repeats in the C-terminal part that bind Ca(2+) in the extracellular space, to trigger protein folding. Like all T1SS, the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli consists of an ABC transporter, a membrane fusion protein and an outer membrane protein allowing the one step translocation of the substrate across both membranes. Here, we analyzed the secretion rate of the HlyA T1SS. Our results demonstrate that the rate is independent of substrate-size and operates at a speed of approximately 16 amino acids per transporter per second. We also demonstrate that the rate is independent of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration raising the question of the driving force of substrate secretion by T1SS in general. PMID:27616645

  1. In vivo quantification of the secretion rates of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, Michael H. H.; Beer, Tobias; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria secrete a broad range of substrates into the extracellular space. Common to all substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence and nonapeptide repeats in the C-terminal part that bind Ca2+ in the extracellular space, to trigger protein folding. Like all T1SS, the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli consists of an ABC transporter, a membrane fusion protein and an outer membrane protein allowing the one step translocation of the substrate across both membranes. Here, we analyzed the secretion rate of the HlyA T1SS. Our results demonstrate that the rate is independent of substrate-size and operates at a speed of approximately 16 amino acids per transporter per second. We also demonstrate that the rate is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration raising the question of the driving force of substrate secretion by T1SS in general. PMID:27616645

  2. The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion.

    PubMed

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Boland, Wilhelm; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Plants produce nectar in their flowers as a reward for their pollinators and most of our crops depend on insect pollination, but little is known on the physiological control of nectar secretion. Jasmonates are well-known for their effects on senescence, the development and opening of flowers and on plant defences such as extrafloral nectar. Their role in floral nectar secretion has, however, not been explored so far. We investigated whether jasmonates have an influence on floral nectar secretion in oil-seed rape, Brassica napus. The floral tissues of this plant produced jasmonic acid (JA) endogenously, and JA concentrations peaked shortly before nectar secretion was highest. Exogenous application of JA to flowers induced nectar secretion, which was suppressed by treatment with phenidone, an inhibitor of JA synthesis. This effect could be reversed by additional application of JA. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine and its structural mimic coronalon also increased nectar secretion. Herbivory or addition of JA to the leaves did not have an effect on floral nectar secretion, demonstrating a functional separation of systemic defence signalling from reproductive nectar secretion. Jasmonates, which have been intensively studied in the context of herbivore defences and flower development, have a profound effect on floral nectar secretion and, thus, pollination efficiency in B. napus. Our results link floral nectar secretion to jasmonate signalling and thereby integrate the floral nectar secretion into the complex network of oxylipid-mediated developmental processes of plants. PMID:20174464

  3. Autoproteolysis and intramolecular dissociation of Yersinia YscU precedes secretion of its C-terminal polypeptide YscU(CC).

    PubMed

    Frost, Stefan; Ho, Oanh; Login, Frédéric H; Weise, Christoph F; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Type III secretion system mediated secretion and translocation of Yop-effector proteins across the eukaryotic target cell membrane by pathogenic Yersinia is highly organized and is dependent on a switching event from secretion of early structural substrates to late effector substrates (Yops). Substrate switching can be mimicked in vitro by modulating the calcium levels in the growth medium. YscU that is essential for regulation of this switch undergoes autoproteolysis at a conserved N↑PTH motif, resulting in a 10 kDa C-terminal polypeptide fragment denoted YscU(CC). Here we show that depletion of calcium induces intramolecular dissociation of YscU(CC) from YscU followed by secretion of the YscU(CC) polypeptide. Thus, YscU(CC) behaved in vivo as a Yop protein with respect to secretion properties. Further, destabilized yscU mutants displayed increased rates of dissociation of YscU(CC)in vitro resulting in enhanced Yop secretion in vivo at 30°C relative to the wild-type strain.These findings provide strong support to the relevance of YscU(CC) dissociation for Yop secretion. We propose that YscU(CC) orchestrates a block in the secretion channel that is eliminated by calcium depletion. Further, the striking homology between different members of the YscU/FlhB family suggests that this protein family possess regulatory functions also in other bacteria using comparable mechanisms.

  4. Developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamazaki, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones play important roles in plant-microbe interactions in rhizospheres. Soybean roots secrete daidzein and genistein to attract rhizobia. Despite the importance of isoflavones in plant-microbe interactions, little is known about the developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots. In this study, soybeans were grown in hydroponic culture, and isoflavone contents in tissues, isoflavone secretion from the roots, and the expression of isoflavone conjugates hydrolyzing beta-glucosidase (ICHG) were investigated. Isoflavone contents did not show strong growth-dependent changes, while secretion of daidzein from the roots dramatically changed, with higher secretion during vegetative stages. Coordinately, the expression of ICHG also peaked at vegetative stages. Nitrogen deficiency resulted in 8- and 15-fold increases in secretion of daidzein and genistein, respectively, with no induction of ICHG. Taken together, these results suggest that large amounts of isoflavones were secreted during vegetative stages via the hydrolysis of (malonyl)glucosides with ICHG. PMID:26168358

  5. Two-Party secret key distribution via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    DOE PAGES

    Grice, Warren P.; Evans, Philip G.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, William R.; Williams, Brian P.; Qi, B.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a method of distributing secret information based on N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) in a modied plug-and-play two-party Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system with N 2 intermediate nodes and compare it to both standard QSS and QKD. Our setup is based on the Clavis2 QKD system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of N parties can build a secret key based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N 2 parties. This method signicantly reduces the number of resources (singlemore » photon detectors, lasers and dark ber connections) needed to implement QKD on the grid.« less

  6. Two-Party secret key distribution via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P.; Evans, Philip G.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, William R.; Williams, Brian P.; Qi, B.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a method of distributing secret information based on N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) in a modied plug-and-play two-party Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system with N 2 intermediate nodes and compare it to both standard QSS and QKD. Our setup is based on the Clavis2 QKD system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of N parties can build a secret key based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N 2 parties. This method signicantly reduces the number of resources (single photon detectors, lasers and dark ber connections) needed to implement QKD on the grid.

  7. Functional Production of a Soluble and Secreted Single-Chain Antibody by a Bacterial Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chiu-Min; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Zhuang, Ya-Han; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Kao, Chien-Han; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Cheng, Ta-Chun; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Hsieh, Yuan-Chin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) serve as an alternative to full-length monoclonal antibodies used in research and therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, when recombinant scFvs are overexpressed in bacteria, they often form inclusion bodies and exhibit loss of function. To overcome this problem, we developed an scFv secretion system in which scFv was fused with osmotically inducible protein Y (osmY), a bacterial secretory carrier protein, for efficient protein secretion. Anti-EGFR scFv (αEGFR) was fused with osmY (N- and C-termini) and periplasmic leader sequence (pelB) to generate αEGFR-osmY, osmY-αEGFR, and pelB-αEGFR (control), respectively. In comparison with the control, both the osmY-fused αEGFR scFvs were soluble and secreted into the LB medium. Furthermore, the yield of soluble αEGFR-osmY was 20-fold higher, and the amount of secreted protein was 250-fold higher than that of osmY-αEGFR. In addition, the antigen-binding activity of both the osmY-fused αEGFRs was 2-fold higher than that of the refolded pelB-αEGFR from inclusion bodies. Similar results were observed with αTAG72-osmY and αHer2-osmY. These results suggest that the N-terminus of osmY fused with scFv produces a high yield of soluble, functional, and secreted scFv, and the osmY-based bacterial secretion system may be used for the large-scale industrial production of low-cost αEGFR protein. PMID:24824752

  8. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Results: Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Conclusion: Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma. PMID:27306775

  9. Cell secretion mediated by granule-associated vesicle transport: a glimpse at evolution.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Nico, Beatrice; Gallo, Valentina Patrizia; Ribatti, Domenico

    2010-07-01

    Regulated secretion allows extrusion of cell products stored in specialized membrane-bound organelles called secretory granules or secretory vesicles. Regulated secretion provides basic functions in living organisms, and in a phylogenetic perspective, it is recognizable in the most primitive eukaryotic forms. This article is an attempt to trace the evolutionary history of a special type of secretory pattern, which has been referred to as vesicle-mediated degranulation or piecemeal degranulation (PMD). First described in the early 70s of the last century in inflammatory cells, such as the basophils, mast cells, and eosinophils, this regulated secretory route has subsequently been recognized in endocrine cells, in particular in the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. This vesicle-mediated degranulation is held to mobilize small and specific aliquots of granule-associated material for selective paracrine or endocrine transport to the cell exterior. PMD has been identified in many vertebrate classes. By contrast, no data are available for invertebrates. We speculate that this pattern of cell secretion emerged early in phylogenesis, when the first metazoans appeared. In this review article, we will first revise the concept of vesicle-mediated degranulation in the light of the most recent experimental discoveries and theoretical implications. Then, the distribution of this secretory mode among vertebrates and its molecular basis will be highlighted. Finally, the potential occurrence of PMD in invertebrates, its biological significance from an evolutionary perspective and the future direction of investigations will be briefly sketched.

  10. Early intervention and early experience.

    PubMed

    Ramey, C T; Ramey, S L

    1998-02-01

    For 4 decades, vigorous efforts have been based on the premise that early intervention for children of poverty and, more recently, for children with developmental disabilities can yield significant improvements in cognitive, academic, and social outcomes. The history of these efforts is briefly summarized and a conceptual framework presented to understand the design, research, and policy relevance of these early interventions. This framework, biosocial developmental contextualism, derives from social ecology, developmental systems theory, developmental epidemiology, and developmental neurobiology. This integrative perspective predicts that fragmented, weak efforts in early intervention are not likely to succeed, whereas intensive, high-quality, ecologically pervasive interventions can and do. Relevant evidence is summarized in 6 principles about efficacy of early intervention. The public policy challenge in early intervention is to contain costs by more precisely targeting early interventions to those who most need and benefit from these interventions. The empirical evidence on biobehavioral effects of early experience and early intervention has direct relevance to federal and state policy development and resource allocation. PMID:9491742

  11. [Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion].

    PubMed

    Mendonça, B B; Madureira, G; Bloise, W; Albergaria, A; Halpern, A; Liberman, B; Villares, S M; Batista, M C; Avancini, V F; Nitterdorfi, C T

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied 8 patients (4 males and 4 females) with Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion. Chronological age ranged from 15 to 45 years and duration of the disease ranged from 3 to 48 months. All patients presented typical signs of Cushing's syndrome, blood hypertension, and four of them had hyperpigmentation of the skin. Five patients had fasting hyperglycemia and all patients but one had serum hypokalemia (serum K = 2.2 to 3.9mEq/l). The circadian rhythm of cortisol was absent in all patients and basal cortisol levels were elevated in all patients but one. Basal ACTH levels evaluated in 7 patients were elevated in 6 (29 to 1050 pg/ml-MRC). One patient presented normal depression of urinary 17-OH after two days of dexamethasone and normal increase of urinary 17-OH and serum 11-dexycortisol after methyrapone. Four patients had carcinoid tumor (3 thymic and 1 bronchial), two had pancreatic islets cell tumors, one had bilateral pheochromocytoma and medular carcinoma of the thyroid, and one had oat cell carcinoma of the lung and medular carcinoma of the thyroid. Thoracic X-rays identified the ectopic ACTH secretion tumor in four cases, all confirmed by CT scan. Abdominal CT showed a difuse enlargement of the adrenals in seven cases and bilateral nodules in one case (pheochromocytomas). Six patients died within 3 years of the diagnosis. The authors concluded that clinical and hormonal findings could mislead the findings of ACTH ectopic secretion and Cushing's disease, and suggest that thoracic X-rays and CT scans of the skull, thorax, and abdome should be done in all cases of Cushing's syndrome. PMID:2559451

  12. Regulation of aldosterone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone synthesized in and secreted from the outer layer of the adrenal cortex, the zona glomerulosa. Aldosterone is responsible for regulating sodium homeostasis, thereby helping to control blood volume and blood pressure. Insufficient aldosterone secretion can lead to hypotension and circulatory shock, particularly in infancy. On the other hand, excessive aldosterone levels, or those too high for sodium status, can cause hypertension and exacerbate the effects of high blood pressure on multiple organs, contributing to renal disease, stroke, visual loss, and congestive heart failure. Aldosterone is also thought to directly induce end-organ damage, including in the kidneys and heart. Because of the significance of aldosterone to the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, it is important to understand the regulation of its biosynthesis and secretion from the adrenal cortex. Herein, the mechanisms regulating aldosterone production in zona glomerulosa cells are discussed, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the secretory response to the main controllers of aldosterone production, the renin-angiotensin II system, serum potassium levels and adrenocorticotrophic hormone. The signaling pathways involved include phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, cytosolic calcium levels, calcium influx pathways, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, diacylglycerol, protein kinases C and D, 12-hydroxyeicostetraenoic acid, phospholipase D, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, tyrosine kinases, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A complete understanding of the signaling events regulating aldosterone biosynthesis may allow the identification of novel targets for therapeutic interventions in hypertension, primary aldosteronism, congestive heart failure, renal disease, and other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:24944029

  13. Secret Objective Standoff: International Safeguards Educational Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Okowita, Samantha L

    2014-01-01

    The International Safeguards Regime, being so multi-faceted, can be overwhelming to those first introduced to its many components. The organizers and lecturers of workshops and courses on nonproliferation often provide a series of independent lectures and must somehow demonstrate the cohesive and effective nature of the system. An exercise titled The Secret Objective Standoff was developed to complement lectures with hands-on learning to assist participants in bringing all the many components (IAEA agreements, export controls, treaty obligations, international diplomacy, etc.) of the International Safeguards Regime together. This exercise divides participants into teams that are assigned the role of either a country or the IAEA and asks that they fully immerse themselves in their roles. The teams are then randomly assigned three unique and secret objectives that are intended to represent realistic and current geopolitical scenarios. Through construction, trading, or hoarding of four resources (experts, technology, money, and uranium), the teams have a finite number of turns to accomplish their objectives. Each turn has three phases random dispersal of resources, a timed discussion where teams can coordinate and strategize with others, and an action phase. During the action phase, teams inform the moderator individually and secretly what they will be doing that turn. The exercise has been tested twice with Oak Ridge National Laboratory personnel, and has been conducted with outside participants twice, in each case the experience was well received by both participants and instructors. This exercise provides instructors the ability to modify the exercise before or during game play to best fit their educational goals. By offering a range of experiences, from an in-depth look at specific components to a generalized overview, this exercise is an effective tool in helping participants achieve a full understanding the International Safeguards Regime.

  14. Veritas Asteroid Family Still Holds Secrets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakovic, B.

    2012-12-01

    Veritas asteroid family has been studied for about two decades. These studies have revealed many secrets, and a respectable knowledge about this family had been collected. Here I will present many of these results and review the current knowledge about the family. However, despite being extensively studied, Veritas family is still a mystery. This will be illustrated through the presentation of the most interesting open problems. Was there a secondary collision within this family? Does asteroid (490) Veritas belong to the family named after it? How large was the parent body of the family? Finally, some possible directions for future studies that aims to address these questions are discussed as well.

  15. Early Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are articles related to the early years of The Mathematical Association of Great Britain. Some of the topics include reports from curriculum committees, tributes to persons associated with The Mathematical Association, and the teaching of mathematics. (CT)

  16. Involvement of hypothalamic dopamine in the regulation of prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M J; Porter, J C

    1985-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of prolactin (PRL) secretion is known to be a multifactorial process, but dopamine (DA) secreted by the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons of the hypothalamus is believed to exert a predominant inhibitory control on the secretion of PRL. The secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, including the rate of biosynthesis of DA and the rate of release of the neurohormone into hypophysial portal blood, can be readily evaluated in the rat. In most conditions in which an altered secretion of PRL has been documented, an altered secretory activity of the TIDA neurons has been found. When an acute reduction in the secretion of DA is observed, an increased secretion of PRL is associated, with an inverse relationship between DA and PRL concentrations in hypophysial portal and systemic blood, respectively. However, the secretion of PRL can be regulated by PRL itself through stimulation of the secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, and consequently hyperprolactinemia can be observed concomitantly with a sustained high secretion of DA, as seen after treatment with estrogen. The short loop feedback of PRL secretion seems to be impaired in the aging rat, since a sustained reduced hypothalamic secretion of DA is observed in spite of long-term hyperprolactinemia.

  17. Sociosexual stimuli and gonadotropin-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Hawken, P A R; Martin, G B

    2012-08-01

    Sociosexual stimuli have a profound effect on the physiology of all species. Sheep and goats provide an ideal model to study the impact of sociosexual stimuli on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis because we can use the robust changes in the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone as a bioassay of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. We can also correlate these changes with neural activity using the immediate early gene c-fos and in real time using changes in electrical activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus of female goats. In this review, we will update our current understanding of the proven and potential mechanisms and mode of action of the male effect in sheep and goats and then briefly compare our understanding of sociosexual stimuli in ungulate species with the "traditional" definition of a pheromone.

  18. Endoderm induction by the organizer-secreted factors chordin and noggin in Xenopus animal caps.

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Y; Lu, B; Piccolo, S; De Robertis, E M

    1996-01-01

    Spemann's organizer has potent neural inducing and mesoderm dorsalizing activities in the Xenopus gastrula. A third activity, the organizer's ability to induce a secondary gut, has been difficult to analyze experimentally due to the lack of early gene markers. Here we introduce endodermin, a pan-endodermal gene marker, and use it to demonstrate that chordin (Chd), a protein secreted by the organizer region, is able to induce endodermal differentiation in Xenopus. The ability of chd, as well as that of noggin, to induce endoderm in animal cap explants is repressed by the ventralizing factor BMP-4. When FGF signaling is blocked by a dominant-negative FGF receptor in chd-injected animal caps, neural induction is inhibited and most of the explant is induced to become endoderm. The results suggest that proteins secreted by the organizer, acting together with known peptide growth factors, regulate differentiation of the endodermal germ layer. Images PMID:8887546

  19. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  20. Rac Regulates Giardia lamblia Encystation by Coordinating Cyst Wall Protein Trafficking and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Thomas, Elizabeth B.; Alas, Germain C. M.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Behjatnia, Habib R.; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encystation of the common intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia involves the production, trafficking, and secretion of cyst wall material (CWM). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of these sequential processes remains elusive. Here, we examined the role of GlRac, Giardia’s sole Rho family GTPase, in the regulation of endomembrane organization and cyst wall protein (CWP) trafficking. Localization studies indicated that GlRac is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus-like encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Constitutive GlRac signaling increased levels of the ER marker PDI2, induced ER swelling, reduced overall CWP1 production, and promoted the early maturation of ESVs. Quantitative analysis of cells expressing constitutively active hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged GlRac (HA-RacCA) revealed fewer but larger ESVs than control cells. Consistent with the phenotype of premature maturation of ESVs in HA-RacCA-expressing cells, constitutive GlRac signaling resulted in increased CWP1 secretion and, conversely, morpholino depletion of GlRac blocked CWP1 secretion. Wild-type cells unexpectedly secreted large quantities of CWP1 into the medium, and free CWP1 was used cooperatively during cyst formation. These results, in part, could account for the previously reported observation that G. lamblia encysts more efficiently at high cell densities. These studies of GlRac show that it regulates encystation at several levels, and our findings support its coordinating role as a regulator of CWP trafficking and secretion. The central role of GlRac in regulating membrane trafficking and the cytoskeleton, both of which are essential to Giardia parasitism, further suggests its potential as a novel target for drug development to treat giardiasis. PMID:27555307

  1. Synthesis, intracellular processing and secretion of thrombospondin in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Vischer, P; Beeck, H; Voss, B

    1985-12-16

    The biosynthesis of thrombospondin, a glycoprotein first described in platelets, has been studied in human endothelial cells. This glycoprotein has a molecular mass of 450 kDa. It is secreted and incorporated into the extracellular matrix of several cell types in culture. Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]leucine were performed and the synthesis and secretion of the glycoprotein was studied by immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results of these experiments show that the three subunits of thrombospondin are identical in molecular mass. During synthesis there is a small but significant increase in molecular mass within 20 min after pulse labeling. The early form of thrombospondin is sensitive to endoglucosaminidase H treatment, indicating that a transformation of the oligosaccharide structures from 'high-mannose' to 'complex' structures takes place. Within 60 min after synthesis only the mature form of the glycoprotein is secreted into the medium. In the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation, there is a reduction in molecular mass of the subunit from 165 kDa to 155 kDa. Pulse-chase experiments in the presence of tunicamycin supported the conclusion that the carbohydrate part is processed during biosynthesis. Inhibition of glycosylation had a pronounced effect on the secretion of thrombospondin. The decreased occurrence of thrombospondin in the culture medium seemed to be due to a high intracellular degradation rate of unglycosylated thrombospondin. Characterization of the glycopeptide structures of thrombospondin metabolically labeled with [3H]mannose by Bio-Gel P-4 and concanavalin-A-Sepharose column chromatography revealed that the oligosaccharide structures of the cellular and secreted forms of thrombospondin differ in their composition. PMID:3935437

  2. Trade Secret Law and Information Systems: Can Your Students Keep a Secret?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Lorrie; Ford, Janet C.; White, Barbara Jo; Clapper, Danial L.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of intellectual property (IP) law on information systems (IS) professionals in business cannot be overstated. The IS 2010 model curriculum guidelines for undergraduate IS programs stress the importance of information security and knowledge about IP. While copyright and patents are the most well-known types of IP, another, trade secrets,…

  3. The Versatile Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial Type VI Secretion Systems (T6SS) function as contractile nanomachines to puncture target cells and deliver lethal effectors. In the ten years since the discovery of the T6SS, much has been learned about the structure and function of this versatile protein secretion apparatus. Most of the conserved protein components that comprise the T6SS apparatus itself have been identified and ascribed specific functions. In addition, numerous effector proteins that are translocated by the T6SS have been identified and characterized. These protein effectors usually represent toxic cargoes that are delivered by the attacker cell to a target cell. The field is beginning to better understand the lifestyle or physiology that dictates when bacteria normally express their T6SS. In this Chapter, we consider what is known about the structure and regulation of the T6SS, the numerous classes of antibacterial effector T6SS substrates, and how the action of the T6SS relates to a given lifestyle or behavior in certain bacteria. PMID:27227310

  4. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  5. Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion.

    PubMed

    Cieszyński, Łukasz; Berendt-Obołończyk, Monika; Szulc, Michał; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is defined as a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms occurring due to hypercortisolism. Cortisol excess may be endogenous or exogenous. The most common cause of CS is glucocorticoid therapy with supraphysiological (higher than in the case of substitution) doses used in various diseases (e.g. autoimmune). One possible CS cause is ectopic (extra-pituitary) ACTH secretion (EAS) by benign or malignant tumours. Since its first description in 1963, EAS aetiology has changed, i.e. as well as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), higher incidence in other malignancies has been reported. Ectopic ACTH secretion symptoms are usually similar to hypercortisolism symptoms due to other causes. A clinical suspicion of CS requires laboratory investigations. There is no single and specific laboratory test for making a CS diagnosis, and therefore multiple dynamic tests should be ordered. A combination of multiple laboratory noninvasive and invasive tests gives 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for EAS diagnosis. If the EAS is caused by localised malignancy, surgery is the optimal treatment choice. Radical tumour excision may be performed in 40% of patients, and 80% of them are cured of the disease. The authors present an interesting clinical case of EAS, which is always a huge diagnostic challenge for clinicians. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 458-464). PMID:27387249

  6. Neisseria gonorrhoeae secretes chromosomal DNA via a novel type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Holly L; Domínguez, Nadia M; Schwartz, Kevin J; Hackett, Kathleen T; Dillard, Joseph P

    2005-03-01

    The process of DNA donation for natural transformation of bacteria is poorly understood and has been assumed to involve bacterial cell death. Recently in Neisseria gonorrhoeae we found that mutations in three genes in the gonococcal genetic island (GGI) reduced the ability of a strain to act as a donor in transformation and to release DNA into the culture. To better characterize the GGI and the process of DNA donation, the 57 kb genetic island was cloned, sequenced and subjected to insertional mutagenesis. DNA sequencing revealed that the GGI has characteristics of a horizontally acquired genomic island and encodes homologues of type IV secretion system proteins. The GGI was found to be incorporated near the chromosomal replication terminus at the dif site, a sequence targeted by the site-specific recombinase XerCD. Using a plasmid carrying a small region of the GGI and the associated dif site, we demonstrated that this model island could be integrated at the dif site in strains not carrying the GGI and was spontaneously excised from that site. Also, we were able to delete the entire 57 kb region by transformation with DNA from a strain lacking the GGI. Thus the GGI was likely acquired and integrated into the gonococcal chromosome by site-specific recombination and may be lost by site-specific recombination or natural transformation. We made mutations in six putative type IV secretion system genes and assayed these strains for the ability to secrete DNA. Five of the mutations greatly reduced or completely eliminated DNA secretion. Our data indicate that N. gonorrhoeae secretes DNA via a specific process. Donated DNA may be used in natural transformation, contributing to antigenic variation and the spread of antibiotic resistance, and it may modulate the host immune response.

  7. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  8. [Research progress on musk secretion mechanism of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Feng, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Gui-Jun; Zeng, De-Jun; Zhang, Cheng-Lu; Chen, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    Forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii), a rare wild medicinal animal, is listed under the category of the state key protected wildlife list of China. Musk, secreted by the musk glands, is with high economic and medicinal value and used as precious traditional medicine in China. In order to meet the needs of musk in Chinese traditional medicine, forest musk deer farming was conducted in 1950s, but the research progress on musk secretion mechanism was slow. Therefore, by reviewing the histological and anatomical structure of forest musk deer musk gland, the relationship between sex hormones and the musk secretion process, and the molecular mechanism of the musk secretion, the existing problems in investigating the musk secretion mechanism were analyzed and the development trends in this field were also discussed, in order to provide a reference for further studies on the musk secretion mechanism and improve musk production of forest musk deer.

  9. Cytokine IL-6 secretion by trophoblasts regulated via sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 involving Rho/Rho-kinase and Rac1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Pankaj; Brünnert, Daniela; Ehrhardt, Jens; Bredow, Marike; Piccenini, Svea; Zygmunt, Marek

    2013-08-01

    Various cytokines derived from placental cells are essential for normal placenta development and successful pregnancy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine produced by extravillous and cytotrophoblasts regulating the functions of these cells, e.g. migration, invasion, trophoblast differentiation and proliferation. In macrophages, newly synthesized IL-6 accumulates in the Golgi complex and exits in tubulovesicular carriers fused with recycling endosomes and secreted as a soluble protein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induces various cytokine secretions including IL-6 in different cell types. The signaling mechanisms regulating the IL-6 secretion are unknown. In this study, we found that S1PR2 was the major S1P receptor being expressed in BeWo cells. S1P regulated IL-6 protein secretion in early phase (6 h) and gene expression in later phase (24 h). IL-6 secretion was completely inhibited via inhibitor of transcription (Actinomycin D) or protein synthesis (Cycloheximide) confirming that IL-6 releases constitutively from BeWo cells. By using specific S1PR2 inhibitor JTE-013 and S1PR2 gene silencing, we found that S1PR2 was the main receptor that regulates IL-6 secretion. Furthermore, S1P induced RhoGTPases-dependent pathways that are required for IL-6 secretion. Pretreatment of cells with specific Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) and Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766) drastically inhibited S1P-induced IL-6 secretion. By using a specific Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), we found that basal activity of PI3K was required for secretion but was independent of S1P/S1PR2 axis activation. In summary, we report first time that binding of S1P to S1PR2 activates multiple RhoGTPases-dependent pathways that coordinate with PI3K pathway for secretion of IL-6 in BeWo cells.

  10. Induction of a secreted protein by the myxoid liposarcoma oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Masahiko; Wang, XiaoZhong; Sok, John; Yin, Yin; Chung, Peter; Giannotti, JoAnn W.; Jacobs, Kenneth A.; Fitz, Lori J.; Murtha-Riel, Patricia; Turner, Katherine J.; Ron, David

    1999-01-01

    The TLS-CHOP oncoprotein, found in the majority of human myxoid liposarcomas, consists of a fusion between the transcription factor CHOP/GADD153 and the N terminus of an RNA-binding protein TLS/FUS. Clinical correlation and in vitro transformation assays indicate that the N terminus of TLS plays an important role in oncogenesis by TLS-CHOP. Until now, however, the only activity attributed to the oncoprotein is that of inhibiting the binding of transcription factors of the C/EBP class to certain adipogenic target genes, a function that TLS-CHOP shares with the nononcogenic CHOP protein. Here we report the isolation of a gene, DOL54, that is activated in primary fibroblasts by the expression of TLS-CHOP. DOL54 is expressed in the neoplastic component of human myxoid liposarcomas and increases the tumorigenicity of cells injected in nude mice. Activation of DOL54 requires an intact DNA-binding and dimerization domain in TLS-CHOP, a suitable cellular dimerization partner, and depends on the TLS N terminus. Normal adipocytic differentiation is associated with an early and transient expression of DOL54, and the gene encodes a secreted protein that is tightly associated with the cell surface or extracellular matrix. TLS-CHOP thus leads to the unscheduled expression of a gene that is normally associated with adipocytic differentiation. PMID:10220412

  11. Sterile neutrinos with secret interactions—lasting friendship with cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: bdasgupta@theory.tifr.res.in

    2015-10-01

    Sterile neutrinos with mass ≅ 1 eV and order 10% mixing with active neutrinos have been proposed as a solution to anomalies in neutrino oscillation data, but are tightly constrained by cosmological limits. It was recently shown that these constraints are avoided if sterile neutrinos couple to a new MeV-scale gauge boson A'. However, even this scenario is restricted by structure formation constraints when A'-mediated collisional processes lead to efficient active-to-sterile neutrino conversion after neutrinos have decoupled. In view of this, we reevaluate in this paper the viability of sterile neutrinos with such ''secret'' interactions. We carefully dissect their evolution in the early Universe, including the various production channels and the expected modifications to large scale structure formation. We argue that there are two regions in parameter space—one at very small A' coupling, one at relatively large A' coupling—where all constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large scale structure (LSS) data are satisfied. Interestingly, the large A' coupling region is precisely the region that was previously shown to have potentially important consequences for the small scale structure of dark matter halos if the A' boson couples also to the dark matter in the Universe.

  12. Human bronchial epithelial cells express and secrete MMP-12.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Mark C; Thakker, Paresh; Gunn, Jason; Wong, Anthony; Miyashiro, Joy S; Wasserman, Aeona M; Wei, Shui-Qing; Pelker, Jeffrey W; Kobayashi, Michiko; Eppihimer, Michael J

    2004-11-12

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade extracellular matrix proteins, which may be responsible for enlargement of alveoli in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and remodeling of pulmonary tissue associated with chronic asthma. Here, we provide novel evidence that MMP-12 is expressed and secreted by normal human bronchial epithelial cell cultures (NHBECs) and reveal the regulation of MMP-12 gene expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated MMP-12 mRNA presence in unstimulated differentiated NHBEC cultures. Cultures stimulated independently with EGF or IFN-gamma failed to alter MMP-12 mRNA abundance, while TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha+EGF, or TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma elicited relatively early (6 h) peak increases in MMP-12 mRNA levels. Western blot analyses specifically indicated the presence of MMP-12 in differentiated NHBEC-conditioned media. These findings indicate that the bronchial epithelium may be an important source of elastolytic activity in COPD and tissue remodeling in chronic asthma.

  13. [Hyponatremia and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)].

    PubMed

    Peri, Alessandro; Parenti, Gabriele; Giuliani, Anna; Scrivano, Jacopo; Pettorini, Laura; Festuccia, Francescaromana; Pirozzi, Nicola; Mene', Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), also termed ''syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD)'', is an often unrecognized cause of hypotonic hyponatremia, arising from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer or as a side effect of various drugs. In SIADH, hyponatremia results from selectively impaired water excretion by the kidney, whereas the external Na+ balance is normally regulated. Despite the increase in total body water, only a slight reduction of urine output and modest edema are usually seen. Renal function and acid-base balance are generally preserved, while subclinical neurological impairment may occasionally become life-threatening, when hyponatremia has an abrupt onset. The major clinical variants of SIADH are reviewed here, with particular emphasis on causes, iatrogenic complications and hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Effective treatment of SIADH is based on water restriction, hypertonic saline plus loop diuretics, or aquaretics. Worsening of hyponatremia may result from parenteral isotonic fluid administration, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis and careful follow-up of these patients.

  14. Pregnancy-secreted Acid phosphatase, uteroferrin, enhances fetal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Wang, Haiqing; Bazer, Fuller W; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-11-01

    Uteroferrin (UF) is a progesterone-induced acid phosphatase produced by uterine glandular epithelia in mammals during pregnancy and targeted to sites of hematopoiesis throughout pregnancy. The expression pattern of UF is coordinated with early fetal hematopoietic development in the yolk sac and then liver, spleen, and bone to prevent anemia in fetuses. Our previous studies suggested that UF exerts stimulatory impacts on hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, the precise role and thereby the mechanism of action of UF on hematopoiesis have not been investigated previously. Here, we report that UF is a potent regulator that can greatly enhance fetal erythropoiesis. Using primary fetal liver hematopoietic cells, we observed a synergistic stimulatory effect of UF with erythropoietin and other growth factors on both burst-forming unit-erythroid and colony-forming unit-erythroid formation. Further, we demonstrated that UF enhanced erythropoiesis at terminal stages using an in vitro culture system. Surveying genes that are crucial for erythrocyte formation at various stages revealed that UF, along with erythropoietin, up-regulated transcription factors required for terminal erythrocyte differentiation and genes required for synthesis of hemoglobin. Collectively, our results demonstrate that UF is a cytokine secreted by uterine glands in response to progesterone that promotes fetal erythropoiesis at various stages of pregnancy, including burst-forming unit-erythroid and colony-forming unit-erythroid progenitor cells and terminal stages of differentiation of hematopoietic cells in the erythroid lineage. PMID:25093463

  15. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  16. A secret image sharing scheme for light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuang-Shyr

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a new ( r, n)-threshold secret image sharing scheme with low information overhead for images is provided, which has a low distortion rate, and is more applicable for light images. A secret image is encoded into n noise-like shadow images to satisfy the condition that any r of the n shares can be used to reveal the secret image, and no information on the secret can be revealed from any r - 1 or fewer shares. The size of the shadow images is relatively small. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Hyperphosphorylation and Cleavage at D421 Enhance Tau Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rivest-McGraw, Jessica; Bertrand, Johanne; Lauzon, Michel; Leclerc, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that tau pathology propagates in a predictable manner in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, tau accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD’s patients. The mechanisms underlying the propagation of tau pathology and its accumulation in the CSF remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have reported that human tau was secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells when it was overexpressed indicating that tau secretion could contribute to the spreading of tau pathology in the brain and could lead to its accumulation in the CSF. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of human tau resulted in its secretion by Hela cells. The main form of tau secreted by these cells was cleaved at the C-terminal. Surprisingly, secreted tau was dephosphorylated at several sites in comparison to intracellular tau which presented a strong immunoreactivity to all phospho-dependent antibodies tested. Our data also revealed that phosphorylation and cleavage of tau favored its secretion by Hela cells. Indeed, the mimicking of phosphorylation at 12 sites known to be phosphorylated in AD enhanced tau secretion. A mutant form of tau truncated at D421, the preferential cleavage site of caspase-3, was also significantly more secreted than wild-type tau. Taken together, our results indicate that hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of tau by favoring its secretion could contribute to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain and its accumulation in the CSF. PMID:22615831

  18. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D.; Soares, Vitor Y. R.; Deschler, Daniel G.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects’ degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs. PMID:26690506

  19. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D; Soares, Vitor Y R; Deschler, Daniel G; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2015-12-22

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects' degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs.

  20. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D; Soares, Vitor Y R; Deschler, Daniel G; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects' degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs. PMID:26690506

  1. Reduced antigen concentration and costimulatory blockade increase IFN-gamma secretion in naive CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Håkan T L; Petrovic, Jelena; Höglund, Petter

    2004-11-01

    CD8+ T cells are killer cells but also major producers of IFN-gamma. We have investigated the effects of peptide antigen titration and costimulatory blockade on IFN-gamma production and proliferation by naive CD8+ T cells. Mature dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with high amounts of agonist peptide triggered proliferation but little IFN-gamma secretion in individual T cells. In contrast, immature DC pulsed with similar amounts of peptide induced IFN-gamma secretion in a larger fraction of T cells but triggered less proliferation. Blocking B7.2 or lowering the amount of peptide on mature DC led to a response similar to that induced by immature DC, suggesting that differences in stimulatory strength were responsible for the different responses. Using splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC) we demonstrate that reducing the amount of peptide in combination with B7 blockage enhanced IFN-gamma secretion and decreased proliferation in naive CD8+ T cells in an additive way. Our data suggest that IFN-gamma secretion and proliferation are independently and inversely controlled by stimulatory strength in naive CD8+ T cells. This may enable CD8+ T cells to respond with IFN-gamma secretion to immature APC with few peptide ligands consistent with an early immunoregulatory role of CD8+ T cells.

  2. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  3. Skin manifestations of hormone-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Serge A

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine and metabolic diseases, besides affecting other organs, can result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology and can lead to a complex symptomatology. Dermatologists may see some of these skin lesions first, either before the endocrinologist, or even after the internist or specialist has missed the right diagnosis. Because some skin lesions might reflect a life-threatening endocrine or metabolic disorder, identifying the underlying disorder is very important, so that patients can receive corrective rather than symptomatic treatment. In this issue, we will review various hormone-secreting tumors, including pituitary disorders (Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly), hyperthyroidism, glucagonoma, carcinoid syndrome, mastocytosis, and hyperandrogenism. We will focus on clinical manifestations, mainly cutaneous, followed by a brief discussion on how to make the diagnosis of each condition in addition to treatment options. PMID:21054708

  4. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  5. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  6. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  7. Coxiella Type IV Secretion and Cellular Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Daniel E.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Coxiella burnetii is a wide spread zoonotic bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever. In vivo, Coxiella displays a tropism for mononuclear phagocytes where it participates in biogenesis of a lysosome-like replication compartment to conduct its obligate intracellular lifestyle. Coxiella actively regulates multiple events during infection, presumably via proteins with effector functions that are delivered to the host cytosol by a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Because the organism is currently refractory to genetic manipulation, Coxiella Dot/Icm substrates have been identified using bioinformatics and Legionella pneumophila as a surrogate type IV delivery system. Functional characterization of the biological activity of these effector proteins will dramatically aid our ability to model Coxiella-host cell interactions. PMID:19144560

  8. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    PubMed

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A K W; Douma, Rutger D; Seifar, Reza M; van Gulik, Walter M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  9. Renal tubular secretion of glutathione (GSH)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.D.; Curthoys, N.P.

    1986-05-01

    The rapid turnover of renal GSH may require its secretion into the tubular lumen. Renal clearance of plasma GSH was measured in rats anesthetized with Inactin and infused with (/sup 3/H)inulin. Renal ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (..gamma..GT) was then inactivated (> 97%) by infusion of acivicin and samples were collected for 6-7 h. By 4.5 h arterial and urinary GSH increased from 5..mu..M and 1.3 n mol/h to 23 ..mu..M and 2400-7000 nmol/h, respectively. The ratio of urinary GSH to filtered load increased from < 0.01 to 0.7-2.6. When renal GSH was decreased to 30% of normal by pretreating rats with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), the subsequent inactivation of ..gamma..GT caused only a slight increase in arterial GSH and urinary GSH increased to only 400-600 nmol/h (60-70% of filtered load). The amount of GSH filtered by the kidney was reduced by initially treating a rat with acivicin and 3 h later infusing purified ..gamma..GT (0.2 mg/h) to degrade plasma GSH. Just before infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH was 23 ..mu..M and urinary GSH was equal to 90% of the filtered load. At 1 h after infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH decreased to 0.3 ..mu..M, whereas urinary GSH remained elevated (1200-1800 nmol/h) and now equalled 10-20 times the filtered load. When similar experiments were carried out in BSO treated rats, maximal urinary GSH was reduced to 200 nmol/h, a value that was still 10 times the filtered load. Therefore, secreted GSH constitutes a significant portion of the GSH that is normally catabolized within the tubular lumen.

  10. An Engineered Yeast Efficiently Secreting Penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Douma, Rutger D.; Seifar, Reza M.; van Gulik, Walter M.; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this β-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) β-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  11. Early Explorers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of a magazine of Iowa history for young people focuses on early explorers and combined learning activities with informative articles. Sections in this issue include: "Where? What? Who?"; "Maps--long ago and recent"; "Every map answers at least two questions: Where? What?"; "Jolliet and Marquette"; "Match the maps"; "Louisiana Purchase";…

  12. Unveiling Cell Surface and Type IV Secretion Proteins Responsible for Archaeal Rudivirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ling; He, Fei; Bhoobalan-Chitty, Yuvaraj; Martinez-Alvarez, Laura; Guo, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Sulfolobus mutants resistant to archaeal lytic virus Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) were isolated, and mutations were identified in two gene clusters, cluster sso3138 to sso3141 and cluster sso2386 and sso2387, encoding cell surface and type IV secretion proteins, respectively. The involvement of the mutations in the resistance was confirmed by genetic complementation. Blocking of virus entry into the mutants was demonstrated by the lack of early gene transcription, strongly supporting the idea of a role of the proteins in SIRV2 entry. PMID:24965447

  13. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis proteins secreted by the Por secretion system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Narita, Yuka; Shoji, Mikio; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses a number of potential virulence factors for periodontopathogenicity. In particular, cysteine proteinases named gingipains are of interest given their abilities to degrade host proteins and process other virulence factors such as fimbriae. Gingipains are translocated on the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu by the Por secretion system (PorSS), which consists of a number of membrane or periplasmic proteins including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorO, PorP, PorQ, PorT, PorU, PorV (PG27, LptO), PorW and Sov. To identify proteins other than gingipains secreted by the PorSS, we compared the proteomes of P. gingivalis strains kgp rgpA rgpB (PorSS-proficient strain) and kgp rgpA rgpB porK (PorSS-deficient strain) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide-mass fingerprinting. Sixteen spots representing 10 different proteins were present in the particle-free culture supernatant of the PorSS-proficient strain but were absent or faint in that of the PorSS-deficient strain. These identified proteins possessed the C-terminal domains (CTDs), which had been suggested to form the CTD protein family. These results indicate that the PorSS is used for secretion of a number of proteins other than gingipains and that the CTDs of the proteins are associated with the PorSS-dependent secretion. PMID:23075153

  14. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis proteins secreted by the Por secretion system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Narita, Yuka; Shoji, Mikio; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses a number of potential virulence factors for periodontopathogenicity. In particular, cysteine proteinases named gingipains are of interest given their abilities to degrade host proteins and process other virulence factors such as fimbriae. Gingipains are translocated on the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu by the Por secretion system (PorSS), which consists of a number of membrane or periplasmic proteins including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorO, PorP, PorQ, PorT, PorU, PorV (PG27, LptO), PorW and Sov. To identify proteins other than gingipains secreted by the PorSS, we compared the proteomes of P. gingivalis strains kgp rgpA rgpB (PorSS-proficient strain) and kgp rgpA rgpB porK (PorSS-deficient strain) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide-mass fingerprinting. Sixteen spots representing 10 different proteins were present in the particle-free culture supernatant of the PorSS-proficient strain but were absent or faint in that of the PorSS-deficient strain. These identified proteins possessed the C-terminal domains (CTDs), which had been suggested to form the CTD protein family. These results indicate that the PorSS is used for secretion of a number of proteins other than gingipains and that the CTDs of the proteins are associated with the PorSS-dependent secretion.

  15. Type II secretion in Yersinia—a secretion system for pathogenicity and environmental fitness

    PubMed Central

    von Tils, Dominik; Blädel, Inga; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Heusipp, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    In Yersinia species, type III secretion (T3S) is the most prominent and best studied secretion system and a hallmark for the infection process of pathogenic Yersinia species. Type II secretion (T2S), on the other hand, is less well-characterized, although all Yersinia species, pathogenic as well as non-pathogenic, possess one or even two T2S systems. The only Yersinia strain in which T2S has so far been studied is the human pathogenic strain Y. enterocolitica 1b. Mouse infection experiments showed that at least one of the two T2S systems of Y. enterocolitica 1b, termed Yts1, is involved in dissemination and colonization of deeper tissues like liver and spleen. Interestingly, in vitro studies revealed a complex regulation of the Yts1 system, which is mainly active at low temperatures and high Mg2+-levels. Furthermore, the functional characterization of the proteins secreted in vitro indicates a role of the Yts1 machinery in survival of the bacteria in an environmental habitat. In silico analyses identified Yts1 homologous systems in bacteria that are known as plant symbionts or plant pathogens. Thus, the recent studies point to a dual function of the Yts1 T2S systems, playing a role in virulence of humans and animals, as well as in the survival of the bacteria outside of the mammalian host. In contrast, the role of the second T2S system, Yts2, remains ill defined. Whereas the T3S system and its virulence-mediating role has been intensively studied, it might now be time to also focus on the T2S system and its role in the Yersinia lifestyle, especially considering that most of the Yersinia isolates are not found in infected humans but have been gathered from various environmental samples. PMID:23248779

  16. Nightshade Wound Secretion: The World's Simplest Extrafloral Nectar?

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Wounded nightshade leaves secrete a sugary liquid that, like extrafloral nectar (EFN), attracts ants as defence against herbivores. The secretion of these droplets requires no detectable nectary tissue, showing how little it takes to produce a functioning nectary. Easy de novo formation of extrafloral nectaries explains their 'scattered' phylogenetic distribution. PMID:27375224

  17. Secrets and Misperceptions: The Creation of Self-Fulfilling Illusions

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines who hears what secrets, comparing two similar secrets-one that is highly stigmatized and one that is less so. Using a unique survey representative of American adults and intake forms from a medical clinic, I document marked differences in who hears these secrets. People who are sympathetic to the stigmatizing secret are more likely to hear of it than those who may react negatively. This is a consequence of people not just selectively disclosing their own secrets but selectively sharing others’ as well. As a result, people in the same social network will be exposed to and influenced by different information about those they know and hence experience that network differently. When people effectively exist in networks tailored by others not to offend, then the information they hear tends to be that of which they already approve. Were they to hear secrets they disapproved of, then their attitudes might change, but they are less likely to hear those secrets. As such, the patterns of secret hearing contribute to a stasis in public opinion. PMID:26082932

  18. Extrafloral nectar secretion from wounds of Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Lortzing, Tobias; Calf, Onno W; Böhlke, Marlene; Schwachtje, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Geuß, Daniel; Kosanke, Susanne; van Dam, Nicole M; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Plants usually close wounds rapidly to prevent infections and the loss of valuable resources such as assimilates(1). However, herbivore-inflicted wounds on the bittersweet nightshade Solanum dulcamara appear not to close completely and produce sugary wound secretions visible as droplets. Many plants across the plant kingdom secrete sugary nectar from extrafloral nectaries(2) to attract natural enemies of herbivores for indirect defence(3,4). As ants forage on wound edges of S. dulcamara in the field, we hypothesized that wound secretions are a form of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We show that, unlike EFN from known nectaries, wound secretions are neither associated with any specific structure nor restricted to certain locations. However, similar to EFN, they are jasmonate-inducible and the plant controls their chemical composition. Wound secretions are attractive for ants, and application of wound secretion mimics increases ant attraction and reduces herbivory on S. dulcamara plants in a natural population. In greenhouse experiments, we reveal that ants can defend S. dulcamara from two of its native herbivores, slugs and flea beetle larvae. Since nectar is defined by its ecological function as a sugary secretion involved in interactions with animals(5), such 'plant bleeding' could be a primitive mode of nectar secretion exemplifying an evolutionary origin of structured extrafloral nectaries. PMID:27243650

  19. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  20. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  1. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  2. Type VI Secretion: not just for pathogenesis anymore

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Andrea J.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Type VI Secretion Systems (T6SS) have been studied primarily in the context of pathogenic bacterial-host interactions. Recent data suggest, however, that these versatile secretion systems may also function to promote commensal or mutualistic relationships between bacteria and eukaryotes, or to mediate cooperative or competitive interactions between bacteria. PMID:20638635

  3. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the MSDS, provided that the operator— (1) Can support the claim that the chemical's identity is a... secret, (3) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the MSDS information on the properties and effects of the hazardous chemical. (b) The...

  4. Nightshade Wound Secretion: The World's Simplest Extrafloral Nectar?

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Wounded nightshade leaves secrete a sugary liquid that, like extrafloral nectar (EFN), attracts ants as defence against herbivores. The secretion of these droplets requires no detectable nectary tissue, showing how little it takes to produce a functioning nectary. Easy de novo formation of extrafloral nectaries explains their 'scattered' phylogenetic distribution.

  5. Redox proteins are constitutively secreted by skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Takagi, Mayumi; Nakamura-Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-11-01

    Myokines are skeletal muscle-derived hormones. In this study, using a C2C12 myotube contraction system, we sought to determine whether the skeletal muscle secreted thioredoxin (TRX) and related redox proteins. Redox proteins such as TRXs, peroxiredoxins, and glutaredoxins were detected in the C2C12 myotube culture medium in the absence of any stimulation. The amounts of TRXs, peroxiredoxins, and glutaredoxins secreted by the C2C12 myotubes were not affected by the contraction, unless the myotubes were injured. Because TRX-1 was known to be a secreted protein that lacks a signal peptide, we examined whether this protein was secreted via exosome vesicles. The results indicated that TRX-1 was not secreted via exosome vesicles. We concluded that TRX-1 and related redox proteins are myokines that are constitutively secreted by the skeletal muscle cells. Although the mechanism of TRX-1 secretion remains unclear, our findings suggest that the skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ and the redox proteins that are constitutively secreted from the skeletal muscle may exert antioxidant and systemic health-promoting effects.

  6. Quantum secret sharing schemes and reversibility of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Iwamoto, Mitsugu; Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    2005-09-15

    Quantum secret sharing schemes encrypting a quantum state into a multipartite entangled state are treated. The lower bound on the dimension of each share given by Gottesman [Phys. Rev. A 61, 042311 (2000)] is revisited based on a relation between the reversibility of quantum operations and the Holevo information. We also propose a threshold ramp quantum secret sharing scheme and evaluate its coding efficiency.

  7. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  8. The Secretion of Areolar (Montgomery's) Glands from Lactating Women Elicits Selective, Unconditional Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Sébastien; Soussignan, Robert; Sagot, Paul; Schaal, Benoist

    2009-01-01

    Background The communicative meaning of human areolae for newborn infants was examined here in directly exposing 3-day old neonates to the secretion from the areolar glands of Montgomery donated by non related, non familiar lactating women. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of the areolar stimulus on the infants' behavior and autonomic nervous system was compared to that of seven reference stimuli originating either from human or non human mammalian sources, or from an arbitrarily-chosen artificial odorant. The odor of the native areolar secretion intensified more than all other stimuli the infants' inspiratory activity and appetitive oral responses. These responses appeared to develop independently from direct experience with the breast or milk. Conclusion/Significance Areolar secretions from lactating women are especially salient to human newborns. Volatile compounds carried in these substrates are thus in a position to play a key role in establishing behavioral and physiological processes pertaining to milk transfer and production, and, hence, to survival and to the early engagement of attachment and bonding. PMID:19851461

  9. Comparative analyses of secreted proteins from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae in response to nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun; Li, Wei-Fang; Cheng, Wang; Lu, Mo; Zhou, Ke-Hai; Zhu, He-Qin; Li, Fu-Guang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-05-01

    The soilborne fungus Verticillium dahliae is the major pathogen that causes the verticillium wilt disease of plants, which leads to huge economic loss worldwide. At the early stage of infection, growth of the pathogen is subject to the nutrition stress of limited nitrogen. To investigate the secreted pathogenic proteins that play indispensable roles during invasion at this stage, we compared the profiles of secreted proteins of V. dahliae under nitrogen starvation and normal conditions by using in-gel and in-solution digestion combined with liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-nanoESI-MS). In total, we identified 212 proteins from the supernatant of liquid medium, including 109 putative secreted proteins. Comparative analysis indicated that the expression of 76 proteins was induced, whereas that of 9 proteins was suppressed under nitrogen starvation. Notably, 24 proteins are constitutively expressed. Further bioinformatic exploration enabled us to classify the stress-induced proteins into seven functional groups: cell wall degradation (10.5%), reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and stress response (11.8%), lipid effectors (5.3%), protein metabolism (21.1%), carbohydrate metabolism (15.8%), electron-proton transport and energy metabolism (14.5%), and other (21.0%). In addition, most stress-suppressed proteins are involved in the cell-wall remodeling. Taken together, our analyses provide insights into the pathogenesis of V. dahliae and might give hints for the development of novel strategy against the verticillium wilt disease.

  10. Changes in the sialylation and sulfation of secreted thyrotropin in congenital hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Gyves, P.W.; Gesundheit, N.; Thotakura, N.R.; Stannard, B.S.; DeCherney, G.S.; Weintraub, B.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have examined the oligosaccharide structure of secreted thyrotropin (TSH) in perinatal and mature rats with congenital primary hypothyroidism. Rat pituitaries from euthyroid control animals and those rendered hypothyroid by methimazole treatment were incubated with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine in vitro. Secreted TSH was purified, and oligosaccharides were enzymatically released and characterized by anion-exchange HPLC. In perinatal hypothyroid animals compared with control animals, oligosaccharides from TSH {alpha} and {beta} subunits contained more species with three or more negative charges. Moreover, perinatal hypothyroid animals demonstrated a dramatic increase in the ratio of sialylated to sulfated species within oligosaccharides of the same negative charge. In mature hypothyroid 9-week-old animals compared with control animals, changes were less pronounced, suggesting that endocrine regulation of oligosaccharide structure is dependent upon the maturational state of the animal. Together, these data provide direct evidence and characterization of specific changes in the structure of a secreted pituitary glycoprotein hormone occurring as a result of in vivo endocrine alterations during early development. Moreover, they provide a potential structural basis to explain the delayed clearance of both TSH and the gonadotropins with end-organ deficiency, which may have important implications for the in vivo biological activities of these hormones.

  11. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva.

    PubMed

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Turse, Joshua E; Scoles, Glen A; Purvine, Samuel O; Nicora, Carrie D; Clauss, Therese R W; Ueti, Massaro W; Brown, Wendy C; Brayton, Kelly A

    2014-11-01

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified. PMID:25110293

  12. Endocrine Determinants of Changes in Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion during a Weight Cycle in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Karschin, Judith; Lagerpusch, Merit; Enderle, Janna; Eggeling, Ben; Müller, Manfred J.; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in insulin sensitivity (IS) and insulin secretion occur with perturbations in energy balance and glycemic load (GL) of the diet that may precede the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Determinants of changes in IS and insulin secretion with weight cycling in non-obese healthy subjects remain unclear. Methods In a 6wk controlled 2-stage randomized dietary intervention 32 healthy men (26±4y, BMI: 24±2kg/m2) followed 1wk of overfeeding (OF), 3wks of caloric restriction (CR) containing either 50% or 65% carbohydrate (CHO) and 2wks of refeeding (RF) with the same amount of CHO but either low or high glycaemic index at ±50% energy requirement. Measures of IS (basal: HOMA-index, postprandial: Matsuda-ISI), insulin secretion (early: Stumvoll-index, total: tAUC-insulin/tAUC-glucose) and potential endocrine determinants (ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, thyroid hormone levels, 24h-urinary catecholamine excretion) were assessed. Results IS improved and insulin secretion decreased due to CR and normalized upon RF. Weight loss-induced improvements in basal and postprandial IS were associated with decreases in leptin and increases in ghrelin levels, respectively (r = 0.36 and r = 0.62, p<0.05). Weight regain-induced decrease in postprandial IS correlated with increases in adiponectin, fT3, TSH, GL of the diet and a decrease in ghrelin levels (r-values between -0.40 and 0.83, p<0.05) whereas increases in early and total insulin secretion were associated with a decrease in leptin/adiponectin-ratio (r = -0.52 and r = -0.46, p<0.05) and a decrease in fT4 (r = -0.38, p<0.05 for total insulin secretion only). After controlling for GL associations between RF-induced decrease in postprandial IS and increases in fT3 and TSH levels were no longer significant. Conclusion Weight cycling induced changes in IS and insulin secretion were associated with changes in all measured hormones, except for catecholamine excretion. While leptin, adiponectin and

  13. Secret key distillation from shielded two-qubit states

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Joonwoo

    2010-05-15

    The quantum states corresponding to a secret key are characterized using the so-called private states, where the key part consisting of a secret key is shielded by the additional systems. Based on the construction, it was shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states. In this work, I consider the shielded two-qubit states in a key-distillation scenario and derive the conditions under which a secret key can be distilled using the recurrence protocol or the two-way classical distillation, advantage distillation together with one-way postprocessing. From the security conditions, it is shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states in a much wider range. In addition, I consider the case that in which white noise is added to quantum states and show that the classical distillation protocol still works despite a certain amount of noise although the recurrence protocol does not.

  14. Cropping and noise resilient steganography algorithm using secret image sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez-Sandoval, Oswaldo; Fierro-Radilla, Atoany; Espejel-Trujillo, Angelina; Nakano-Miyatake, Mariko; Perez-Meana, Hector

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an image steganography scheme, in which a secret image is hidden into a cover image using a secret image sharing (SIS) scheme. Taking advantage of the fault tolerant property of the (k,n)-threshold SIS, where using any k of n shares (k≤n), the secret data can be recovered without any ambiguity, the proposed steganography algorithm becomes resilient to cropping and impulsive noise contamination. Among many SIS schemes proposed until now, Lin and Chan's scheme is selected as SIS, due to its lossless recovery capability of a large amount of secret data. The proposed scheme is evaluated from several points of view, such as imperceptibility of the stegoimage respect to its original cover image, robustness of hidden data to cropping operation and impulsive noise contamination. The evaluation results show a high quality of the extracted secret image from the stegoimage when it suffered more than 20% cropping or high density noise contamination.

  15. Annexin 1 is secreted by the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Haigler, H T; Christmas, P

    1990-12-01

    The human prostate expresses very high concentrations of annexins 1, 4, and 5 and secretes high concentrations of annexins 1 and 5. Although the biological roles of these proteins in prostate secretions are not known, these studies emphasize the need to consider extracellular sites for physiological functions of annexins. The clear demonstration of secretion of proteins that have blocked N-termini and lack hydrophobic signal sequences raises the possibility that novel cellular secretory pathways exist. Preliminary immunohistochemical experiments in collaboration with Dr. James Fallon indicate that both annexins 1 and 4 are expressed in prostate ductal secretory epithelium. Since annexin 1, but not annexin 4, is secreted, a comparison of the cellular fate of these two related proteins in the prostate may provide a useful model system for determining the structural elements that direct the secretion of proteins which lack conventional signal sequences.

  16. New Explorations with Waste Materials in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uyanik, Ozgun; Inal, Gozde; Calisandemir, Fatma; Can-Yasar, Munevver; Kandir, Adalet

    2011-01-01

    Creativity is innately brought with secret power which can emerge at any time throughout life and be enhanced if fostered. Properly designed art activities serve as a potential for emergence and the enhancement of children's creativities in their early childhood educations. Those children who cannot express their emotions through oral language or…

  17. Conjunctival goblet cell secretion stimulated by leukotrienes is reduced by resolvins D1 and E1 to promote resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dartt, Darlene A; Hodges, Robin R; Li, Dayu; Shatos, Marie A; Lashkari, Kameran; Serhan, Charles N

    2011-04-01

    The conjunctiva is a mucous membrane that covers the sclera and lines the inside of the eyelids. Throughout the conjunctiva are goblet cells that secrete mucins to protect the eye. Chronic inflammatory diseases such as allergic conjunctivitis and early dry eye lead to increased goblet cell mucin secretion into tears and ocular surface disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the actions of the inflammatory mediators, the leukotrienes and the proresolution resolvins, on secretion from cultured rat and human conjunctival goblet cells. We found that both cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) receptors, CysLT(1) and CysLT(2,) were present in rat conjunctiva and in rat and human cultured conjunctival goblet cells. All leukotrienes LTB(4), LTC(4), LTD(4), and LTE(4), as well as PGD(2), stimulated goblet cell secretion in rat goblet cells. LTD(4) and LTE(4) increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), and LTD(4) activated ERK1/2. The CysLT(1) receptor antagonist MK571 significantly decreased LTD(4)-stimulated rat goblet cell secretion and the increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Resolvins D1 (RvD1) and E1 (RvE1) completely reduced LTD(4)-stimulated goblet cell secretion in cultured rat goblet cells. LTD(4)-induced secretion from human goblet cells was blocked by RvD1. RvD1 and RvE1 prevented LTD(4)- and LTE(4)-stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), as well as LTD(4) activation of ERK1/2. We conclude that cysteinyl leukotrienes stimulate conjunctival goblet cell mucous secretion with LTD(4) using the CysLT(1) receptor. Stimulated secretion is terminated by preventing the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and activation of ERK1/2 by RvD1 and RvE1.

  18. Early Risers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Chistina

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author features Bard High School Early College, the first public school in the country to offer a free, full-time college curriculum--and all the credits that go with it--to high schoolers. In Bard's four-year program, students race through high school requirements in 9th and 10th grades, then take college courses in 11th and…

  19. Mechanism and Synergism in Epithelial Fluid and Electrolyte Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong Hee; Park, Seonghee; Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Muallem, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    A central function of epithelia is the control of the volume and electrolyte composition of bodily fluids through vectorial transport of electrolytes and the obligatory H2O. In exocrine glands fluid and electrolyte secretion is carried out by both acinar and duct cells, with the portion of fluid secreted by each cell type vary among glands. All acinar cells secrete isotonic, plasma-like fluid, while the duct determines the final electrolyte composition of the fluid by absorbing most of the Cl− and secreting HCO3−. The key transporters mediating acinar fluid and electrolyte secretion are the basolateral Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter, the luminal Ca2+-activated Cl− channel ANO1 and basolateral and luminal Ca2+-activated K+ channels. Ductal fluid and HCO3− secretion are mediated by the basolateral membrane Na+-HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1-B and the luminal membrane Cl−/HCO3− exchanger slc26a6 and the Cl− channel CFTR. The function of the transporters is regulated by multiple inputs, which in the duct include major regulation by the WNK/SPAK pathway that inhibit secretion and the IRBIT/PP1 pathway that antagonize the effects of the WNK/SPAK pathway to both stimulate and coordinate the secretion. The function of these regulatory pathways in secretory glands acinar cells is yet to be examined. An important concept in biology is synergism among signaling pathways to generate the final physiological response that ensures regulation with high fidelity and guards against cell toxicity. While synergism is observed in all epithelial functions, the molecular mechanism mediating the synergism is not known. Recent work reveals a central role for IRBIT as a third messenger that integrates and synergizes the function of the Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways in activation of epithelial fluid and electrolyte secretion. These concepts are discussed in this review using secretion by the pancreatic and salivary gland ducts as model systems. PMID:24240699

  20. Regulation of mucous acinar exocrine secretion with age.

    PubMed

    Culp, D J; Richardson, L A

    1996-01-01

    Denny and co-workers (Navazesh et al., 1992) recently reported decreased concentrations of MG1 and MG2 mucins in resting and stimulated whole human saliva with age. The current study was therefore conducted to examine whether there is a corresponding attenuation with age in stimulus secretion coupling regulating mucous cell exocrine secretion. We utilized an in vitro model system, isolated rat sublingual acini, to evaluate the regulation of mucous cell exocrine secretion. Rat sublingual glands are similar to human sublingual and minor mucous glands, both histologically and in terms of their pattern of innervation, which is predominantly parasympathetic. Mucin secretion is thus activated primarily by muscarinic cholinergic agonist and to a lesser extent by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which is co-localized with acetylcholine in parasympathetic nerve terminals. We isolated sublingual mucous acini from five-month-old and 24-month-old rats and compared the concentration responses for mucin secretion induced by VIP and the muscarinic agonist, arecaidine propargyl ester (APE). Concentration-response curves for VIP were nearly identical for mucous acini from the five-month-old and 24-month-old animals. Values for basal secretion, maximal secretion, and EC50 (approximately equal to 200 nmol/L VIP) were statistically equivalent between both age groups. Concentration-response curves for APE were also very similar between age groups, with no statistically significant difference in basal secretion or EC50 values (approximately equal to 50 nmol/L APE). Maximal secretion was slightly less but statistically different for 24-month-old vs. five-month-old animals, 158% vs. 169% above basal secretion, respectively. Collectively, we found no substantial age-related changes in the secretory responsiveness of salivary mucous cells.

  1. Biliary lipid secretion in health and in cholesterol gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Carey, M C; Mazer, N A

    1984-01-01

    The secretory compartment for biliary lecithin and cholesterol secretion probably resides in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. The secretory compartment for bile salts lies predominantly in the enterohepatic circulation which fluxes bile salts continuously through the smooth endoplasmic reticulum compartment and extracts lipids for secretion into bile. Most of bile lecithin is newly synthesized by the liver; most of bile cholesterol is derived from extrahepatic sources. Both cholesterol and lecithin secretion are coupled to bile salt secretion and describe output curves which can be fitted by rectangular hyperbolae: since bile salt secretion is a linear function of input, the relative proportions of cholesterol to bile salts plus lecithin in bile increase at low bile salt outputs. In health, an adequate bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion coupled with normal cholesterol secretion maintains the relative composition of bile in a stable state: fasting compositions usually lie within the micellar zone or metastable supersaturated zone of a triangular coordinate-phase diagram plot. In cholesterol gallstone disease, mean bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion rates are subnormal and/or mean cholesterol secretion rates are supranormal, especially in the fasting state. If individuals are obese there is also enhanced hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol. Either or both secretory defects lead to an elevation and persistence of cholesterol supersaturation of bile. The physical state of the secreted lipids in bile is complex and fluctuant, and probably involves vesicle structures and mixed micelles at high water and cholesterol concentrations and predominantly micellar structures at low water and cholesterol concentrations. In lithogenic bile, the physical state, proportions and nucleation potential of the lipid aggregates are probably different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST).

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Sang-Jik; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Yeam, Inhwa; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-04-18

    Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  3. Molecular genetic manipulation of Pichia pastoris SEC4 governs cell growth and glucoamylase secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.-H.; Chou, W.-I; Lin, S.-C.; Sheu, C.-C.; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr . E-mail: dtchang@life.nthu.edu.tw

    2005-11-04

    We have previously engineered a recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 transformant, MSPGA-7, harboring seven copies of glucoamylase (GA) fused with modified signal peptide. High yield secretion of GA was achieved as an extra copy of SEC4 was integrated to the transformant. To elucidate the physiological role of SEC4, a dominant-negative mutant of SEC4, SEC4 {sub S28N}, was overexpressed under the control of alchohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter in P. pastoris strain MSPGA-7 as well as a set of host cells harboring multi-copy of wild type SEC4. We found that SEC4 {sub S28N} mutation in the key guanine nucleotide binding domain reduced guanine nucleotide binding affinity, hence it blocked the transport of vesicles required for targeting and fusion to the plasma membrane. The inhibitory levels of cell growth and GA secretion were correlated with the dosage of SEC4 {sub S28N} gene. In addition, overexpression of SEC4 driven by AOX1 promoter in MSPGA-7 improved the secretory production of GA, but demonstrated the delay of cell growth by increased gene dosage of SEC4. Interestingly, a limited level of Sec4p did not disturb the cell growth. It was because expression of only one copy of SEC4 resulted in delay of cell growth at an early stage while still maintaining high level Sec4p at long-term incubation. Accordingly, as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter was used to substitute AOX1 promoter to drive the SEC4 expression, enhanced GA secretion but not inhibition of cell growth was achieved. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SEC4 is essential for P. pastoris in regulating cell growth and heterologous protein secretion in a dosage-dependent manner.

  4. Effect of particle size on hydroxyapatite crystal-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Imad; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Philippidis, Pandelis; Whelan, Linda C; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages may promote a vicious cycle of inflammation and calcification in the vessel wall by ingesting neointimal calcific deposits (predominantly hydroxyapatite) and secreting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, itself a vascular calcifying agent. Here we have investigated whether particle size affects the proinflammatory potential of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro and whether the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway plays a role in the macrophage TNFalpha response. The particle size and nano-topography of nine different crystal preparations was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and gas sorbtion analysis. Macrophage TNFalpha secretion was inversely related to hydroxyapatite particle size (P=0.011, Spearman rank correlation test) and surface pore size (P=0.014). A necessary role for the NF-kappaB pathway was demonstrated by time-dependent I kappaB alpha degradation and sensitivity to inhibitors of I kappaB alpha degradation. To test whether smaller particles were intrinsically more bioactive, their mitogenic activity on fibroblast proliferation was examined. This showed close correlation between TNFalpha secretion and crystal-induced fibroblast proliferation (P=0.007). In conclusion, the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate macrophage TNFalpha secretion depends on NF-kappaB activation and is inversely related to particle and pore size, with crystals of 1-2 microm diameter and pore size of 10-50 A the most bioactive. Microscopic calcific deposits in early stages of atherosclerosis may therefore pose a greater inflammatory risk to the plaque than macroscopically or radiologically visible deposits in more advanced lesions.

  5. Ameloblastic secretion and calcification of the enamel layer in shark teeth.

    PubMed

    Kemp, N E

    1985-05-01

    Tooth primordia at early stages of mineralization in the sharks Negaprion brevirostris and Triaenodon obesus were examined electron microscopically for evidence of ameloblastic secretion and its relation to calcification of the enamel (enameloid) layer. Ameloblasts are polarized with most of the mitochondria and all of the Golgi dictyosomes localized in the infranuclear end of the cell toward the squamous outer cells of the enamel organ. Endoplasmic reticular membranes and ribosomes are also abundant in this region. Ameloblastic vesicles bud from the Golgi membranes and evidently move through perinuclear and supranuclear zones to accumulate at the apical end of the cell. The vesicles secrete their contents through the apical cell membrane in merocrine fashion and appear to contribute precursor material both for the basal lamina and the enameline matrix. The enamel layer consists of four zones: a juxta-laminar zone containing newly polymerized mineralizing fibrils (tubules); a pre-enamel zone of assembly of matrix constituents; palisadal zones of mineralizing fibrils (tubules); and interpalisadal zones containing granular amorphous matrix, fine unit fibrils, and giant cross-banded fibers with a periodicity of 17.9 nm. It seems probable that amorphous, non-mineralizing fibrillar and mineralizing fibrillar constituents of the matrix are all products of ameloblastic secretion. Odontoblastic processes are tightly embedded in the matrix of the palisadal zones and do not appear to be secretory at the stages investigated. The shark tooth enamel layer is considered homologous with that of other vertebrates with respect to origin of its mineralizing fibrils from the innerental epithelium. The term enameloid is appropriate to connote the histological distinction that the enamel layer contains odontoblastic processes but should not signify that shark tooth enamel is a modified type of dentine. How amelogenins and/or enamelins secreted by amelo- blasts in the shark and other

  6. The Historical Legacy of a Secret Society at Duke University (1913-1971): Cultural Hegemony and the Tenacious Ideals of the "Big Man on Campus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Krispin Wagoner

    2013-01-01

    Collegiate secret societies, as distinguished from Greek-letter fraternal organizations, enjoyed prominence within many American campus communities from the early nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century (Baird, 1879; Hitchcock, 1863; Slosson, 1910; Veysey, 1965). The establishment of these elite groups preceded the maturation of…

  7. Insulin secretion at high altitude in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Singh, T.; Rai, R. M.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of hypoxia on circulatory levels of insulin, its response to oral glucose administration (100 g) and changes in circadian rhythms of glucose as well as insulin were evaluated in euglycemic males at sea level (SL, 220 m) during their stay at high altitude (3500 m, SJ) and in high altitude natives (HAN). Basal glucose levels were not altered at high altitude but the rise in glucose (δ glucose) after glucose load was significantly higher in SJ and HAN (p<0.01) as compared to SL values. An increase (p<0.01) both in basal as well as glucose induced rise in insulin secretion (δ insulin) was observed at HA. The rise in insulin in SJ was significantly higher (p<0.01) than in HAN. This elevation in glucose and insulin levels was also evident at different times of the day. The circadian rhythmicity of glucose as well as insulin was altered by the altitude stress. The findings of the study show a rise in insulin level at HA but the hyperglycemia in the face of hyper-insulinism require the presumption of a simultaneous and dispropotionate rise of insulin antagonistic hormones upsetting the effect of insulin on glucose metabolism.

  8. Physiopathology of prolactin secretion in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, P G

    2000-06-01

    In many species prolactin is of biological importance and has a major role in determining the deposition and mobilization of fat. In human physiology, outside pregnancy, prolactin secretion is altered by increasing body weight in both children and adults. Prolactin in this circumstance appears to be marker of hypothalamic-pituitary function: the prolactin response to insulin-hypoglycaemia, thyrotrophin releasing hormone stimulation and other stimulatory factors may be diminished. In addition, obesity alters the 24h spontaneous release of prolactin with a generalised dampening of release. A number of explanations have been given as possible causes for these alterations, but it seems likely that they reflect obesity per se and are associated with hyperinsulinaemia. Weight reduction, with accompanying decrease in plasma insulin levels, leads to a normalization of prolactin responses in most, but not all, circumstances. To date, no molecular basis has been identified which links prolactin with increasing body fatness, weight and appetite: new data suggests a possible link in obese men between fasting plasma prolactin and leptin concentrations. PMID:10997622

  9. Exploring the Secrets of the Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George

    Short, professional autobiographies of the founders of space physics have been solicited by AGU's History Committee and published in special sections of Space Physics issues of the Journal of Geophysical Research. Here we have a book-length professional autobiography by the discoverer of magnetospheric substorms, which is arguably the most intensely researched topic in the field.Probably the book's most valuable contribution to the history of space physics is precisely the narration of the discovery of substorms. Exploring the Secrets of the Aurora has an epic quality. It starts with Akasofu's insight that the auroral zone—a circumpolar zone that auroras inhabit, with geographic borders established in the previous century—is a fiction. There followed a struggle to replace it with the concept of an expandable auroral oval, which has quite a different shape. The road to final success entailed Akasofu's installing a chain of aurora-imaging, “all-sky” cameras stretching the north-south length of Alaska. These proved the point and set a precedent for north-south aligned magnetometer chains.

  10. Choice of measurement as the secret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Feng; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-04-01

    Recently, Kalev et al. [A. Kalev, A. Mann, and M. Revzen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 260502 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.260502] proposed a quantum (public) communication protocol with an interesting encoding style, where the signal is encoded in the choice of the measurement basis of one of the communicating parties (Bob) and Bob's measurement results are irrelevant for the communication. As we know, one of the main advantages of quantum technique in communication over the classical one is the higher security. Therefore, as Kalev et al. have mentioned in their paper, an interesting open question is whether one could and how to utilize this new encoding style to design a secure communication protocol, i.e., translate the choice of measurement into the secret. Here we propose a quantum key distribution protocol, which is a secure communication protocol, with this encoding style, where Bob's measurement results are still irrelevant. Furthermore, the security of the proposed protocol in the zero-error case has been proved.

  11. Insulin secretion as a determinant of pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-08-01

    New epidemiology confirms that glucose intolerance is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and that this association cannot be accounted for by an adverse impact of early pancreatic cancer on beta cell function. Previous reports indicate that risk for pancreatic cancer is increased in adult-onset diabetics. Since streptozotocin diabetes inhibits carcinogen-mediated induction of pancreatic cancer in hamsters, the most reasonable interpretation of these findings is that insulin (or some other beta cell product) acts as a promoter for pancreatic carcinogenesis. This view is consistent with a report that human pancreatic adenocarcinomas express insulin receptors that can stimulate mitosis; an additional possibility is that high insulin levels indirectly promote pancreatic carcinogenesis by boosting effective IGF-I activity via hepatic actions. In international ecologic epidemiology, pancreatic cancer rates correlate tightly with dietary intake of animal products; this may reflect the fact that vegan diets are associated with low diurnal insulin secretion. There is also suggestive evidence that macrobiotic vegan diets, which are low in glycemic index, may increase mean survival time in pancreatic cancer. However, other types of diets associated with decreased postprandial insulin response, such as high-protein diets or 'Mediterranean' diets high in oleic acid, may also have the potential for pancreatic cancer prevention. The huge increases of age-adjusted pancreatic cancer mortality in Japan and among African-Americans during the last century imply that pancreatic cancer is substantially preventable; a low-insulin-response diet coupled with exercise training, weight control, and smoking avoidance, commendable for a great many other reasons, may slash pancreatic cancer mortality dramatically. PMID:11461162

  12. The Evolution of the Secreted Regulatory Protein Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Palfree, Roger G. E.; Bennett, Hugh P. J.; Bateman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Progranulin is a secreted growth factor that is active in tumorigenesis, wound repair, and inflammation. Haploinsufficiency of the human progranulin gene, GRN, causes frontotemporal dementia. Progranulins are composed of chains of cysteine-rich granulin modules. Modules may be released from progranulin by proteolysis as 6kDa granulin polypeptides. Both intact progranulin and some of the granulin polypeptides are biologically active. The granulin module occurs in certain plant proteases and progranulins are present in early diverging metazoan clades such as the sponges, indicating their ancient evolutionary origin. There is only one Grn gene in mammalian genomes. More gene-rich Grn families occur in teleost fish with between 3 and 6 members per species including short-form Grns that have no tetrapod counterparts. Our goals are to elucidate progranulin and granulin module evolution by investigating (i): the origins of metazoan progranulins (ii): the evolutionary relationships between the single Grn of tetrapods and the multiple Grn genes of fish (iii): the evolution of granulin module architectures of vertebrate progranulins (iv): the conservation of mammalian granulin polypeptide sequences and how the conserved granulin amino acid sequences map to the known three dimensional structures of granulin modules. We report that progranulin-like proteins are present in unicellular eukaryotes that are closely related to metazoa suggesting that progranulin is among the earliest extracellular regulatory proteins still employed by multicellular animals. From the genomes of the elephant shark and coelacanth we identified contemporary representatives of a precursor for short-from Grn genes of ray-finned fish that is lost in tetrapods. In vertebrate Grns pathways of exon duplication resulted in a conserved module architecture at the amino-terminus that is frequently accompanied by an unusual pattern of tandem nearly identical module repeats near the carboxyl-terminus. Polypeptide

  13. Analysis of eight out genes in a cluster required for pectic enzyme secretion by Erwinia chrysanthemi: sequence comparison with secretion genes from other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lindeberg, M; Collmer, A

    1992-01-01

    Many extracellular proteins produced by Erwinia chrysanthemi require the out gene products for transport across the outer membrane. In a previous report (S. Y. He, M. Lindeberg, A. K. Chatterjee, and A. Collmer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:1079-1083, 1991) cosmid pCPP2006, sufficient for secretion of Erwinia chrysanthemi extracellular proteins by Escherichia coli, was partially sequenced, revealing four out genes sharing high homology with pulH through pulK from Klebsiella oxytoca. The nucleotide sequence of eight additional out genes reveals homology with pulC through pulG, pulL, pulM, pulO, and other genes involved in secretion by various gram-negative bacteria. Although signal sequences and hydrophobic regions are generally conserved between Pul and Out proteins, four out genes contain unique inserts, a pulN homolog is not present, and outO appears to be transcribed separately from outC through outM. The sequenced region was subcloned, and an additional 7.6-kb region upstream was identified as being required for secretion in E. coli. out gene homologs were found on Erwinia carotovora cosmid clone pAKC651 but were not detected in E. coli. The outC-through-outM operon is weakly induced by polygalacturonic acid and strongly expressed in the early stationary phase. The out and pul genes are highly similar in sequence, hydropathic properties, and overall arrangement but differ in both transcriptional organization and the nature of their induction. Images PMID:1429461

  14. Novel Threshold Changeable Secret Sharing Schemes Based on Polynomial Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingchu; Guo, Cheng; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Ren, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    After any distribution of secret sharing shadows in a threshold changeable secret sharing scheme, the threshold may need to be adjusted to deal with changes in the security policy and adversary structure. For example, when employees leave the organization, it is not realistic to expect departing employees to ensure the security of their secret shadows. Therefore, in 2012, Zhang et al. proposed (t → t′, n) and ({t1, t2,⋯, tN}, n) threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. However, their schemes suffer from a number of limitations such as strict limit on the threshold values, large storage space requirement for secret shadows, and significant computation for constructing and recovering polynomials. To address these limitations, we propose two improved dealer-free threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. In our schemes, we construct polynomials to update secret shadows, and use two-variable one-way function to resist collusion attacks and secure the information stored by the combiner. We then demonstrate our schemes can adjust the threshold safely. PMID:27792784

  15. Type V Protein Secretion Pathway: the Autotransporter Story

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Desvaux, Mickaël; Fernandez, Rachel C.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer

    2004-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane layer which constrains uptake and secretion of solutes and polypeptides. To overcome this barrier, bacteria have developed several systems for protein secretion. The type V secretion pathway encompasses the autotransporter proteins, the two-partner secretion system, and the recently described type Vc or AT-2 family of proteins. Since its discovery in the late 1980s, this family of secreted proteins has expanded continuously, due largely to the advent of the genomic age, to become the largest group of secreted proteins in gram-negative bacteria. Several of these proteins play essential roles in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections and have been characterized in detail, demonstrating a diverse array of function including the ability to condense host cell actin and to modulate apoptosis. However, most of the autotransporter proteins remain to be characterized. In light of new discoveries and controversies in this research field, this review considers the autotransporter secretion process in the context of the more general field of bacterial protein translocation and exoprotein function. PMID:15590781

  16. Changes in the sialylation and sulfation of secreted thyrotropin in congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Gyves, P W; Gesundheit, N; Thotakura, N R; Stannard, B S; DeCherney, G S; Weintraub, B D

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the oligosaccharide structure of secreted thyrotropin (TSH) in perinatal and mature rats with congenital primary hypothyroidism. Rat pituitaries from euthyroid control animals and those rendered hypothyroid by methimazole treatment were incubated with [3H]glucosamine in vitro. Secreted TSH was purified, and oligosaccharides were enzymatically released and characterized by anion-exchange HPLC. In perinatal hypothyroid animals compared with control animals, oligosaccharides from TSH alpha and beta subunits contained more species with three or more negative charges. Moreover, perinatal hypothyroid animals demonstrated a dramatic increase in the ratio of sialylated to sulfated species within oligosaccharides of the same negative charge (2.9- to 7.4-fold increase for TSH-alpha; 15.1- to 25.5-fold increase for TSH-beta). In mature hypothyroid 9-week-old animals compared with control animals, changes were less pronounced, suggesting that endocrine regulation of oligosaccharide structure is dependent upon the maturational state of the animal. These changes were specific for TSH because glycosylation of free alpha subunit (synthesized by the thyrotroph and gonadotroph) and of total glycoproteins was minimally altered by hypothyroidism. Together, these data provide direct evidence and characterization of specific changes in the structure of a secreted pituitary glycoprotein hormone occurring as a result of in vivo endocrine alterations during early development. Moreover, they provide a potential structural basis to explain the delayed clearance of both TSH and the gonadotropins with end-organ deficiency, which may have important implications for the in vivo biological activities of these hormones. Specifically, such posttranslational changes may be an important adaptive response to prevent the consequences of endocrine deficiency during early development. PMID:1692623

  17. Por Secretion System-Dependent Secretion and Glycosylation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Hemin-Binding Protein 35

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Mikio; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Kondo, Yoshio; Narita, Yuka; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in severe forms of periodontal disease and refractory periapical perodontitis. We have recently found that P. gingivalis has a novel secretion system named the Por secretion system (PorSS), which is responsible for secretion of major extracellular proteinases, Arg-gingipains (Rgps) and Lys-gingipain. These proteinases contain conserved C-terminal domains (CTDs) in their C-termini. Hemin-binding protein 35 (HBP35), which is one of the outer membrane proteins of P. gingivalis and contributes to its haem utilization, also contains a CTD, suggesting that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS. In this study, immunoblot analysis of P. gingivalis mutants deficient in the PorSS or in the biosynthesis of anionic polysaccharide-lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) revealed that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS and is glycosylated with A-LPS. From deletion analysis with a GFP-CTD[HBP35] green fluorescent protein fusion, the C-terminal 22 amino acid residues of CTD[HBP35] were found to be required for cell surface translocation and glycosylation. The GFP-CTD fusion study also revealed that the CTDs of CPG70, peptidylarginine deiminase, P27 and RgpB play roles in PorSS-dependent translocation and glycosylation. However, CTD-region peptides were not found in samples of glycosylated HBP35 protein by peptide map fingerprinting analysis, and antibodies against CTD-regions peptides did not react with glycosylated HBP35 protein. These results suggest both that the CTD region functions as a recognition signal for the PorSS and that glycosylation of CTD proteins occurs after removal of the CTD region. Rabbits were used for making antisera against bacterial proteins in this study. PMID:21731719

  18. Role of the neuropeptide, bombesin, in bile secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times, bile secretion has been considered vital for maintaining health. One of the main functions of bile secretion is gastric acid neutralization with biliary bicarbonate during a meal or Pavlovian response. Although the liver has many extrinsic and intrinsic nerve innervations, the functional role of these nerves in biliary physiology is poorly understood. To understand the role of neural regulation in bile secretion, our recent studies on the effect of bombesin, a neuropeptide, on bile secretion and its underlying mechanisms will be reviewed. Using isolated perfused rat livers (IPRL) from both normal and 2 week bile duct ligated rats, as well as hepatocyte couplets and isolated bile duct units (IBDU) from normal rat livers, bombesin was shown to stimulate biliary bicarbonate and fluid secretion from bile ducts. Detailed pH studies indicated that bombesin stimulated the activity of Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, which was counterbalanced by a secondary activation of electrogenic Na+/HCO3- symport. Quantitative videomicroscopic studies showed that bombesin-stimulated fluid secretion in IBDU was dependent on Cl- and HCO3- in the media, anion exchanger(s), Cl- and K+ channels, and carbonic anhydrase, but not on the microtubular system. Furthermore, this bombesin response is inhibited by somatostatin but not substance P. Finally, studies of secondary messengers in isolated cholangiocytes and IBDU indicated that bombesin had no effect on intracellular cAMP, cGMP, or Ca++ levels in cholangiocytes. These results provide evidence that neuropeptides such as bombesin can directly stimulate fluid and bicarbonate secretion from cholangiocytes by activating luminal Cl-/HCO3- exchange, but by different mechanisms from those established for secretin. These findings, in turn, suggest that neuropeptides may play an important regulatory role in biliary transport and secretion. Thus, this neuropeptidergic regulation of bile secretion may provide a plausible mechanism for the

  19. Identification of new secreted effectors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Kaoru; Worley, Micah; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred

    2005-10-01

    A common theme in bacterial pathogenesis is the secretion of bacterial products that modify cellular functions to overcome host defenses. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to inject effector proteins into host cells. The genes encoding the structural components of the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among bacterial species and can be identified by sequence homology. In contrast, the sequences of secreted effector proteins are less conserved and are therefore difficult to identify. A strategy was developed to identify virulence factors secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cell cytoplasm. We constructed a transposon, which we refer to as mini-Tn5-cycler, to generate translational fusions between Salmonella chromosomal genes and a fragment of the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase gene derived from Bordetella pertussis (cyaA'). In-frame fusions to bacterial proteins that are secreted into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm were identified by high levels of cyclic AMP in infected cells. The assay was sufficiently sensitive that a single secreted fusion could be identified among several hundred that were not secreted. This approach identified three new effectors as well as seven that have been previously characterized. A deletion of one of the new effectors, steA (Salmonella translocated effector A), attenuated virulence. In addition, SteA localizes to the trans-Golgi network in both transfected and infected cells. This approach has identified new secreted effector proteins in Salmonella and will likely be useful for other organisms, even those in which genetic manipulation is more difficult.

  20. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  1. Acid secretion and proton conductance in human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Illek, Beate

    2002-04-01

    Acid secretion and proton conductive pathways across primary human airway surface epithelial cultures were investigated with the pH stat method in Ussing chambers and by single cell patch clamping. Cultures showed a basal proton secretion of 0.17 +/- 0.04 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), and mucosal pH equilibrated at 6.85 +/- 0.26. Addition of histamine or ATP to the mucosal medium increased proton secretion by 0.27 +/- 0.09 and 0.24 +/- 0.09 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), respectively. Addition of mast cells to the mucosal medium of airway cultures similarly activated proton secretion. Stimulated proton secretion was similar in cultures bathed mucosally with either NaCl Ringer or ion-free mannitol solutions. Proton secretion was potently blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and was unaffected by mucosal bafilomycin A(1), Sch-28080, or ouabain. Mucosal amiloride blocked proton secretion in tissues that showed large amiloride-sensitive potentials. Proton secretion was sensitive to the application of transepithelial current and showed outward rectification. In whole cell patch-clamp recordings a strongly outward-rectifying, zinc-sensitive, depolarization-activated proton conductance was identified with an average chord conductance of 9.2 +/- 3.8 pS/pF (at 0 mV and a pH 5.3-to-pH 7.3 gradient). We suggest that inflammatory processes activate proton secretion by the airway epithelium and acidify the airway surface liquid.

  2. Restructuring of Pancreatic Islets and Insulin Secretion in a Postnatal Critical Window

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Godinez-Puig, Victoria; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Function and structure of adult pancreatic islets are determined by early postnatal development, which in rats corresponds to the first month of life. We analyzed changes in blood glucose and hormones during this stage and their association with morphological and functional changes of alpha and beta cell populations during this period. At day 20 (d20), insulin and glucose plasma levels were two- and six-fold higher, respectively, as compared to d6. Interestingly, this period is characterized by physiological hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, where peripheral insulin resistance and a high plasmatic concentration of glucagon are also observed. These functional changes were paralleled by reorganization of islet structure, cell mass and aggregate size of alpha and beta cells. Cultured beta cells from d20 secreted the same amount of insulin in 15.6 mM than in 5.6 mM glucose (basal conditions), and were characterized by a high basal insulin secretion. However, beta cells from d28 were already glucose sensitive. Understanding and establishing morphophysiological relationships in the developing endocrine pancreas may explain how events in early life are important in determining adult islet physiology and metabolism. PMID:17183663

  3. Catecholamine-Secreting Paragangliomas at the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Kuhweide, Rudolf; Lanser, Michael J.; Fisch, Ugo

    1996-01-01

    Paragangliomas (glomus tumors) comprise 15% of all neoplasms at the skull base. Despite extensive growth, these tumors usually do not secrete active biogenic substances into the circulation in sufficient quantities to produce symptoms. When they do secrete large amounts of catecholamines, they will cause symptoms that mimic a pheochromocytoma. The still confusing nomenclature of paragangliomas is reviewed, and the clinical work-up, surgical treatment, and follow-up of five patients with catecholamine-secreting paragangliomas of temporal bone (3), infratemporal fossa (1), and nasopharynx (1) are presented and discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170951

  4. ER to Golgi-Dependent Protein Secretion: The Conventional Pathway.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Secretion is the cellular process present in every organism that delivers soluble proteins and cargoes to the extracellular space. In eukaryotes, conventional protein secretion (CPS) is the trafficking route that secretory proteins undertake when are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus (GA), and subsequently to the plasma membrane (PM) via secretory vesicles or secretory granules. This book chapter recalls the fundamental steps in cell biology research contributing to the elucidation of CPS; it describes the most prominent examples of conventionally secreted proteins in eukaryotic cells and the molecular mechanisms necessary to regulate each step of this process. PMID:27665548

  5. A Method for Staining Nematode Secretions and Structures

    PubMed Central

    Premachandran, D.; Von Mende, N.; Hussey, R. S.; McClure, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Secretions from amphids, phasmids, and excretory system were stained by incubating nematodes in 0.1% coomassie brilliant blue G-250 in 40% aqueous methanol containing 10% acetic acid on slides with coverslips sealed with nail polish or Zut. Nematodes incubated in this staining solution usually produced copious amounts of secretions from their amphids and excretory pore. Phasmids also stained dark blue, enabling them to be easily observed. Other biological dyes stained these secretions or were useful for differentiating specific morphological features of nematodes. PMID:19290186

  6. Effect of environmental contaminants on nasal lysozyme secretions.

    PubMed

    Noble, Rudolf E

    2002-02-01

    Human nasal secretions are comprised of lysozyme and albumin as their main protein components. Lysozyme, an anti-microbial substance, is produced by nasal serous cells while albumin is obtained, primarily, from increased nasal vasculature permeability. We measured lysozyme levels in nasal secretions following challenge by a variety of non-infectious environmental contaminants. The methodology given presents a simple and rapid method of collecting nasal secretions and determining their lysozyme content, a technique which can be used for a host of environmental irritants.

  7. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M; Ferry, Vivian E; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A Paul; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-07-01

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  8. Multiparty semiquantum secret sharing based on rearranging orders of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gan; Wang, Yue; Wang, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Based on the assumption of a perfect qubit, Boyer et al. proposed a novel semiquantum key distribution protocol [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 140501], in which quantum Alice shares a secret key with classical Bob. In this paper, we use Bell states to propose a multiparty semiquantum secret sharing (MSQSS) protocol, in which only the boss is quantum and all agents are classical. Classical agents are restricted to performing measurements in a computational basis and rearranging orders of qubits. Unless all classical agents collaborate, no subset of them can obtain the secret of the quantum boss. Also, we show that this proposed protocol is secure against eavesdropping.

  9. Competitively coupled maps for hiding secret visual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidelys, M.; Ziaukas, P.; Ragulskis, M.

    2016-02-01

    A novel digital image hiding scheme based on competitively coupled maps is presented in this paper. Self-organizing patterns produced by an array of non-diffusively coupled nonlinear maps are exploited to conceal the secret. The secret image is represented in the form of a dot-skeleton representation and is embedded into a spatially homogeneous initial state far below the noise level. Self-organizing patterns leak the secret image at a predefined set of system parameters. Computational experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness and the security of the proposed image hiding scheme.

  10. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M.; Ferry, Vivian E.; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-06-03

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Lastly, such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  11. Characterization of the Unconventional Secretion of the Ebola Matrix Protein VP40.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Mateo, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    While most secreted proteins use the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi secretion pathway to reach the extracellular medium, a few proteins are secreted through unconventional secretary pathways. Viral proteins can be secreted through unconventional secretion pathways. Here, we describe how we have recently demonstrated that the Ebola virus (EBOV) matrix protein VP40 is released from transfected and infected cells in a soluble form through an unconventional secretion pathway. PMID:27665561

  12. TRAPP Complexes in Secretion and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Lipatova, Zhanna; Segev, Nava

    2016-01-01

    TRAPP is a highly conserved modular multi-subunit protein complex. Originally identified as a “transport protein particle” with a role in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport, its multiple subunits and their conservation from yeast to humans were characterized in the late 1990s. TRAPP attracted attention when it was shown to act as a Ypt/Rab GTPase nucleotide exchanger, GEF, in the 2000s. Currently, three TRAPP complexes are known in yeast, I, II, and III, and they regulate two different intracellular trafficking pathways: secretion and autophagy. Core TRAPP contains four small subunits that self assemble to a stable complex, which has a GEF activity on Ypt1. Another small subunit, Trs20/Sedlin, is an adaptor required for the association of core TRAPP with larger subunits to form TRAPP II and TRAPP III. Whereas the molecular structure of the core TRAPP complex is resolved, the architecture of the larger TRAPP complexes, including their existence as dimers and multimers, is less clear. In addition to its Ypt/Rab GEF activity, and thereby an indirect role in vesicle tethering through Ypt/Rabs, a direct role for TRAPP as a vesicle tether has been suggested. This idea is based on TRAPP interactions with vesicle coat components. While much of the basic information about TRAPP complexes comes from yeast, mutations in TRAPP subunits were connected to human disease. In this review we will summarize new information about TRAPP complexes, highlight new insights about their function and discuss current controversies and future perspectives. PMID:27066478

  13. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  14. Myelomagenesis: capturing early microenvironment changes.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Maric, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Plasma cell neoplasms result from the clonal expansion of terminally differentiated, immunoglobulin heavy-chain class switched B cells that typically secrete a monoclonal immunoglobulin. The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of plasma cell neoplasms encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, from the precursor disorder monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to plasma cell leukemia. The classification includes, in addition to precursor lesion MGUS, plasma cell myeloma, plasmacytoma, immunoglobulin deposition diseases, and osteosclerotic myeloma. Plasma cell myeloma is further divided into symptomatic plasma cell myeloma or multiple myeloma (MM), asymptomatic smoldering myeloma (SMM), non-secretory myeloma, and plasma cell leukemia. Although histopathologic cut-off criteria are incorporated into the classification schema, distinction between MGUS, SMM, and MM depends primarily on the presence or absence of end-organ damage, as defined by "CRAB" criteria (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, lytic bone lesions, or a combination of these). Systematic evaluation of pathogenetic differences between MGUS and MM should offer invaluable insights into early myelomagenesis. Given the complex, intertwined nature of the malignant plasma cell and its surroundings, multiple pathogenetic mechanisms play a critical role in interactions between neoplastic cells and their microenvironment. Understanding the events leading to end-organ damage, like anemia and bone remodeling, is a critical part of investigating early myelomagenesis and should provide us with better tools for early identification and treatment of these patients. PMID:21232654

  15. Structure of EspB, a secreted substrate of the ESX-1 secretion system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Korotkova, Natalia; Piton, Jérémie; Wagner, Jonathan M.; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Japaridze, Aleksandre; Evans, Timothy J.; Cole, Stewart T.; Pojer, Florence; Korotkov, Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretes multiple virulence factors during infection via the general Sec and Tat pathways, and via specialized ESX secretion systems, also referred to as type VII secretion systems. The ESX-1 secretion system is an important virulence determinant because deletion of ESX-1 leads to attenuation of M. tuberculosis. ESX-1 secreted protein B (EspB) contains putative PE (Pro-Glu) and PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) domains, and a C-terminal domain, which is processed by MycP1 protease during secretion. We determined the crystal structure of PE–PPE domains of EspB, which represents an all-helical, elongated molecule closely resembling the structure of the PE25–PPE41 heterodimer despite limited sequence similarity. Also, we determined the structure of full-length EspB, which does not have interpretable electron density for the C-terminal domain confirming that it is largely disordered. Comparative analysis of EspB in cell lysate and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis revealed that mature secreted EspB forms oligomers. Electron microscopy analysis showed that the N-terminal fragment of EspB forms donut-shaped particles. These data provide a rationale for the future investigation of EspB's role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:26051906

  16. Effect of pulse frequency and amplitude of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the pulsatile secretion of prolactin and LH.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, T; Bordiu, E; Rubio, J A; Duran, A; Charro, A L

    1993-09-01

    This work analyzes the effect of the pulse amplitude and frequency of a potent LHRH analog, D-Trp6-LHRH, in a perfusion system of isolated rat pituitary cells. To this purpose, we studied the LH and PRL secretion in different conditions: basal secretion, secretion after increasing concentrations of D-Trp6-LHRL (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 nM) secretion in function of the pulses frequency (2,3, and 4 pulses per h) and amplitude (0.1, 1 and 10 nM). The principal findings were: 1. The basal LH and PRL secretions was pulsatile; 2. The stimulation of LH by the analog was not dose-dependent; 3. When more than 2 pulses per h were administered, a rapid desensitization of gonadotroph to release LH (at 20-30 min) occurred; 4. There was a loss of pulsatility of PRL secretion with an increase in the pulse frequency and amplitude of the D-Trp6-LHRH, which was produced parallelly to the desensitization of the gonadotroph to release LH. In summary, these findings suggest that a rapid loss of pulsatility of the PRL when the D-Trp6-LHRH pulse frequency and amplitude is increased might be due to the early desensitization of the gonadotroph to the analog.

  17. Beyond the wall: Candida albicans secret(e)s to survive.

    PubMed

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans occupies various niches of the human body such as the skin and the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It can also enter the blood stream and cause deadly, systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, but also in immunocompetent individuals through inserted medical devices. To survive in these diverse host environments, C. albicans has developed specialized virulence attributes and rapidly adapts itself to local growth conditions and defense mechanisms. Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins that are involved in biofilm formation, tissue invasion, immune evasion, and wall maintenance, as well as acquisition of nutrients including metal ions. The secretome of C. albicans is predicted to comprise 225 proteins. On a proteomic level, however, analysis of the secretome of C. albicans is incomplete as many secreted proteins are only produced under certain conditions. Interestingly, glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins and known cytoplasmic proteins are also consistently detected in the growth medium. Importantly, a core set of seven wall polysaccharide-processing enzymes seems to be consistently present, including the diagnostic marker Mp65. Overall, we discuss the importance of the secretome for virulence and suggest potential targets for better and faster diagnostic methods.

  18. Beyond the wall: Candida albicans secret(e)s to survive.

    PubMed

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans occupies various niches of the human body such as the skin and the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It can also enter the blood stream and cause deadly, systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, but also in immunocompetent individuals through inserted medical devices. To survive in these diverse host environments, C. albicans has developed specialized virulence attributes and rapidly adapts itself to local growth conditions and defense mechanisms. Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins that are involved in biofilm formation, tissue invasion, immune evasion, and wall maintenance, as well as acquisition of nutrients including metal ions. The secretome of C. albicans is predicted to comprise 225 proteins. On a proteomic level, however, analysis of the secretome of C. albicans is incomplete as many secreted proteins are only produced under certain conditions. Interestingly, glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins and known cytoplasmic proteins are also consistently detected in the growth medium. Importantly, a core set of seven wall polysaccharide-processing enzymes seems to be consistently present, including the diagnostic marker Mp65. Overall, we discuss the importance of the secretome for virulence and suggest potential targets for better and faster diagnostic methods. PMID:23170918

  19. Early Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.

  20. Analysis of the Proteins Secreted from the Oryza meyeriana Suspension-Cultured Cells Induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Dong, Yan; Yu, Chulang; Fang, XianPing; Deng, Zhiping; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Oryza meyeriana, a wild species of rice from China, shows high resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the cause of rice bacterial blight, one of the most serious rice pathogens. To better understand the resistance mechanism, a proteomic study was conducted to identify changes in the proteins secreted in embryo cell suspension cultures in response to Xoo. After two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), 72 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 34 proteins were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Of the 34 proteins, 10 were up regulated and 24 down regulated. The secreted proteins identified were predicted to be involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, defense, ROS and cell wall modification. 77% of the 34 proteins were predicted to have a signal peptide by Signal P. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that transcript levels of 14 secreted proteins were not well correlated with secreted protein levels. Peroxidase activity was up regulated in both O. meyriana and susceptible rice but was about three times higher in O. meyeriana. This suggests that peroxidases may play an important role in the early response to Xoo in O. meyeriana. These results not only provide a better understanding of the resistance mechanism of O. meyeriana, but have implications for studies of the interactions between other plants and their pathogens. PMID:27196123

  1. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  2. Expression and secretion of heterologous proteases by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed Central

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Wang, L; Kortt, A; Stewart, D; Radford, A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the basic protease of Dichelobacter nodosus (bprV) and the subtilisin of Bacillus subtilis (aprE) were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In each case, enzymatically active protein was detected in the supernatants of liquid cultures. While the secretion of subtilisin was directed by its own signal peptide, the natural signal peptide of the bprV basic protease did not facilitate secretion. A hybrid aprE-bprV gene in which the promoter and signal peptide coding sequences of subtilisin replaced those of bprV could be expressed, and basic protease was secreted by C. glutamicum. Expression of these proteases in C. glutamicum provides an opportunity to compare protein secretion from this gram-positive host with that from other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7747974

  3. Autocrine regulation of milk secretion by a protein in milk.

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, C J; Addey, C V; Boddy, L M; Peaker, M

    1995-01-01

    Frequency or completeness of milk removal from the lactating mammary gland regulates the rate of milk secretion by a mechanism which is local, chemical and inhibitory in nature. Screening of goat's milk proteins in rabbit mammary explant cultures identified a single whey protein of M(r) 7600 able to inhibit synthesis of milk constituents. The active whey protein, which we term FIL (Feedback inhibitor of Lactation), also decreased milk secretion temporarily when introduced into a mammary gland of lactating goats. FIL was synthesized by primary cultures of goat mammary epithelial cells, and was secreted vectorially together with other milk proteins. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that it is a hitherto unknown protein. The evidence indicates that local regulation of milk secretion by milk removal is through autocrine feedback inhibition by this milk protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7826353

  4. Effect of nervous excitation on acid secretion in horses.

    PubMed

    Sandin, A; Andrews, F M; Nadeau, J A; Nilsson, G

    2000-03-01

    Nervous excitation was induced by various means in horses provided with a gastric cannula. Insulin hypoglycaemia profoundly inhibited the basal acid output and volume secreted from the stomach. No clear effect on acid secretion was noted after administration of bethanechol, as the acid output was covered by the copious secretion of saliva. Atropine almost abolished the basal acid output. Sensoric stimulation by teasing caused a slight but not significant increase in the total acid output. These data suggest that cholinergic excitation might play a role in the stimulation of both volume and acid secretion in the horse. The inhibitory effect seen on these two parameters after insulin hypoglycaemia may hypothetically be ascribed to inhibitory impulses carried in peptide neurones of the vagal nerves or to inhibitory impulses in adrenergic nerves acting directly or indirectly on the parietal cells.

  5. Eyes, ears, lips, fingertips, secrets: Dora, psychoanalysis, and the body.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    The topic of secrets will be expanded here to apply to complex secrets of the body, sex, and gender kept by both patients and analysts. Their detection is made harder by our field's current lack of interest in them compared to Freud's curiosity. We tend to ignore body narratives these days, with both men and women, keeping secret from ourselves daily challenges to theory that do indeed exist. Dora's case will be used to examine her own, her father's, and Freud's expectations of what constitutes a sexed and gendered portrait of grown-up males and females, and how they behave together. Contemporary embodied questions will emerge in discussion of Dora and her mother(s), the men in the story, and some male case vignettes. Ordinary secrets, hidden in broad daylight in both 1905 and in 2014, will be "revealed." PMID:25688679

  6. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  7. Directional cell movement through tissues is controlled by exosome secretion.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Ketova, Tatiana; Hoshino, Daisuke; Zijlstra, Andries; Weaver, Alissa M

    2015-05-13

    Directional cell movement through tissues is critical for multiple biological processes and requires maintenance of polarity in the face of complex environmental cues. Here we use intravital imaging to demonstrate that secretion of exosomes from late endosomes is required for directionally persistent and efficient in vivo movement of cancer cells. Inhibiting exosome secretion or biogenesis leads to defective tumour cell migration associated with increased formation of unstable protrusions and excessive directional switching. In vitro rescue experiments with purified exosomes and matrix coating identify adhesion assembly as a critical exosome function that promotes efficient cell motility. Live-cell imaging reveals that exosome secretion directly precedes and promotes adhesion assembly. Fibronectin is found to be a critical motility-promoting cargo whose sorting into exosomes depends on binding to integrins. We propose that autocrine secretion of exosomes powerfully promotes directionally persistent and effective cell motility by reinforcing otherwise transient polarization states and promoting adhesion assembly.

  8. Mink-mouse hybridomas that secrete mink immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Galakhar, N L; Djatchenko, S N; Fomicheva, I I; Mechetina, L V; Taranin, A V; Belousov, E S; Nayakshin, A M; Baranov, O K

    1988-11-25

    Optimum conditions were established to obtain mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas secreting mink IgG in fusions of mouse myelomas with mink immune spleen cells. Minks were immunized with allogeneic IgG, and the spleen cells were fused with three mouse myeloma lines P3-X63-Ag8.653, NSO and Sp2/0-Ag14. Of these, P3-X63-Ag8.653 and NSO were found to be the best fusion partners giving the highest yield of hybrid clones and number of IgG secreting clones. Cloning of mink-mouse hybridomas was efficient when BALB/c nu/nu peritoneal and spleen cells were used as feeders. The ten clonal lines produced secreted intact mink IgG molecules as shown by SDS-PAGE and subsequent immunoblotting. The secretion level of IgG ranged from 5 to 200 ng/ml in the clonal lines.

  9. Microfluidic Devices for the Measurement of Cellular Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrell, Adrian M.; Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Roper, Michael G.

    2016-06-01

    The release of chemical information from cells and tissues holds the key to understanding cellular behavior and dysfunction. The development of methodologies that can measure cellular secretion in a time-dependent fashion is therefore essential. Often these measurements are made difficult by the high-salt conditions of the cellular environment, the presence of numerous other secreted factors, and the small mass samples that are produced when frequent sampling is used to resolve secretory dynamics. In this review, the methods that we have developed for measuring hormone release from islets of Langerhans are dissected to illustrate the practical difficulties of studying cellular secretions. Other methods from the literature are presented that provide alternative approaches to particularly challenging areas of monitoring cellular secretion. The examples presented in this review serve as case studies and should be adaptable to other cell types and systems for unique applications.

  10. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Justyna; Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  11. A Generalized Information Theoretical Model for Quantum Secret Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    An information theoretical model for quantum secret sharing was introduced by H. Imai et al. (Quantum Inf. Comput. 5(1), 69-80 2005), which was analyzed by quantum information theory. In this paper, we analyze this information theoretical model using the properties of the quantum access structure. By the analysis we propose a generalized model definition for the quantum secret sharing schemes. In our model, there are more quantum access structures which can be realized by our generalized quantum secret sharing schemes than those of the previous one. In addition, we also analyse two kinds of important quantum access structures to illustrate the existence and rationality for the generalized quantum secret sharing schemes and consider the security of the scheme by simple examples.

  12. Secretion of cellulase - a key role in production

    SciTech Connect

    Montenecourt, B.S.; Sheir-Neiss, G.I.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.; Frein, E.M.; Eveleigh, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A mutant strain, Rut-C30, was compared to wild-type Trichoderma reesei to investigate differences that might explain the observed difference in cellulase secretion between the two. 21 references, 1 figure, 1 table. (ACR)

  13. PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE KILLS FISH BY MICROPREDATION NOT ECOTOXIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Massive fish kills in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries involving several million Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus,have been attributed to dinoflagellates of the toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC). Potent ichthyotoxins secreted during Pfiesteria blooms are thought to be responsible fo...

  14. Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments Bacteria on skin sometimes release fatty acids ... News) -- In a finding that could lead to new treatments for acne, scientists say they've discovered ...

  15. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine. PMID:26520801

  16. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) in {sup 3}H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium.

  17. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  18. Do pancreatic β cells "taste" nutrients to secrete insulin?

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-08-28

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is controlled by nutrients, hormones, and neurotransmitters. Unlike the latter, which work through classic receptors, glucose and most other nutrients do not interact with membrane receptors but must be metabolized by β cells to induce insulin secretion. Studies have revealed the presence of umami and sweet taste receptors and their downstream effectors in β cells. That the receptors are functional was established by the effects of fructose and artificial sweeteners, which induced signals similar to those produced in taste buds of the tongue. These signals mediated an increase in insulin secretion in the presence of glucose. However, the physiological implications of these pathways in insulin secretion are unclear because of the large differences between plasma concentrations of fructose or sweeteners and their effective concentrations in vitro.

  19. Platelet secretion: From haemostasis to wound healing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-05-01

    Upon activation, platelets secrete more than 300 active substances from their intracellular granules. Platelet dense granule components, such as ADP and polyphosphates, contribute to haemostasis and coagulation, but also play a role in cancer metastasis. α-Granules contain multiple cytokines, mitogens, pro- and anti-inflammatory factors and other bioactive molecules that are essential regulators in the complex microenvironment of the growing thrombus but also contribute to a number of disease processes. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretion and the genetic regulation of granule biogenesis still remains incomplete. In this review we summarise our current understanding of the roles of platelet secretion in health and disease, and discuss some of the hypotheses that may explain how platelets may control the release of its many secreted components in a context-specific manner, to allow platelets to play multiple roles in health and disease.

  20. Granular gland transcriptomes in stimulated amphibian skin secretions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianbao; Farragher, Susan; Bjourson, Anthony J; Orr, David F; Rao, Pingfan; Shaw, Chris

    2003-04-01

    Amphibian defensive skin secretions are complex, species-specific cocktails of biologically active molecules, including many uncharacterized peptides. The study of such secretions for novel peptide discovery is time-limited, as amphibians are in rapid global decline. While secretion proteome analysis is non-lethal, transcriptome analysis has until now required killing of specimens prior to skin dissection for cDNA library construction. Here we present the discovery that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding dermal granular gland peptides are present in defensive skin secretions, stabilized by endogenous nucleic acid-binding amphipathic peptides. Thus parallel secretory proteome and transcriptome analyses can be performed without killing the specimen in this model amphibian system--a finding that has important implications in conservation of biodiversity within this threatened vertebrate taxon and whose mechanistics may have broader implications in biomolecular science.

  1. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    DOE PAGES

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J.; Austin, Jotham; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2015-12-28

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generatemore » partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.« less

  2. Expression and Targeting of Secreted Proteins from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bauler, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a vacuole termed the inclusion. Many of the interactions of chlamydiae with the host cell are dependent upon bacterial protein synthesis and presumably exposure of these proteins to the cytosol. Because of the dearth of genetic tools for chlamydiae, previous studies examining secreted proteins required the use of heterologous bacterial systems. Recent advances in genetic manipulation of chlamydia now allow for transformation of the bacteria with plasmids. We describe here a shuttle vector system, pBOMB4, that permits expression of recombinant proteins under constitutive or conditional promoter control. We show that the inclusion membrane protein IncD is secreted in a type III-dependent manner from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and also secreted from C. trachomatis in infected cells where it localizes appropriately to the inclusion membrane. IncD truncated of the first 30 amino acids containing the secretion signal is no longer secreted and is retained by the bacteria. Cytosolic exposure of secreted proteins can be confirmed by using CyaA, GSK, or microinjection assays. A protein predicted to be retained within the bacteria, NrdB is indeed localized to the chlamydia. In addition, we have shown that the chlamydial effector protein, CPAF, which is secreted into the host cell cytosol by a Sec-dependent pathway, also accesses the cytosol when expressed from this system. These assays should prove useful to assess the secretion of other chlamydial proteins that are potentially exposed to the cytosol of the host cell. PMID:24443531

  3. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Variable effects of soman on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.K.; Zwierzynski, D.J.; Stone, K.K.; Culp, D.J.; Marin, M.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the anticholinesterase agent, soman, on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea, in vitro. We mounted pieces of ferret trachea in Ussing-type chambers. Secreted sulfated macromolecules were radiolabeled by adding 500 microCi of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} to the submucosal medium and incubating for 17 hr. Soman added to the submucosal side produced a concentration-dependent increase in radiolabeled macromolecular release with a maximal secretory response (mean +/- SD) of 202 +/- 125% (n = 8) relative to the basal secretion rate at a concentration of 10{sup {minus} 7} M. The addition of either 10{sup {minus}6} M pralidoxime (acetylcholinesterase reactivator) or 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine blocked the response to 10{sup {minus}7} M soman. At soman concentrations greater than 10{sup {minus}7} M, secretion rate decreased and was not significantly different from basal secretion. Additional experiments utilizing acetylcholine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, suggest that inhibition of secretion by high concentrations of soman may be due to a secondary antagonistic effect of soman on muscarinic receptors.

  5. A model study of the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Ypey, D L; de Goede, J; Verveen, A A; Hekkens, W

    1989-07-01

    A computer simulation model is presented of the gastric phase regulation of gastric acid secretion in humans. The model is based on experimental data from the literature and includes terms representing gastric pH and gastric volume-dependent gastrin secretion, gastrin-dependent acid secretion, food storage in the stomach, and gastric emptying. We have explored the predictive value of the model in assessing the relative importance of gastric pH-dependent and gastric volume-dependent acid secretion mechanisms under various conditions. Similarly we have studied the role of gastric acid deregulation in achlorhydria, the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and duodenal ulcer, and the influence of the antacid drugs cimetidine and ranitidine under duodenal ulcer conditions. Model analysis of normal gastric acid regulation suggests that gastric volume-controlled acid secretion is of major importance during eating and predicts that pH-dependent gastrin secretion is of major importance in preventing excessively low pH levels between meals and during the night.

  6. Human Insulinomas Show Distinct Patterns of Insulin Secretion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude; Nenquin, Myriam; Guiot, Yves; Rahier, Jacques; Sempoux, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Insulinomas are β-cell tumors that cause hypoglycemia through inappropriate secretion of insulin. Characterization of the in vitro dynamics of insulin secretion by perifused fragments of 10 human insulinomas permitted their subdivision into three functional groups with similar insulin content. Group A (four patients with fasting and/or postprandial hypoglycemic episodes) showed qualitatively normal responses to glucose, leucine, diazoxide, tolbutamide, and extracellular CaCl2 omission or excess. The effect of glucose was concentration dependent, but, compared with normal islets, insulin secretion was excessive in both low- and high-glucose conditions. Group B (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) was mainly characterized by large insulin responses to 1 mmol/L glucose, resulting in very high basal secretion rates that were inhibited by diazoxide and restored by tolbutamide but were not further augmented by other agents except for high levels of CaCl2. Group C (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) displayed very low rates of insulin secretion and virtually no response to stimuli (including high CaCl2 concentration) and inhibitors (CaCl2 omission being paradoxically stimulatory). In group B, the presence of low-Km hexokinase-I in insulinoma β-cells (not in adjacent islets) was revealed by immunohistochemistry. Human insulinomas thus show distinct, though not completely heterogeneous, defects in insulin secretion that are attributed to the undue expression of hexokinase-I in 3 of 10 patients. PMID:26116696

  7. Pathophysiology of rhinitis. Lactoferrin and lysozyme in nasal secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, G D; Jeney, E V; Baraniuk, J N; Kim, I; Meredith, S D; Kaliner, M A

    1989-01-01

    The antimicrobial proteins lactoferrin (Lf) and lysozyme (Ly) are invariably found in nasal secretions. To investigate the cellular sources and the secretory control of these nasal proteins in vivo, 34 adult subjects underwent nasal provocation tests with methacholine (MC), histamine (H), and gustatory stimuli. Nasal lavages were collected and analyzed for total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), Lf, and Ly. MC (25 mg), H (1 mg), and gustatory stimuli (spicy foods) all increased the concentrations of TP, Alb, Lf, and Ly. However, when each protein was assessed as a percentage of TP (i.e., Alb% = Alb/TP; Lf% = Lf/TP; Ly% = Ly/TP), MC and gustatory stimuli, which both induce glandular secretion, selectively augmented Lf% and Ly% without changing Alb%, while H, which primarily increases vascular permeability, increased Alb% without significantly affecting Lf% or Ly%. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis of nasal secretions demonstrated both Lf and Ly in cholinergically induced secretions. Furthermore, histochemical analyses of nasal turbinate tissue revealed Lf and Ly colocalization within the serous cells of submucosal glands, providing evidence that both proteins are strictly glandular products within the nasal mucosa. Therefore, both Lf and Ly are produced and secreted from the glands, and their secretion may be pharmacologically regulated in attempts to improve host defenses. Images PMID:2681268

  8. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  9. Hydrolase secretion is a consequence of membrane recycling

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Acanthamoeba releases lysosomal hydrolases continuously into the culture medium. This release is specific for lysosomal hydrolases, but not other cellular proteins, and is energy dependent. The secreted hydrolases can be separated into two groups on the basis of their secretion kinetics: one is secreted at approximately 15% of the cellular activity per hour and the other at approximately 5%. Intracellularly the lysosomal hydrolases are restricted almost exclusively to secondary lysosomes where the hydrolases demonstrate a differential pH-dependent binding to membrane. Hydrolase secretion is not the result of secondary lysosomes' fusing with the plasma membrane since soluble and particulate lysosomal contents are not released at the same rate. Together the data suggest that the secreted hydrolases are trapped in shuttle vesicles that cycle membrane from secondary lysosomes to the cell surface. The inner membrane and content of these vesicles undergo a marked pH shift when, following fragmentation from lysosomes, these vesicles fuse with plasma membrane. This rapid pH shift and the differential pH-dependent membrane binding of hydrolases appear to account for the heterogeneous hydrolase secretion kinetics. PMID:6707089

  10. Proteolytic events in the processing of secreted proteins in fungi.

    PubMed

    Calmels, T P; Martin, F; Durand, H; Tiraby, G

    1991-01-01

    Secreted heterologous proteins have been found to be produced much less efficiently by fungi than secreted homologous ones. This could be due, at least in part, to proteolytic cleavage by site-specific endoproteases of the secretory pathway, similar to the yeast KEX2 protease and the mammalian dibasic endoproteinases found in secretory pathways. Mature secreted fungal proteins may be protected from such cleavage due to the absence of cleavable sites in exposed regions. A comparison of the dipeptide distributions of 33 secreted and 34 cytoplasmic proteins from fungal producers of extracellular enzymes indicated a significant bias for some doublets, including the basic dipeptides Lys-Arg, Arg-Arg and Arg-Lys which have also been demonstrated to be KEX2 substrates. Other combinations were also found to be rare in secreted proteins, which could indicate either a broader specificity of the considered endopeptidase, or the presence either in the secretory organelles or among the secreted proteins of additional proteases with different specificities. Experimental evidence that the Lys-Arg site is processed in Tolypocladium geodes was provided by cloning a synthetic prosequence upstream of a phleomycin resistance (Sh ble) gene and analyzing the N-terminus of the corresponding protein purified from the culture supernatant. This system also provides a tool for further studies of specific proteases of fungi.

  11. A molecular mechanism that stabilizes cooperative secretions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook

    2010-01-01

    Summary Bacterial populations frequently act as a collective by secreting a wide range of compounds necessary for cell-cell communication, host colonization and virulence. However, how such behaviors avoid exploitation by spontaneous ‘cheater’ mutants that use but do not contribute to secretions remains unclear. We investigate this question using Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming, a collective surface motility requiring massive secretions of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. We first show that swarming is immune to the evolution of rhlA− ‘cheaters’. We then demonstrate that P. aeruginosa resists cheating through metabolic prudence: wild-type cells secrete biosurfactants only when the cost of their production and impact on individual fitness is low, therefore preventing non-secreting strains from gaining an evolutionary advantage. Metabolic prudence works because the carbon-rich biosurfactants are only produced when growth is limited by another growth limiting nutrient, the nitrogen source. By genetically manipulating a strain to produce the biosurfactants constitutively we show that swarming becomes cheatable: a non-producing strain rapidly outcompetes and replaces this obligate cooperator. We argue that metabolic prudence, which may first evolve as a direct response to cheating or simply to optimize growth, can explain the maintenance of massive secretions in many bacteria. More generally, prudent regulation is a mechanism to stabilize cooperation. PMID:21166901

  12. An unexpected knock on Corrigan’s secret door

    PubMed Central

    Woywodt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Corrigan’s secret door describes a metaphorical escape route for busy physicians. The term was derived from the successful and exceptionally busy professional life of Irish physician Dominic John Corrigan (1802–80). It is claimed that Corrigan’s outpatient clinic was so busy that he required a secret door in his consulting rooms to escape from the ever-growing queue of eager patients. The origins of this charming story are unknown, and the door may have never existed. However, at present, Corrigan’s secret door is often quoted when busy physicians have their own little ways in surviving a stressful professional life. Generations of British-trained doctors have grown up with Corrigan’s secret door, as it was featured in the introduction of the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. Accordingly, trainees as well as more senior doctors are often reminded that having a ‘secret door’ is vital in surviving in the medical profession. My own escape is through classical music and the violoncello, in particular. As the name implies, my own secret door is normally invisible to colleagues and patients. This little article is about a patient who found me out, and a reflection on the role of classical music and the cello in my professional life. PMID:25984078

  13. Inhibition of cyclic gonadotropin secretion by endogenous human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J E; Khojandi, M; Huth, J; Smith, B; Thomas, P

    1975-02-01

    The resumption of cyclic uterine bleeding reportedly accompanies the use of human prolactin (HPRL)-suppressing agents in postpill galactorrhea-amenorrhea. In this laboratory, HPRL suppression with L-dopa was variable and short lived. Basal plasma HPRL levels were elevated before and after as much as five months of therapy. Galactorrhea persisted and mean gonadotropin concentrations were subnormal. An immediate and sustained attenuation of HPRL secretion ( less than 200 per cent) followed the use of 2-Br-alpha-ergocryptine (CB-154). Cyclic gonadotropin secretion resumed and was accompanied by ovulation and, in one instance, pregnancy. The cessation of galactorrhea was positively correlated with the rise in the daily concentration of 17 beta-estradiol. Cyclic postovulatory menstruation continued after the cessation of CB-154 treatment. HPRL levels remained normal. The daily patterns of human follicle-stimulating hormone (HFSH) and human tuteinizing hormone (HLH) secretion created by the suppression of HPRL displayed an inherent rhythmicity identical to that observed at the time of menarche. The inhibitory effects of HPRL appeared directed at cyclic rather than tonic gonadotropin secretion. At the same time, diminished ovarian estrogen production seemed to increase mammary gland sensitivity to HPRL, leading to lactation. One may postulate, therefore, that the ingestion of sex steroids is associated with an over-all suppression of endogenous cyclic and, to a lesser extent, tonic gonadotropin secretion secondary to which ovarian function is attenuated. Without physiologic concentration of circulating estrogen, HPRL induces mammary alveolar function with the production of a milklike secretion.

  14. Constraints on secret neutrino interactions after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forastieri, Francesco; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Natoli, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Neutrino interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics may affect the cosmological evolution and can be constrained through observations. We consider the possibility that neutrinos possess secret scalar or pseudoscalar interactions mediated by the Nambu-Goldstone boson of a still unknown spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, as in, e.g., Majoron models. In such scenarios, neutrinos still decouple at Tsimeq 1 MeV, but become tightly coupled again (``recouple'') at later stages of the cosmological evolution. We use available observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, including Planck 2013 and the joint BICEP2/Planck 2015 data, to derive constraints on the quantity γνν4, parameterizing the neutrino collision rate due to scalar or pseudoscalar interactions. We consider both a minimal extension of the standard ΛCDM model, and more complicated scenarios with extra relativistic degrees of freedom or non-vanishing tensor amplitude. For a wide range of dataset and model combinations, we find a typical constraint γνν4 lesssim 0.9× 10-27 (95% C.L.), implying an upper limit on the redshift zνrec of neutrino recoupling 0lesssim 850, leaving open the possibility that the latter occured well before hydrogen recombination. In the framework of Majoron models, the upper limit on γνν roughly translates on a constraint g lesssim 8.2× 10-7 on the Majoron-neutrino coupling constant g. In general, the data show a weak (~ 1σ) but intriguing preference for non-zero values of γνν4, with best fits in the range γνν4 = (0.15-0.35)× 10-27, depending on the particular dataset. This is more evident when either high-resolution CMB observations from the ACT and SPT experiments are included, or the possibility of non-vanishing tensor modes is considered. In particular, for the minimal model ΛCDM+γνν and including the Planck 2013, ACT and SPT data, we report γνν4=(0.44+0.17-0.36)×10-27 (0300 lesssim zνrec lesssim 550) at 68

  15. ALE OF TWO CLUSTERS YIELDS SECRETS OF STAR BIRTH IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image shows rich detail, previously only seen in neighboring star birth regions, in a pair of star clusters 166,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in the southern constellation Doradus. The field of view is 130 light-years across and was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. HST's unique capabilities -- ultraviolet sensitivity, ability to see faint stars, and high resolution -- have been utilized fully to identify three separate populations in this concentration of nearly 10,000 stars down to the 25th magnitude (more that twice as many as can be seen over the entire sky with the naked eye on a clear night on Earth). The field of view is only 130 light-years across. Previous observations with ground-based telescopes resolve less than 1,000 stars in the same region. About 60 percent of the stars belong to the dominant yellow cluster called NGC 1850, which is estimated to be 50 million years old. A scattering of white stars in the image are massive stars that are only about 4 million years old and represent about 20 percent of the stars in the image. (The remainder are field stars in the LMC.) Besides being much younger, the white stars are much more loosely distributed than the yellow cluster. The significant difference between the two cluster ages suggests these are two separate star groups that lie along the same line of sight. The younger, more open cluster probably lies 200 light-years beyond the older cluster. If it were in the foreground, then dust contained in the white cluster would obscure stars in the older yellow cluster. To observe two well-defined star populations separated by such a small gap of space is unusual. This juxtaposition suggests that supernova explosions in the older cluster might have triggered the birth of the younger cluster. This color composite image is assembled from exposures taken in ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light. Yellow stars correspond to Main Sequence stars (like our Sun) with average surface temperatures of 6000 Kelvin; red stars are cool giants and supergiants (3500 K); white stars are hot young stars (25,000 K or more) that are bright in ultraviolet. Credit: R. Gilmozzi, Space Telescope Science Institute/European Space Agency; Shawn Ewald, JPL; and NASA

  16. SECRETED KLOTHO AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble Klotho (sKl) in the circulation can be generated directly by alterative splicing of the Klotho transcript or the extracellular domain of membrane Klotho can be released from membrane-anchored Klotho on the cell surface. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), sKl, acts as hormonal factor and plays important roles in anti-aging, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, and Wnt signaling. Emerging evidence reveals that Klotho deficiency is an early biomarker for chronic kidney diseases as well as a pathogenic factor. Klotho deficiency is associated with progression and chronic complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In multiple experimental models, replacement of sKl, or manipulated up-regulation of endogenous Klotho protect the kidney from renal insults, preserve kidney function, and suppress renal fibrosis, in chronic kidney disease. Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:22396167

  17. Protease secretion by Erwinia chrysanthemi: the specific secretion functions are analogous to those of Escherichia coli alpha-haemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Létoffé, S; Delepelaire, P; Wandersman, C

    1990-01-01

    A 5.5 kb DNA fragment carrying the functions necessary for the specific secretion of the extracellular metalloproteases B and C produced by the Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi has been sequenced. The fragment contains four transcribed and translated genes: inh, which codes for a protease inhibitor and is not required for protease secretion, and prtD, prtE and prtF, which share significant homology with the hlyB, hlyD and tolC genes required for alpha-haemolysin secretion in Escherichia coli. Mutations in any of the three prt genes abolish protease secretion. The prtD and prtE products (60 and 50 kd) contain at least one hydrophobic segment and the prtF gene product contains a signal sequence. Images Fig.4. Fig. 5. PMID:2184029

  18. Early Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called early pregnancy loss , miscarriage , or spontaneous abortion . How common is early pregnancy loss? Early pregnancy ... testes that can fertilize a female egg. Spontaneous Abortion: The medical term for early pregnancy loss. Trimester: ...

  19. Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Secretes Proteases and Xylanases via the Xps Type II Secretion System and Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Magali; Scheibner, Felix; Hoffmeister, Anne-Katrin; Hartmann, Nadine; Hause, Gerd; Rother, Annekatrin; Jordan, Michael; Lautier, Martine; Arlat, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant-pathogenic bacteria utilize type II secretion (T2S) systems to secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S substrates presumably mediate the degradation of plant cell wall components during the host-pathogen interaction and thus promote bacterial virulence. Previously, the Xps-T2S system from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was shown to contribute to extracellular protease activity and the secretion of a virulence-associated xylanase. The identities and functions of additional T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, however, are still unknown. In the present study, the analysis of 25 candidate proteins from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria led to the identification of two type II secreted predicted xylanases, a putative protease and a lipase which was previously identified as a virulence factor of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Studies with mutant strains revealed that the identified xylanases and the protease contribute to virulence and in planta growth of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. When analyzed in the related pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris, several T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria were secreted independently of the T2S systems, presumably because of differences in the T2S substrate specificities of the two pathogens. Furthermore, in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria T2S mutants, secretion of T2S substrates was not completely absent, suggesting the contribution of additional transport systems to protein secretion. In line with this hypothesis, T2S substrates were detected in outer membrane vesicles, which were frequently observed for X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. We, therefore, propose that extracellular virulence-associated enzymes from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria are targeted to the Xps-T2S system and to outer membrane vesicles. IMPORTANCE The virulence of plant-pathogenic bacteria often depends on TS2 systems, which secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S

  20. A novel serotonin-secreting cell type regulates ciliary motility in the mucociliary epidermis of Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Walentek, Peter; Bogusch, Susanne; Thumberger, Thomas; Vick, Philipp; Dubaissi, Eamon; Beyer, Tina; Blum, Martin; Schweickert, Axel

    2014-04-01

    The embryonic skin of Xenopus tadpoles serves as an experimental model system for mucociliary epithelia (MCE) such as the human airway epithelium. MCEs are characterized by the presence of mucus-secreting goblet and multiciliated cells (MCCs). A third cell type, ion-secreting cells (ISCs), is present in the larval skin as well. Synchronized beating of MCC cilia is required for directional transport of mucus. Here we describe a novel cell type in the Xenopus laevis larval epidermis, characterized by serotonin synthesis and secretion. It is termed small secretory cell (SSC). SSCs are detectable at early tadpole stages, unlike MCCs and ISCs, which are specified at early neurulation. Subcellularly, serotonin was found in large, apically localized vesicle-like structures, which were entirely shed into the surrounding medium. Pharmacological inhibition of serotonin synthesis decreased the velocity of cilia-driven fluid flow across the skin epithelium. This effect was mediated by serotonin type 3 receptor (Htr3), which was expressed in ciliated cells. Knockdown of Htr3 compromised flow velocity by reducing the ciliary motility of MCCs. SSCs thus represent a distinct and novel entity of the frog tadpole MCE, required for ciliary beating and mucus transport across the larval skin. The identification and characterization of SSCs consolidates the value of the Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for human MCEs, which have been known for serotonin-dependent regulation of ciliary beat frequency. PMID:24598162

  1. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65.

    PubMed

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F

    2007-11-01

    We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  2. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  3. Btc22 chaperone is required for secretion and stability of the type III secreted protein Bsp22 in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi; Abe, Akio

    2012-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a sophisticated protein secretion machinery that delivers bacterial virulence proteins into host cells. A needle-tip protein, Bsp22 , is one of the secreted substrates of the T3SS and plays an essential role in the full function of the T3SS in Bordetella bronchiseptica. In this study, we found that BB1618 functions as a chaperone for Bsp22 . The deletion of BB1618 resulted in a dramatic impairment of Bsp22 secretion into the culture supernatants and Bsp22 stability in the bacterial cytosol. In contrast, the secretion of other type III secreted proteins was not affected by the BB1618 mutation. Furthermore, the BB1618 mutant strain could not induce cytotoxicity and displayed the same phenotypes as the Bsp22 mutant strain. An immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that BB1618 interacts with Bsp22 , but not with BopB and BopD . Thus, we identified BB1618 as a specific type III chaperone for Bsp22 . Therefore, we propose that BB1618 be renamed Btc22 for the Bordetella type III chaperone for Bsp22 .

  4. Secret Science: Exploring Cold War Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K.

    2013-12-01

    During the early Cold War - from the immediate postwar period through the 1960s - the United States military carried out extensive scientific studies and pursued technological developments in Greenland. With few exceptions, most of these were classified - sometimes because new scientific knowledge was born classified, but mostly because the reasons behind the scientific explorations were. Meteorological and climatological, ionospheric, glaciological, seismological, and geological studies were among the geophysical undertakings carried out by military and civilian scientists--some in collaboration with the Danish government, and some carried out without their knowledge. This poster will present some of the results of the Exploring Greenland Project that is coming to a conclusion at Denmark's Aarhus University.

  5. Secretion of lysosomal hydrolases by stimulated and nonstimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from untreated mice and from mice treated with thioglycollate medium (TA), proteose peptone medium (PP), or a suspension of streptococcus A cell wall material (SA). The biochemical and secretory properties of these cells in long term cultures (up to 2 wk) were compared. TA-elicited macrophages contained more protein, lactate dehydrogenase, lysosomal hydrolases, and in particular, more plasminogen activator than the other cells studied. All types of macrophages studied were found to release considerable amounts of lysosomal hydrolases (beta-glucuronidase, N-acetyl-beta- glucosaminidase, alpha-mannosidase, and acid phosphatase) into the medium. Release was independent of phagocytosis and must, therefore, be regarded as true secretion. In both elicited and nonelicited macrophages, the rates of lysosomal enzyme secretion were virtually identical in the presence and in the absence of serum, and they were not enhanced by increasing serum concentrations. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in macrophages appears to depend on protein synthesis, since it was blocked by low concentrations of cycloheximide which neither affected cell viability nor lowered the intracellular enzyme levels. The amounts of lysosomal hydrolases secreted were highest in TA- elicited macrophages. The rates of secretion of PP- or SA-elicited and of nonelicited macrophages were about one-fourth of that of the TA- elicited cells. This difference, although significant, is much smaller than that observed for the secretion of plasminogen activator which was 20-50 times higher in TA-elicited cells. Acid glycosidases were also found in the peritoneal lavage media used for cell harvesting from both treated and nontreated mice. This indicates that active secretion of lysosomal hydrolases may be an in vivo property of the macrophage. PMID:29935

  6. Integrin adhesion in regulation of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sofia V; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Gierow, J Peter

    2006-09-01

    The extracellular microenvironment regulates lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion. Culturing isolated rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells on different extracellular matrix proteins revealed that laminin enhances carbachol-stimulated secretion to a greater extent than other extracellular matrix proteins investigated. Furthermore, immunofluorescence indicated that integrin subunits, potentially functioning as laminin receptors are present in acinar cells. Among these, the integrin alpha6 and beta1 subunit mRNA expression was also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. Secretion assays, which measured beta-hexosaminidase activity released in the culture media, demonstrated that function-blocking integrin alpha6 and beta1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) induce a rapid, transient and dose-dependent secretory response in cultured cells. To determine the intracellular pathways by which integrin alpha6 and beta1 mAbs could induce secretion, selected second messenger molecules were inhibited. Although inhibitors of protein kinase C and IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization attenuated carbachol-stimulated secretion, no effect on integrin mAb-induced release was observed. In addition, protein tyrosine kinases do not appear to have a role in transducing signals arising from mAb interactions. Our data clearly demonstrate, though, that cell adhesion through integrins regulates secretion from lacrimal gland acinar cells. The fact that the integrin mAbs affect the cholinergic response differently and that the integrin beta1 mAb secretion, but not the alpha6, was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, suggests that each subunit utilizes separate intracellular signaling pathways to induce exocytosis. The results also indicate that the secretory response triggered by the beta1 integrin mAb is generated through dephosphorylation events.

  7. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Swelling of the vesicle is prerequisite for PTH secretion.

    PubMed

    Lim, S K; Kwon, Y H; Song, Y D; Lee, H C; Ryu, K J; Huh, K B; Park, C S

    1996-02-01

    Unlike most secretory cells, high extra cellular calcium inhibits rather than stimulates hormonal secretion in several cells such as parathyroid cells, Juxtaglomerular cells and osteoclast. To gain further insight into the common but unique stimulus-secretion coupling mechanism in these cells, bovine parathyroid slices were incubated in various conditions of Krebs-Ringer (KR) solution containing essential amino acids. Parathyroid cells showed the inverse dependency of secretion on extra cellular calcium concentration as we expected. Ammonium acetate overcame the inhibitory effect of 2.5 mM of calcium and the maximum effect was as much as the five times of the basal value, while there was a little additive effect under 0 mM CaCl2. PTH secretion was biphasic according to the change of extra cellular osmolarity and the lowest response was observed at 300 mOsm/l. In Na-rich KR solution, high concentration of nigericin (> 10(-4)M) completely overcame the inhibitory effect of 2.5 mM CaCl2 and the maximum stimulatory effect was 8 times greater whereas it was only 2 times greater without CaCl2. In K-rich KR solution that abolished the K-gradient between the extra cellular solution and the cytoplasm, the rate of PTH secretion increased, and furthermore the addition of nigericin increased the rate of secretion significantly. The results above suggested that the osmotic swelling of the secretory vesicle in parathyroid cells might promote exocytosis as in Juxtaglomerular cells. We propose that the swelling of the vesicle is also prerequisite for secretion in several cells inhibited paradoxically by Ca++, whatever the signal transduction pathway for swelling of the secretory granules induced by the lowering of Ca++ in cytoplasm are.

  9. Nutrients and cyclical interdigestive pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Holtmann, G; Kelly, D G; DiMagno, E P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It is hypothesised that nutrients increase pancreatic enzyme secretion by converting cyclical interdigestive secretion to a non-cyclical pattern. This study tested the hypotheses that nutrients do not interrupt cycles and determined the relation of nutrients, calories, and osmotic load to the rate of pancreatic secretion. METHODS: Twenty six healthy persons were intubated with oroduodenal and orogastric tubes. Each had one of four different solutions containing 12 to 36% of calories as protein, 24 to 48% as fat, and 40 to 64% as carbohydrate infused into the duodenum at 40, 90, or 160 kcal/h for 300 minutes. Nine g/l sodium chloride (290 mOsm) was added to 16 infusates; osmolality of the other 10 infusates was 24 to 98 mOsm. Pancreatic enzyme outputs were measured every 15 minutes and peaks of enzyme secretion were identified. RESULTS: The number of enzyme peaks was similar for the different infusates and the proportion of nutrients in the infusates did not affect secretion of individual enzymes. The nadir, but not the peak of the cycles of enzyme outputs correlated with increasing the caloric load (r = 0.55, p < 0.003 for nadir:peak ratio). Increasing osmolality did not affect cycling but reduced (p < 0.001) enzyme output. CONCLUSION: Nutrients entering the duodenum do not abolish cycles of enzyme secretion; instead they modulate cycles by increasing the nadir. Forty and 90 kcal infusions submaximally stimulate pancreatic secretion and might be used in patients with pancreatitis without producing pain; adding sodium chloride to solutions should increase this effect. PMID:8984034

  10. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chitinase, a gradually secreted protein.

    PubMed

    Folders, J; Algra, J; Roelofs, M S; van Loon, L C; Tommassen, J; Bitter, W

    2001-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino acid residues, without a typical N-terminal signal sequence. Nevertheless, an N-terminal segment of 11 residues was found to be cleaved off in the secreted protein. The protein shows sequence similarity to the secreted chitinases ChiC of Serratia marcescens, ChiA of Vibrio harveyi, and ChiD of Bacillus circulans and consists of an activity domain and a chitin-binding domain, which are separated by a fibronectin type III domain. ChiC was able to bind and degrade colloidal chitin and was active on the artificial substrates carboxymethyl-chitin-Remazol Brilliant Violet and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, but not on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, indicating that it is an endochitinase. Expression of the chiC gene appears to be regulated by the quorum-sensing system of P. aeruginosa, since this gene was not expressed in a lasIR vsmI mutant. After overnight growth, the majority of the ChiC produced was found intracellularly, whereas only small amounts were detected in the culture medium. However, after several days, the cellular pool of ChiC was largely depleted, and the protein was found in the culture medium. This release could not be ascribed to cell lysis. Since ChiC did not appear to be secreted via any of the known secretion systems, a novel secretion pathway seems to be involved.

  11. Model for Glucagon Secretion by Pancreatic α-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Vélez, Virginia; Dupont, Geneviève; Gil, Amparo; González, Alejandro; Quesada, Iván

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon hormone is synthesized and released by pancreatic α-cells, one of the islet-cell types. This hormone, along with insulin, maintains blood glucose levels within the physiological range. Glucose stimulates glucagon release at low concentrations (hypoglycemia). However, the mechanisms involved in this secretion are still not completely clear. Here, using experimental calcium time series obtained in mouse pancreatic islets at low and high glucose conditions, we propose a glucagon secretion model for α-cells. Our model takes into account that the resupply of releasable granules is not only controlled by cytoplasmic , as in other neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, but also by the level of extracellular glucose. We found that, although calcium oscillations are highly variable, the average secretion rates predicted by the model fall into the range of values reported in the literature, for both stimulated and non-stimulated conditions. For low glucose levels, the model predicts that there would be a well-controlled number of releasable granules refilled slowly from a large reserve pool, probably to ensure a secretion rate that could last for several minutes. Studying the α-cell response to the addition of insulin at low glucose, we observe that the presence of insulin reduces glucagon release by decreasing the islet level. This observation is in line with previous work reporting that dynamics, mainly frequency, is altered by insulin [1]. Thus, the present results emphasize the main role played by and glucose in the control of glucagon secretion by α-cells. Our modeling approach also shows that calcium oscillations potentiate glucagon secretion as compared to constant levels of this cellular messenger. Altogether, the model sheds new light on the subcellular mechanisms involved in α-cell exocytosis, and provides a quantitative predictive tool for studying glucagon secretion modulators in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22412861

  12. 45 CFR 5.65 - Exemption four: Trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be expected if the information is disclosed? (c) Designation of certain confidential information. A... Exemption four: Trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information. We will withhold trade... confidential. (a) Trade secrets. A trade secret is a secret, commercially valuable plan, formula, process,...

  13. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  14. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  15. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  16. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  17. Rhomboid intramembrane protease RHBDL4 triggers ER-export and non-canonical secretion of membrane-anchored TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Wunderle, Lina; Knopf, Julia D.; Kühnle, Nathalie; Morlé, Aymeric; Hehn, Beate; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Freeman, Matthew; Lemberg, Marius K.

    2016-01-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases are the enzymes that release active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in Drosophila and C. elegans, but little is known about their functions in mammals. Here we show that the mammalian rhomboid protease RHBDL4 (also known as Rhbdd1) promotes trafficking of several membrane proteins, including the EGFR ligand TGFα, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus, thereby triggering their secretion by extracellular microvesicles. Our data also demonstrate that RHBDL4-dependent trafficking control is regulated by G-protein coupled receptors, suggesting a role for this rhomboid protease in pathological conditions, including EGFR signaling. We propose that RHBDL4 reorganizes trafficking events within the early secretory pathway in response to GPCR signaling. Our work identifies RHBDL4 as a rheostat that tunes secretion dynamics and abundance of specific membrane protein cargoes. PMID:27264103

  18. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  19. Total protein output during rapid reduction of bile salt secretion rates in man.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P R; Toth, J L; Upadhya, G A; Ilson, R G; Strasberg, S M

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the effect of bile salt secretion on total biliary protein secretion in man. Bile was collected in eight patients from a tube in the bile duct. Collection was started after a meal and continued for six hours, in order to obtain bile salt secretion rates over the entire physiological range. Total protein secretion rates did not vary with change in bile salt secretion or bile flow. The protein pattern assessed by SDS-PAGE did not vary with bile salt secretion. The results indicate that bile salt secretion has little influence on biliary protein secretion under these conditions in man. Changes in bile salt secretion were associated with linear change in bile flow, but there was no relationship between bile flow and protein secretion rates. This argues against convective sieving of plasma proteins into bile. Images Fig. 4 PMID:2920916

  20. Circannual changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes, luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized estradiol-implanted ewes, and prolactin secretion in three sheep breeds anticipated to differ in seasonality of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Goff, Katherine J; Knight, James W; Pelzer, Kevin D; Akers, R Michael; Notter, David R

    2013-05-01

    Changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes (7 or 9 per breed) and luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized, estradiol-implanted ewes (9 or 10 per breed) were monitored for 12 mo in Suffolk, tropically adapted St. Croix, and OOS ewes. The OOS line is a composite population of 50% Dorset, 25% Rambouillet, and 25% Finnish Landrace breeding that was selected for 10 yr for ability to lamb in October and early November. Ewes were isolated from rams, and blood samples were collected twice weekly. Circulating prolactin concentrations were also determined from blood samples collected near the summer and winter solstice and vernal and autumnal equinox. Intact OOS ewes entered anestrus later, began the subsequent breeding season sooner, and had a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk and St. Croix ewes (P ≤ 0.005). St. Croix ewes did not differ from Suffolk ewes in date of onset or cessation of breeding or duration of anestrus (P ≥ 0.06). Breed differences in duration of luteinizing hormone inhibition in ovariectomized ewes were essentially identical to those observed for duration of anestrous. Prolactin concentrations varied during the year: annual changes were larger in relatively seasonal Suffolk ewes than in tropically-derived St. Croix ewes (P<0.01), and OOS ewes were intermediate to, and tended to differ from (P<0.10), the other two breeds. We conclude that OOS ewes developed by selection for fertility in spring matings had an abbreviated seasonal anestrus that is one of the shortest ever reported for temperate breeds, and that tropical St. Croix sheep did not have a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk sheep under temperate conditions and ram isolation. PMID:23528712

  1. Effect of environmental pollutants on oxytocin synthesis and secretion from corpus luteum and on contractions of uterus from pregnant cows

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Wrobel, Michal H.; Kotwica, Jan

    2010-09-15

    Chloro-organic compounds are persistent environmental pollutants and affect many reproductive processes. Oxytocin (OT) synthesized in luteal cells is a local regulator of ovarian activity and uterine contractions. Therefore the effect of xenobiotics on the OT prohormone synthesis, secretion of OT and progesterone (P4) from luteal cells and on myometrial contractions during early pregnancy in cows was investigated. Luteal cells and myometrial strips from a cow at early pregnancy were treated with polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB 77), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (1 or 10 ng/ml). The mRNA expression of neurophysin-I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT) and peptidyl-glycine-{alpha}-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA) and concentration of OT and P4 were determined by RT-PCR and EIA, respectively. Moreover, the effect of xenobiotics given with P4 (12 ng/ml) on the basal and OT (10{sup -7} M) stimulated contractions of myometrial strips was studied. Xenobiotics increased (P < 0.05) OT secretion but DDE only stimulated P4 secretion. The ratio of P4 to OT in culture medium was decreased by all xenobiotics during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. All xenobiotics, except HCH, increased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of NP-I/OT during all stages of pregnancy and all treatments decreased (P < 0.05) expression of mRNA for PGA during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Myometrial strips were relaxed (P < 0.01) after pre-incubation with P4, while each of the xenobiotics jointly with P4 increased (P < 0.01) myometrial contractions. In conclusion, the xenobiotics used increased both expression of mRNA for genes involved in OT synthesis and secretion of OT from luteal cells. This decreases the ratio of P4 to OT and presumably, in this manner, the chloro-organic compounds can influence uterine contractions and enhance risk of abortions in pregnant females.

  2. Dynamic Changes in Mucus Thickness and Ion Secretion during Citrobacter rodentium Infection and Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Piñeiro, Ana M.; Alomran, Ala H. A.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Fernandez, Harvey R.; Banerjee, Debashish; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Lindén, Sara K.

    2013-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is an attaching and effacing pathogen used as a murine model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The mucus layers are a complex matrix of molecules, and mucus swelling, hydration and permeability are affected by many factors, including ion composition. Here, we used the C. rodentium model to investigate mucus dynamics during infection. By measuring the mucus layer thickness in tissue explants during infection, we demonstrated that the thickness changes dynamically during the course of infection and that its thickest stage coincides with the start of a decrease of bacterial density at day 14 after infection. Although quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that mucin mRNA increases during early infection, the increased mucus layer thickness late in infection was not explained by increased mRNA levels. Proteomic analysis of mucus did not demonstrate the appearance of additional mucins, but revealed an increased number of proteins involved in defense responses. Ussing chamber-based electrical measurements demonstrated that ion secretion was dynamically altered during the infection phases. Furthermore, the bicarbonate ion channel Bestrophin-2 mRNA nominally increased, whereas the Cftr mRNA decreased during the late infection clearance phase. Microscopy of Muc2 immunostained tissues suggested that the inner striated mucus layer present in the healthy colon was scarce during the time point of most severe infection (10 days post infection), but then expanded, albeit with a less structured appearance, during the expulsion phase. Together with previously published literature, the data implies a model for clearance where a change in secretion allows reformation of the mucus layer, displacing the pathogen to the outer mucus layer, where it is then outcompeted by the returning commensal flora. In conclusion, mucus and ion secretion are dynamically altered during the C. rodentium infection cycle. PMID:24386378

  3. Clinical and morphological features of undifferentiated monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Skorić, T; Korsić, M; Zarković, K; Plavsić, V; Besenski, N; Breskovac, L; Giljević, Z; Paladino, J

    1999-06-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with progressive visual defects, acromegaly and hyperthyroidism. After clinical evaluation a giant GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma was diagnosed. Administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide at doses of 150 microg s.c. per day inhibited the secretion of both GH and TSH. A three-week treatment with octreotide prior to surgery led to slight visual improvement and CT scan showed some new necrotic areas within the tumor mass. Transcranial surgery was performed. By immunohistochemical analyses of the adenoma tissue GH, prolactin and beta-chorionic gonadotropin were detected; TSH was negative. Electron microscopy revealed an undifferentiated, monomorphous adenoma with morphological features of an acidophil stem cell adenoma such as the presence of misplaced exocytoses, fibrous bodies and mitochondrial gigantism. However, the tumor cells contained small secretory granules (up to 250 nm) accumulated along the cell membrane characteristic of thyrotrope cells. Furthermore, some adenoma cells were fusiform with long cytoplasmic processes resembling thyrotropes. Two months after the operation CT scan revealed a large residual tumor. Serum GH and TSH levels had increased again and the TSH level was even higher than before the treatment. The patient died suddenly, most probably of lethal arrhythmia. Specimens of the adenoma tissue obtained at autopsy confirmed the previous findings with the exception of positive immunostaining for TSH which was found in less than 1% of the adenoma cells. This undifferentiated, monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma represents an entity that is unusual both in its ultrastructural features and clinical manifestations suggesting a cytogenesis from an early, undifferentiated stem cell.

  4. Synthesis and secretion of Muc4/sialomucin complex: implication of intracellular proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Masanobu; Arango, Maria E; Carraway, Kermit L

    2002-01-01

    Muc4/sialomucin complex (SMC) is a heterodimeric glycoprotein complex implicated in epithelial protection and overexpressed in some tumours. It is encoded by a single gene, and the two subunits are produced by proteolytic cleavage at a time before substantial O-glycosylation, near the time of transit from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. Although Muc4/SMC is translated as a membrane protein, it is produced as a soluble form in many epithelia. Transfection experiments using Cos-7, HBL-100 human epithelial, MCF-7 human breast tumour and HC11 mouse mammary cell lines showed that soluble rat Muc4/SMC is produced by a proteolytic cleavage mechanism and released by secretion from multiple cell lines, including both human and mouse normal epithelial cells and tumour cells. Similar transfection experiments demonstrated the same mechanism for the human analogue MUC4. Gel electrophoresis analyses of deglycosylated membrane and soluble transmembrane subunits and of the membrane-associated cleavage fragment indicated a released cleavage product of 25 kDa, resulting from cleavage between two epidermal growth factor-like domains. Further evidence for this site was obtained from deletion mutants removing this region of the protein, which blocked secretion. Finally, pulse-chase analyses of Muc4/SMC biosynthesis indicated no kinetic difference between the timing of the cleavage to release the soluble form and that to produce the two subunits, indicating that the soluble form is created early in transit to the cell surface. These studies provide the first clear evidence that membrane mucins can be released from cells by an intracellular proteolytic mechanism that leads to secretion of the soluble form of the mucin. PMID:12186632

  5. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa. PMID:25426629

  6. Clinical and morphological features of undifferentiated monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Skorić, T; Korsić, M; Zarković, K; Plavsić, V; Besenski, N; Breskovac, L; Giljević, Z; Paladino, J

    1999-06-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with progressive visual defects, acromegaly and hyperthyroidism. After clinical evaluation a giant GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma was diagnosed. Administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide at doses of 150 microg s.c. per day inhibited the secretion of both GH and TSH. A three-week treatment with octreotide prior to surgery led to slight visual improvement and CT scan showed some new necrotic areas within the tumor mass. Transcranial surgery was performed. By immunohistochemical analyses of the adenoma tissue GH, prolactin and beta-chorionic gonadotropin were detected; TSH was negative. Electron microscopy revealed an undifferentiated, monomorphous adenoma with morphological features of an acidophil stem cell adenoma such as the presence of misplaced exocytoses, fibrous bodies and mitochondrial gigantism. However, the tumor cells contained small secretory granules (up to 250 nm) accumulated along the cell membrane characteristic of thyrotrope cells. Furthermore, some adenoma cells were fusiform with long cytoplasmic processes resembling thyrotropes. Two months after the operation CT scan revealed a large residual tumor. Serum GH and TSH levels had increased again and the TSH level was even higher than before the treatment. The patient died suddenly, most probably of lethal arrhythmia. Specimens of the adenoma tissue obtained at autopsy confirmed the previous findings with the exception of positive immunostaining for TSH which was found in less than 1% of the adenoma cells. This undifferentiated, monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma represents an entity that is unusual both in its ultrastructural features and clinical manifestations suggesting a cytogenesis from an early, undifferentiated stem cell. PMID:10366409

  7. Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone is not Required for Thyrotropin Secretion in the Perinatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Theodor; Braverman, Lewis E.; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.

    1979-01-01

    To determine the role of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the regulation of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion in the perinatal period, a physiological approach of neutralizing circulating TRH in the fetal and early neonatal rat was employed. TRH-antiserum (TRH-AS) raised in rabbits and administered daily to low iodine-propylthiouracil (LID-PTU)-fed pregnant rats from days 12 to 19 of gestation markedly impaired the rise in serum TSH to LID-PTU when compared with normal rabbit serum-treated controls. In contrast, fetal serum TSH was unaffected by TRH-AS. The binding capacity of TRH-AS in the fetal serum (111 ng/ml) far exceeded circulating TRH in the fetus. Similarly, acute TRH-AS administration to the pregnant rat fed LID-PTU markedly decreased the serum TSH concentration in the mother, but not in the fetus, 60 min after TRH-AS administration. Chronic TRH-AS administration to neonatal rats whose nursing mothers were fed LID-PTU was in-effective in decreasing the elevated serum TSH in the neonate through day 8 of life, whereas a slight but significant decrease in serum TSH was observed on day 10. Chronic daily TRH-AS administration to neonatal rats through day 10 of life had no effect on the later development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. These findings suggest that TRH does not participate in TSH regulation during the perinatal life in the rat and that thyroid hormones are probably the main regulators of TSH secretion during this period. Placental TRH is not important in regulating TSH secretion in the fetal rat. Furthermore, TRH “deprivation” during neonatal life does not prevent normal later development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. PMID:108290

  8. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  9. The dynamics of secretion during sea urchin embryonic skeleton formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, Fred H.

    2008-05-01

    Skeleton formation involves secretion of massive amounts of mineral precursor, usually a calcium salt, and matrix proteins, many of which are deposited on, or even occluded within, the mineral. The cell biological underpinnings of this secretion and subsequent assembly of the biomineralized skeletal element is not well understood. We ask here what is the relationship of the trafficking and secretion of the mineral and matrix within the primary mesenchyme cells of the sea urchin embryo, cells that deposit the endoskeletal spicule. Fluorescent labeling of intracellular calcium deposits show mineral precursors are present in granules visible by light microscopy, from whence they are deposited in the endoskeletal spicule, especially at its tip. In contrast, two different matrix proteins tagged with GFP are present in smaller post-Golgi vesicles only seen by electron microscopy, and the secreted protein are only incorporated into the spicule in the vicinity of the cell of origin. The matrix protein, SpSM30B, is post-translationally modified during secretion, and this processing continues after its incorporation into the spicule. Our findings also indicate that the mineral precursor and two well characterized matrix proteins are trafficked by different cellular routes.

  10. Cultured human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Yohn, J J; Morelli, J G; Walchak, S J; Rundell, K B; Norris, D A; Zamora, M R

    1993-01-01

    The human epidermal-melanin unit exists as a complex interplay of cell-cell interactions. Melanocytes synthesize melanin and transfer it to the surrounding keratinocytes, which, in turn, produce factors that affect melanocyte homeostasis, growth, and melanization. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor peptide produced by endothelial cells, has recently been shown to stimulate human melanocyte proliferation and tyrosinase activity. To investigate the possibility that keratinocytes synthesize and secrete ET-1, we grew human keratinocytes in a defined serum-free medium and measured ET-1 levels in the keratinocytes and the keratinocyte-conditioned medium. Northern analysis of keratinocyte total RNA also was performed. We found that human keratinocytes express preproET-1 mRNA and translate the message to ET-1 protein, which is secreted into the keratinocyte medium. Human keratinocytes produced ET-1 in a time-dependent manner with total production of 20.1 +/- 1.1 pg ET-1/10(6) cells at 24 h (n = 7). Although total ET-1 production (secreted plus cell-associated ET-1) was similar, the proportion of secreted versus cell-associated ET-1 varied widely among the different donors. We have found that human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete ET-1 in vitro. From these data we believe that the keratinocyte could be an in vivo epidermal source of this melanocyte growth and pigmentation factor.

  11. Elucidation of cell secretion: pancreas led the way.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    Secretion is a basic process in all cells and is required for several important functions such as neurotransmission, the secretion of digestive juices from the exocrine pancreas and the release of hormones from endocrine and neuroendocrine cells. Due to these important functions, the mechanism of cell secretion has been intensely investigated for over half a century. However, it is only in the last decade, with the discovery of a new cellular structure, the 'porosome' or 'fusion pore', and the elucidation of SNARE-induced membrane fusion, that has finally provided us with an understanding of cell secretion at the molecular level. The 'porosome', a supramolecular structure at the cell plasma membrane, was first discovered in the exocrine pancreas, and subsequently in endocrine/neuroendocrine cells and in neurons. The structure and dynamics of the 'porosome' in live cells at nanometer resolution and in real-time, its composition and functional reconstitution in lipid membrane, have all been determined. These findings have fundamentally changed our understanding of cell secretion and provide a clear understanding of this highly regulated process in cells.

  12. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Colicin V Secretion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L. H.; Fath, M. J.; Mahanty, H. K.; Tai, P. C.; Kolter, R.

    1995-01-01

    Colicin V (ColV) is peptide antibiotic secreted by Escherichia coli through a dedicated exporter composed of three proteins, CvaA, CvaB, and TolC. ColV secretion is independent of the E. coli general secretory pathway (Sec) but requires an N-terminal export signal specific for the CvaAB/TolC exporter. ColV secretion was characterized using genetic and biochemical methods. When the ColV N-terminal extension is replaced with the OmpA signal sequence, the Sec system can localize ColV to the periplasm. Periplasmic ColV is lethal to cells lacking the ColV immunity protein, Cvi. Based on this result, a genetic assay was designed to monitor for the presence of periplasmic ColV during normal CvaAB/TolC mediated secretion. Results indicate that low levels of ColV may be present in the periplasm during secretion. Precursor and mature ColV were also characterized from the wild-type system and in various exporter mutant backgrounds using immunoprecipitation. ColV processing is rapid in wild-type cells, and CvaA and CvaB are critical for processing to occur. In contrast, processing occurs normally, albeit more slowly, in a TolC mutant. PMID:8536973

  14. Androecia in two Clusia species: development, structure and resin secretion.

    PubMed

    Sá-Haiad, B; Silva, C P; Paula, R C V; Rocha, J F; Machado, S R

    2015-07-01

    Clusia fluminensis and C. lanceolata are dioecious shrubs having resiniferous flowers with strongly distinct androecia. The aim of this study was to investigate the development and anatomy of their androecia and the ultrastructure, histochemistry and secretory process of their androecium resin glands, examining whether the cellular aspects of resin secretion differed between these two morphologically distinct androecia. Stamens differ, being free in C. fluminensis and clustered in a synandrium in C. lanceolata. Staminode sterility is due to the undifferentiated nature of the anthers in C. lanceolata and degeneration of meiocytes and anther indehiscence in C. fluminensis. Resin is produced in subepidermal cavities and canals with wide lumens. In the secretory stage, epithelial cells present sinuous walls, voluminous nuclei, polymorphic plastids associated with periplastidial reticulum, mitochondria, oil bodies, multivesicular bodies, endoplasmic reticulum and dictyosomes. The resin is released through rupture points on the distal surface of stamens and staminodes, associated with disrupted cavities and canals. Our results show morphological diversity associated with functional similarity. Also, a secretion pattern shared by the two species includes initiation of the secretory process in young floral buds, compartmentalisation of the secretion in pre-anthesis buds and release of secretions at anthesis. Cellular aspects of resin secretion in these species are quite similar, as are the chemical identities of the main components of the floral resins of the genus.

  15. Constitutive secretion of tau protein by an unconventional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiyun; Dage, Jeffrey L; Citron, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and several related disorders. In the disease tau aggregates into paired helical and straight filaments, which can form higher order neurofibrillary tangles in neurons and this pathology is associated with progressive neuronal loss and cognitive decline. Tau is a cytoplasmic protein and is thought to be released only from degenerating cells. In contrast, here we provide evidence that tau is constitutively secreted at a low level. We directly show tau release in cell culture model systems. In inducible transfected cell lines we observe that a small proportion of full-length tau is released from intact cells in a time dependent manner. We show that this tau is released by an unconventional secretion process, as the release is temperature dependent but not blocked by inhibitors of the conventional secretory pathway. We characterize the released tau as full length, not vesicle associated and containing Phospho-Tau (181P) proportional to its intracellular concentration. We demonstrate that tau secretion and its suppression by low temperature also occurs in human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. The constitutive tau secretion that we propose provides the most parsimonious explanation for the observed presence of tau in the CSF of healthy animals and human beings. If previously postulated pathogenic extracellular tau intermediates are released by this route, low level constitutive tau secretion could play a role in the spread of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other human tauopathies. PMID:22668776

  16. Type VI Secretion System Toxins Horizontally Shared between Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Klimko, John A.; Trudgian, David C.; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread protein secretion apparatus used by Gram-negative bacteria to deliver toxic effector proteins into adjacent bacterial or host cells. Here, we uncovered a role in interbacterial competition for the two T6SSs encoded by the marine pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. Using comparative proteomics and genetics, we identified their effector repertoires. In addition to the previously described effector V12G01_02265, we identified three new effectors secreted by T6SS1, indicating that the T6SS1 secretes at least four antibacterial effectors, of which three are members of the MIX-effector class. We also showed that the T6SS2 secretes at least three antibacterial effectors. Our findings revealed that many MIX-effectors belonging to clan V are “orphan” effectors that neighbor mobile elements and are shared between marine bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. We demonstrated that a MIX V-effector from V. alginolyticus is a functional T6SS effector when ectopically expressed in another Vibrio species. We propose that mobile MIX V-effectors serve as an environmental reservoir of T6SS effectors that are shared and used to diversify antibacterial toxin repertoires in marine bacteria, resulting in enhanced competitive fitness. PMID:26305100

  17. Depletion of enteroendocrine and mucus-secreting cells is associated with colorectal carcinogenesis severity and impaired intestinal motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Sequetto, Priscila Lima; Vilela Gonçalves, Reggiani; Cupertino, Marli Carmo; Santos, Eliziária Cardoso; Mello, Vanessa Joia; Araújo, Marta Rocha; Silva, Edson; Oliveira, Tânia Toledo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between enteroendocrine and mucus-secreting cells distribution, the severity of colonic mucosal injury and intestinal motility in experimental colorectal carcinogenesis. Using a standardized murine model of colorectal carcinogenesis, eight-weeks-old female Wistar rats weighting 147.30 ± 29.15g were randomized into two groups receiving a subcutaneous injection of 0.9% saline (control) or the chemical carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) at 20 mg/kg per week during 10 weeks. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were more frequent in DMH group compared to control group (P < 0.001). The number of enteroendocrine and mucus-secreting cells, and intestinal motility was reduced in DMH animals (P < 0.05). The distribution of enteric neurons was similar in both groups. In DMH animals there was a direct correlation between colonic motility and distribution of enteroendocrine (R(2)  = 0.68, P < 0.05) and mucus-secreting cells (R(2)  = 0.77, P < 0.05). Inverse correlation between the number of ACF, mucus-secreting cells (R(2)  = -0.57, P < 0.05), and enteroendocrine cells (R(2)  = -0.74, P < 0.05) was also observed. There was inverse correlation between the severity of the mucosal lesion, the number of mucus-secreting cells (R(2)  = -0.83, P < 0.05) and enteroendocrine cells (R(2)  = -0.96, P < 0.05). There was a direct correlation between nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR) and ACF number (R(2)  = 0.62; P < 0.01). Inverse correlation was also found between AgNOR, the number of mucus-secreting cells (R(2)  = -0.76; P < 0.001), and enteroendocrine cells (R(2)  = -0.86; P < 0.001). Taken together, the results indicated that colonic malignant transformation is related to depletion of mucus-secreting and enteroendocrine cells, which was a useful indicator of the evolutionary status of intestinal neoplasm, partially explaining the intestinal motility disorders in the

  18. Characterization of Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in the Human Pancreatic EndoC-βH1 Beta Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Lotta E.; Valtat, Bérengère; Bagge, Annika; Sharoyko, Vladimir V.; Nicholls, David G.; Ravassard, Philippe; Scharfmann, Raphael; Spégel, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets. Methods Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay), gene expression (Gene Chip array), metabolite levels (GC/MS), respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer), glucose utilization (radiometric), lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric), ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence) and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry) were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets. Results Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells. Conclusions/Interpretation Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings

  19. Contrasted evolutionary constraints on secreted and non-secreted proteomes of selected Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinobacteria have adapted to contrasted ecological niches such as the soil, and among others to plants or animals as pathogens or symbionts. Mycobacterium genus contains mostly pathogens that cause a variety of mammalian diseases, among which the well-known leprosy and tuberculosis, it also has saprophytic relatives. Streptomyces genus is mostly a soil microbe known for its secondary metabolites, it contains also plant pathogens, animal pathogens and symbionts. Frankia, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium establishes a root symbiosis with dicotyledonous pionneer plants. Pathogens and symbionts live inside eukaryotic cells and tissues and interact with their cellular environment through secreted proteins and effectors transported through transmembrane systems; nevertheless they also need to avoid triggering host defense reactions. A comparative genome analysis of the secretomes of symbionts and pathogens allows a thorough investigation of selective pressures shaping their evolution. In the present study, the rates of silent mutations to non-silent mutations in secretory proteins were assessed in different strains of Frankia, Streptomyces and Mycobacterium, of which several genomes have recently become publicly available. Results It was found that secreted proteins as a whole have a stronger purifying evolutionary rate (non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions or Ka/Ks ratio) than the non-secretory proteins in most of the studied genomes. This difference becomes statistically significant in cases involving obligate symbionts and pathogens. Amongst the Frankia, secretomes of symbiotic strains were found to have undergone evolutionary trends different from those of the mainly saprophytic strains. Even within the secretory proteins, the signal peptide part has a higher Ka/Ks ratio than the mature part. Two contrasting trends were noticed amongst the Frankia genomes regarding the relation between selection strength (i.e. Ka/Ks ratio) and the codon adaptation

  20. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C B; Hashim, Onn H; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  1. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  2. Melatonin modulates secretion of growth hormone and prolactin by trout pituitary glands and cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Falcón, J; Besseau, L; Fazzari, D; Attia, J; Gaildrat, P; Beauchaud, M; Boeuf, G

    2003-10-01

    In Teleost fish, development, growth, and reproduction are influenced by the daily and seasonal variations of photoperiod and temperature. Early in vivo studies indicated the pineal gland mediates the effects of these external factors, most probably through the rhythmic production of melatonin. The present investigation was aimed at determining whether melatonin acts directly on the pituitary to control GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in rainbow trout. We show that 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin, a melatonin analog, binds selectively to membrane preparations and tissue sections from trout pituitaries. The affinity was within the range of that found for the binding to brain microsomal preparations, but the number of binding sites was 20-fold less than in the brain. In culture, melatonin inhibited pituitary cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin, the adenyl cyclase stimulator. Forskolin also induced an increase in GH release, which was reduced in the presence of picomolar concentrations of melatonin. At higher concentrations, the effects of melatonin became stimulatory. In the absence of forskolin, melatonin induced a dose-dependent increase in GH release, and a dose-dependent decrease in PRL release. Melatonin effects were abolished upon addition of luzindole, a melatonin antagonist. Our results provide the first evidence that melatonin modulates GH and PRL secretion in Teleost fish pituitary. Melatonin effects on GH have never been reported in any vertebrate before. The effects result from a direct action of melatonin on pituitary cells. The complexity of the observed responses suggests several types of melatonin receptors might be involved.

  3. Absence of pubertal gonadotropin secretion in girls with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foster, C M; Ross, J L; Shawker, T; Pescovitz, O H; Loriaux, D L; Cutler, G B; Comite, F

    1984-06-01

    Precocious puberty in girls with McCune-Albright syndrome has been attributed in some cases to early activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in other cases to sex steroid secretion by apparently autonomous ovarian cysts. We evaluated serum gonadotropins and sex steroids in six girls (aged 1-9 yr) with McCune-Albright syndrome. The children had Tanner stage II-IV pubertal development. In five patients, nocturnal gonadotropin concentrations and the gonadotropin response to LHRH were within the normal range for prepubertal children. Thus, the precocious puberty in these patients could not be explained by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. One child had high amplitude nocturnal pulses of serum LH and a LH-predominant response to LHRH. She was the oldest of the six girls and had a bone age of 13.5 yr which is within the range in which hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian activation normally occurs. The children all had ovarian enlargement and ovarian cysts determined by ultrasound. It appears that precocious puberty in McCune-Albright syndrome may result from ovarian estrogen secretion in the absence of normal pubertal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

  4. Hyperglycaemia exerts deleterious effects on late endothelial progenitor cell secretion actions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Li, Hong; Cui, Xiaodong; Guan, Xiumei; Tang, Kexin; Jin, Chengwen; Cheng, Min

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in tissue regeneration and vascular repair both by differentiating into endothelial cells and by secretion of vasoactive substances that promote angiogenesis and maintain vascular homeostasis. It has previously been shown that hyperglycaemia impairs early and late EPC functions, such as differentiation, proliferation and adhesion. However, its role in the regulation of the production of vasoactive substances in EPCs, especially in late EPCs, is less well defined. We investigated the effects of hyperglycaemia on the production of vasodilator, fibrinolytic and angiogenic growth factors, and also on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in late EPCs. For this purpose, late EPCs were incubated with different concentrations of D-glucose (5-40 mmol/L) for 24 hr. Levels of nitric oxide (NO), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the activity of SOD were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Under high glucose stress conditions, late EPCs exhibited lower levels of NO, t-PA, PAI-1, PGI(2) and VEGF compared to control medium (5 mmol/L glucose). Moreover, high glucose was also observed to decrease the activity of SOD in late EPCs. These results suggest that hyperglycaemia-induced impairment of late EPC secretion functions could contribute to the development of vascular disease in diabetes.

  5. Intrathecal bone marrow stromal cells inhibit neuropathic pain via TGF-β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a pressing clinical problem. Here, we demonstrate that a local, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) following lumbar puncture alleviates early- and late-phase neuropathic pain symptoms, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia, for several weeks in murine chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury models. Moreover, i.t. BMSCs reduced CCI-induced spontaneous pain and axonal injury of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and inhibited CCI-evoked neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord tissues. BMSCs secreted TGF-β1 into the cerebrospinal fluid, and neutralization of TGF-β1, but not IL-10, reversed the analgesic effect of BMSCs. Conversely, i.t. administration of TGF-β1 potently inhibited neuropathic pain. TGF-β1 acted as a powerful neuromodulator and rapidly (within minutes) suppressed CCI-evoked spinal synaptic plasticity and DRG neuronal hyperexcitability via TGF-β receptor 1–mediated noncanonical signaling. Finally, nerve injury upregulated CXCL12 in lumbar L4–L6 DRGs, and this upregulation caused migration of i.t.-injected BMSCs to DRGs through the CXCL12 receptor CXCR4, which was expressed on BMSCs. BMSCs that migrated from the injection site survived at the border of DRGs for more than 2 months. Our findings support a paracrine mechanism by which i.t. BMSCs target CXCL12-producing DRGs to elicit neuroprotection and sustained neuropathic pain relief via TGF-β1 secretion. PMID:26168219

  6. Does MMP-2 expression and secretion change with increasing serial passage of keratocytes in culture?

    PubMed

    Sandeman, S R; Faragher, R G; Allen, M C; Liu, C; Lloyd, A W

    2001-02-01

    The effects of ageing on matrix metalloprotease degradation of the extracellular matrix during corneal wound healing are largely unknown. The following study used an in vitro model of ageing to assess changes in MMP-2 RNA expression and protein secretion. Early passage (EP) EK1.BR keratocyte cultures from 14 to 18 cumulative population doublings (cpds) and late passage (LP) cultures from 40 to 47 cpds were used to isolate protein and mRNA samples. Total protein from EP and LP cultures was measured using the Bradford protein assay. Zymographic analysis of EP and LP samples was carried out to compare MMP-2 activity. Northern blot analysis was used to assess changes in MMP-2 mRNA expression by EP and LP cultures, using a digoxigenin (DIG) based chemiluminescent detection system. LP cultures secreted more total protein per cell. MMP-2 but not MMP-9 activity was detected in keratocyte cultures. Densitometric analysis of zymograms and calculation of MMP-2 activity indicated a significant increase in MMP-2 activity per cell (P<0.05, n=11). No difference was observed in the levels of MMP-2 mRNA expressed by EP and LP cultures. An increase in MMP-2 activity per cell by LP cultures suggests that senescent keratocytes increase their degradative capacity. Similar changes in the keratocyte phenotype within the ageing cornea may alter the balanced response necessary for adequate wound healing and may have implications for the therapeutic use of MMP inhibitors in the eye.

  7. The effect of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and neuropeptide-secreting tumors on the stomach.

    PubMed

    Pisegna, J R

    1999-12-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is caused by a tumor that secretes gastrin and is the most common of the malignant islet cell tumors. ZES leads to hypergastrinemia, which, in turn, causes an overproduction of gastric acid and results in complications of peptic ulcer disease. Of all the islet cell tumors, gastrinoma tumors have undergone the most extensive study, providing a model of tumor management. Increased awareness and improved biochemical and radiologic techniques mean that these disorders are being recognized in more patients. Advances in the management of gastric acid secretion and new localization methods have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with ZES. The use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors such as pantoprazole will make surgical and perioperative management more favorable for patients. Radiologic and nuclear medicine studies permit the detection of the majority of islet cell tumors and improve the ability for surgical resection. With the recent cloning of the gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-I) and the recognition of tumor markers associated with the development of islet cell tumors, early detection of these tumors may someday be possible. PMID:10980995

  8. Frontiers in transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue for diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Garth L.

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue represents a physiologic approach to reverse diabetes mellitus. Pancreas transplants yield a remarkable enhancement in quality of life and appear to modify the devastating neurovascular complications of diabetes. A more attractive approach is transplantation of insulin-secreting cells, a procedure of low invasiveness with the exciting prospect of modulating graft immunogenicity before transplantation, so as to minimize requirements for toxic immunosuppressive drugs. The Surgical-Medical Research Institute at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, and several others centres throughout the world, has demonstrated that islet cell transplants can reverse insulin dependence and induce remarkable glycemic stability for several years. However, widespread success has been denied because of insufficient donor tissue, early failures to reverse insulin dependence and the loss of graft function with time. Promising new research approaches to these problems are reviewed, including xenogeneic sources of cells, engineering islet cells with genes that induce expression of immunoprotective molecules, and neogenesis factors that may sustain populations of transplanted β cells. PMID:10593242

  9. Preimplantation embryo-secreted factors modulate maternal gene expression in rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kazuki; Islam, M Rashedul; Yoshii, Yuka; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-05-01

    In mammalian reproduction, embryo implantation into the uterus is spatiotemporally regulated by a complex process triggered by a number of factors. Although previous studies have suggested that uterine receptivity is mediated by blastocyst-derived factors, specific functions of embryos remain to be defined during preimplantation. Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify the maternal genes regulated by embryo-secreted factors in the rat uterus. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that 10 genes are up-regulated in the delayed implantation uterus compared with the pseudopregnancy uterus. The RNA-seq results were further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Sulf1 expression is significantly (P < 0.05) induced in the delayed implantation uterus, although Areg, Calca, Fxyd4 and Lamc3 show a definite but non-statistically significant increase in their expression levels. During early pregnancy, the levels of Areg, Calca, Fxyd4, Lamc3 and Sulf1 expression at 3.5 days post coitus (dpc) are significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those at 1.5 dpc. Treatment with embryo-conditioned media revealed that Lamc3 and Sulf1 are up-regulated compared with the other genes studied. Thus, embryo-derived factors regulate maternal gene expression, with Lamc3 and Sulf1 possibly being suitable markers for a response study of embryo-secreted factors to improve our understanding of embryo-maternal communication.

  10. Preimplantation embryo-secreted factors modulate maternal gene expression in rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kazuki; Islam, M Rashedul; Yoshii, Yuka; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-05-01

    In mammalian reproduction, embryo implantation into the uterus is spatiotemporally regulated by a complex process triggered by a number of factors. Although previous studies have suggested that uterine receptivity is mediated by blastocyst-derived factors, specific functions of embryos remain to be defined during preimplantation. Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify the maternal genes regulated by embryo-secreted factors in the rat uterus. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that 10 genes are up-regulated in the delayed implantation uterus compared with the pseudopregnancy uterus. The RNA-seq results were further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Sulf1 expression is significantly (P < 0.05) induced in the delayed implantation uterus, although Areg, Calca, Fxyd4 and Lamc3 show a definite but non-statistically significant increase in their expression levels. During early pregnancy, the levels of Areg, Calca, Fxyd4, Lamc3 and Sulf1 expression at 3.5 days post coitus (dpc) are significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those at 1.5 dpc. Treatment with embryo-conditioned media revealed that Lamc3 and Sulf1 are up-regulated compared with the other genes studied. Thus, embryo-derived factors regulate maternal gene expression, with Lamc3 and Sulf1 possibly being suitable markers for a response study of embryo-secreted factors to improve our understanding of embryo-maternal communication. PMID:26685865

  11. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease. PMID:1399544

  12. Protein secretion in Pichia pastoris and advances in protein production.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Leonardo M; Huang, Chung-Jr; Batt, Carl A

    2012-01-01

    Yeast expression systems have been successfully used for over 20 years for the production of recombinant proteins. With the growing interest in recombinant protein expression for various uses, yeast expression systems, such as the popular Pichia pastoris, are becoming increasingly important. Although P. pastoris has been successfully used in the production of many secreted and intracellular recombinant proteins, there is still room for improvement of this expression system. In particular, secretion of recombinant proteins is still one of the main reasons for using P. pastoris. Therefore, endoplasmic reticulum protein folding, correct glycosylation, vesicular transport to the plasma membrane, gene dosage, secretion signal sequences, and secretome studies are important considerations for improved recombinant protein production. PMID:22057543

  13. Biliary lipid secretion and its control. Effect of taurodehydrocholate.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, K; Coleman, R

    1987-01-01

    Multiple short pulses of taurocholate (TC) brought about, in isolated perfused rat livers, the secretion of phospholipid and cholesterol into bile; the lipids showed an appreciable lag period behind the bile-salt secretion, and there was considerable variability in response, both between low and high dose pulses of TC and, at the higher dose, even between individual livers. When a background continuous infusion of taurodehydrocholate (a hydrophilic non-micelle-forming bile-salt analogue) was superimposed upon the short TC pulses, the lipid secretion showed much better control, and the lipid peaks were of more uniform size, following more closely, or more coincident with, the bile-salt output peaks. Taurodehydrocholate may provide a signal for the control of the supply and delivery of lipid vesicles to the bile-canalicular membrane, from where the lipid vesicles are then removed by the action of the pulses of TC. PMID:3663176

  14. Assembly and mechanisms of bacterial type IV secretion machines

    PubMed Central

    Zechner, Ellen L.; Lang, Silvia; Schildbach, Joel F.

    2012-01-01

    Type IV secretion occurs across a wide range of prokaryotic cell envelopes: Gram-negative, Gram-positive, cell wall-less bacteria and some archaea. This diversity is reflected in the heterogeneity of components that constitute the secretion machines. Macromolecules are secreted in an ATP-dependent process using an envelope-spanning multi-protein channel. Similar to the type III systems, this apparatus extends beyond the cell surface as a pilus structure important for direct contact and penetration of the recipient cell surface. Type IV systems are remarkably versatile in that they mobilize a broad range of substrates, including single proteins, protein complexes, DNA and nucleoprotein complexes, across the cell envelope. These machines have broad clinical significance not only for delivering bacterial toxins or effector proteins directly into targeted host cells, but also for direct involvement in phenomena such as biofilm formation and the rapid horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. PMID:22411979

  15. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins in Eimeria tenella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlee, Intan Azlinda; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2015-09-01

    Eimeria tenella is a protozoan parasite that causes coccidiosis, an economically important disease in the poultry industry. The characterization of proteins that are secreted by parasites have been shown to play important roles in parasite invasion and are considered to be potential control agents. In this study, 775 proteins potentially secreted by E. tenella were identified. These proteins were further filtered to remove mitochondrial proteins. Out of 763 putative secreted proteins, 259 proteins possess transmembrane domains while another 150 proteins have GPI (Glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchors. Homology search revealed that 315 and 448 proteins have matches with known and hypothetical proteins in the database, respectively. Within this data set, previously characterized secretory proteins such as micronemes, rhoptry kinases and dense granules were detected.

  16. Porosome: the universal molecular machinery for cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2008-12-31

    Porosomes are supramolecular, lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. The mouth of the porosome opening to the outside, range in size from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas, to 12 nm in neurons, which dilates during cell secretion, returning to its resting size following completion of the process. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. In this mini review, the discovery of the porosome, its structure, function, isolation, chemistry, and reconstitution into lipid membrane, the molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and fusion at the base of porosomes, and how this new information provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of cell secretion, is discussed.

  17. Temporally resolved, independent stages of individual exocytotic secretion events.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, T J; Borges, R; Finnegan, J M; Pihel, K; Amatore, C; Wightman, R M

    1996-01-01

    The stages of the complex events involved in exocytotic secretion after vesicle-cell membrane fusion have been examined at the level of individual vesicles. Catecholamine flux from single bovine adrenal medullary cells was measured with carbon-fiber microelectrodes firmly touching the cell surface. The data reveal that secretion during exocytotic events has three distinct stages: a small increase in catecholamine flux, a rapid, but not instantaneous, rise to a maximum, followed by an exponential decrease in the flux. These stages are interpreted in the following ways. The initial stage corresponds to catecholamine secretion through a fusion pore. The rate of pore expansion appears to control the rise time of the flux to its maximum value. The final exponential stage is consistent with chemical dissociation of the intravesicular matrix or gel. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8789125

  18. Comparative study of the labial gland secretion in termites (Isoptera).

    PubMed

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Krasulová, Jana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Pytelková, Jana; Cvačka, Josef; Kutalová, Kateřina; Bourguignon, Thomas; Miura, Toru; Šobotník, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Labial glands are present in all castes and developmental stages of all termite species. In workers, their secretion contains a food-marking pheromone and digestive enzymes, while soldier secretion plays a defensive role. However, these functions were studied only in a limited set of species, and do not allow drawing general conclusions. Hence, we have investigated the chemical composition of the labial gland extracts from soldiers and workers in 15 termite species belonging to 6 families using an integrative approach based on proteomic and small-molecule profiling. We confirmed the presence of hydroquinone and cellulase in the labial glands of workers, and we identified new toxic compounds in soldiers and workers of several species. Our results highlight the dual role of labial gland secretion, i.e. the defensive role in soldiers and workers of several termite species, and the digestive function in workers.

  19. Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, L.E. Jr.; Fertig, J.; Pomerleau, O.; Hunt, D.; Parker, K.

    1984-01-02

    The relationships among changes in plasma nicotine, ACTH, and cortisol secretion after smoking were investigated. Ten male subjects smoked cigarettes containing 2.87 mg nicotine and 0.48 mg nicotine. No rises in cortisol or ACTH were detected after smoking 0.48 mg nicotine cigarettes. Cortisol rises were significant in 11 of 15 instances after smoking 2.87 mg nicotine cigarattes, but ACTH rose significantly in only 5 of the 11 instances where cortisol increased. Each ACTH rise occurred in a subject who reported nausea and was observed to be pale, sweaty, and tachycardic. Peak plasma nicotine concentrations were not significantly different in sessions when cortisol rose with or without ACTH increases, but cortisol increases were significantly greater in nauseated than in non-nauseated smokers. This data suggest that smoking-induced nausea stimulates cortisol release by stimulating ACTH secretion and that cortisol secretion in non-nauseated smokers may occur through a non-ACTH mechanism.

  20. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  1. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Omura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-07-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 microg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 microg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. alpha,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with alpha,beta,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  2. Comparative Study of the Labial Gland Secretion in Termites (Isoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Krasulová, Jana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Pytelková, Jana; Cvačka, Josef; Kutalová, Kateřina; Bourguignon, Thomas; Miura, Toru; Šobotník, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Labial glands are present in all castes and developmental stages of all termite species. In workers, their secretion contains a food-marking pheromone and digestive enzymes, while soldier secretion plays a defensive role. However, these functions were studied only in a limited set of species, and do not allow drawing general conclusions. Hence, we have investigated the chemical composition of the labial gland extracts from soldiers and workers in 15 termite species belonging to 6 families using an integrative approach based on proteomic and small-molecule profiling. We confirmed the presence of hydroquinone and cellulase in the labial glands of workers, and we identified new toxic compounds in soldiers and workers of several species. Our results highlight the dual role of labial gland secretion, i.e. the defensive role in soldiers and workers of several termite species, and the digestive function in workers. PMID:23071569

  3. Induction of interleukin 1 secretion by adjuvant-active peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, F; Guenounou, M; Nauciel, C

    1983-01-01

    The ability of differently structured, purified peptidoglycans (PG) to induce interleukin 1 (IL1) secretion was compared. PG from Bacillus megaterium and Staphylococcus aureus stimulated the production of IL1 by mouse peritoneal macrophages and human adherent mononuclear cells, whereas PG from Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Corynebacterium poinsettiae were inactive. There was a correlation between the ability of PG to induce IL1 secretion and previously demonstrated immunoenhancing activities (adjuvant effect, increase of resistance to tumor growth) of PG. PG solubilization by lysozyme decreased but did not abolish the PG effect on IL1 secretion. Active PG induced IL1 production in nude mice and in the C3H/HeJ strain (which is unresponsive to lipopolysaccharides). PMID:6605929

  4. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease.

  5. Measurement of gastric secretion as a student teaching exercise.

    PubMed

    Nicol, S C; MacPherson, R D; McLeod, L J

    1991-12-01

    Teaching gastrointestinal physiology to preclinical medical students presents problems in finding suitable practical exercises to demonstrate the physiology of gastric acid secretion. In our course, students measure their own gastric secretory activity by the use of nasogastric tubes. Gastric secretion can be stimulated by insulin-induced hypoglycemia or by pentagastrin, a synthetic gastrin analogue. The time course of the secretory responses, i.e., volume, acid output, and pH, are followed by collecting control and poststimulatory secretions into 15-min samples. The effect of antiulcer drugs, such as cimetidine, can be easily studied in such experiments. The results of these experiments are very reproducible, allowing year-to-year comparisons of treatments. Examples of results of various experimental protocols are shown. We believe this to be a useful class exercise not only because of the excellent results it yields but because of the experience and insights it produces.

  6. Regulation of human growth hormone secretion and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuzuru; Murakami, Yoshio; Sohmiya, Motoi; Nishiki, Masateru

    2002-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion from anterior pituitary is regulated by the hypothalamus and the mediators of GH actions. Major regulatory factors include GH releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SRIF), GH releasing peptide (ghrerin) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). The principal physiological regulation mechanisms of GH secretion are neural endogenous rhythm, sleep, stress, exercise, and nutritional and metabolic signals. GH deficiency results from various hereditary or acquired causes, which may be isolated or combined with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. GH deficiency can be treated with recombinant human GH, which results in accelerating growth in children and normalization of intermediary metabolism in adults. GH hypersecretion mostly results from a pituitary tumor and causes acromegaly or gigantism. Hypersecretion of GH can be treated by transshenoidal surgery. Medical treatment with octreotide and analogs is also effective to reduce GH secretion in combination with or without the surgery. PMID:11838603

  7. Wnt trafficking: new insights into Wnt maturation, secretion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Port, Fillip; Basler, Konrad

    2010-10-01

    Proteins of the Wnt family are secreted signaling molecules that regulate multiple processes in animal development and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Wnts spread over considerable distances to regulate gene expression in cells located at distant sites. Paradoxically, Wnts are poorly mobile because of their posttranslational modification with lipids. Recent evidence suggests that several pathways exist that are capable of transforming hydrophobic, insoluble Wnts into long-range signaling molecules. Furthermore, the discovery of Wntless as a protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt suggests that Wnt trafficking through the secretory pathway is already under special scrutiny. Here, we review recent data on the molecular machinery that controls Wnt secretion and discuss how Wnts can be mobilized for long-range signaling. PMID:20477987

  8. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Ômura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-05-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 µg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 µg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. α,β,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with α,β,β,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  9. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion.

  10. A Yersinia secreted effector protein promotes virulence by preventing inflammasome recognition of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Igor E.; Palm, Noah W.; Sadanand, Saheli; Ryndak, Michelle B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Bliska, James B.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect conserved microbial structures generally absent from eukaryotes. Bacterial pathogens commonly utilize pore-forming toxins or specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence factors that promote bacterial replication by modulating host cell physiology. Detection of these secretion systems or toxins by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain leucine-rich-repeat proteins (NLRs) triggers the assembly of multiprotein complexes, termed inflammasomes, necessary for caspase-1 activation. Here we demonstrate that caspase-1 activation in response to the Yersinia type III secretion system (T3SS) requires the adapter ASC, and involves both NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. We further identify a Yersinia type III secreted effector protein, YopK, which prevents inflammasome activation by preventing cellular recognition of the T3SS. Inflammasome-mediated sensing of the T3SS promotes bacterial clearance from infected tissues in vivo. These data demonstrate that a class of bacterial proteins interferes with cellular recognition of bacterial secretion systems, which contributes to bacterial survival within host tissues. PMID:20478539

  11. Hexameric structures of the archaeal secretion ATPase GspE and implications for a universal secretion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Atsushi; Tainer, John A

    2007-02-01

    The secretion superfamily ATPases are conserved motors in key microbial membrane transport and filament assembly machineries, including bacterial type II and IV secretion, type IV pilus assembly, natural competence, and archaeal flagellae assembly. We report here crystal structures and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) solution analyses of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus secretion superfamily ATPase, afGspE. AfGspE structures in complex with ATP analogue AMP-PNP and Mg(2+) reveal for the first time, alternating open and closed subunit conformations within a hexameric ring. The closed-form active site with bound Mg(2+) evidently reveals the catalytically active conformation. Furthermore, nucleotide binding results and SAXS analyses of ADP, ATPgammaS, ADP-Vi, and AMP-PNP-bound states in solution showed that asymmetric assembly involves ADP binding, but clamped closed conformations depend on both ATP gamma-phosphate and Mg(2+) plus the conserved motifs, arginine fingers, and subdomains of the secretion ATPase superfamily. Moreover, protruding N-terminal domain shifts caused by the closed conformation suggest a unified piston-like, push-pull mechanism for ATP hydrolysis-dependent conformational changes, suitable to drive diverse microbial secretion and assembly processes by a universal mechanism. PMID:17255937

  12. Hexameric Structures of the Archaeal Secretion Atpase GspE And Implications for a Universal Secretion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, A.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-06-04

    The secretion superfamily ATPases are conserved motors in key microbial membrane transport and filament assembly machineries, including bacterial type II and IV secretion, type IV pilus assembly, natural competence, and archaeal flagellae assembly. We report here crystal structures and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) solution analyses of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus secretion superfamily ATPase, afGspE. AfGspE structures in complex with ATP analogue AMP-PNP and Mg(2+) reveal for the first time, alternating open and closed subunit conformations within a hexameric ring. The closed-form active site with bound Mg(2+) evidently reveals the catalytically active conformation. Furthermore, nucleotide binding results and SAXS analyses of ADP, ATPgammaS, ADP-Vi, and AMP-PNP-bound states in solution showed that asymmetric assembly involves ADP binding, but clamped closed conformations depend on both ATP gamma-phosphate and Mg(2+) plus the conserved motifs, arginine fingers, and subdomains of the secretion ATPase superfamily. Moreover, protruding N-terminal domain shifts caused by the closed conformation suggest a unified piston-like, push-pull mechanism for ATP hydrolysis-dependent conformational changes, suitable to drive diverse microbial secretion and assembly processes by a universal mechanism.

  13. Effects of trifluoperazine on renin secretion of rat kidney slices.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested recently that calmodulin acts as an intracellular "Ca-receptor," and that many Ca-dependent cellular activities are mediated in some manner by Ca-calmodulin. The renin-secretory activity of juxtaglomerular cells appears to be inversely related to intracellular Ca concentration (Ca); if Ca-calmodulin is the mediator in the secretory process, it follows that secretory rate should be inversely related to Ca-calmodulin activity. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the effects of trifluoperazine, an inactivator of Ca-calmodulin, on renin secretion of rat kidney slices. Over the range 10(-6) to 10(-4) M, trifluoperazine produced a concentration-dependent increase in renin release. As assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release, the trifluoperazine-induced increase in renin release cannot be attributed to increased cell membrane permeability to proteins. Thus, trifluoperazine stimulated renin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. This is consistent with an inverse relation between Ca-calmodulin activity and renin secretion. However, in the presence of trifluoperazine, isoproterenol still stimulated and antidiuretic hormone, angiotensin II, high extracellular K concentration, ouabain and vanadate still inhibited renin secretion. Provided these stimulatory and inhibitory effects are associated with decreased and increased Ca, respectively, these observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the effects of Ca, on renin secretion are mediated by changes in Ca-calmodulin activity, since increases in Ca promote rather than attenuate the binding of trifluoperazine to calmodulin. It is concluded that trifluoperazine-stimulated renin secretion is mediated by a decrease in Cai produced by inhibition of Ca influx and/or stimulation of Ca efflux and/or sequestration.

  14. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  15. Stimulation of corticosterone secretion in vitro by brief ACTH exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, L.D.; Tam, B.; Greer, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between ACTH concentration and exposure duration on stimulation of corticosterone (B) secretion in vitro using perifused enzymatically dispersed rat adrenocortical cells. A modular perifusion apparatus was used that permitted evaluation of 20-24 cell chambers per experimental session. In expt 1,20-1000 pg/ml concentrations of synthetic ACTH-(1-24) were presented to cells for 1 min. In expt 2, 100 pg ACTH-(1-24) was presented to adrenal cells in five dose-duration regimens ranging from 5 pg/min for 20 min to 100 pg/min for 1 min. Perifusal rate was 1 ml/min in all sessions. B was determined by radioimmunoassay. In expt 1 (constant-duration paradigm), 1-min presentation of ACTH-(1-24) produced log-linear dose-response effects across these concentrations. In expt 2 (constant-mass paradigm), identical masses administered in different dose-duration regimens had different steroidogenic efficacies: low-dose long-duration regimens provoked greater total release than high-dose short-duration regimens. Overall, every dose-duration regimen was associated with stimulation of B secretion. These results indicate that 1) very brief exposure to physiological concentrations of ACTH-(1-24) is a significant stimulus for corticosteroid secretion; 2) variations in the dose-duration regimen over the physiological range modifies both the maximum rate of secretion and the duration of secretion, but not the response latency; and 3) ACTH-(1-24) presentation mass is not the sole determinant of B secretion.

  16. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  17. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  18. Secreted proteins as a fundamental source for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Miroslava; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteins secreted by various cells (the secretomes) are a potential rich source of biomarkers since they reflect various states of the cells at real time and at given conditions. To have accessible, sufficient and reliable protein markers is desirable since they mark various stages of disease development and their presence/absence can be used for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification and therapeutic monitoring. As direct analysis of blood/plasma, a common and noninvasive patient screening method, can be difficult for candidate protein biomarker identification, the alternative/complementary approaches are required, one of them is the analysis of secretomes in cell conditioned media in vitro. Since the proteins secreted by cells as a response to various stimuli are most likely secreted into blood/plasma, the identification and preselection of candidate protein biomarkers from cell secretomes with subsequent validation of their presence at higher levels in serum/plasma is a promising approach. In this review, we discuss the proteins secreted by three progenitor cell types (smooth muscle, endothelial and cardiac progenitor cells) and two adult cell types (neonatal rat ventrical myocytes and smooth muscle cells) which can be relevant to cardiovascular research and which have been recently published in the literature. We found, at least for secretome studies included in this review, that secretomes of progenitor and adult cells overlap by 48% but the secretomes are very distinct among progenitor cell themselves as well as between adult cells. In addition, we compared secreted proteins to protein identifications listed in the Human Plasma PeptideAtlas and in two reports with cardiovascular-related proteins and we performed the extensive literature search to find if any of these secreted proteins were identified in a biomarker study. As expected, many proteins have been identified as biomarkers in cancer but 18 proteins (out of 62) have been tested as biomarkers in

  19. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  20. Differentially expressed protein markers in human submandibular and sublingual secretions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Denny, Patricia; Denny, Paul; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Li, Yang; McBride, Jim; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Navazesh, Mavash; Wong, David T

    2004-11-01

    Proteome analysis of secretions from individual salivary glands is important for understanding the health of the oral cavity and pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, cross-contamination of submandibular (SM) and sublingual (SL) glandular secretions can occur. The close anatomic relationship of the SM and SL ductal orifices can lead to such contamination. Additionally, these glands may share common ducts. To insure the purity of SM/SL secretions for proteomic analysis, it is important to develop unique biomarkers which could be used to verify the integrity of the individual glandular saliva. In this study, a proteomics approach based on mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis techniques was utilized to identify and verify a set of proteins (cystatin C, calgranulin B and MUC5B mucin), which are differentially expressed in SM/SL secretions. SM/SL fluids were obtained from nine healthy subjects. Cystatin C was found to be an SM-selective protein as it was found in all SM fluids but not detected in two SL fluids. MUC5B mucin and calgranulin B, on the other hand, were found to be SL-selective proteins. All SL samples contained MUC5B mucin, whereas MUC5B mucin was not detected in four SM samples. Eight of the SL samples contained calgranulin B; however, calgranulin B was absent in eight SM samples. This set of protein markers, especially calgranulin B, can be used to determine the purity of SM/SL samples, and therefore identify potential individuals who do not exhibit cross-contaminated SM/SL secretions, an important requirement for subsequent proteome analysis of pure SM and SL secretions.